The Love of Strangers: Literary Cosmopolitanism in the English Fin de Siècle

Lead Research Organisation: University of Oxford
Department Name: English Faculty

Abstract

The proposed research will lead to a book entitled The Love of Strangers: Literary Cosmopolitanism in the English 'Fin de Siècle', as well as to two workshops and an international conference designed to explore cosmopolitanism within and beyond the specific historical context of the 1890s.Throughout, I aim to show that knowing how cosmopolitanism was understood in the 1890s can enhance our understanding of, and participation in, the debates around national identity and globalisation that are current in our own day.

Cosmopolitanism, derived from the ancient Greek for 'world citizenship', offers a radical alternative to the ideology of nationalism, asking individuals to imagine themselves as part of a global community that goes beyond national and linguistic boundaries. The 1890s witnessed a widespread public debate on cosmopolitanism: in Britain and throughout Europe, this period saw a clash between ideologies of trans-national cooperation and universalism, partly promoted by modern transport and communication technologies, and the rising nationalism that would culminate in the First World War.

My research will show that the 1890s controversy around cosmopolitanism, largely uncharted so far, is a shaping influence on the literary culture of this decade which has long been recognised as a crucial turning point in literary history. Promoters of literary cosmopolitanism questioned the supposedly fundamental link between literature, national identity, and national language: they deliberately sought out the strange and foreign in their works in order to create new ways of reading and writing that crossed boundaries between languages and literary genres as much as between different nations. These practices were denounced as politically and morally suspect by the detractors of cosmopolitanism, who stressed the responsibilities of literature towards local communities and the nation. I aim to show that a nuanced and historically-accurate understanding of the debate on cosmopolitanism transforms our understanding of the literary culture of the fin de siècle, allowing us to move beyond the categories of decadence, impressionism, and symbolism that have dominated the critical tradition. In order to do so, I concentrate on authors who embrace the cosmopolitan ideal but are also careful to define what is at stake in the controversy surrounding it. My monograph will therefore be divided into five chapters that examine, respectively: Oscar Wilde; George Egerton (Mary Dunne Bright); Ouida (Maria Louise Ramé); John Addington Symonds and Havelock Ellis; and Henry James. Drawing mainly on articles in the periodical press, the introduction will aim to reconstruct the meaning and associations of the term 'cosmopolitanism' for readers in the 1890s, teasing out its literary implications; while the conclusion will relate the 1890s debate on cosmopolitanism to our current discussion about global/local identities.

My case studies have been chosen in order to break down existing distinctions between canonical and marginal writers, 'high' and popular literature, male and female authorship. I will show that the debate on cosmopolitanism involved authors and readerships with very different aesthetic and political agendas. Each chapter draws both on published and archival material in order to piece together literary networks that connect English works from this period with a range of French, Scandinavian, Italian, and German sources. A particularly original aspect of my approach is the emphasis on gender: I argue that politically and socially marginalised groups such as women and homosexual men were drawn to the cosmopolitan ideal as a utopian path towards artistic and personal freedom; and conversely, that cosmopolitanism, with its attack on traditional models of national identity, generated new ways of understanding the body, gender, and sexual identities.

Planned Impact

My research on cosmopolitanism addresses fundamental questions about identity that are of vital importance beyond the academic research community: it investigates how the individual relates to the concepts of nationality, citizenship, and community. The cosmopolitan ideal asks women and men to think of themselves as belonging to a broad trans-national order of equals with shared values, rights, and obligations. In the post-war period, this ideal has found a political and institutional embodiment in the United Nations and, more recently, the European Union. Both these institutions, which represent the triumph of the cosmopolitan ideal as bringer of peace and democracy, are experiencing a crisis, as they are challenged in their ability to respond to the needs and aspirations of individuals across the globe.

Policy-makers at national and trans-national level can benefit from my research in order to enhance their understanding of what is at stake for the individual in embracing the cosmopolitan ideal. My research into the 1890s shows that the literary, political, civic, legal, and institutional aspects of cosmopolitanism are inextricably bound within one another. In our age of ever-increasing trans-national traffic, individuals are called upon to reconfigure their allegiances: as the world 'gets smaller' and human interconnection across national, ethnic, and religious divides gets bigger, individuals and communities are forced to renegotiate the conflicting claims of the local and global dimensions of their identity. My research shows that authors in the 1890s already felt that their own modernity forced a 'global' identity on them (although of course they did not have access to this word), and reveals a long history of globalisation that is often ignored in the public discussion. In other words, it aims to demonstrate that a deep and historically-nuanced understanding of the controversy over cosmopolitanism in the 1890s generates new ways of understanding the moral and political debates that characterise the phenomena of globalisation and multiculturalism today.

I therefore hope that my research will also have an impact on how the media discuss issues of local/global identity in a multicultural society, within and beyond the UK. In the UK, the debate over what constitutes a modern British identity, and what values and obligations should be attached to that, has been particularly intense in the last few decades, largely as a result of mass immigration. In particular, my fellowship would fall within a period that is likely to witness an increasing amount of debate on the question of British identity within Europe. The Prime Minister has recently promised to hold an in/out referendum in 2017 if he wins the next general election, in order to give electors the opportunity to determine the place of Britain within the EU. The public discussion about this topic already proliferates in the media, on the internet, and in social networks. In political terms, hostility to the cosmopolitan project represented by European integration reveals the fear that transnational and supranational organisations fail to connect with the individual. On the cultural plane, it translates into an anxiety about loss of identity and the erasure of cultural difference. My research into 1890s cosmopolitanism aims to generate knowledge about identity that is highly transferrable to the present, and that will benefit people involved in making practical decisions as well as helping the larger public understand, for instance, what is at stake in embracing a British and/or European identity and how far each of these can be said to enhance, compensate, or exclude the other.
 
Title Literature and Transnational Citizenship 
Description Student-led exhibition resulting from a collaboration between Oxford and the Berlin universities on the topic of 'Transnational Citizenship'. I organised and led the workshops that were the basis for the exhibition. The exhibition was held as part of Berlin's Lange Nacht der Wissenschaften. 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2019 
Impact The exhibition was held in the historical main building of the Humboldt University and was visited by a large number of people. 
 
Description The main achievement of the award has been to generate new knowledge about literary cosmopolitanism in the end of the nineteenth and beginning of the twentieth century. In my own research I have done so by investigating how a number of specific authors (Oscar Wilde, Lafcadio Hearn, George Egerton) engaged with the concept of cosmopolitanism in order to create new ways of writing and new understandings of how literature operates across borders; I have also investigated how the category of cosmopolitanism operates in fields that transcend traditional categories, e.g. the international periodical press and the artificial language movement of the end of the nineteenth century (Volapük and Esperanto). In the course of this research the main findings that have emerged are:

* the end of the nineteenth century witnessed a wide-ranging debate on the meaning and value of cosmopolitanism that focused on the relationship between literary texts, individual identities and notions of citizenship
* literature became a widely-used and distinctive medium for the articulation of the cosmopolitan ideal
* certain authors became particularly associated with cosmopolitan and internationalist ideologies
* a focus on cosmopolitan practices enables us to recuperate otherwise marginal authors (e.g. Hearn) and discover their great importance as international mediators; or refocus our attention onto otherwise marginalised parts of a canonical author's production (e.g. Egerton's Scandinavian translations)
* cosmopolitanism, and its literary applications, were contested territories

Key to these findings is an ongoing commitment to improve our understanding of how cosmopolitanism operates within literature. There has been extensive research on cosmopolitanism in recent years in the fields of philosophy, politics and the social sciences. The work generating from my award aims to relate these fields to literary studies, and to investigate how cosmopolitanism can function as a specifically literary ideal and practice. My project has, as a result, generated high-level interdisciplinary discussions, e.g. between British-based literary scholars and the research group on literary sociology led by Prof Gisèle Sapiro at the CNRS and EHESS Paris, which has already attracted further research funding (international workshops were held in Paris and Oxford in 2017 and 2018). That collaboration in its turn triggered a successful bid for a Global South Visiting Fellowship, awarded by The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities, to invite Dr Analía Gerbaudo from the Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Argentina, to deliver a series of lectures and workshops in Oxford. Two international graduate workshops held during my AHRC fellowship, respectively in Birkbeck, University of London and Paris Nanterre, which I convened together with my former research assistant, Dr Clément Dessy, and colleagues from these institutions, have provided the platform for focused training of graduates in these new methodologies, as well as planting the seeds for future international collaborations among early-career researchers, who are developing new understandings of the national/international/transnational scope of literature both individually and collaboratively. My research on literary cosmopolitanism has also led to the establishment of a graduate-student exchange between Oxford and Berlin (Humboldt and Freie Universities) in the academic year 2019-20, which resulted in an exhibition on the topic of 'transnational citizenship'.

I engage with these key discoveries and new methodologies both in my own work (a monograph on this topic, various book chapters and journal articles) and in a range of collaborative activities that have been instrumental for my research. The papers delivered at an international conference on literary cosmopolitanism I organised in Oxford in March 2016 are now available as podcasts that can be freely accessed via Oxford iTunes. The broader theoretical questions addressed by my research have acquired increased topicality after the EU referendum of June 2016 and subsequent political events. A feature on my project highlighting its impact potential was commissioned by the AHRC and has been added to their website.
Exploitation Route My findings highlight the fact that the debate on national/international identities that is very present in today's media have an historical precedent in the late nineteenth century and that an increased knowledge of how the debate was conducted in that period can help us focus our understanding of the present. Literature is an incredibly important medium for our understanding, and construction, of citizenship and individual identity: paying attention to how literature navigates its national, international and transnational dimensions can help us understand our own role(s) as individuals that necessarily participate both in national and larger international or global communities.
Sectors Government, Democracy and Justice,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections,Security and Diplomacy

URL https://podcasts.ox.ac.uk/series/cosmopolis-and-beyond-literary-cosmopolitanism-after-republic-letters
 
Description The potential impact of my research on literary cosmopolitanism in the 1890s is emerging more and more clearly with the increase of the public debate on citizenship and national loyalty in the UK, triggered by the result of the EU referendum in June 2016 and subsequent events. In the initial period of my fellowship I was invited to give a talk on British cosmopolitanism in the 1890s by the Centre for British Studies of the Humboldt University, Berlin, as part of their 'Monday Lectures' - a series of public talks which are attended by members of the general public, including journalists, and where - these were the days before the UE referendum - my presentation sparked a lively debate. The Centre for British Studies has since then hosted other important debates on Britain in the EU, becoming a key forum for such discussions in Germany. The Berlin lecture has then triggered two more invitations to talk about literary cosmopolitanism in Germany, in front of international audiences. After the EU referendum and in the context of redefining a British identity within Europe - from the cultural, social and political points of view - politicians are asking the public to think about their individual identities and loyalties. Explicitly invoking the idea of cosmopolitanism (i.e. world citizenship) Theresa May controversially stated that 'If you think you're a citizen of the world, you're a citizen of nowhere'. My research tries to promote a nuanced understanding of the cultural, emotional and historical factors involved in the notions of national/transnational citizenship. It shows that there need not be a conflict between national and cosmopolitan loyalties. The outcomes of the international conference 'Cosmopolis and Beyond' which I held in Oxford in March 2016 as part of my AHRC-funded project are now accessible for free via the Oxford iTunes web pages (https://podcasts.ox.ac.uk/series/cosmopolis-and-beyond-literary-cosmopolitanism-after-republic-letters), where they can be accessed by the general public. A feature on my project, outlining its potential impact beyond academia, was put up by the AHRC website, where it can be read by anyone who is interested in this debate. Since then a similar feature has appeared on Trinity College Website. News of the AHRC feature of my project was also tweeted extensively. I hope that such increased visibility in the media will alert users beyond academia to the importance of gaining a historically nuanced understanding of notions of local/global citizenship, in these times where these issues are being extensively invoked by politicians, often in a simplified manner. Since then, I have been invited to contribute an article entitled 'Citizens of Nowhere - A new Politics of Literary Criticism after Brexit', which has been published in an ebook (paper version also available) on the impact of Brexit on the cultural sector edited by Gesa Stedman and Sandra van Lente. I hope that this contribution, which is specifically aimed at a non-academic audience and can be downloaded free of charge from the net, will reach the general public as well as policy-makers (other contributors include civil servants, curators, writers and practising artists). I was also invited to contribute an article on Brexit, based on the findings of my research on literary cosmopolitanism, to the online magazine of the Centro di Studi sull'Europa Contemporanea of Naples 'Orientale' University, thus establishing an international collaboration with this institution. In the summer 2020, I will give a lecture in Glasgow as part of a public event connected to a project on cosmopolitanism and Scotland run by Glasgow University. In September 2018, I co-organised a conference entitled Writing Europe 1918-2018, which focused on internationalism at the end of WW1. The conference was held in Berlin and included a panel discussion with 4 major writers from Germany, France, Russia and Britain, each of whom read in their language and then participated in a Q&A. This event led to another invitation to give a public lecture in Berlin in May 2019, on the latest findings of my project on literary cosmopolitanism.
Sector Education
Impact Types Cultural

 
Description Decadence and Translation
Amount £35,896 (GBP)
Funding ID AH/R006571/1 
Organisation Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2018 
End 04/2020
 
Description Global South Visiting Fellowship
Amount £15,000 (GBP)
Organisation University of Oxford 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2019 
End 11/2019
 
Description John Fell OUP Research Fund
Amount £2,016 (GBP)
Funding ID AXD12860 
Organisation University of Oxford 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2017 
End 06/2017
 
Description John Fell OUP Research Fund
Amount £20,832 (GBP)
Funding ID AXD11010 
Organisation University of Oxford 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2016 
End 09/2016
 
Description Mid-career Fellowship
Amount £143,516 (GBP)
Funding ID MD/170050 
Organisation The British Academy 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2018 
End 09/2019
 
Description Oxford OUP John Fell Fund
Amount £3,666 (GBP)
Organisation University of Oxford 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 11/2018 
End 04/2019
 
Description Oxford-Berlin partnership
Amount £5,750 (GBP)
Organisation University of Oxford 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2018 
End 06/2019
 
Description Sasakawa Fund Grant
Amount £1,863 (GBP)
Organisation University of Oxford 
Department Faculty of Oriental Studies
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2015 
End 07/2015
 
Description Literature and Transnational Citizenship 
Organisation Free University of Berlin
Country Germany 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I have organised two international graduate workshops and an exhibition
Collaborator Contribution Collaborating in organising and leading the workshops and exhibition and obtaining funds to cover graduate students' travel and accommodation expenses
Impact There was an exhibition in the main building of the Humboldt University (Senatsaal) in June 2019 as part of Berlin's Lange Nacht der Wissenschaften.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Literature and Transnational Citizenship 
Organisation Humboldt University of Berlin
Department Centre for British Studies
Country Germany 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I have organised two international graduate workshops and an exhibition
Collaborator Contribution Collaborating in organising and leading the workshops and exhibition and obtaining funds to cover graduate students' travel and accommodation expenses
Impact There was an exhibition in the main building of the Humboldt University (Senatsaal) in June 2019 as part of Berlin's Lange Nacht der Wissenschaften.
Start Year 2018
 
Description The transnational Literary Field 
Organisation National Center for Scientific Research (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique CNRS)
Department IN2P3 CNRS
Country France 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Setting up workshop, graduate training, sharing ongoing research and methodological expertise.
Collaborator Contribution Seeing up workshop, graduate training, sharing ongoing research, sharing methodological expertise with international research leaders in the field.
Impact Two international workshops.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Writing 1900: Mindscapes and Bodyscapes 
Organisation Humboldt University of Berlin
Country Germany 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I co-hosted a two-day international workshop with the Centre for British Studies (Humboldt University, Berlin) where I had previously given a public lecture as part of my AHRC Fellowship. My award helped me to build my ongoing collaboration with the Centre for British Studies, where the study of Britain in a global context is one of the research priorities.
Collaborator Contribution The Centre for British Studies hosted the event and invited speakers.
Impact The Berlin meeting that took place in March 2015 will eventually lead to a special issue of the journal 'Forum for Modern Language Studies'
Start Year 2015
 
Description Writing Europe 1918 - Writing Europe 2018 
Organisation Humboldt University of Berlin
Department Centre for British Studies
Country Germany 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This was a further step in my ongoing collaboration with the Centre for British Studies of the Humboldt University. This two-day international conference on 'Writing Europe 1918 -Writing Europe 2019' related closely to the main aims of my award and brought together new international research partners. It will result in a special issue of the Journal for European Studies.
Collaborator Contribution Logistics and organisation, recruiting participants, successful funding application from the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft.
Impact Further meetings planned. Currently working on a special issue of an academic journal.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Birkbeck workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact 15 postgraduate students and 3 academics put in common their researches and their readings of three major texts on cosmopolitanism (Kant, P. Casanova, H. Bhabha). This resulted in several group discussions and in further perspectives for the organisation of a conference on a related subject.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://blogs.bbk.ac.uk/artsresearch/2015/09/16/19c-studies-literary-cosmopolitanism-theory-and-pract...
 
Description Citizens of Nowhere - A new Politics of Literary Criticism after Brexit, in Brexit and the Cultural Sector (ed. by Gesa Stedman and Sandra van Lente) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Article on the impact of Brexit on English literature research in online publication.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.gbz.hu-berlin.de/downloads/pdf/brexit-and-the-cultural-sector_pdf.pdf
 
Description Cosmopolitanism paper (Stockholm) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact A talk on the evolution of The Love of Strangers project for a mainly postgraduate audience in Stockholm.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Graduate research seminar (Bristol) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Talk aimed at graduate students and colleagues in art history department (i.e. not my normal field of research). Debate followed. Creation of new contacts. Influence on the way that graduates conceptualise their research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Graduate workshop (London) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact 15 postgraduate students attended this one-day event. Participants from the UK and Europe (Germany, Italy) were selected on the basis of competitive application. The day included a seminar-style session for the discussion of methodological issues and a case-studies session in which participants related the theory to their own research. The discussion was extremely lively and engaged. Several graduates have subsequently reported change in their thinking / direction of thesis. Two of the participants applied to attend further workshop in France. Several now keep in touch about their ongoing research, asking for advice and leadership. Four of the participants will present research enabled by the workshop at forthcoming international conference in Oxford.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Graduate workshop (Paris Nanterre) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact 12 postgraduate students and two colleagues attended this one-day event. Participants from France and the UK were selected on the basis of competitive application. The day started with a discussion of a number of key texts and then moved on to small-group discussion sessions in which participants were asked to rethink fundamental questions of their own research. Extremely lively debate bringing together postgraduates from different disciplines/backgrounds that would not otherwise have worked together. Several participants have keep in touch about their ongoing research, asking for advice and leadership. One of the participants will present research enabled by the workshop at forthcoming international conference in Oxford.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Guest lecture (Bard Berlin) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact Invited guest lecture on literature and cosmopolitanism attended by around 30 students in the international Bard College Berlin. Lively debate afterwards with plenty of audience participation on interface between literature, politics and identity politics.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Guest seminar (Balliol College, Oxford) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Around 10 graduate students attended this workshop on symbolism and decadence. I gave a talk on the shakespearian references in Belgian symbolism.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Guest seminar (EHESS, Paris) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact 'Thinking bilateral relations within the transnational literary field: The Belgo-British case around 1900'. Considering the case of Belgian literature at the end of the 19th century, opens the path to many interesting methodological questions in a sociology of literature, and, more globally, a sociology of the arts. In this presentation, I first reminded the specificities of the Belgian literary case within the French literary arena, before shedding light on a few specificities related to the Belgian case through its relationship to English and British cultures around 1900. Around 20 postgraduate students and academics attended the workshop, which enabled long discussions on methodologies and transfers of knowledge between different disciplines.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Guest seminar (Institut Universitaire de France, Paris) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact I gave a paper on the literary connection of the cosmopolitan writer Georges Eekhoud with Italian naturalist literature. It was delivered in front of different research groups from France (Paris) and Italy (Padova). Followed by long lively debate, plans were made for another meeting in Padova in July 2018.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://prelia.hypotheses.org/497
 
Description Guest seminar (Sussex) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Around 20 graduate students attended this lecture on Lafcadio Hearn and literary cosmopolitanism, which was followed by a long debate.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Invited lecture on comparative dystopian representations (Brussels) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact This lecture was part of a broader event 'Université Livre' organised at the Université libre de Bruxelles on the theme of 'Apocalypse'. The audience was mainly composed of students and academics.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.facebook.com/events/1738644889701847/
 
Description Invited public talk (Paris) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Around 30 participant attended this talk, including colleagues from various disciplines (art history, literature, anthropology, oriental studies), graduate students and members from the general public. Followed by discussion. It led to new contacts and collaborations and further invitations to speak at the Sorbonne.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Invited talk (Oxford classics) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Lecture on literary cosmopolitanism in the nineteenth century delivered in front of different disciplinary group (classics) that constituted a new audience for me. Followed by long lively debate, including links between nineteenth-century and present-day cultural politics on nationalism/cosmopolitanism.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014,2016
 
Description Invited talk (Paris) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Talk hosted by the Sorbonne that followed on from previous public talk. It included a response by the Vice-President of the university. Followed by debate and exchange with colleagues, students, members of the general public (including artists/performers). Led to new contacts and possible future collaborations.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Item for newsletter (A-Catholic Cemetery, Rome) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Parts of my talk for the event at the A-Catholic Cemetery, Rome, were reprinted in the cemetery's Newsletter. As a result of donations received during the event, the cemetery were able to commission the restoration of a headstone.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Keynote lecture, British Association of Victorian Studies (Exeter) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Keynote lecture at annual meeting of this subject association, around 200 registered participants including colleagues, postgraduate students, and some members of the general public. The talk generated interest in the project and further invitations. It was widely disseminated through social media.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://bavs.ac.uk/bavs/bavs-annual-conference-2018-victorian-patterns-university-of-exeter-29-31-au...
 
Description Lecture to general public Berlin 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Public lecture on literary cosmopolitanism and the international press. Attendance of around 40 people, many not from academia. Debate about cosmopolitanism and identity, and about Brexit and British identity in Europe.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Paris-Nanterre workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact 12 postgraduate students and 3 academics put in common their researches and their readings of three major texts on world literature (Moretti, Apter, Damrosch). This resulted in several group discussions and in further perspectives for the organisation of a conference on a related subject.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Podcast of conference Cosmopolis and Beyond 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Podcast of the conference organised as part of the grant. All papers podcast and available for free download from Oxford iTunes site.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/cosmopolis-beyond-literary-cosmopolitanism-after-republic/id1105...
 
Description Public talk (Berlin) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Public talk hosted by the Centre for British Studies in Berlin. Very lively debate followed, including teachers, graduate students, other professionals. Talk also featured in the Centre's annual report bulletin, which circulated among alumni and sponsors internationally. Further invitations to two other institutions in Berlin issued as a result.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Roundtable participation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Participation in a roundtable on world literature and the other media held at the EHESS, Paris. Audience from humanities, social sciences, translators.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Talk to general public (Rome) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Presentation associated with performance in the A-Catholic Cemetery, Rome. Around 40 people attended.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Vernon Lee talk (Associazione Culturale Il Palmerino, Florence) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Talk and participation on debate on English expatriate writer Vernon Lee in cultural association, attended by around 50 members of the general public. Debate sparked questions on the writer and the nature of cosmopolitanism more generally. The talk allowed me to reach a non-academic audience. The talk was in Italian. It allowed me to reach an audience that would not normally read articles and books written in English.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Victorian Studies conference (Honolulu) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Presentation on my ongoing research at international conference that brings together colleagues and graduate students. Part of a pre-organised panel that has helped me cement collaboration with colleagues in the US. One of the panel participants has proposed a panel for an international conference I'm currently organising, as part of my AHRC leadership award, to take place in Oxford.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Website feature (AHRC) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact An interview with a journalist resulted in a feature on my research on the AHRC website. This has been extensively tweeted in the UK and the US. The feature has triggered news items on my research on the website of Trinity College and Oxford English Faculty.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016,2017
URL http://www.ahrc.ac.uk/research/readwatchlisten/features/the-love-of-strangers/