Modernism, Medicine and the Embodied Mind: Investigating Disorders of the Self

Lead Research Organisation: University of Bristol
Department Name: School of Humanities

Abstract

'Modernism, Medicine and the Embodied Mind' is an interdisciplinary network that will use the radical insights of aesthetic modernism to develop dialogue with medical practice in psychiatry, psychoanalytic psychotherapy, neurology, and the mental healthcare offered at the end of life. The project is dynamically interdisciplinary, fostering collaboration between researchers and clinicians working in Higher Education, the NHS, and international healthcare. It brings literary and arts scholars, philosophers, psychiatrists, psychoanalysts, neuropsychologists, neurologists, research scientists, and doctors in palliative care and general practice into dialogue with theatre practitioners, dancers and artists from across the UK, Europe and the USA, asking them to explore together the resources modernism offers for creatively understanding experiences of body and mind poorly served by realist models of self.

The project will extend Barry, Maude and Salisbury's work exploring the historical and discursive links between literary modernism, medical discoveries, and clinical practice, by putting it into dialogue with the insights of visual artists and art historians, dancers and dance scholars, and contemporary scientists and clinicians. The benefits of this will be reciprocal. The humanities scholars and practitioners will be offered innovative vocabularies, concepts, and ethical research frames for their work, while scientific researchers and medical practitioners will gain new resources for contextualising and analysing the institutional, cultural and conceptual assumptions that inform current practice. Underpinning the project is the significance of phenomenology and the first-person experience of medicine, as explored in literature, theatre, dance, and the philosophy of medicine, and as applied to medical education and clinical care through innovative performance-based workshops and pedagogical interventions.

The Network's core team consists of Dr Ulrika Maude (Bristol; PI), Dr Elizabeth Barry (Warwick; Co-I) and Dr Laura Salisbury (Exeter; Co-I)-all scholars of literary modernism and medical humanities-and dancer and academic Dr Charlotta Palmstierna Einarsson (Stockholm), visual artist and academic Dr Deborah Robinson (Plymouth), NHS psychiatrist and philosopher of psychiatry Dr Matthew Broome (Oxford), and Theatre Research Fellow, Jonathan Heron (Director of Fail Better Productions). The international working group includes: researcher in the field of art and neuro-psychoanalysis Prof Lois Oppenheim (Montclair State); Hunter Groninger, geriatrics and palliative care MD (NIH, Washington); Sander Gilman, Professor of the Liberal Arts and Sciences and Professor of Psychiatry (Emory); Ronald Schleifer, Professor of English and Adjunct Professor in the College of Medicine (Oklahoma); philosopher Prof Catherine Malabou (Kingston), Femi Oyebode, Professor of Psychiatry (Birmingham) and modernism scholars Prof Dirk van Hulle (Antwerp), and Dr Peter Fifield (Birkbeck). The interdisciplinary project team and its intellectual and clinical goals speak to the key AHRC 'Science in Culture' initiative and also address the RCUK's research challenge of 'Lifelong Health and Well-being'.

The project will combine aesthetic criticism, which can attend to aesthetic form and engage in nuanced ways with questions of language, representation, subjectivity, and affect - with the archival emphases of cultural history and conceptual rigour of philosophy and critical theory, to explore modernism's specific ability to speak to seemingly unruly mental and embodied states, and the conceptual 'black hole' of extreme old age. It will use performance-as-research strategies to consider how theatre and dance might help scholars and clinicians understand these states via experiential means, and explore the role of the visual arts in communicating experiences that resist conceptual definition.

Planned Impact

This research network will benefit scholars, artists and health practitioners in the UK, USA and Europe, and contribute to the development of new clinical initiatives to promote public health and wellbeing. The network will encompass a range of professionals in literary and arts studies, philosophy, psychiatry, neuropsychology, neurology, medicine, and in dance, visual arts and theatre practice. Its work will focus on intellectual, conceptual and ethical questions that inform medical education, particularly in relation to the treatment of complex chronic conditions that present challenges - psychological, ethical and ontological - to doctors and healthcare practitioners. Crucially, the network will also participate in the application of the research to clinical and professional settings.

The following users in the UK, US and Europe will particularly benefit from the building of a cohesive network of scholars and practitioners, and the enhanced capacity for intellectual, pedagogic, and clinical collaborations and interventions it will create. The network will be established, and the first fruits of its creation disseminated, through a series of workshops, an international conference, and a dedicated website.

STUDENT AND PRACTISING DOCTORS, CLINICIANS AND OTHER HEALTHCARE WORKERS in the fields of neurology, psychiatry and end-of-life mental healthcare in NHS and selected US settings (clinicians in these areas will be part of the network, which will allow the following collaborations in the fields of medical education):

1. The network will enable the lead investigators to build on work tested in the pilot project 'Beckett on the Wards' (Health Education Kent Surrey Sussex, 2012-13), which used pedagogic interventions devised by Jonathan Heron in collaboration with Barry, Maude and Salisbury to explore the challenges of geriatric and psychogeriatric care. Prof Zoe Playdon will offer specialist advice to members of the network on taking this work into medicine and clinical practice. The core group will work on offering Continuing Professional Development (CPD) workshops in geriatric and psychiatric care nationally not only through the investigators' medical schools and the institutions of the wider project group but also NHS Health Education England, the body responsible for the management and delivery of postgraduate medical education and continuing professional development of doctors nationwide.

2. The network will allow teaching collaborations between humanities faculties, medical schools and hospitals attached to the universities of Bristol, Coventry, Exeter, Warwick, Oklahoma (USA), Montclair State (USA), Virginia (USA), and National Institutes of Health (USA) through the network members. These will offer a model for future collaborations, and create teaching resources for performance-related workshops exploring disorders of self and their treatment. The phenomenological principles of the investigators' work provide the basis both for the conceptual scrutiny of psychiatric and medical concepts, and the development of experiential learning that explores the importance of the first-person experience of both patient and doctor to clinical practice.

3. The network will consolidate American contacts, and disseminate its work in an event at the New York Psychoanalytic Society and Institute, initiating conversations about the role of narrative in conceptualizing and treating disorders of self, and exploring new interfaces between neurology and psychoanalysis.

THEATRE AND DANCE PROFESSIONALS interested in developing new work exploring psychiatric and neurological concerns through the opportunity to participate in interdisciplinary work in applied performance and medical pedagogy.

VISUAL ARTISTS who will participate in the network and create new work in collaboration with scholars and scientists exploring non-narrative approaches to disorders of self, as well as innovations in art therapy.

Publications

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Barry E (2016) All in My Head: Beckett, Schizophrenia and the Self. in The Journal of medical humanities

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Barry E (2016) Introduction - Beckett, Medicine and the Brain. in The Journal of medical humanities

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Barry E (2018) Putting it down to experience: ageing and the subject in Sartre, Munro and Coetzee in European Journal of English Studies

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Barry, Elizabeth (2018) The Moment of Truth: Proust, Barthes and the Contingency of Old Age in Textual Practice

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Barry, Elizabeth (2016) Samuel Beckett and the Contingency of Old Age in Samuel Beckett Today/Aujourd'hui

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Barry, Elizabeth (2020) Literature and Ageing

 
Title 'Like a Signal Falling', artist Deborah Robinson's artwork, inaugurated at the 'Modernism, Medicine and the Embodied Mind' Conference on 16 July 2016 
Description This project, which was commissioned for the MMEM Networking project, uses film to imaginatively recapture Virginia Woolf's personal experiences through an attempt to re-enact (or retrace) Woolf's own visual perception. Through the filming of the bust of Virginia Woolf - an imagined self- perception - an empathetic connection is forged between the subject and the artist's own personal mental health problems. The resulting film, which Deborah Robinson then re-filmed, creates a sense of fragmentation that the artist pares with the ragmentation in Woolf's own writing. This approach, based on a continuous breaking apart of narrative/intended meaning seems to enable the emergence of extended visual moments, often luminous and unstable. Within an artistic process premised on an undoing or letting-go of familiar co- ordinates, Robinson responds to what she perceives to be a 'signalling' in Woolf's writing. This emerges in the randomised crossing between words, images, and an imagined 'other'. In this state of undoing, challenging edges are found that unground thought, perhaps implying that the signals are themselves a mental construct. These can be viewed as existing outside the 'normal' self as it is conventionally represented in narrative medicine. It is the charge of such connections that themselves give form to the developing artwork. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact To be added. 
URL http://www.bristol.ac.uk/arts/research/modernism-medicine/upcoming-events/modernism-medicine-embodie...
 
Title 'Rosemary', theatre performance commissioned by MMEM and inaugurated in the Wickham Theatre, University of Bristol on 15 July 2015 
Description A performance that unmakes and remakes itself, 'Rosemary' is the outcome of Theatre Practitioner Jonathan Heron's five-year collaboration with the Beckett actor and renowned scholar Rosemary Pountney. Addressing the experiences of ageing, dying and bereavement, this new commission has been especially created for the AHRC-funded Modernism, Medicine and the Embodied Mind project. 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact To be added. 
URL http://www.bristol.ac.uk/arts/research/modernism-medicine/upcoming-events/modernism-medicine-embodie...
 
Description 'Modernism, Medicine and the Embodied Mind' has brought together humanities scholars, artists, theatre practitioners, psychiatrists, psychoanalysts, neurologists, and philosophers to jointly investigate the many connections between literature, the arts, medicine and the mind sciences in the Modernist period. It has also analysed the use of Modernist literature and art in healthcare and medical education. It has brought together researchers from nine different countries, and created an international interdisciplinary community of scholars and clinical practitioners interested in researching Modernism and medical culture. Through its numerous publications and events, the project has established a new dimension of Modernist Studies, namely the significance of medicine and medical culture to the formal and thematic innovations of Modernist literature and art. It has also analysed the use of Modernist literature and art in healthcare and medical education, especially in the treatment of chronic illness, extreme old age and the end of life.

The project events and publications have shown how intricately and decisively medical discoveries and ideas have changed the understanding of subjectivity, by questioning such crucial notions as agency, intentionality and free will. This evolved sense of self, in turn, necessitated new literary and painterly responses, in order to express a self that is no longer experienced as narrative-shaped or compliant with received modes of representation. The project has also investigated the uses of Modernist literature in healthcare, in cases where Aristotelian or Realist models of narrative fall short. One key discovery has been the multiplicity and complexity of the various narratives used in clinical encounters, from the initial meeting between doctor and patient, to the consultants' meeting to devise a treatment plan, to the manner in which that plan is presented to the patient and, subsequently, the patient's self-narrative about his/her illness and the rebuilding of a new or altered sense of self. The project concluded that this is a major area for further investigation, and the team is currently planning a new research project on the intricate uses of narrative in healthcare, which, despite the current prominence of Narrative Medicine, have not hitherto been investigated or interrogated in detail.
Exploitation Route The project has established a new dimension of Modernist Studies, namely the significance of medicine and medical culture in the formal and thematic innovations of Modernist literature, performance and art. It has also analysed the use of Modernist experimental literature, performance practice and art in healthcare and medical education. The project publications, podcasts and other events are a key resource for both Modernist scholars and medical educators, physicians, psychoanalysts and psychotherapists. This will inform further work on the use of narrative in healthcare.
Sectors Creative Economy,Education,Healthcare

URL http://www.bristol.ac.uk/arts/research/modernism-medicine/previous-events/modernism-medicine-embodiedmind/
 
Description Since 2018, Ulrika Maude has been the Director of the University of Bristol's Centre for Health, Humanities and Science (CHHS). She has developed an impact case study for REF2021 entitled 'Intercalated BA in Medical Humanities: Transforming Clinical Understanding and Practice'. It is premised on her and her colleagues' research-led Medical Humanities teaching of students of Medicine at the University of Bristol. Questionnaires, interviews and workshops indicate that the teaching of literature undertaken by Maude, Lee, Blades and Vaccarella has had a considerable impact on former iBAMH students' understanding of their role as physicians and on their clinical practice. From 2018-2020, Maude was co-lead of the Elizabeth Blackwell Institute Medical Humanities Research Strand, funded by Wellcome Trust ISSF (£50,000). She also serves on the Anti-Microbial Resistance (AMR) Research Strand, and received funding from the AMR Strand to research a monograph on 'The Microbe'. Maude is currently part-seconded to a Visiting Professorship at the IAS of the University of Turku in Finland. On 17 September 2015, Ulrika Maude, Elizabeth Barry, Laura Salisbury and Jonathan Heron gave an invited research seminar to psychoanalysts, psychiatrists and psychotherapists at Mount Sinai Hospital, New York City. The seminar was on 'Modernist Literature and Disorders of the Self'. It was attended by c. 30 members of clinical staff at the Hospital. On 18-19 September, Ulrika Maude, Elizabeth Barry and Laura Salisbury, with the collaboration of Lois Oppenheim, organised a two-day conference at the New York Psychoanalytic Society and Institute (NYPSI) entitled 'Modernism, Psychoanalysis and the Embodied Mind'. The conference was attended by 113 New Yorkers, most of them psychoanalysts. Maude, Barry and Salisbury each presented papers at the event; other speakers included Professor Sander Gilman (Emory), Professor Louis Sass (Rutgers), Professor Jean-Michel Rabate (University of Pennsylvania), Dr Theodore Shapiro (NYPSI), and others. Jonathan Heron performed a reading of the 'Cyclops' episode of Joyce's 'Ulysses'. The full programme is available at http://www.nypsi.org/#Event/27408 Impact forms were collected at NYPSI, and delegates observed that 'The event was rich in theory, interpretation & addressing issues of analytic practice'; 'Excellent'; 'Broadened views'; 'Evocative in causing a review of the impact on my clinical understandings of certain dynamics'. 84% of respondents felt that the event had changed their view of the subject. During the grant period, Maude has taught medical students on the Intercalated BA in Medical Humanities at the University of Bristol. In the Autumn of 2017, she will deliver guest lecture at the Medical School at Bristol on the history of neurology and psychoanalysis. In June 2017, she has been invited to give a research seminar to students of Psychiatry, and a guest lecture to students of Medicine, at the University of Wroclaw, Poland. Since 2015, Barry and Heron have taught a course on 'The Modernist Mind' to students of Medicine at the University of Warwick. Salisbury is now the 'Humanities Lead' at Exeter's new Wellcome Centre for Medical Humanities. Maude, Barry and Salisbury were invited speakers at 'Not I? Neurodiversity in Performance and Practice', Institute for English Studies, University of London, 4 December 2015. The expert panel addressed Samuel Beckett's work from the perspective of neurodiversity, including Tourette's syndrome, which Beckett had an interest in and took notes on (see Maude, 'A Stirring Beyond Coming and Going: Beckett and Tourette's', Journal of Beckett Studies 17:1-2 (2008), pp. 153-168). Jessica Thom and Matthew Pountney of the theatre group, Touretteshero, attended the event, and went on to develop a performance of 'Not I' in 2017 and 2018, to high critical acclaim. See for instance the following reviews in 'The Guardian' and 'The Independent': https://www.theguardian.com/culture/2017/aug/24/not-i-review-beckett-tourette-syndrome-jess-thom-pleasance-grand-edinburgh and https://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/edinburgh-festival/backstage-in-biscuit-land-pleasance-courtyard-review-remarkable-tourettes-inspired-comedy-9651503.html Please also note the BBC Radio 4 interview of Jess Thom, https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b09smh8r and the interview of Jess Thom in 'The Independent': https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/features/tourettes-syndrome-a-heroic-response-7648085.html
First Year Of Impact 2015
Sector Creative Economy,Education,Healthcare,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections,Pharmaceuticals and Medical Biotechnology
Impact Types Cultural,Societal,Economic

 
Description Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies Conference Fund
Amount € 17,000 (EUR)
Organisation University of Helsinki 
Sector Academic/University
Country Finland
Start 02/2017 
End 04/2017
 
Description Research Fellow (Project title: Modernism and Medical Culture)
Amount € 60,000 (EUR)
Organisation University of Helsinki 
Sector Academic/University
Country Finland
Start 09/2015 
End 07/2016
 
Description 'Modernism, Psychoanalysis and the Embodied Mind' 
Organisation New York Psychoanalytic Society and Institute
Country United States 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution A conference co-organised with the New York Psychoanalytic Society and Institute (NYPSI) on 247 East 82nd Street, New York city. Papers were given by all three investigators, namely Ulrika Maude, Elizabeth Barry and Laura Salisbury. The audience consisted mainly of psychoanalysts and the event attracted an audience of more than 100 delegates. The conference programme can be found on http://www.nypsi.org/#Event/27408
Collaborator Contribution NYPSI provided organisational help, the venue, AV facilities, technical help, publicity and lunches and coffees during the conference, and project members spoke at the event.
Impact Seven 45-minute talks, namely Sander Gilman, Sander Gilman: 'Freud, Anti-Semitism and the Psychopathology of Racism' Ulrika Maude, 'Modernism and the Invention of Psychoanalysis' Laura Salisbury, 'Slow Modernism: Perversion, Temporality and the Mind's Sustenance' Elizabeth Barry, '"These Palimpsests of Time": Modernism, Psychoanalysis and Old Age' Ludovica Lumer, '"How to explain pictures to a dead hare": Art, Neuroscience and the Quest for Meaning' Louis Sass, 'Lacan: The Mind of the Modernist' Theodore Shapiro, 'Eternal Recurrence or Patricide?' A reading from the Cyclops episode of Joyce's 'Ulysses' A roundtable discussion This event was multidisciplinary, including Psychoanalysis, Literary Studies, Philosophy, Psychiatry, Art History, Performance and Theatre Practice, Medicine. In impact questionnaires, 100% of respondents reported that the event 'enhanced their understanding of the subject'. 75% of respondents reported that the event changed their views of the subject. Audience comments on the event include the following (forms available on request): 'many brilliant minds at work and play' 'The UK representation was the best part of this conference -- each of their papers was really superb' 'The event was rich in theory, interpretation & addressing issues of analytic practice.' '[The event] empowers me more to use modernist literature in teaching of medical students.' 'Encourages me to pursue scholarly projects on modernist writers, especially for the ways this work can suggest new approaches to timely subjects of illness, ageing, and writing and to teaching young physicians' 'my understanding has been both enriched and expanded' 'Very often we isolate the knowledge of psychoanalysis and clinical knowledge from the larger cultural context, so it was a treat to hear presentations that helped to broaden the perspective.' 'opened perspectives that I did not consider before including the intention to broaden my play therapy style with my patients and it will influence my teaching.'
Start Year 2015
 
Description Like a Signal Falling', by Deborah Robinson 
Organisation Glenside Museum of Psychiatry, Bristol
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Deborah Robinson's artwork, 'Like a Signal Falling', commissioned for MMEM, was inaugurated on 16 July 2016 at the Glenside Museum of Psychiatry, and created in collaboration with scholars and scientists. This was the concluding event of the University of Bristol international conference, 'Modernism, Medicine and the Embodied Mind', held on 15 and 16 July 2016.
Collaborator Contribution Deborah Robinson attended all of the UK-based project events and remained in constant dialogue with Maude, Barry and Salisbury and other project members as she was creating her artwork.
Impact 'Like a Signal Falling' by Deborah Robinson
Start Year 2016
 
Description 'Empathy and Affect in Medical and Theatrical Practice', University of Warwick, 13-14 October 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Empathy and Affect in Medical and Theatrical Practice: A Workshop, University of Warwick, 13th and 14th October 2017

This two-day interdisciplinary workshop at the University of Warwick, funded by the Monash-Warwick Alliance, brought together theatre practitioners, clinicians, scholars in medical humanities and creative artists to explore the connections between performance, pathology and emotion. The central questions of the workshop, approached through performance and embodiment as well as scholarly enquiry, asked what the role of empathy might be in difficult clinical encounters, when empathy might be counter-productive or counter-therapeutic, and how both positive and negative affect may be created and managed between doctors and patients.

The opening session on Friday morning was led by workshop organisers Dr. Elizabeth Barry (English, University of Warwick), Dr. Jane Montgomery Griffiths (Theatre, Monash University, Melbourne), and Dr. Jan Parker (Classics, University of Cambridge), with contributions from Dr. Anne Whitehead (English, University of Newcastle, and author of Medicine and Empathy) and others. The speakers introduced the key themes for the event, beginning with the potential of theatre - and in particular theatrical portrayals of different pathologies - to elicit empathetic engagement with an audience. This was linked to questions around how such portrayals might inform the dynamic between clinicians and patients (including interactions with patients who have difficulty expressing themselves), and the role that performance might play in helping us understand how mental distress is manifested.

Highlights of the event included two sessions on Friday led by Dr. Griffiths which explored Sophocles' play Electra in relation to certain complex health conditions, and a talk by Dr. John Michael (Philosophy, Warwick) on work he has done with young people with Möbius syndrome, with additional insight provided by Professor Jonathan Cole (Professor of Neurology at the University of Bournemouth/Poole Hospital, and author of About Face). Dr Anna Harpin (Theatre, Warwick) also spoke about mood and psychosis in contemporary film, and Professor Swaran Singh of Warwick Medical School contributed insights into his work in mental health and applied theatre.

The event ended with a roundtable discussion engaging all participants about future projects that might develop from the workshop. A recurrent theme, which could serve to sum up this thought-provoking event was the collective recognition of the considerable scope that theatre has not only for the training of medical students and practising clinicians, in offering ethical exploration and emotional catharsis, but also for expanding the way in which we think conceptually about empathy at all.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/hrc/confs/emp/conferenceimages/
 
Description 'Modernism's Chronic Conditions: Temporality, Medicine and Disorders of the Self', workshop held at the University of Exeter on 17 April 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This event generated lively discussion. Participants, e.g. consultants, reported that it had changed their understanding of their own practice and made them think more critically about evidence-based medicine.

We collected impact forms in which a variety of different impacts were reported. Some results will be quoted here shortly.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.bristol.ac.uk/arts/research/modernism-medicine/previous-events/
 
Description 'Modernist Literature and Disorders of the Self', seminar given to psychiatrists and psychotherapists at Mount Sinai Hospital, New York City on 17 September 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This seminar generated lively discussion and contributions from the psychiatrists and psychotherapists, who reflected on their own practice, the defence mechanisms they use, their interpretive skills, etc.

Some of the participants attended our conference at the New York Psychoanalytic Society and Institute on 18 and 19 September 2015, as a consequence of our seminar.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Ageing, Embodiment and the Self Workshop, University of Warwick, 18 March 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact 10am Welcome by Elizabeth Barry (Warwick)

10.05-10.45am Kathleen Woodward (University of Washington): 'Affect, Entanglement and

Alzheimer's Disease'

10.45-11.30am Lucy Burke (Manchester Metropolitan University) and Hannah Zeilig

(University of London): 'Dementia: Ways of Talking'

11.30-11.45am Coffee/tea

11.45am-1.00pm Theatre and Performance panel, chaired by Jonathan Heron with

presentations by Anna Harpin (Warwick), Nicholas Johnson (Trinity College Dublin) and

Bridie Moore (Sheffield)

1-1.45pm Lunch

1.45-2.15pm Roundtable with Jonathan Cole (Poole Hospital; University of Bournemouth),

Sarah Falcus (University of Huddersfield), Katsura Sako (Keio University, Japan) and

Christopher Vassilas (Birmingham and Solihull Mental Health Foundation NHS)

2.30pm-3.15pm Helen Small (University of Oxford): 'Does Self-Identity Persist into Old Age?'

3.15-3.30pm Responses to the symposium from project investigators Ulrika Maude (Bristol)

and Laura Salisbury (Exeter), and Zoë Playdon (University of London; NHS)

3.30-3.45pm Tea/coffee

3.45-4pm Walk across campus to new venue

4-5pm 'Rosemary' (performance project, work-in-progress), Humanities Studio

The symposium is free to attend, but places are limited. To register, please

email E.C.Barry@warwick.ac.uk
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.bristol.ac.uk/arts/research/modernism-medicine/
 
Description Body Literature: A Conversation about the Relationship between Literature and the Complexities of Embodied Life 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact There was a lively discussion and an engaged and enthusiastic question and answer session afterwards.

The discussion was recorded, and it will later be available on the internet to a world-wide audience.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://slought.org/resources/body_literature
 
Description Elizabeth Barry's talk, "Expectation and surprise: the temporality of dementia", at 'Psychopathology of time and body', a Marie Curie-funded workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Marie Curie-funded workshop with a public engagement event.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Modernism, Medicine and the Embodied Mind Facebook Group 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The project's Facebook group currently has 180 followers. The site has sparked discussion on recent articles, policies and project events.

The Facebook site has enhanced awareness of the project and of project events and questions.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016
URL https://www.facebook.com/groups/1645184719101434/?fref=ts
 
Description Modernism, Medicine and the Embodied Mind Project Website 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The website has raised awareness of the project, its events and the central questions explored. Project investigators have also received invitations to speak about the project and their own research.

Website hits are currently being monitored. This section will be updated shortly.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016
URL http://www.bristol.ac.uk/arts/research/modernism-medicine/
 
Description Modernism, Psychoanalysis and the Embodied Mind 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This was a two-day conference held at the New York Psychoanalytic Society and Institute, with an audience of more than one hundred delegates, consisting mainly, but not exclusively, of practising psychoanalysts. Papers were given by project members Ulrika Maude (Bristol), Laura Salisbury (Exeter), Elizabeth Barry (Warwick), Sander Gilman (Emory), and Louis Sass (Rutgers). In addition, Jonathan Heron (Warwick) read from the Cyclops episode of James Joyce's 'Ulysses' and Jean-Michel Rabaté (University of Pennsylvania) participate in the final round-table discussion.

We collected impact questionnaires at the end of the day and received very positive feedback, including a wish for this to become 'an annual event'.

This section will be updated shortly
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.nypsi.org/#Event/27408
 
Description On 4 December 2015, Ulrika Maude, Elizabeth Barry and Laura Salisbury were invited speakers at 'Not I? Neurodiversity in Performance and Practice', Institute for English Studies, University of London. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Ulrika Maude, Elizabeth Barry and Laura Salisbury were invited speakers at 'Not I? Neurodiversity in Performance and Practice', Institute for English Studies, University of London, 4 December 2015. The expert panel addressed Samuel Beckett's work from the perspective of neurodiversity, including Tourette's syndrome, which Beckett had an interest in and took notes on (see Maude, 'A Stirring Beyond Coming and Going: Beckett and Tourette's', Journal of Beckett Studies 17:1-2 (2008), pp. 153-168). Jessica Thom and Matthew Pountney of the theatre group, Touretteshero, attended the event, and went on to develop a performance of 'Not I' in 2017 and 2018, to high critical acclaim. See for instance the following reviews in 'The Guardian' and 'The Independent': https://www.theguardian.com/culture/2017/aug/24/not-i-review-beckett-tourette-syndrome-jess-thom-pleasance-grand-edinburgh and . https://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/edinburgh-festival/backstage-in-biscuit-land-pleasance-courtyard-review-remarkable-tourettes-inspired-comedy-9651503.html Please also note the following BBC Radio 4 interview of Jess Thom, https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b09smh8r
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/features/tourettes-syndrome-a-heroic-re...