Bass Culture

Lead Research Organisation: University of Westminster
Department Name: Westminster Sch of Arts

Abstract

Bass Culture is a response to the disengagement and lack of education surrounding the heritage of Jamaican and Jamaican-influenced music in Britain over the last six decades. A direct line can be traced from pioneering British sound systems in the 1960s to modern chart-topping artistes such as Soul2Soul, Goldie, and Tiny Tempah. Jamaican music is recognised as a key catalyst in integration and multiculturalism in London and beyond. An understanding of the contribution made by the Jamaican community is also vital for anyone researching and performing popular music production, dance, and fashion.

This heritage is, however, largely a hidden history, and its value and importance is underestimated by both the Jamaican and wider communities in the UK. This history is neither readily available to schools or universities, nor to other cultural institutions such as archives and museums. In addition, in the absence of research and preservation this history is being lost. First generation pioneers are now in their 80s, making the capture of their experiences urgent. Many physical objects were not created with a view to longevity, and are often valued more as family heirlooms than community heritage.

This project will locate, capture and preserve memories, experiences and ephemera from three generations of musicians, music industry participants, and audience members. The term 'Bass Culture' has been adopted to identify the British experience, as separate to the Jamaican. Bass Culture will be the first in-depth retrospective of Jamaican music in the UK. The University of Westminster's Black Music Research Unit (BMRU) will operate as a central hub for research and link to the community, working with School of Oriental and African Studies, and Black Cultural Archives (BCA).

The research will be conducted through oral history and archival work, led by professional researchers but involving community volunteers at every stage who will receive training. Researchers will conduct 100+ interviews, with additional material solicited from the community directly. Archival research will be conducted primarily at BCA and British Library-Popular Music section.

Community volunteers will also work with Fully Focused Community, a youth media organisation, to create their own oral history-based 60-90 minute film, focusing both on key individuals within the history of Jamaican-inspired music in Britain, and also exploring the participants' experience of rediscovering this history.

Four inter-generational workshops will allow community members from three generations to share and discuss their memories and feelings as music makers and consumers. Volunteers will perform and talk about their music and what it means to them, and also curate a new soundtrack for the Exhibition.

The research will form the basis for a free landmark Exhibition at the Black Cultural Archives in Brixton, to be accompanied by a programme of events and publications aimed at both general public and academic communities. Running for 5 months, BCA anticipates 10,000 visitors. The project will have a further legacy when the Exhibition tours.

A Web Portal will provide an ongoing hub for publicising the project and opportunities for community involvement. The Portal will be used to solicit additional interviews or recollections from family, neighbours, etc, using personal equipment such as mobile phones or tablet computers, and will also extend our reach beyond London.

Academic outputs include an edited, contextualised volume of oral histories, and a monograph focussing on the period 1976-81. Two academic conferences will further explore the heritage uncovered before, and after, the Exhibition, and papers presented will be used as the basis for the first two issues of a new scholarly journal on black music research.

Planned Impact

The grandchildren of Jamaicans who arrived in the 1950s no longer cheer for Caribbean football sides: they support the English team. If you ask them about Ska music, they're more likely to mention The Specials (a mixed race band from the 1980s) rather than Millie Small. If you mention the term 'Dub', they'll likely ask if you meant DubStep? Bass Culture will uncover for the community the threads of its shared musical history, and forge points of connection - despite differences in terminology - to facilitate conversation across generations.

The project will;
- Connect memories and experiences of those who were key in creating the community's music history, with those keen to learn more about it,
- Provide an opportunity for first, second and third generation Jamaican families to participate in the creation of a comprehensive record of their musical heritage,
- Involve the Jamaican community, the general public and experts in a collective conversation about preserving and promoting this history,
- Clarify the rolling confusions concerning identity, cultural ownership and heritage, in relation to reggae's history in Britain,
- Provide official recognition of musical contributions made by London's Jamaican community to Britain's cultural heritage.

The community find it increasingly difficult to discuss its history as a continuous thread. This is due to timespan, generational differences, and the absence of links that allow the community to connect its memories and experiences together. 'Bass Culture' focuses on these connections, and aims to empower British Jamaicans to have conversations with each other. The project will uncover new information, but will also directly involve community members in taking charge of rewriting their history, so that it more accurately reflects the contribution of Jamaican music. Such activities and recognition will also instil pride and confidence from the satisfaction that their contributions have been finally recognised, transforming perceptions both inside and outside of the reggae community.

By combining professionals with community-based researchers, and by soliciting free-format contributions from Web Portal visitors, the project maximises the opportunities for the whole community. Community involvement also broadens the community skills base whilst educating members. The possibility of making low-tech contributions, i.e., via their own equipment to capture heritage, will demystify the process of 'research', making participatory involvement instantly rewarding and fun, whilst contributing to their own and other peoples' heritage; feedback loops further enhance community involvement.

We understand that some community members will be hard to reach, and this has informed our approach to developing the project elements. Local radio and community websites will be stakeholders in the research, events, exhibition, and dissemination of the project. For the general public, the project provides additional opportunities to participate in what was always a shared experience, giving opportunities to capture and feature their memories and experiences (particularly in the Exhibition and book).

The community research and resulting Exhibition primarily (but not exclusively) target first, second and third generation individuals of Jamaican heritage, a community which has totally transformed since the 70s, but has maintained cultural links through Jamaican music. The main groups who will benefit are:
- Jamaican elders and first generation individuals who have witnessed history unfold, but have never had a chance to share their experience,
- Second generation British-born Jamaicans and their families,
- London's contemporary Jamaican community, for whom this will often be the first opportunity to work with a major archive or university on a large-scale project where their history and heritage is being made public,
- The wider Caribbean/British community, who continue to support reggae.

Publications

10 25 50
 
Title Filmed 1st person interviews 
Description Our first collection of of first person individual interviews on film, connecting four generations of music makers and audience member in the UK 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact Our initial set of interviews has generated intrest amongst BAME musicians and the wider, in researching their own contributions to the music and culture of the UK 
URL http://blackmusicresearchunit.co.uk
 
Description Bass Culture unearthed the significant contributions to popular music made by the Jamaican community in Britain and it recognised these contributions as a British rather than a migrant art form. The project challenged the latter categorisation that excludes, artists of colour. For London's black community and those that travel from other parts of the UK and Europe, Bass Culture was recognition of a generation of musicians that had been overlooked. It has impacted the perceptions of history, legacy and cultural heritage, through staging the largest exhibition on the subject. It has impacted contemporary cultural practice by creating opportunities for new black British artists, and academic expertise. It increased community pride and social cohesion through situating Black British culture front and centre stage as a success story.
Exploitation Route This project focused on a mapping of contributions made by Caribbean musicians to the culture and history of British popular music. The project scratched the surface of a much larger creative and cultural contribution to Britain and many would argue the world of music. Extending this project to include the rest of the UK, will provide a much more inclusive story of this contribution history and heritage of British popular music.
Sectors Creative Economy,Education,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections

URL https://www.mixcloud.com/BassCultureduk/
 
Description The project has triggered a new interest in energy in the history and heritage attached to this music. As a result of the exhibition and associated events, both musicians and the wider public have commented on the need for a permanent exhibition, reflecting this contribution to British music history. The project is also redefined and repositioned the use term 'Bass Culture' to reflect the history and impact of Jamaican music in Britain. And in so doing provoked an intergenerational conversation connecting the various associated genres from the last five decades. This surge of interest not gone unnoticed at its point of origin, in Jamaica. Here we've attracted the attention of the Jamaican commission, cultural Minister and organisations such as the Jamaican international artist awards. We've also been contacted by the BBC, Nottingham Carnival, Red Bull and Brent Council. In each case, these organisations have cited the work we've been engaged with, is of value outside of academia. Our website, our YouTube channel are already recognised as a public resource, attracting local and international usage.
First Year Of Impact 2018
Sector Education,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections,Other
Impact Types Cultural

 
Description The removal of Metropolitan police Risk Assessment Form 696
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a national consultation
Impact The of the report, was that it provided fact-based information that was not previously available. This enabled government ministers such as Matt Hancock Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, To support the removal of Risk Assessment Form 696 In the House Of Commons, Prompting Similar Support from the Labour Party. This culminated with a letter being sent to the Mayor of London Sadiq Khan, raising his concerns over the Metropolitan polices implementation of what was viewed in the community as a racist policy.
URL https://www.channel4.com/news/matt-hancock-defends-grime-music-scene
 
Description Being Human Festival 2017
Amount £800 (GBP)
Organisation University of London 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 05/2017 
End 05/2017
 
Description Being Human Festival 
Organisation Being Human Festival
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Being Human Festival allowed us to to extend our community outreach activities. Entitled 'Bass In the Attic" it took the form of a music themed informal workshop, where recognized musicians, academics and community members, were invited to share their music memories.
Collaborator Contribution The Being Human Festival provided admin, marketing and promotional support. This marketing our project within within a lager project assisted in raising the profiled and work of Bass Culture amongst other institutions, academics researchers, and the general public. They also invited us to present at their press launch which resulted in further publicity in key community press outlets.
Impact The main output from this activity has been the opportunity to test our research approach within a live project activity - whilst working with external partners.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Black Cultural Archives / expo, intergen music workshops, archive placements 
Organisation Black Cultural Archives
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution This partnership will provide exhibition content that will feature in the BCA public programme, plus associated workshops, events and a private view.
Collaborator Contribution This partnership allows us access to the BCA archives for research purposes, and the use of the BCA spaces and expertise for exhibitions and events. It also facilitated the up skilling and training of interns in researching their archives.
Impact To date we have collaborated on the delivery of two internships - each lasting 12 weeks. Internships were offered to community members seeking an opportunity to develop research skills - that would allow them to contribute the Bass Culture project. On completion of their training each community member had the opportunity to present their findings, at one of our academic events.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Brent Borough of Culture 2020 
Organisation Brent Local Education Authority
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Brent is one of the most diverse Local Authorities in the UK. Historically the borough has incurred high levels of migration which has given rise to a complex mix of cultural histories, memories, and experiences. As the location for the second London Borough of Culture, it was Brents opportunity to spotlight its constituents' rich cultural history through a distinctive programme of artistic activities and events. I was invited as the academic advisor to assist in the music program and to share the experiences of the Bass Culture project in the development and delivery of their Caribbean music programme. Titled No Bass Like Home (NBLH) project centred on capturing and sharing the history of contemporary art and culture within Brent's African Caribbean community. With the dominant group being of Jamaican heritage, this was a story of reggae music and its broader impact on local lives and experiences and would underpin the borough's key cultural outputs in 2020. I assisted the project manager in developing research, archiving, and a community program of activities throughout the delivery project. The project timeline was from November 2019 to November 2020, with challenges that mirrored Bass Culture until March 2020; the knowledge exchange was straightforward until the national lockdown. The impact on the community was devastating, with several project members falling to COVID-19. Steering the training of volunteers and digitisation and archiving all content into the development of an online archive would pay dividends. The project was able to recover and move online, where it delivered a fantastic festival. Educational Workshops included: On write scriptwriting, Kilm theatre, performance(acting/ dance) • Educational Events: Spoken-word, poetry, Talks, Films • Community Stories: (podcast) About pioneering entrepreneurs, local labels, journalist, photographers, filmmakers, • Professionals Stories: : (podcast/ filmed interview) photography, session musicians, engineers, producers, artist, Radio Stations: mapping of historical buildings where music occurred and activities (dread broadcasting) through workshops/talks. • Local Sound-system stories: (podcast) series of interview targeting Soundsystem passes from the past that could include an event
Collaborator Contribution NBLH was one component of a much larger programme. It was also one of the most sensitive. If successful, there was the potential for a new relationship, but should it fail, it would consolidate historical grievances and distrust. The project had to speak to an intergenerational community. That had at its core, a small but outspoken assortment of individuals. Legitimately or otherwise, at various moments in the programme, this group to represent everyone. For NBLH this meant, maintaining continuity between the ambitions of the project and how the community received this information, could never be taken for granted. In what was to be a year-long celebration, every decision was under scrutiny, particularly by those that perceived No bass like home to be an extension of the council. For this mindset, the project was an opportunity to vent their frustrations. Being 'Borough of Culture' meant expectations extended beyond the music community and Brent. At one point Wembley Arena, was touted as the location for the main event, but who would headline? Was this a borough-wide celebration with all projects participating, or the final show in the programme? The answer was, on occasions, there was no answer. In a project that often generated more questions than it did answers, negotiating the first response, was often down to the senior producer - who would repeatedly demonstrate leadership was the ability to resolve a battle before it is fought. One of the outputs was the Reggae Map. The online grouping of venues, record labels, record shops and other locations connecting the cultural history of black music in Brent. The map provided a direct link to a range of artists interviews on SoundCloud and Spotify. But while Soundcloud improved access and visibility to NBLH, it also increased the need for content. Success for NBLH was always accompanied by some level of added pressure. NBLH was a project that persistently reached for the stars, in the knowledge it would most likely be reined in. It had evolved to regroup and reimagine its potential in pursuit of its primary goal: the collection and archiving of the community's musical heritage. The delivery strategy was a year-long series of celebratory events, that brought with it any number of problems, but it survived: even COVID-19. So, if there was a standout feature about NBLH, it would be its ability to bounce back after a setback. Either way, it's fair to say by a large margin; the success of NBLH was down to the senior producer Zerritha Brown. After all the hard graft, No Bass Like Home has established what it set out to achieve. A celebration of reggae and the local musicians that transformed the borough brent - through an archive that will preserve and share this history for prosperity. Project outputs as of December 2020 25 transcribed from October 19 - December 20 with volunteers continuing to transcribe throughout next year. 40 Storyfinders volunteers, 320 volunteer hours, No Bass Like Home has been the most successful and engaging overall project for volunteers with highest number of volunteers contributing the most hours on a single project. 14,676 combined listens to the archive and visits to the reggae map February - December 2020 4 curated playlists by the Blueprint Collective Partnership with the Jamaican High Commission - 90 people attending the launch of the digital reggae archive Partnership with Freeword Power of a Soundsystem - 40 people attending the online event Partnerships with Worldwide FM- No Bass Like Home documentary show which is currently number One in the Ska chart, and high on the Reggae chart on Mixcloud. 150 sign up for Documenting Black British History talk in July 328 sign-ups for the No Bass Like Home University talks 127,800 views across all streams of the No Bass Like Home Online Festival
Impact This is a multidisciplinary collaboration that gave birth to; the Reggae Map, the Reggae archive, in Brent Museum and Archives, and an online festival accessed via YouTube.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Dub London 
Organisation Museum of London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution As an academic board member for the museum, my contribution to the Dub London exhibition was to mentor a new curator and advise on the development of a reggae Soundsystem exhibition.
Collaborator Contribution This was an activity funded by the Museum of London, positioned in the Museum of London Barbican site. From its roots in Jamaican reggae to shaping communities over the last 50 years, this new display will explore not only dub music but also the cultural and social impact it has had on the identity of London and its people. Dub has had a far-reaching impact across the music industry and the history of the capital.
Impact This collaboration was multidisciplinary, and that involved collecting supporting artefacts, i.e. records, memorabilia, clothes and video interviews.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Fully Focused Productions / Youth engagement and impact 
Organisation Fully Focused
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution This project offers Fully Focused productions and their team of young producers and creatives the opportunity to work professionally on a significant piece of academic research that will introduce their work and expertise to new audiences and that fits with the expressed areas of interest of the company: music, youth, culture, London and more. Most of the team involved will be young Londoners of African / Caribbean heritage. Partnering with us to undertake filmed oral history interviews and deliver a full length documentary film that responds to the the Bass Culture research questions will give the young people a deeper knowledge of their musical and cultural heritage and an opportunity to bring their own thoughts and lines of enquiry to bear in response to our core questions.
Collaborator Contribution Working with a youth-led organisation provides us the opportunity to build the inter-generational aspect of our work and facilitate dialogue between generations of music makers, fans and industry professionals whose collective experience contains the stories we seek to investigate. The Fully Focused team will also bring a particular youth persepctive, contacts and approach that will invigorate the research and ensure its relevance and impact for a younger, non-academic. It also helps us to explore - and demonstrably address - research questions around legacy and responsibility in preserving heritage.
Impact None yet, just at beginning stages
Start Year 2017
 
Description Goldsmith University 
Organisation Goldsmiths, University of London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Expertise, Planning, Promotion, marketing, community engagement, artwork. Over the first eighteen months I focused on developing a network of academic and professions contacts that carefully mapped the project objectives. Partnering with Goldsmith allowed me to widen this network, create a South London base for the project, alongside testing a new approach to academic and public engagement at conferences. During this initial period, we also facilitated community workshops and training at the British library and Black Cultural Archives. One of the outputs for participants in our workshops, was the opportunity to present at one of our conferences. Through their own targeted subjects, my research team were able to keep contributors and content for our conferences.
Collaborator Contribution Expertise, Venue, community engagement, Publicity, promotion> As mentioned in the previous section, Goldsmith University provided a unique opportunity to develop a local profile. In this instance in South London where having conducted related research, they had established a recognised profile within the subject area, and importantly credibility amongst key contributors and and the local community. Through my co-investigator Les Back, located at Goldsmiths, is able to gain access to expert staff, facilities, marketing and promotion for these events. Les was also able to provide links to personal contacts and content creators, that greatly enhanced our conferences. Specific to this conference we targeted local sound system culture professionals and contributors. Expertise, Venue, community engagement, Publicity, promotion> As mentioned in the previous section, Goldsmith University provided a unique opportunity to develop a local profile. In this instance in South London where having conducted related research, they had established a recognised profile within the subject area, and importantly credibility amongst key contributors and and the local community. Through my co-investigator Les Back, located at Goldsmiths, is able to gain access to expert staff, facilities, marketing and promotion for these events. Goldsmith was also able to provide links to personal contacts and content creators, that greatly enhanced our conferences. Specific to this conference we targeted local sound system culture professionals and contributors. The conference was titled Bass Culture 70/ 50, in recognition of the 70th anniversary of the Windrush generation and their contributions to soundsystem culture. Whilst at the same time celebrating 50th anniversary of the reggae. These were two important dates for bass culture research, that provided unique opportunities for the conference. Having attended reggae related conferences prior to and throughout our development period, I was confident I'd acquired a broad collection of academic and professional contacts. What the research now required was a proper interface with the content creators and the public. Les was invaluable in providing links to local authors, photographers, musicians, DJs and music distributors. Les Back was also key to facilitating the screening of our film content, a bookstand that accommodated local traders and a reggae history walk in New Cross south London. Les also arranged for Goldsmiths resident sound system 'Sound System Outernational' to provide music between presentations and for the post conference drink. The partnership with Goldsmith also provided Unique outputs such as the Reggae Map of New Cross that one could follow on Google maps. Overall the even gave both attendees and non-attendees a sense of the significance of the location and reggae's rich history in this part of London.
Impact Local Press article, local engagement, south london soundsystem network
Start Year 2018
 
Description Hammersmith and Fulham Artsfesth 
Organisation Peckings Records
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Curation of the record shop exhibition, creation of a new photo exhibit, the planning of a week of events, and the screening of the Bass Culture documentary.
Collaborator Contribution This was an introductory project receiving minimal funding and in-kind support affording community individuals opportunities to develop content for their festivals.
Impact Photography and film
Start Year 2018
 
Description Northern Reggae Networking Partnerships 2017 
Organisation University of East Anglia
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We contributed to the staging of a two-day conference in London. On the second of the two days we provided the Regent Street cinema as part of a joint conference between the three universities. We assisted in the provision of administrative support, organising and promotion of the event, the provision of supporting images, text promotional and networking connections.
Collaborator Contribution As part of a two-day event partner institutions facilitated the first conference at Senate house. Providing teas coffees and lunch for all attendees. As well as marketing and promotion in the lead up to the event. This was all underpinned by administrative support throughout.
Impact Key outcomes of this collaboration would include but are not limited to a better understanding of research activities within the subject area of black British music. In particular, research into the impact of Jamaican music on Britain over the last half-century. The collaboration has also assisted in identifying the areas of research and the regional locations and institutions involved. it is also highlighted the extent to which the subject area operates as a multidisciplinary practice.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Northern Reggae Networking Partnerships 2017 
Organisation University of Liverpool
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We contributed to the staging of a two-day conference in London. On the second of the two days we provided the Regent Street cinema as part of a joint conference between the three universities. We assisted in the provision of administrative support, organising and promotion of the event, the provision of supporting images, text promotional and networking connections.
Collaborator Contribution As part of a two-day event partner institutions facilitated the first conference at Senate house. Providing teas coffees and lunch for all attendees. As well as marketing and promotion in the lead up to the event. This was all underpinned by administrative support throughout.
Impact Key outcomes of this collaboration would include but are not limited to a better understanding of research activities within the subject area of black British music. In particular, research into the impact of Jamaican music on Britain over the last half-century. The collaboration has also assisted in identifying the areas of research and the regional locations and institutions involved. it is also highlighted the extent to which the subject area operates as a multidisciplinary practice.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Southampton Solent University 
Organisation Southampton Solent University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I consulted on the staging of their exhibition, was a keynote speaker at the conference, and the launch of the exhibition - I screened Bass Culture documentary at Solent cinema and contributed to Q&A. For this collaboration, I introduced the interdisciplinary concept utilised in the Bass Culture exhibition of commissioning new art, this case paintings. I recommend the same painter engaged in the Bass Culture Expo to capture local music contributors. This generated new legacy content.
Collaborator Contribution Key contributions - the staging of the exhibition, provision of screening facilities at Solent cinema, promotion of the event - June 12th - 6.30-9.30pm
Impact For this collaboration, I introduced the interdisciplinary concept utilised in the Bass Culture exhibition of commissioning new art, this case paintings. I recommend the same painter engaged in the Bass Culture Expo to capture local music contributors. This generated new legacy content.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Sussex University 
Organisation University of Sussex
Department Sackler Centre for Consciousness Science
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Content from the exhibition, curatorial expertise, access to professional network.
Collaborator Contribution Exhibition 'Paris-London (March- September 2019 - January 2020 The exhibition will explore the links between migration, musical forms and urban identities by showing how the inhabitants of these two former imperial capitals have taken ownership of this universal form of expression to make their voices heard, to claim their place within public space and contribute to the transformation of Paris and London as global cities. The exhibition will draw upon aspects that are well known to the public, linked to popular music elements, and to the music scenes in Paris and London, but it will also look bring into view lesser-known dimensions which will allow the audience to understand how migration has contributed to the construction of Paris and London as global cities. Bass Culture Project will be formally recognised and thanked within the exhibition and the catalogue and we will supply all the necessary information/ metrics that you will need in terms of measuring impact and public engagement 1. Collaborating on events like the Babylon screening as part of the Brighton Film Festival which further raises the profile of Bass Culture. Also working towards to an external bid on the global impact of reggae which Westminster will lead upon and where Sussex can act as co-PI in terms of the impact of reggae in France and the Francophone world. Outcome - external bid to AHRC 2. Paris Exhibition March 2019 - January 2020 Material from Bass Culture will be used in the exhibition. Bass Culture will also be involved in thinking about content/design/cultural programming. Bass Culture will be an officially recognised in all publicity/website/exhibition itself b. within the catalogue c. cultural programming d. also material from the Exhibition will be donated to the Bass Culture project The Immigration Museum/Sussex to supply all necessary information for impact/engagement/AHRC reports. Also Paris project to explore how we can feed into Bass Culture's Exhibition - potentially around Martin Messonnier's album Big Men which brought together Algerian and Jamaican musicians. 3. Work with the British Council in Paris
Impact Exhibition in Paris ran for six months from March 2019 - January 2020 at the museum of migration
Start Year 2018
 
Description University of Leicester / Prof.Mark Banks, mentoring 
Organisation University of Leicester
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The research team is contributing to an ongoing and constructive dialogue with Prof. mark Banks of Leicester University, to further the aims of the research.
Collaborator Contribution Prof. mark Banks of Leicester University brings his experience and expertise to the research team in ways that tangibly benefit the progress of the work - helping deliver focus and structure. He has also helped work through practical skills-based questions, and offer useful suggestions for how we might best proceed.
Impact This collaboration is in its early stages and is focused on delivering mentoring support for me as new researcher.
Start Year 2016
 
Description BBC 4 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact As part of the Ticketmaster state of play Grime Report, principal investigator Mykaell Riley, was invited to talk on BBC radio4. THE interview focused on Bass Culture's contribution to the first big data informed report, on a black British music genre.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description BBC Live 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact As part of the Ticketmaster state of play Grime Report, principal investigator Mykaell Riley, was interviewed by BBC live. As part of the Ticketmaster interview focused on Bass Culture's contribution to the first big data informed report, on a black British music genre.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/article/41559356/academic-study-finds-grime-as-disruptive-and-powerful...
 
Description BBC Radio 6 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact As part of the Ticketmaster state of play Grime Report, principal investigator Mykaell Riley, was invited to talk on BBC radio6, The interview focused on Bass Culture's contribution to the first big data informed report, on a black British music genre.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Bass Culture Presentation at the Jamaican High Commission, Feb 21st 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Mykaell presented a 1 hour presentation on the Bass Culrure Research work - underlining the importance of capturing / investigating this particular music and cultural heritage, the gaps in the establishment representations of the culture and our aims for the research. He also made an appeal to the caribbean community present to share their stories with the projectr and to get involved in the research. This sparked a lively debate and contributions from the audience, and we made several new contacts of use to the research - some as oral history interview subjects and others at the policy making level.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Being Human festival 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A collection of interviews on BBC radio 4, 6 and BBC live, promoting the release of the Grime report
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Farah Nice Up The Dance! - Celebrating the Influence of UK Sound Systems 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Nice Up The Dance! - Celebrating the Influence of UK Sound Systems video: I was one of several interviewees, that spoke to camera sharing antidotal experiences on UK reggae Soundsystems. The short was posted on YouTube and to date has generated over 64,000 views. A key focus of the video is fashion and the extent to which Jamaican music and sound system culture in the UK has and continues to informed taste.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2k3KlE9649A&feature=youtu.be
 
Description Grime Music Planel Talk 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact The organisation 'Love At First Vibe' arranged for a mixed group of students and the general public to attend a talk, on the finding in the Grime report. The talk prompted interest from several of the attendees, one of which was in the process of writing the book. Another was a PhD student, in the process of finishing his dissertation on grime music. Both attendees approached me for assistance on their projects and in both cases collaborating on their outputs.

www.loveakirstvibe.co.uk
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://www.loveakirstvibe.co.uk
 
Description Invitation from the Prime Minister to a Back History Month reception at 10 Downing Street 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact This was an annual event that takes place at 10 Downing Street. The invite came from the Prime Minister to celebrate Black history month 2017. This was formal recognition of the work completed on the Grime Report and recognition of Its Impact on London Metropolitan police legislation.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017,2018
 
Description Metro Press Report 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact This was one of several press interviews that resulted from my collaboration with Ticketmaster on the report. The interview was for the Metro UK publication which was also recorded filmed by BBC Newsbeat.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.metro.news/grime-is-the-new-punk-heres-why/780371/
 
Description Norwich symposium: Scoping the Field 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This was a symposium used theme of reggae as the basis for networking, practitioners and other parties working in the field. Titled 'Scoping the Field', it did just that. It attracted a mixed group of academics, partitioners, curators students and journalist. It also provided an opportunity to share research and related activities. For the Bass Culture Project it was an opportunity to reconnect, update and in some cases initiate new interest in our research. I was invited to presented on the nature and scope of our research, chimed with those present generating offers to collaborate on future outputs. This includes the possibility of a joint symposium later this year.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://reggaenetwork.wordpress.com/blog/
 
Description Reggae Network London Symposium 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This was collaboration between the The University of East Anglia, Liverpool University, under the heading The Reggae Research Network and the University of Westminster. The joint symposium provided a platform to actively engage in networking practicing academics, industry professionals and community members, with shared interest in the subject area. The second and last day of the conference, was staged at the University of Westminster, Regent Street campus. The event allowed us to present to a captive audience our approach to developing community-based research. An example of this was the all female panel, comprising of music industry professionals and community members, sharing their experiences with academics. This collection of presentations sparked very emotional discussions, that post the event, continued as emails and text messages. It was clear that this type platform had the capacity to produced responses that might otherwise remain hidden. One community member have since applied and has been accepted to study for a Masters degree.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://reggaenetwork.wordpress.com/london-conference-reggae-futures/
 
Description Reggae tourism map for UK / Jamaica tourist board 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This activity resulted from an ongoing relationship with the Jamaican High Commission. I was asked to contribute to the creation of a tourist map that would identify UK tourism to Jamaica. This involved engaging graphic design and animation students in the creation of a digital map that identified key reggae music-related locations, British fans might wish to visit. Having identified this demographic as part of bass culture research, this collaboration involved re-analysing existing data in relation to planning holidays to Jamaica.

This activity provided work placement for two students, access to new professional networks and the opportunity to engage with a national and international audience.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Screening of base culture documentary, as part of the Difference Festival, at the Regent Street Cinema. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This was a central London public screening of the Bass Culture documentary, at the Regent Street cinema. The screening was part of the University's public-facing events, titled The Difference Festival. We had a hundred and 180 bookings for this event which is capacity for the cinema. The event was a response to the academic and public interest in a second screening of the documentary, which is now identified as a resource within the subject area.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL http://blogstage.westminster.ac.uk/difference/home/
 
Description Talking Humanities blog 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact This article focused on developing a better understanding of the impact and legacy of Jamaican music on British culture and heritage over the last half century.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://talkinghumanities.blogs.sas.ac.uk/2018/02/15/theres-more-to-british-pop-music-than-meets-the...
 
Description The Conversation - Online Magazine 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This article focused on the impact of black British music on British culture and the challenges currently faced by black British musicians.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://theconversation.com/grime-is-the-new-punk-heres-why-85544
 
Description The Resonancia Music Conference in Bogota Colombia. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact I was invited to present at the Resonancia Music Conference in Bogota Colombia. The focus was the international impact impact of the Bass Culture research project over the next three years. The audience comprised of a of a mixture of arts, education, technology and business individuals from a mixed demographic and age group. My presentation prompted many debates and offer of further collaboration.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.resonanciacolombia.org
 
Description The Times Education Online Magazine 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact This was an essay for the Times Higher Education online magazine. The article focused the publication of the Grime Report and the potential of its findings to impact on industry thinking about the genre.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2010,2017
URL https://www.timeshighereducation.com/people/interview-mykaell-riley-university-of-westminster
 
Description University of Westminster Research Impact Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact University workshop on research impact. 20 post graduate researchers from several institutions and local staff attended. I was required to present my approach to research to explain the various processes employed to achieve my impact outputs. The range of outputs presented generated many questions on my methodology, network and funding. The presentation generated several requests to partner on further research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018