Martial Arts Studies Research Network

Lead Research Organisation: Cardiff University
Department Name: Journalism Media and Cultural Studies

Abstract

Four decades after being kicked off by the 'kung fu craze' of the early 1970s, participation in martial arts in the Western world now rivals (and often exceeds) participation in traditional physical cultural practices connected with sport, health and exercise. Taekwondo and t'ai chi are as common in schools, college campuses and community centres as football and tennis; and Mixed Martial Arts are now globally bigger business than boxing. Yet, in the UK (and the English language in general), the academic study of martial arts remains in the shadows. This is so even though academics from a range of disciplines are contributing to diverse international scholarly fields via explorations of the many questions attached to martial arts, culture and society. Indeed, martial arts studies is demonstrably emerging, in diverse academic disciplines and across many geographical regions. Clusters of overlapping problematics are emerging within disciplines such as anthropology, cultural studies, ethnography, film studies, history, medicine, psychology, religious studies, sociology, and sports studies.

However, as these studies have developed within discrete disciplines, researchers have rarely engaged in cross-disciplinary dialogue. In fact, in the UK (and across Anglophone academia), the proliferation of academic writing has outpaced academic events, and there is little face-to-face exchange of ideas and approaches. Yet, there is evidence of not only a national but also an international appetite for a research network to foster cross-disciplinary communication in the development of martial arts studies. As well as increasing publications, there are growing numbers of conferences and events internationally, yet very few events have ever taken place in the UK or in the English language. There are regular academic conferences on martial arts in Germany, Poland, the Czech Republic and all over Asia. Around the world, a growing number of degree programmes involve elements of martial arts studies, including some in the UK.

Yet, despite this growing research context, there is little sense of community or network for the development of martial arts studies. To address this lack, the Principal Investigator has already organised an international interdisciplinary Martial Arts Studies conference (Cardiff University, June 2015). The call for papers attracted over 100 proposals, some 60 of which were accepted. Proposals came from the UK, Australia, Guam, North America, China, Korea, Hong Kong, Japan, South America, Germany, Finland, and France, and represent fields as diverse as anthropology, cultural studies, ethnography, film studies, history, medicine, philosophy, psychology, religious studies, sociology, and sports studies. This wide national and disciplinary sweep is matched in a broad spectrum of work, spanning from theoretical to practical orientations. As well as pure academic work, there will be talks by surgeons, security experts, diplomats, and medical doctors involved in research into ways of incorporating elements of martial arts as therapy into NHS treatment for post-stroke rehabilitation and depression.

The Martial Arts Studies Research Network will bring more researchers together in face to face events that advance the study of martial arts and ask what studying martial arts can contribute to knowledge more widely. Each event will engage with a cluster of questions around a specific theme, and will involve the participation of academics, researchers, practitioners, and professionals, in order to explore core social and cultural questions. In this way the research network will stimulate multi-disciplinary conversations that advance our understanding of martial arts in broader cultural contexts. Through these dialogues, the network will generate knowledge and lead the way in the development of martial arts studies that contributes to multiple areas.

Planned Impact

1. The Martial Arts Studies Research Network will organise events that seek to impact on diverse practices. Academics and practitioners will engage each others' research and experience at events that will be captured via audiovisual recording equipment and published in locations such as the multimedia areas of the open access journal Martial Arts Studies.

2. There will be a dedicated Martial Arts Studies Research Network Website that will disseminate news about events and outputs via posts and emails, and will also host online discussions. The website will include information about participants, events, and other stakeholders, such as choreographers, directors, actors and artists, and it will be a stable point of presence for the network. The website will also emphasise and build connections with relevant international institutions, such as the International Martial Arts and Combat Sports Scientific Society (IMACSSS), the Martial Arts Studies journal, the Martial Arts Studies blog, the Institute of Martial Arts and Combat Sports, and other networks, organisations and institutes from around the world. It will be built on Wordpress and maintained by the PI.

3. Network events themselves will be freely open to the public, and academic researchers will share platforms with a range of professional practitioner-experts in order to stimulate encounters and engagements that could modify practices of all orders - academic, professional, practical, even personal. For example:

- Dialogues on martial arts, gender and ethnicity could reconfigure of the status of martial arts in activist and practitioner projects and practices, for instance, via projects connected to the ongoing work of key speaker Dr Sukhwant Dhaliwal, who moved to academia after ten years of working in the UK voluntary sector for feminist organisations challenging violence against women and girls. Similarly, key speaker Jon Daniel is an artist whose ongoing work on non-white action heroes of the 1970s could be enriched by his participation.

- Practitioners of writing, choreographing and directing martial arts dramas could benefit from the contributions of key speakers such as emeritus professor and choreographer/director Phillip Zarrilli.

- The Royal Armouries event could impact on museum curatorial practice.

- The SOAS event will stage encounters between academics, practitioners and medical researchers that could inform health, medical, therapeutic and convalescence practices.

- The diasporas event could foreground the creative potential of martial arts in community building or identity projects.

4. At every event, the contact information of participants and attendees will be recorded, and each will be contacted after the period of funding has finished to ask whether the events have affected or altered their practice in notable ways. Wherever the networking events are implicated in a change of practice, these instances can be followed up in order to explore the establishment of impact narratives, and to ascertain the possibility of publishing an academic study of the intervention.

5. At the same time, the network will work to develop its activities, to enhance its agenda-setting status and to make contributions and interventions into ongoing debates, issues and practices. The network will become a nexus from which to develop collaborations and apply for further national and international funding to expand research activities. Funding bodies will include the AHRC, the ESRC, and trusts such as Rowntree and Wellcome, as well as European and international bodies, particularly in nations and areas where there are connections and collaborations to be made with existing martial arts studies bodies, such as Poland, Germany, China and Japan.

Publications

10 25 50
 
Title Adam Frank keynote 
Description Keynote lecture 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact None known as yet 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=myGPa0GOQp0&t=5s
 
Title Animation submitted to and shown at our 2016 conference 
Description Animation of kung fu form. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact The animator was given free attendance and accommodation, came to the conference and made valuable contacts which have aided her in her animation work. 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rz2W9I4Scvg
 
Title Ben Judkins keynote 
Description Keynote lecture on the topic of light sabre 'martial arts' 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact None known as yet 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uApMEYbX1-4&t=98s
 
Title Ben Spatz keynote 
Description Keynote on the subject of embodied knowledge 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact Ben Spatz has gone on to found the Journal of Embodied Research, which will provide an interface between academic and practitioner communities, and also provide open access knowledge dissemination 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rWFgJSoA7TA&t=60s
 
Title Bruce Lee animation 
Description animation of Bruce Lee, shown during 2016 conference 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact none known 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rEJn5a6lm6g
 
Title Budo Inochi 
Description Feminist Martial Arts Studies Blog 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact The emergence of this blog is an impact, as it was developed by a non-academic who was inspired and emboldened by the activities of the network. 
URL http://www.budo-inochi.com/
 
Title Film submitted and presented at the 2016 conference 
Description Film submitted and presented at the 2016 conference 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact None known as yet. 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8JYKkoAuaDk
 
Title Grandmaster ink animation 
Description Ink animation presented during 2016 conference. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact none known as yet, but the animator made significant new contacts whilst at the conference 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NCbt-YanEos
 
Title Janet O'Shea keynote 
Description Keynote lecture on martial arts as deep play 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact O'Shea has gone on to develop this work into a monograph for Oxford University Press. 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JakJ_BFbzz8&t=3s
 
Title Lecture in full authentic mediaeval armour 
Description Lecture in full authentic mediaeval armour 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact This research and performance has significance for those involved in historical reconstruction of battles 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zcOGAADjds0
 
Title Maori haka and presentation 
Description Presentation by the Head of the Maori King's Guard of a tewhatewha (general's staff) to the director of the research network. 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact The presentation was made by a non-academic institution (the Maori king's guard) to the director of the research network to acknowledge the impact of its activities outside of academia. 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UFaWRplzoY8
 
Title Martial Arts Stories (DoJoTV) 
Description Series of short films telling martial arts stories 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact DoJoTV's contributions are broadening awareness of the network and field 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TL1kkKUuk6s&list=PLG0It92iVSRIhVN7g1IoWiAD0CisWF_VP
 
Title Martial Arts Studies Conference Handbook 2016 
Description The schedule and handbook of the 2016 Martial Arts Studies Conference 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact Excellent networking, both with academics and practitioners 
URL https://mastudiesrn.files.wordpress.com/2016/07/2016-mas-conference.pdf
 
Title Mini-series: why martial arts? 
Description Micro-interviews filmed at our conferences 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact Greatly improving the visibility of the network 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BEJzEr4xotI&list=PLG0It92iVSRL3RRhRfXfMLOMTH46ijpjG
 
Title Phillip Zarrilli Keynote 
Description Keynote at 2016 conference 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact None known as yet. 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ot6SDV_hmTU
 
Title Shaolin kung fu meihua quan 
Description Animation of shaolin kung fu form 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact None known as yet 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3h2a0seH8RM
 
Title Shaolin kung fu tao pencil animation 
Description Animation of Shaolin kung fu form 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact None known as yet, other than in terms of the animator's new contacts and raised profile. 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I8CztLf1E94
 
Title Thirteen Micro-Interviews 
Description Micro-interviews conducted during the AHRC-funded 2016 conference, carried out by Dojo-TV, who attended and produced the films for free. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact I believe these films have the status of both network activity and impact simultaneously. 
URL http://www.jomorrell.co.uk/martial-arts-studies.html
 
Description The primary objective of the Martial Arts Studies Research Network was always to connect up disconnected disciplinary and cultural discourses on martial arts by bringing together diverse researchers, in order to develop knowledge of the significance and impact of martial arts in the contemporary world and set the agenda for future research in the interlocking multidisciplinary fields around them.

As such, the project was more focused on the development of a research network than searching out answers to specific questions. So, the principal discovery of this research project has been the coordinates, kinds, forms, characteristics and orientations of the academic and non-academic research and scholarship that is currently taking place on all aspects of martial arts, in the UK in particular but also internationally.

To illustrate, the July 2016 conference in Cardiff University attracted students and academics from all over the world, from masters students in Canada to PhD students from Hong Kong, as well researchers, lecturers and professors from all over the world. But, significantly, it also attracted significant numbers of non-academic practitioners and researchers, both from the UK and beyond. The international reach of the network can be indicated by mentioning that as well as tenured academics from the US, Europe, Japan, China, and elsewhere, the conference also attracted a martial arts instructor and writer from Boulder, Colorado, and the head of the New Zealand Maori King's Guard.

Each event has been successful in connecting academics and practitioners from different disciplines, fields, practices and enterprises related to martial arts. Of course, because these are UK-based network events they have primarily attracted the participation and attendance of people who are based in the UK - although many of the academics who have participated in the events have been able to travel from abroad.

As well as developing significant new connections, both between individuals and institutions, the project has also stimulated and influenced the orientation of ongoing discourses in and around academic disciplines on martial arts. Thanks to the network, connections have been made between students and future supervisors, colleagues and institutions, and research, ideas, arguments and exchanges have forged new directions in scholarship.

The new journal, Martial Arts Studies, is closely linked to the network and has already published articles developed from network presentations and conference papers. Future issues are planned based on the proceedings of network events.

The findings of the network (specifically, that there is a broad-based emergent and expanding research field of martial arts studies) facilitated the initiation of a research monograph series of martial arts studies with a major academic publisher, Rowman and Littlefield International.

The activities of the network have linked together previously isolated researchers at all levels across many countries on all continents and have begun to set key research agendas in martial arts studies internationally.
Exploitation Route As the selection of blog essays by Kai Morgan illustrate, the research network proceedings, discussions, connections and other findings are already feeding into the ongoing production of academically informed and self-reflexive discourse in and around martial arts.

The presence of a new film production company, DojoTV, at 2016 and 2017's conferences and several of our networking events, has also stimulated their interest in producing educational documentaries on issues around martial arts practice and culture in the UK. It is hoped that collaboration between academics and DojoTV will result in free and accessible, professionally produced and educational online documentaries.
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Education,Healthcare,Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections

URL https://mastudiesrn.wordpress.com/2017/02/21/kai-morgans-write-ups-of-our-events/
 
Description I have received numerous testimonials from non-academics who have reported an impact on their practice as a direct result of network activities and events. The following is an account provided by non-academic martial arts blogger, Kai Morgan, and it is by far the most detailed and comprehensive account I have received, although it is also representative of other accounts too: Case Study - How the Martial Arts Studies Research Network has impacted on my life By Kai Morgan - Martial Arts blogger - February 2017 Introduction - do people even care about an intellectual take on the martial arts? In December 2015 I finally embarked on a long-held dream to write a martial arts blog. At that point I had no idea what it was going to look like. I just had a vague dream of writing thoughtful pieces that linked "philosophy" and martial arts. I also wanted to cover women's experience of and participation in the martial arts, and other issues relating to inclusion. My plain-speaking younger sister thought it was a waste of time. She said (genuinely wanting to help): This is the age of Facebook. No one wants to read essays these days! People like memes now. You should take inspirational martial arts quotes and put them onto a nice background. That's the kind of thing people actually read. In fact, she's turned out to be very wrong. I already knew that martial artists were special people - thoughtful, ethical and dedicated to becoming the best people they can be. But in my first year of blogging, I've been blown away by direct encounters with ordinary martial artists' raw hunger for new ideas they can use and make their own. And where have these ideas come from? Very largely, through the events and other activities of the Martial Arts Studies Research Network . . . First steps I started the blog with no clue about where to take it, and zero confidence to articulate or share my own ideas. Then I came across the newly published Volume 1 of the MAS Journal, and decided to start by writing a brief article-by-article summary of its contents. I was pretty nervous about getting it wrong, and sent my summary to Paul Bowman before publishing it, asking if he would check it over. Although Paul had no idea who I was, he responded with kindness and encouragement, and by late December 2015 I had my first proper blog article to publish. At the same time, I connected online with Alex Channon, who invited me to a conference called Martial Arts Studies: Gender Issues in Theory and Practice in Eastbourne in February 2016. I was really scared about going, but sensed it was going to be an invaluable experience - and it absolutely was. I wasn't certain if I could fit in with all the "academics" at the event - but the event couldn't have been more friendly or inclusive. The network likes to emphasise bringing together practitioners and academics; and this has been superbly accomplished at all the events I've attended. Attending that conference felt like an important milestone, and a portal into a world I'd always craved, and unknowingly been dreaming of for a long time. In my "real" Karate life, my dojo brothers often affectionately tease me for a tendency to "overthink" things. But within the world of the Network, there's no such thing as overthinking - indeed the whole point of being there is to drill right down into the depths of a given concept. I feel very much at home here. I came to realise that this was the real reason I'd wanted to start the blog - to connect with interesting, like-minded people outside my relatively small world (I still live in my hometown, and work locally for the NHS). In fact, 2016 turned out to be the best year of my life to date, and I connected as a blogger with brilliant, exciting martial artists beyond my wildest dreams. These people came from many sources, but the MASRN was at the heart of much of it. Firstly through people I directly met in person or online and became friends with. Secondly, through access to the wonderfully curated collection of lectures and reading material that the Network brings together. Thirdly, because I've written extensively about ideas I've encountered through the Network, and this has drawn all kinds of people to make contact and share their own thoughts and ideas. Fourthly, through a kind of light-touch "mentoring"-type support from several people, in particular Paul Bowman and Ben Judkins. Impact on my own thinking about martial arts The MASRN has constantly supported and accelerated the development of my own thinking. An example of this was the process of writing the article: Is Lightsaber Combat a real martial art? This drew on Martin Meyer's talk at the 2016 MAS conference, and an article in the MAS Journal (Volume 2) by Ben Judkins. Writing this article turned out to be a rich experience in a number of ways, none of which would have been possible without the MASRN. Firstly, I benefitted greatly from exposure to both men's ideas in the first place. Secondly, when I told them both I'd like to write this article, we ended up having a fascinating three-way conversation by email across our three respective countries. Thirdly, Ben Judkins gave me constructive challenge and guidance on the draft article, leading me to rewrite it and take the ideas further: Constant exposure to these kinds of conversations and this type of gentle, supportive challenge has built my confidence and taken me to places with my writing I don't believe I could have reached alone. At the start of 2016, I could do nothing better or more ambitious than play it safe and précis the MAS Journal. By the end of 2016, I'd gained a ton of confidence to start applying the academic ideas to my own practice - with continued background support from Paul: I've learned a lot of things through exposure to the Network that may seem laughably obvious to an academic. I've learned that my actual interest these days might be better defined as sociology than philosophy. I've learned about Embodiment, and all kinds of random topics that I never would have come across otherwise, such as HEMA, Lightsaber Combat and martial arts cinema. I've started to pursue a focused, almost obsessive course of private study about the relationship between the sociology of religion, and the martial arts. I've learned that mindfulness isn't just some boring fake pastime of people who don't understand "real" life (although perhaps it can be in some cases!) And this is just the beginning! It's only been a year . . . Impact on my Karate practice My practice of Karate is infinitely different now, to anything that predated 2016. This is a lot to do with discovering the concept of "embodiment" through the Network. I didn't know this term a year ago, or know anything about the wealth of interest and research available on the related ideas. Above all, I feel that reading about these ideas has given me a new vocabulary, so that I can think, speak, write and practise in ways that weren't possible before. I always knew that practising a martial art was enjoyable, and addictive, and transformative. Now I'm starting to move beyond these vague labels, to a place where I begin to understand more clearly what is going on; and why it has the effect that it does. By coincidence (or is it?!) last year, I also transferred to a dojo that's like nothing I've ever experienced before. My sensei teaches us to pay attention to developing the warrior, the monk and the scholar within ourselves; and close reading of classic texts is encouraged as an important supplement to the physical study. We're also encouraged to explore and discover the nuances of the techniques in our own time. Discovering Ben Spatz's ideas on embodied research through the MASRN has supported me greatly to engage with this new way of learning, and start to perceive the synergies between theory and practice in the martial arts - in ways I never dreamed of before. Impact on others In 2016 I wrote 15 blog articles directly inspired by the work of the MASRN - these are summarised in the table below, along with details of a two-part podcast that another blogger produced in response to one of the articles. As stated above, the hunger of martial artists to encounter and explore new ideas has blown me away. I've had emails from university professors and other academics around the world. But I've also heard from people with little or no post-compulsory education, who find that the ideas speak to them with directness and urgency. These conversations mean a lot to me, and I feel that these are people who literally would not access the ideas if it weren't for the Network. Here are a few sample comments: - "Finding yourself in the movement". Yes, beautiful, when I don't look to outcomes there's a freedom to be and then to respond . Thank you for your pointing. - Really great! Wish I'd been there! Fits really well with what Patrick Cassidy Sensei (Aikido) teaches. - Thanks for sharing these lectures and your thoughts! - This is a great article which really highlights Martial Arts in a refreshing light. Thanks for the great insights. - I believe aikido is meditation, in motion. Movement without thought. A continuity of motion that ends with energy being released, back into the universe. - Awesome take on what many of us beginning martial artists are starting to grasp ? Thank you! - I've been practicing aikido for many years and can identify - Bravo! Most folks don't see the depth in our art - all they see is a bunch of kiddos waving their hands and feet in a vaguely aggressive way ? Thanks for this. Maybe it'll help someone understand there's depth and riches enough to satisfy adult minds and spirits, and that the black belt should never be viewed as the ultimate achievement and the end of learning. - "Specialized knowledge in any field is not directly accessible from the surface of everyday, commonplace knowledge. One has to find one's way into it, proceeding step by step along its paths" - Powerful stuff there. I'll probably have to come back to this post a few more times to get the full value of it. Thanks for sharing :- - Nice article. I have moved around a few times and occasionally studied a different art. Some of my views on secrets is that the basics of one art are the secrets of another - Kanku Sho with an augmented block that could be katate dori nikyo, hand waving in aikido that could be a strike, karate forms with hands held in a position that mirrors shoulder locks or Judo throws. Japanese and western martial arts especially seem to have compartmentalized skill sets that actually fir together well. The belief that there is more is what starts the constant discovery. If you never wanted there to be more or never hoped for more, there would be nothing else. Is boxing a sweet science, or a martial art with only four techniques? Eye and heart of the beholder. - You sure do go to some interesting conferences, Kai! Thanks for sharing! Love the bit about learning the art from a goblin on a mountain, LOL! - It sounds like the lecture was amazing - I wish I had been able to go! I'm looking forward to reading through all of the resources you have listed ? - "Felicia explained that the trauma of separation from mother / father is a theme which Hou Hsiao-Hsien has explored before. It alludes to Taiwan's complicated history since 1945, with the parents representing the State. Felicia also believes that in this particular film, Hsiao-Hsien is seeking to recapture and recuperate an older China, modelled nostalgically on the Tang Dynasty golden age of literacy, cosmopolitanism and democracy (from around 600-900 BCE)." There are times, I wish I had more exposure more about Asian history, Asian culture, Asian societies and Asian symbols in these movies so I can fully understand them more fully and appreciated them. The future 2016 was amazing, and I look forward to whatever adventures 2017 may bring. By now, I'm utterly drowning (in a nice way!) in the wealth of books and articles I've already discovered via the Network - surely enough to keep me busy during 2017 - let alone the further riches that I look forward to gaining through the MASRN's ongoing work. I even still have loads of handwritten notes from the 2016 Martial Arts Studies Conference which I haven't had time to mentally process and/or write up yet - and then there are some lectures I didn't even get to see that week, which I know are sitting there on YouTube waiting to be watched. I've already booked my ticket for the 2017 conference and look forward to it with great excitement. I wish Paul Bowman all the best with his endeavours to secure future funding for the Network, as it has been a treasure within my life for the last year. I also hope it will continue to go from strength to strength - for my own sake, and that of others . . .
First Year Of Impact 2017
Sector Education,Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism
Impact Types Cultural

 
Description Cardiff Undergraduate Research Opportunities (CUROP)
Amount £1,400 (GBP)
Organisation Cardiff University 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 06/2017 
End 07/2017
 
Description Cardiff Undergraduate Research Opportunities Programme (CUROP)
Amount £1,838 (GBP)
Organisation Cardiff University 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 06/2018 
End 08/2018
 
Description Cardiff University Research Leave Fellowship Scheme
Amount £15,000 (GBP)
Organisation Cardiff University 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2018 
End 02/2019
 
Description Grant for interdisciplinary group research in the humanities and social sciences
Amount ¥1,000,000 (JPY)
Organisation Suntory Foundation 
Sector Private
Country Japan
Start 08/2016 
End 07/2017
 
Description DoJoTV 
Organisation DoJoTV
PI Contribution DoJoTV are a wing of a professional filmmaking company who specialise in making short films and documentaries about martial arts and cultural identity. They have attended conferences and network events since 2016, and have produced many short films about and during our events. DoJoTV would not have been able to make their films were it not for network events.
Collaborator Contribution At the very core, DoJoTV was inspired to exist by the Birmingham MAS event, where they met Bey Logan. The main summer conferences have enabled DoJoTV to network with people that would have been impossible (or just too hard/expensive) otherwise. This has meant the production of some simple and unique content that is defining the evolution of the channel in an exciting and potentially genre-defining direction. This is important as DoJoTV started on a very different agenda before they went to the 2016 conference and saw the potential with the MAS network. So, what exists today and where it's going is a reflection of what's been learnt dealing with the network. Some specific things that would not have been possible are looking very promising: • Dr George Jennings is now their hands-on channel consultant, who they met at the 2017 event and is forging some promising connections at Cardiff Metropolitan University • They at very early stages on scoping a feature documentary with Phillip Zarrilli, met at the 2016 event • They are in regular contact with several other network members on topics/ideas that may bear fruit over the next year or two • The quality of MAS network members reflects on them, so the channel itself has been lifted - this is something that has increased their learning curve about the kind of potential stories/content they could produce. This is not just limited to content, e.g., this effect has a 'door opening' effect that they are starting to utilise The DoJoTV venture remains an experiment and is funded mainly with gaps in diaries and goodwill. Moving into sustainability would be quite a transformation at this point as they have entered the scene and become more tuned into what it could become. This is down to what's been observed and learned from the conferences and the members.
Impact Multiple short films, available here: http://www.dojotv.co.uk/
Start Year 2016
 
Description East Asian Martial Arts as Global Culture 
Organisation Waseda University
Department Department of Mathematics
Country Japan 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I have visited Japan and contributed to their research network.
Collaborator Contribution The Japanese scholars will visit the UK and contribute to our AHRC network in May 2017.
Impact One guest edited issue of the online open access journal 'Martial Arts Studies'
Start Year 2016
 
Description Love Fighting, Hate Violence - University of Brighton 
Organisation University of Brighton
Department School of Applied Social Science
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Our first AHRC funded research network event was at the University of Brighton where the 'Love Fighting, Hate Violence' project was first outlined and debated by participants. Those participants are the AHRC network event went on do found 'Love Fighting, Hate Violence'.
Collaborator Contribution Love Fighting Hate Violence (LFHV) is a campaign aiming to raise awareness of the important moral difference between sport-based combat, and violence, which was founded by members of our AHRC network. The project seeks to encourage practitioners and fans of martial arts and combat sports to reflect on the distinction between fighting and violence, and to encourage various forms of anti-violence action within and through their different disciplines. The ideas underpinning the campaign are outlined in their manifesto, and are discussed and developed in the posts on their blog page, which is written by people who are members of both this project and the AHRC Martial Arts Studies Research Network.
Impact http://lfhv.org/
Start Year 2016
 
Description Networking Exchanges - DVS: German Society of Sport Science 
Organisation German Society of Sport Science
Country Germany 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Research visits and consultancy. First, members of the DVS have attended UK events and the DVS have invited members of the Martial Arts Studies Research Network to German conferences and events. Second, the DVS have called on Professor Bowman as consultant for their activities developing publications in German martial arts studies
Collaborator Contribution Members of the DVS are active participants in UK network events and publications (e.g., Sixt Wetzler, Leo Istas, Swen Corner)
Impact Conference presentations in the UK and Germany. Publications by Paul Bowman, Ben Judkins and Wayne Wong in German publications; publications by Sixt Wetzler, Daniel Jaquet, in our English language publications.
Start Year 2016