Using Digital Tools to Challenge Xenophobia and Support International Development in South Africa

Lead Research Organisation: University of Leeds
Department Name: School of Modern Languages and Cultures

Abstract

The project will work with groups of young people across the Gauteng province of South Africa to challenge the rising tide of xenophobia to be found in the country today, supporting the work of the international development NGO The Bishop Simeon Trust (BST) and the 20 Community Based Organisations (CBOs) it services in the region.

Working in partnership with BST and the Johannesburg Holocaust & Genocide Centre (JHGC), the project will use the exhibitions, archive and other resources of JHGC to create a set of digital educational materials that will explore the lessons that can be learnt for South Africa today from the ethnic violence of the Holocaust and the Rwandan Genocide. The project will draw on the research findings of Cooke's AHRC project 'Experiencing the Digital World: the Cultural Value of Digital Engagement with Heritage' on the ways in which the co-production of digital heritage assets can, when time and resources permit, genuinely connect grassroots communities with heritage institutions, effecting a fundamental shift in the relationship between the two. Over the course of the project, the group will work together to make a range of digital resources, the precise nature of which will be decided via a process of knowledge exchange and co-produduction. It is envisaged that the project will produce short films, video and photographic essays, curate small digital exhibitions, research family histories or produce creative writing, all of which will be presented in such a way as to raise questions, draw comparisons with, and prompt discussion about the rise of contemporary xenophobic violence in South Africa. These resources will then be used as part of an educational programme to be rolled out across, and embedded within, the wider educational activities of all the CBOs.

In so doing, the project will give BST the opportunity to further strengthen the CBOs, as well as explore new means of building the confidence and resilience of the children and young people supported. It will provide a safe space for the exploration of the highly sensitive issues around xenophobia and empower young people to consider root causes, consequences and means of resolution within their own communities. This will have the impact of helping to challenge prejudice at community level, leading to greater prioritization of xenophobia by community leaders and help identify long term and sustainable community-led solutions. The project will also give JHGC the opportunity to undertake a sustained period of work with CBOs that have a far more diverse demographic than the visitors they have worked with hitherto. It will develop the digital skill-base of colleagues working at the centre, allowing them to undertake future digital co-production projects, exploring how digital tools can provide new and better ways to deliver its broader mission 'to use the history of the Holocaust and Rwandan genocide to intervene directly in contemporary debates on human rights abuses, xenophobia, racism and bigotry'. The material produced will be incorporated into the centre's online offering and will be freely available to all. A selection of the materials will also be exhibited as a digital installation at the centre itself.

Thus, the project responds to the 'Highlight Notice for International Development'. It will 'catalyse knowledge exchange, shared learning and capability development' between cultural organisations and diverse community groups and 'explore ways that arts and humanities research can inform approaches to inclusive participatory decision-making, community engagement, co-production, social innovation and user-led service design in an ODA recipient country', in order to make 'a significant contribution to the UN's 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development', specifically, Goal 16 to 'promote just, peaceful and inclusive societies', by 'challenging discrimination' and supporting 'participatory and representative decision-making at all levels.

Planned Impact

This project will be able to significantly enhance the impact of our original research project, finding new applications within the international development sector for the digital engagement that heritage professionals seek to achieve and which was investigated in detail in the original project's 'Critical Review'.

The project will allow The Bishop Simeon Trust (BST) to raise awareness of, and challenge, xenophobia in 20 Citizen Based Organisations (CBOs) it works with in townships across Gauteng, via an educational programme that will be sustainable in the longer term. For the last 25 years, the CBOs supported by BST have helped young people to address the key social challenges they face, including the exploitation of vulnerable children, HIV/Aids, drug and alcohol abuse, gender-based and ethnic violence. In the process, they support communities to develop strategies for child protection, behaviour change, and advocacy tools that can provide their communities with an effective political voice. Challenging xenophobic violence is currently a priority issue for the BST. The growing social deprivation of townships across Gauteng facing a weakening economy, worsened by the impact of HIV/AIDS, has, since 2013 but even more pronouncedly since 2015, seen a radical increase in racially-motivated attacks. The project will provide a safe space for the exploration of this highly sensitive issue. Furthermore, it will support BST's efforts to develop the leadership capacity of its CBOs, providing a skills development opportunity for its peer educators, helping their communities to confront this issue and develop their own solutions to it, and thus enhance the sustainability of BST's international development work, specifically addressing the 16th UN Sustainable Development Goal to 'promote just, peaceful and inclusive societies', by 'challenging discrimination' and supporting 'responsive, inclusive, participatory and representative decision-making at all levels'.

The project will allow the Johannesburg Holocaust and Genocide Centre to realise the practical potential of the original project's findings on the ways in which digital tools can support the co-production of museum exhibitions with diverse audiences. JHGC, which is a newly opened centre and part of South Africa's National Holocaust and Genocide Foundation - a partner on the original project -, is currently using the original project's research findings to develop its digital strategy, with the aim of maximizing the demographic diversity of its visitors, in particular seeking to engage communities that live in the townships outside of urban Johannesburg. It is also exploring how digital tools can provide new and better ways to deliver its broader mission 'to use the history of the Holocaust and Rwandan genocide to intervene directly in contemporary debates on human rights abuses, xenophobia, racism and bigotry'. In particular, the project will use the centre's exhibitions, participating survivor community and wider archive to develop bespoke, community-specific digital materials designed to challenge the recent growth in xenophobia. These materials will be incorporated into the JHGC's online offering and will also provide the centre with a digital installation to be exhibited at the centre itself. It is anticipated that the project as a whole, and the installation in particular, will significantly enhance their visitor experience, helping both to increase footfall and to diversify their visitor demographic.

Finally, via the project website and the various celebration events planned for the end of the project, to which the wider professional networks of both BST and JHGC will be invited, the materials produced by the project will be widely disseminated and used by other community groups, heritage and international development professionals wishing to undertake similar educational projects aimed at tackling xenophobia in, and beyond, South Africa.

Publications

10 25 50
 
Title 'Behind the Bully' - by the Ncedo-Thuso Youth Committee 
Description The youth committee candidates from Ncedo Thuso wanted to explore the universal issue of bullying. Bullying is undoubtedly an issue that links the experiences of youths all over the world. However these youths wanted to acknowledge the other side of the story. They understand that although bullying cannot be justified, there are always two sides to the story. Therefore they chose to explore the home factors that can cause a youth to become a bully. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact This film was shown at the Ncedo-Thuso advocacy event as well as the final celebration event. It was also shared on social media through the #ChangingTheStory Facebook page. 
URL https://vimeo.com/217641417
 
Title 'Discrimination: Nqobile's Story' - by the Repheleng Youth Committee 
Description This is one of the films that was created by participants after our discussions about discrimination and xenophobia in South Africa with them. This story is a representation of the real life experiences of one of the group members, which is why they chose to create a film about it. One of the key themes that came up in our discussions, was that of discrimination. However, it soon became obvious that discrimination is not singular, it does not only apply to one specific group of people. Our youths spoke about how they have witnessed the effects of racism, homophobia, gender inequality, xenophobia, (the list goes on...), in their community. Therefore this group felt that they wanted to create a film that would capture how easily discrimination can be felt, through creating a story about a girl with a skin infection. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact This film was shown at the Repheleng Advocacy event to an audience that was made up of community members as well as members of other Safe Parks. The main feedback that was received about the film was that the local community appreciated the youths ability to express their own opinion on certain issues. The film was also shared online through the #ChangingTheStory Facebook page. 
URL https://vimeo.com/213831849
 
Title 'Dissecting Discrimination in South Africa' 
Description This film was created by Project Officer, Daniela Wegrostek, in order to summarise the South African project. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact This film was screened at the 'Voicing Hidden Histories' Event hosted by the University of Leeds. 
URL https://vimeo.com/247496011
 
Title 'Introducing Leth'iThemba' - by the Leth'iThemba Youth Committee 
Description This film was created in order to aid the Leth'iThemba Youth Committee in generating community support for their Safe Park. It shows the work that the Safe Park does as well as it's importance to the undocumented children that are supported by it. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact This film was shown at the Leth'iThemba advocacy event as well as at the final celebration event. Many of the teachers as well as other community members that watched it noted that they found it informative as they had previously been unsure about the Safe Park's work and its importance. 
URL https://vimeo.com/233276874
 
Title 'Jerry Maseko' - by the Leth'iThemba Youth Committee 
Description The youths from the Leth'ithemba safe park wanted to show how teenagers are often subjected to intense pressure from their parents. This is particularly the case in their community where their generation have higher chances of getting into university than their elders had. This film has a strong message for parents who can all too easily isolate their children through their high expectations and pressure to succeed. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact This film was shown at the Leth'iThemba advocacy event as well as the final celebration events. It was also shared on social media through the #ChangingTheStory Facebook Page. This film seemed to widely appeal to many youths in the audience that were in the same age group as they agreed that most of them felt the effects of 'parent-pressure' in some way. 
URL https://vimeo.com/224487702
 
Title 'The Born-Free Generation, Phendulani's Story and Me' 
Description Short participatory documentary about the life of a teenage boy living in a township in South Africa. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2018 
Impact The film has been screened in a number of locations, including: The University of Lincoln The University of Bournemouth The University of Leeds SM Online Film Festival, Docs without Borders Film Festival UK Monthly Film Festival, Nominated for the AHRC Research in Film Award Nominated for AHRC Best Social Media Film Award Winner of Best Global Impact Short at Move Me Productions, Belgium Gold Award Winner for Best Documentary Short, Mindfield Film Festival Albuquerque 
URL https://vimeo.com/257217658
 
Title 'The Journey of My Life' by the Lethi'iThemba Youth Committee 
Description This story touches on the issues of "Blessers", who are typically older men who sponsor young women with money and gifts mostly in exchange for sex. Young women are often drawn in by such characters, as they can offer a change in lifestyle and an escape from their current situations. However these relationships come with risk, as young women may mistake this exchange for true romantic feelings and end up getting hurt. "the Journey of My Life shows one such example and serves as a warning to young women to not be lured in by the charms of blessers. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact This film was shown at the Leth'iThemba advocacy event, as well as at the celebration events. It was also shared on social media through the #ChangingTheStory Facebook page. This is another film that was hugely on trend within the South African national narrative as the issue of "blessers"is becoming hugely problematic in society as it leaves many teenage girls as single mothers, infected with HIV and with very little job prospects. Therefore reactions to this seem to indicate a wide approval of the youth committee's desire to engage with this issue. 
URL https://vimeo.com/228191626
 
Title 'Welcome to Bonisiwe' - by the Bonisiwe Field Project Youth Committee 
Description Bonisiwe was by far the least developed Safe Park we were working with. The Safe Park itself is situated on land that once belonged to a church, whose Pastor had allowed the Safe Park to run on the land before she passed away. She had also started the construction of a new Church building on the land, which she had promised could be used by Safe Park when it was completed. However, since her passing the construction has stopped, leaving a half completed building with no roof and the Safe Park operating out of a shack and a repurposed shipping container. Therefore the youth committee decided to host an event that would introduce their Safe Park to their community as well as their local Ward Councillor in order to gain donations and support for the building to be completed. In the lead up to the event, they created a short film that would provide this introduction which was screened alongside performances of traditional dance and singing. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact This film was screened at the Bonisiwe advocacy event as well as at the final celebration events. The most notable impact of the advocacy campaign that this film was created for, is that it led to the Safe Park being granted it's own plot of land, so that they will no longer be situated on land that is borrowed from the Church and the children will no longer be endangered by the half completed construction and health and safety issues that come from learning inside a shack. 
URL https://vimeo.com/234283149
 
Title 'When You Strike a Woman, You Strike a Rock' - by the Bonisiwe Field Project Youth Committee 
Description A Short film created by the Youth Committee of the Bonisiwe Field Project in Magagula Heights. These youths felt that sexual abuse is a pressing issue in their community, therefore they wanted to draw attention to it whilst also wanting to give victims the confidence to speak out about what has happened to them. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact This film was shown at the Safe Park's advocacy event as well as at the final Celebration events. It was also shared on social media through the #ChangingTheStory Facebook page. Feedback to this film indicates that this issue is hugely prevalent in their community (as well as throughout South Africa) and that the youths were on trend in trying to engage it as during our project there were frequently discussions about Intimate Partner Violence in the national media. 
URL https://vimeo.com/214641326
 
Title 'Xenophobia: Shimoni's Story' - by the Bonisiwe Field Project Youth Committee 
Description Xenophobia is a highly contentious and prevalent issue in South Africa. The second group of youths from the Bonisiwe Field Project felt that xenophobia can particularly be seen in their community, so they wanted to create a story that drew attention to both sides of this story. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact This film was shown at the Bonisiwe Adovcacy event as well as the final celebration events. It was also displayed on social media through the #ChangingTheStory Facebook Page. This film has revealed that the youths that we have been working with have a relatively superficial knowledge of xenophobia in South Africa, however it does also reveal one of the main underlying economic tensions between South Africans and other African nationals in South Africa - that of job competition. 
URL https://vimeo.com/214825570
 
Title Building Inclusive Civil Societies: Changing the Story, Lethi'themba Rocks 
Description Film made with young people from Lethi'themba Safe Park. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2018 
Impact Screened in the Lethi'themba Safe Park to 40 young people on 24/05/2019 and to local councillors, and viewed 25 times to date online. 
URL https://vimeo.com/271570072
 
Description This project has explored the way that participatory video can be used as a youth leadership development too.
Exploitation Route Our project has developed a youth leadership model that can potentially be used across, and as we are currently exploring beyond, South Africa.
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections

URL http://yarncommunity.com/users/ChangingTheStory
 
Description The project has helped to raise awareness of the issue of xenophobia in our participating communities. However, the main focus of the project became the development of a youth leadership programme, which we hope to further enhance in a future project. This has led to discussions with the National Association of Childcare Workers, who accredit the Isibindi Safe Park Scheme, on which we have been working. NACCW are interested in further developing this leadership programme and rolling it out across safe parks nationally. We are currently in discussions about the best way to support this work.
First Year Of Impact 2017
Sector Communities and Social Services/Policy,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections
Impact Types Cultural,Societal

 
Description Land provided to Bonisiwe Safe Park
Geographic Reach Africa 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact Bonisiwe Safe Park is a partner organisation of Bishop Simeon Trust (and a fieldwork site for this project) based in the township Magagula Heights in Johannesburg, South Africa. It was by far the least developed Safe Park that we have been working with, in terms of facilities as well as general resource. The Safe Park supports around 100 children of all ages by offering them a nutritious meal and a space to do their homework after school. The Safe Park currently runs out of a makeshift shack and container that are situated on the outskirts of its community, on land that has been borrowed from the Church. Over 10 years ago, the Church began the construction of a small building on the plot of land that was to be for their use. The previous Pastor of the Church had promised Patricia, the founder and manager of Bonisiwe, that she would be able to have access to this building for the Safe Park. However the Pastor passed away shortly after the construction began, and after her passing the building was never completed. As the years have passed, the Church has become more eager to reclaim their land and the future of the Safe Park has become uncertain. As you will see, this was the main concern of the youths that we worked with. They felt that it was their right to have access to a safe space that they could attend for their daily meal and extra curricular support, without the fear that this space could be taken away from them at any moment. The films that they created in the first half of the project also touched on other issues that can be found in their communities that they decided they would like to speak out about. The young people we worked with there decided to make their films about this call for land and a space through which to develop the safe park and keep it open. They showcased their films at a public event they organised, where they invited members of the Church and local council. The result was that Bonisiwe Safe Park were allocated a plot of land to build a new youth centre on by the Ekurhuleni local council. The impact of this is various - economical improved services for the young people that access the safe park, further security of the safe park structure (and validation of its practices and value in the community) and significant impact for the young people who campaigned for the change in terms of their self-confidence and ability to effect change. (scroll down to section 3/4 of the Yarn link below for more details).
URL http://yarncommunity.com/stories/538
 
Description National Association of Child Care Workers
Geographic Reach Africa 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
Impact Through the advocacy campaings organised by the young people in the safe parks across Johannesburg, where they shared the films they had made and spoke of the main issues they wished to raise awareness and call for change, the Bishop Simeon Trust and University of Leeds are now working with the National Association of Child Care Workers (NACCW) in South Africa, who are key lobbyists to the government for the provision of programmes like the Safe Parks programme and developed the Safe Park model currently being replicated across South Africa by over 20 organisations.. As the Safe Parks programme is re-evaluated every 4 years, the NACCW wish to use the films made by the youths to support their campaign to keep the safe parks going and expand them. A new HEFCE follow-on fund, with Prof. Paul Cooke and Dr. Lou Harvey, will be used to support the development of this partnership and shape the future of the Isibindi Safe Park Model nationally and internationally.
URL http://www.naccw.org.za/isibindi/safe-parks
 
Description 'Cross-Language Dynamics: Reshaping Community' AHRC-Funded OWRI Programme
Amount £60,000 (GBP)
Funding ID AH/N004647/1 
Organisation Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 03/2018 
End 03/2019
 
Description AHRC-MRC Global Public Health: Partnership Awards
Amount £183,621 (GBP)
Funding ID AH/R005869/1 
Organisation Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 08/2017 
End 03/2019
 
Description GCRF Area-Focused Network Plus
Amount £1,999,998 (GBP)
Funding ID AH/R005354/1 
Organisation Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2017 
End 09/2021
 
Description HEFCE Allocation for Global Challenge Research, University of Leeds
Amount £61,145 (GBP)
Organisation Higher Education Funding Council for England 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2018 
End 07/2018
 
Description HEFCE Allocation for Global Challenge Research, University of Leeds
Amount £99,209 (GBP)
Organisation Higher Education Funding Council for England 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2018 
End 07/2018
 
Description Translating Cultures/Care for the Future Innovation Awards on International Development
Amount £100,000 (GBP)
Funding ID AH/P007511/1 
Organisation Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 11/2016 
End 03/2017
 
Description Bishop Simeon Trust 
Organisation Bishop Simeon Trust
PI Contribution The UoL team provided funding (through VHH) to allow for the trial and implementation of the film project, film expertise via Prof. Paul Cooke, logistical and facilitation support via the in-country Research Officer Daniela Wegrostek, marketing support via our social media channels and university blogs, and research support via publications and research into participatory video approaches.
Collaborator Contribution Bishop Simeon Trust enabled a vital connection with Themba Interactive, our on-the-ground delivery partners for the South Africa strand of the project. THey provided free venue hire and a work station for our research officer, and gave 200 hours of staff-time in kind. They provided invaluable expertise regarding the context on the ground, as well as experienced facilitators through which we co-delivered the project.
Impact Formal Memorandum of Understanding signed by Bishop Simeon Trust with UoL at the Voicing Hidden Histories celebration event in November 2017. All South Africa outcomes related to this project would not have been possible without this partnership. Further partnership work as BST now also a partner in our newly awarded major GCRF fund 'Changing the Story'. BST are now increasingly using the films we have used (and commissioning Prof. Paul Cooke to create new ones) as part of their marketing and awareness campaigns, helping BST to generate more funds for their work. The film's have also raised awareness of the 'safe parks' that BST/Themba support in South Africa by regional lobbyists who are now keen to work with the films created and the young people that made them to lobby for the continuation of the safe parks in the next round of public funding.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Hyde Park Picture House 
Organisation Hyde Park Picture House, Leeds
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution We funded and co-organised with a Hyde Park producer the 'Film and Activism' event as part of LIFF, and brought international speakers for the event.
Collaborator Contribution Hyde Park provided free venue space for our 'Film and Activism' event, as well as an in-kind contribution to a curator to co-produce the event, and additional marketing support.
Impact Increased engagement of local public in university events, and a more interdisciplinary programme of speakers, including academics and filmmakers from the UK and abroad. Academic event taking place in an inner city area outside of the campus or city centre. The partnership also allowed for Hyde Park to conduct their own research into public perceptions of their building, for which they are currently applying for a Heritage Lottery Fund grant for regeneration.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Oxygen Films 
Organisation Oxygen Films Ltd
PI Contribution We provided an opportunity for Oxygen FIlms - a young filmmaking organisation based in Leeds that focuses on Youth and LGBTQI+ rights in particular - an opportunity to partner with University of Leeds on a protest film workshop, and work with international activist filmmakers Dakxin Bajrange and Daniela Westogrek. We raised awareness of Oxygen Films work through in-university marketing of the event and project managed the delivery of the resulting partnership event, also in partnership with Leeds International Film Festival.
Collaborator Contribution Oxygen Films - in collaboration with LIFF - led on marketing and recruitment of young filmmakers across Leeds to take part in the project. They also advised us on approach and structure of the workshop from a youth-focused capacity.
Impact Successful protest filmmaking workshop working with international filmmakers and young people from across Leeds (see weblink above). This event informed our own experiences and reflection of participatory filmmaking processes with young people in different contexts.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Radical Film Festival 
Organisation Bristol Radical Film Festival
PI Contribution Provide financial and infrastructure support to run the Activist Film conference as part of Leeds International Film Festival 15 Nov. Raise awareness of Radical Film Network with University of Leeds and LIFF audiences through co-badged marketing. Co-curate the programme for the conference with Laura Ager from Radical Film Network, resulting in a combined programme built from UoL and RFN networks.
Collaborator Contribution Radical Film Network speakers spoke at the event and Laura Ager from RFN worked on behalf of LIFF to co-curate the programme with University of Leeds.
Impact Event as detailed above. We are now looking at potential future events and other opportunities between Centre for World Cinemas and Digital Cultures and the Radical Film Network (the RFN also has a strong academic focus with film scholars from across the UK participating in its activities).
Start Year 2017
 
Description Themba Interactive 
Organisation Themba Interactive
PI Contribution Themba Interactive are an organisation subcontracted by Bishop Simeon Trust to deliver on-the-ground workshops in South Africa. The UoL team provided funding (through VHH) to allow for the trial and implementation of the film project, film expertise via Prof. Paul Cooke, logistical and facilitation support via the in-country Research Officer Daniela Wegrostek, marketing support via our social media channels and university blogs, and research support via publications and research into participatory video approaches.
Collaborator Contribution Themba supported the development of our Research Officer on the ground, provided invaluable facilitation advice and support, as well as building crucial in-roads and supporting trust-building with the communities we were working with.
Impact All South Africa outcomes related to this project would not have been possible without this partnership. The partnership has also significantly impacted the development of Themba/BST's wider youth leadership programme, prompting a re-evaluation and implementation of the programme for future years. The film's have also raised awareness of the 'safe parks' that BST/Themba support in South Africa by regional lobbyists who are now keen to work with the films created and the young people that made them to lobby for the continuation of the safe parks in the next round of public funding.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Advocacy Workshops and Events with youths from Bonisiwe and Repheleng 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact The aims of these workshops were to define the purpose of a youth committee as well as to establish the issues to be addressed by the youth committee as well as to formalize the structure of the youth committee. The main issues that were highlighted from the Bonisiwe youths were the, unfinished church building on the Safe Park land as a safety hazard; The shack that the Safe Park uses is an insufficient meeting space; the need to generate clothing donations for the children of the Safe Park. These points all came together to form the beginnings of their campaign and it seemed here that as Bonisiwe was not a safe space for the children to be in, their advocacy would be around:  - Establishing themselves as youth leaders within the safe park. This was highlighted by the fact that some children were getting hurt by the unfinished church building. When asked where the CCAs were to look after the children, they reported that due to a shortage of staff, the CCAs were only around to cook for the children. When asked why the CCAs did not allow them to look after the children, they reported that they were also still viewed as children and as such the CCAs did not trust them to look after the younger children. In this way it felt important to establish this so that they could help the younger children with homework as well as run sports clubs and arts groups within the safe park to ensure that the children of the safe park were looked after by them.  - Establishing the safe park within their community. The youths reported that they did not know how well the community knew about the operation of this safe park. They said that perhaps the more affluent members of the Magagula Heights community may be able to help with clothing and food donations to the safe park if they knew that it was there. They mentioned that they were not sure whether the ward counselor knew about the existence of the safe park. They reported that establishing the presence of the safe park may also help in getting donations for the church to be completed so that they are able to feel safe within the safe park.  The youths from Repheleng highlighted an important fact that we may have missed out at the beginning of the workshops. When recruited, Dudu (leader) told us that she had a big enough pool of young people to serve as the safe park Youth Committee. However at this session the youths highlighted that after the Themba sessions not all the members came to their meetings. Digging deeper into the issue we found that because Repheleng was part of a faith based organization (St Andrews Anglican Church), members of the church did not regard Repheleng as separate from the church rather as part of the church feeding scheme. As such the youths confessed that they only found out through Themba Interactive that the safe park was a separate entity and that this entity was called Repheleng. This echoed some of the problems that we (Themba Interactive) had faced with some of the other safe parks beforehand where the safe park operated within the church and thus held the same values as the church making our sexual reproductive health interventions difficult. It now made sense that these youths seemed to be more affluent than the Bonisiwe because it was not necessarily them that came from needy homes and they were not necessarily the vulnerable children we aim to benefit. This then highlighted the fact that the safe park was established as a church feeding scheme and there was a stigma attached to being part of the feeding scheme. Through this session, we then understood more why these particular youths seemed to struggle when faced with the questions of issues within the safe park and instead of specific issues gave broad and abstract issues such as gender based violence, substance abuse and the like. It then seemed to us that the main issues to be addressed by the youth committee were: - Establishing the safe park as part of but separate from the church, which meant that church members would be able to donate to the safe park for any of the needy children. - Recruitment of adolescents who were in vulnerable situations that could benefit from the safe park and the youth committee program, moving Repheleng from a faith based organization to a psycho-social support space for these vulnerable youths. During these workshops, the groups would also organise events within Safe Parks that would introduce them to the advocacy process. The event that the Bonisiwe group planned focussed on the issues mentioned above and it should be noted that due to the Youth Committee's involvement with their local ward councillor for their event, they were granted a new piece of land to establish their Safe Park on, so that they will no longer be situated on land borrowed from the Church, and will no longer be endangered by a sea-completed construction. The Repheleng event was set up to be our final project celebration event hosted on Heritage day (24/09/2017) that showcased all work by all the safe parks to each other, other safe parks and community members alike. This event would also serve the purpose of demonstrating the separation of the Repheleng Safe Park from the Church that it is situated within, and also to recruit volunteers to help with the Safe Park as well as more vulnerable youths that are in the community.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://yarncommunity.com/stories/538
 
Description Advocacy Workshops and Events with youths from Leth'iThemba and Ncedo-Thuso 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact The aim of these workshops was to define the purpose of a youth committee as well as to establish the issues to be addressed by the youth committee as well as to formalize the structure of the youth committee.
- Ncedo Thuso
The youths highlighted that the issues they faced were:
- Teenage pregnancy
- Woman Abuse
- Bullying
They seemed interested in the topic of teenage pregnancy and thus on this first session were able to think around the event as being one to create awareness around this issue. They had projected their event to fall on 26 August. And at this session came up with an event plan.
- Leth' iThemba
The youths were interested in the topics of
- Bullying
- Woman abuse
- Women's empowerment However during conversations with the Safe Park Leader, the project officers found out that a significant amount of the children that Leth'iThemba work with are undocumented for a variety of reasons. Therefore after discussions with the Youth Committee, they decided that their event should in some way address this. However, they noted that this issue is a national problem that they had very little confidence they could have an effect on, particularly within the time constraints of our project and also due to the fact that they were relatively new to the concept of advocacy, let alone the process. Therefore they decided that they would host an event that would introduce the Safe Park to its local community, its schools, organisations and ward councillor. In doing so, they felt that perhaps they could garner more aid from their local community in their support of undocumented children through food and clothing donations. The Ncedo-Thuso group noted that from their point of view the biggest challenge that they as youths are facing is the issue of teenage pregnancy and its dangers. Therefore they decided to organise an event that would appeal to other youths in their age group that also attend their Safe Park and their schools to speak to them about teenage pregnancy. This event would then be followed up with workshops that would be run by the Youth Committee for their peers that would encourage safe sex and further educate about the dangers of teenage pregnancy.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://yarncommunity.com/stories/538
 
Description Anthropology students workshop 27 Oct 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact Prof Paul Cooke taught a Level 3 Anthropology class - designed to draw on the learning from the Voicing Hidden Histories project, in particular the work in South Africa. The class had around 30 students and consisted of a half day workshop.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Arts & Development Seminar at LIFF 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A day-long seminar hosted by the Centre for World Cinemas and Digital Cultures at the University of Leeds and in partnership with Leeds International Film Festival (LIFF), reflecting on learning, opportunities and challenges regarding the relationship between participatory arts and international development. The seminar featured an international, interdisciplinary mix of panels with distinguished academics, policy makers, artists and practitioners from across the world. Funded by the AHRC Global Challenges Research Fund. Project partners from both 'Voicing Hidden Histories', 'Challenging Xenophobia' and 'Changing the Story' presented papers and engaged in discussion and networking, along with other practitioners, academics, activists, postgraduate students and general public members in attendance. A full programme can be found in the link below.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.leedsfilmcity.com/whats-on/voicing-hidden-histories-day-1-academic-seminar/
 
Description Creative alternatives workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact The Creative Alternatives Workshop was a 'critical friends' day of workshops organised by Action Aid, Christian Aid and University of York to which our PI and Project Manager were invited to attend. The aims were: To critically learn and reflect on the value and impact of using arts methodologies as a way of exploring credible alternative futures that build from the local level and confront, challenge, contradict and extend dominant global narratives; To explore challenges such as: whether arts enable participants to better imagine alternatives' how to best share, translate, explore and deepen analysis of development alternatives across different geographies (local, national or transnational)' to meet other individuals and organisations who are interested in using or use art in development practice as a way of imagining alternatives. It took place on 16 January 2018 in London and was attended by some 50 people. There were many vibrant discussions and key issues raised and it was a great opportunity for academics and practitioners to work together. The key organisers of the event are interested in engaging more directly with our growing network of related projects. Kate Caroll (the chief organiser from Action Aid) is also now sitting on our Steering Group. There is no URL linked to this as it was a closed event.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Film Workshop with Youths from the Bonisiwe and Repheleng Safe Parks (1) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact We ran a workshop with 23 potential youth committee members. There were 12 from Bonisiwe and 11 from Repheleng, aged 12 - 17. We used this session to introduce the concept of the project and to generate discussion amongst the youths about the issues that are prevalent in their communities. We then used the Grassroots Comics to tap into these issues and introduce the basis of story creation. From the comics that were produced, it seems that the areas of interest to the youths were primarily sexual assault/abuse, drug and alcohol abuse and teenage pregnancy. We then started a discussion with the youths on human rights, what they are, who they are for, and if anyone's are being abused in South Africa. The youths noted that for them, the most marginalised people are those with mental illness and poorer members of society. Upon further probing, one person mentioned foreigners and the issue of xenophobia, but it was difficult to gauge the group's perspective on this as the dominant rhetoric seems to be that foreign Africans take South African jobs. All in all, the workshop was very telling of the state of the youths we are working with. We cannot just make them tell stories on Xenophobia as it is apparent that there are more immediate issues they are confronted with. We are looking at these workshops now as a warm up where they can acclimatise themselves with the methods we use and hopefully see potential in these methods for advocacy or working through their own issues.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://yarncommunity.com/stories/448
 
Description Film Workshop with Youths from the Bonisiwe and Repheleng Safe Parks (2) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact During this workshop, we built on the activities of the previous week, but used the Xenophobia march against foreigners in Pretoria on the 24/2/2017 as a stimulus for discussion. This sparked an intense debate amongst the youths on who is considered to be a foreigner (they mainly placed other African nationals and not White people within this category.) Some discussion also happened on why xenophobia happens, but it is still hard to gauge the position of the youths on this topic. They understand that it is classified as a human rights abuse, yet there also seems to be a strong feeling from both communities that foreigners are taking jobs that should instead be given to local people. When discussing types of discrimination, there was also an intense debate over gender inequality. This topic naturally incensed both sides of the spectrum in our youth committees as many of the boys had a definite opinion on the types of jobs that women could and couldn't do. This may be a point of interest in the final formation of the Youth Committees and the election of their Youth Leaders, as the suggestion may need to be made that they have a male and a female elected into these positions.

After this discussion, the youth committees decided on the topics for their films and we now have three groups who are making films about; alcohol/sexual abuse, discrimination against sick people and xenophobia. The groups first created role plays that would formulate their stories and then began filming. Our next session will wrap up the filming process and then start editing the films.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://yarncommunity.com/stories/571
 
Description Film Workshop with Youths from the Bonisiwe and Repheleng Safe Parks (3) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact This was our final workshop with the Bonisiwe and Repheleng candidates. The day mostly involved finishing up the films and comics that were created previously. Project Officer Daniela completed the editing of the films, as time/ resources really did not allow for this to be done by the youths at the safe park.
The groups were also interviewed about their film topics (abuse, discrimination and xenophobia), and showed a great deal of reflection about how these issues are prevalent in their communities. Most notably, the group who chose discrimination as their topic, created a film about a girl who was discriminated against for having chicken pox. Understandably seriousness of this choice was questioned. However when questioned about it, they felt that discrimination happens on so many different levels and to so many different types of people in their community, that they wanted to create a story that didn't just focus on a specific type of discrimination. Instead they felt that by creating a story about a skin affliction, which most people have suffered with, they could make the message of the story appeal to a wider audience.

We have arranged that we will visit both safe parks individually next week in order to aid the youth committee election process, as well as give the youths their films. We will also ask them for feedback on their films and the workshops.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://yarncommunity.com/stories/592
 
Description Film Workshop with Youths from the Ncedo-Thuso and Leth'iThemba Safe Parks (1) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact This was our first session with the Youth Committee Candidates from Lethi Themba and Ncedo Thuso Safe Parks. There was a good turnout of 25+ youths, pretty evenly split between both Safe Parks.

The session involved a discussion around the UN Convention of Children's Rights, through which the youth's identified sanitary conditions, child abuse, homophobia, and sexism as issues that are prevalent in their communities. Xenophobia only presented itself as an issue after suggestion from Project Officer Sinethemba, but it still sparked a heated discussion, during which many of the youths expressed the feeling that they have less rights than that of foreigners particularly when it comes to establishing businesses.

From this discussion, the youths split into groups to construct a still image that related to a certain right, whilst the others had to guess what this right was. This gave us an opportunity to explore the issues deeper, through gaining an insight into the attitudes of various characters that were involved. These still images, again primarily focused on the right to a healthy and sanitary environment as well as aspects of abuse.

From here, the youths were split into groups of two, and they created comics that drew on various issues. There were a wide range of issues that came up in these, with one focusing on xenophobia, which was entitled 'Ethiopians Have Feelings Too', but others focusing on issues of teenage pregnancy, drugs, abuse etc.

The session was wrapped up by displaying all the comics on the wall so that everyone could see what others had done and give feedback on the story content. As with the previous workshops with the groups from Bonisiwe and Repheleng, it is apparent that although the youths acknowledge the presence and seriousness of xenophobia, there are other more pressing social issues that affect them directly that they would prefer to address.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://yarncommunity.com/stories/512
 
Description Film Workshop with Youths from the Ncedo-Thuso and Leth'iThemba Safe Parks (2) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Following on from the previous workshop where we finished the comics, the youth members were tasked with creating role plays that dug deeper into the issues presented in the comics. We spent some time going through basic acting skills and they were given the time to create their role plays. They presented their role plays and we opened a space for them to give each other feedback based on this. It was interesting how this space also became a space where we discussed group dynamics and working together as a team. The themes were pressure to pass matric (grade 12) from parents, sugar daddies and HIV, peer pressure and bullying (with themes of alcohol abuse). This session was unusually heavy as there were a lot of emotions from engaging with the themes through drama. We had a moment where we discussed the sad and almost tragic nature of all their endings and the group confessed that their lives are generally sad and tragic. We then spoke about their role as youth leaders within the safe park to instill hope in their participants. We then moved on to making the plays films where they sat down again in their groups and did scene breakdowns. Only one group began with the filming. It is important to complete the filming next week.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://yarncommunity.com/stories/593
 
Description Film Workshop with Youths from the Ncedo-Thuso and Leth'iThemba Safe Parks (3) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact This session was dedicated to the filming process, so there is little to report. The groups developed the themes they touched on in their role plays into films and we managed to complete the filming process. The Youth Committee Leaders from both safe parks were also elected by their peers ahead of the JHGC workshop.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://yarncommunity.com/stories/594
 
Description GCRF Global Engagement Meeting Pretoria 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Prof. Paul Cooke presented a paper on our participatory video work in South Africa, India and Brazil to an audience of over 100 people from across Africa and the UK drawn from ifferent countries, different disciplines, and from a mix of academic and non-academic organisations (e.g. non-governmental organisations; charities; policy makers; international funders). . This was part of a GCRF Global Engagement Meeting in Pretoria, South Africa, taking place 5-6 December 2017.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.rcuk.ac.uk/funding/gcrf/gcrf-global-engagement-events/
 
Description Participatory Filmmaking in Participatory Development at Royal Holloway 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact In this research seminar at Royal Holloway University of London, Professor Paul Cooke reflected upon the findings of the recent AHRC project 'Troubling the National Brand and Voicing Hidden Histories'. 20 people were in attendance and there was very interesting and engaged discussion after the paper.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/aboutus/newsandevents/events/eventsarticles/participatory-filmmaking...
 
Description Paul Cooke - Participatory filmmaking in the East Rand 21 Nov 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact LUCAS Seminar - all welcome

Professor Paul Cooke (Leeds) invited to present a talk on 'Changing the Story or Confirming the Story? Participatory filmmaking, development and youth leadership in the East Rand, South Africa' as part of the LUCAS (Centre for African Studies) open seminar series.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://lucas.leeds.ac.uk/events/paul-cooke-participatory-filmmaking-in-the-east-rand/
 
Description Presentation, screening and discussion at Midwestern University, Kathmandu, Nepal 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Whilst in Nepal working on the 'Sourcing Community Solutions to Antibiotic Resistance in Nepal", Prof. Paul Cooke was invited to speak about his recent work in participatory filmmaking and international development at MidWestern University in Nepal on 16 February 2018. There were 40 Masters students present. He screened the project film "Voicing Hidden Histories: Participatory Filmmaking, Advocacy and International Development" and provided an overview of this project, his recent work challenging Xenophobia in South Africa. He also introduced the Changing the Story project, highlighting future opportunities to get involved, as well as highlighting the wider potential for creative activities and youth-focused civil society in participatory development. Prof. Cooke and Project Officer Inés Soria-Donlan then took questions and engaged in a very engaged discussion with the group. The meeting has led to a potential further partnership with the organiser of the event, Bishnu Khatri (one of the MA course leaders and also directly involved in the Nepal International Human Rights Film Festival) which we hope will support project film outputs of all project associated.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://twitter.com/Changing_Story_/status/964917221796581377
 
Description Screening of Voicing Hidden Histories film at the Participatory Video Festival plus discussion 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Prof. Paul Cooke's film 'Voicing Hidden Histories: Participatory Filmmaking, Advocacy and International Development' - the culmination of the project, which includes footage from each project film - was selected to be screened at the Participatory Video Festival at Ghent University. An active discussion followed the screening.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.participatoryvideofestival.com/
 
Description Voicing Hidden Histories Celebration Event 14 Nov 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact An evening of film, talk, and performance in celebration of the power of film and creativity. The evening included the world premiere of a selection of films made by communities in Brazil, South Africa and India as part of the recent project "Voicing Hidden Histories: Troubling the National Brand" and "Using Digital Tools to Challenge Xenophobia". It also marked the launch of two new international network projects based at University of Leeds, 'Changing the Story: Building Inclusive Civil Societies With, and For, Young People" and "Sumak Kawsay and the Sustainable Development Agenda".

With introduction and Q&As by the in-country project teams, live performance, film screenings and music.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.leedsfilmcity.com/whats-on/voicing-hidden-histories-celebration-event/
 
Description Week-long workshop at the Johannesburg Holocaust and Genocide Centre 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact During this week we took all of the participants that we had been working with from the Bonisiwe, Repheleng, Ncedo-Thuso and Leth'iThemba Safe Parks to the Johannesburg Holocaust and Genocide Centre for a workshop that introduced them to the themes of Human Rights, the Holocaust, the Rwandan Genocide and xenophobia in South Africa. The following is a day by day breakdown of this workshop: Day One: During this session we covered the basics of the Holocaust, introducing the topic of gross human rights violations and how they can escalate into genocide. A wide array of films were shown that covered the various aspect of the Holocaust and then the Youths were given the opportunity to hear a survivor speak and then interview her. Feedback from this day indicates that the films were too graphic for the youths and caused unnecessary distress. Also it was not explained from the start that the youths could speak in their home language. Therefore the pressure to speak English meant that felt unable to fully reflect on what they were being shown.

Day Two: This Day looked at the Holocaust and the Rwandan Genocide, again ending in the youths listening to a Rwandan Genocide survivor speak and then interviewing him on his experience. Feedback from this day more or less was the same as the previous day, which built upon the negativity that was rooted in the previous days trauma. Although there was a slight increase in interest in Genocide in the African context, as the Rwandan case was new to many of the youths. This interest did not equate to a full understanding of the purpose of the project and many of the youths felt like we were just trying to shock their senses with graphic images of dead bodies with no real explanation into why we had bought them to the Centre to show them these things.

Day Three: The topic of Xenophobia was bought up and Bonaventure, the Rwandan genocide survivor also spoke about his experiences of xenophobia in South Africa. After this, the youths were given space to reflect on all they had learnt, with it being made clear that they could speak in the vernacular. This lead to a long and engaging debate on the topic of xenophobia, with all of the youths engaging and speaking about their own communities. A real break through for the week!

Days Four and Five: The youths started engaging more with the project as the purpose was now clear and they had gained confidence in expressing their opinions as they now knew they could speak their home language. They engaged with various activities, which revolved around moral choices and role models. On the final day they all produced incredible poems/role plays/ songs that reflected on the week, and their ability to perform them infront of their peers was an indication of how despite everything their confidence had managed to grow. This is truly a reflection of the resilience of the youths and has very little to do with the content and activities of the programme.

All in all the general feedback on the week is that although it ended in a positive way, with the confidence of the youths developed. This could also have been done without the unnecessary trauma caused at the start of the week. In this sense, the JHGC may not be the best place to host future iterations of this project as there seemed to be a disjoint between their programme and an awareness of the environment that the youths come from. They may benefit more from a shorter workshop at an institution that discusses human rights in the national context.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://yarncommunity.com/stories/463
 
Description Yarn Page - Human Rights Workshop at the Johannesburg Holocaust and Genocide Centre 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact We used the UoL tool yarncommunity.org to create a visual storytelling report of this section of the project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://yarncommunity.org/stories/463
 
Description Yarn Page - The Story Telling Process 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact We used the UoL tool yarncommunity.org to create a visual storytelling report of this section of the project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://yarncommunity.org/stories/512
 
Description Yarn page - Bonisiwe Field Project 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact We used the UoL tool yarncommunity.org to create a visual storytelling report of this section of the project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://yarncommunity.org/stories/571
 
Description Yarn page - Ncedo-Thuso Ea Bana 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact We used the UoL tool yarncommunity.org to create a visual storytelling report of this section of the project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://yarncommunity.org/stories/594
 
Description Yarn page - Project Evaluation 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact We used the UoL tool yarncommunity.org to create a visual storytelling report of this section of the project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://yarncommunity.org/stories/612
 
Description Yarn page - Repheleng Care Centre 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact We used the UoL tool yarncommunity.org to create a visual storytelling report of this section of the project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://yarncommunity.org/stories/592
 
Description Yarn page - Advocacy Campaigns 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact We used the UoL tool yarncommunity.org to create a visual storytelling report of this section of the project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://yarncommunity.org/stories/538
 
Description Yarn page - Empowering Youths in the East Rand, Johannesburg. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact We used the UoL tool yarncommunity.org to create a visual storytelling report of this section of the project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://yarncommunity.org/stories/448
 
Description Yarn page - Leth'iThemba EduCare 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact We used the UoL tool yarncommunity.org to create a visual storytelling report of this section of the project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://yarncommunity.org/stories/593
 
Description Yarn page - Project Reflections 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact We used the UoL tool yarncommunity.org to create a visual storytelling report of this section of the project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://yarncommunity.org/stories/609
 
Description YarnCommunity Project on Voicing Hidden Histories 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact We used the Yarn community site to create a visual story and provide an overview of the whole project activities that is publicly available online. This also includes materials from the previous 'Using Digital Tools to Challenge Xenophobia' project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://yarncommunity.com/projects/25