Practising Reparative Histories in Rural Heritage Sites

Lead Research Organisation: University of Nottingham
Department Name: Sch of Geography

Abstract

The UK countryside includes iconic sites of national heritage. Country houses represent long-standing elite rural lifestyles while water-powered textile mills refer to Britain's past as an industrial pioneer. However these sites suffer from a lack of diversity in the histories presented and the visitors they attract. Black and Asian groups are more typically resident in urban areas and report feelings of isolation and difference during visits to the countryside. Many feel their heritage is not sufficiently represented in rural sites, despite evidence existing of key connections. In country houses portraits of Black or Asian figures, 'exotic' products and plants suggest these connections, while textile mills display raw cotton supplies grown in warmer climates. Yet these histories are rarely explored or explained and are often seen as challenging to address due to associations with colonial and slave trade practices.

This project seeks to connect together heritage organisations, Black and Asian community groups and academics in a collaboration which aims to benefit all parties. Drawing on evidence of historical connections with people of African and Asian descent its goals are to produce more diverse representations of Black and Asian histories in rural heritage sites and to change their organisational cultures. Two key examples of rural textile and country estate heritage sites have been selected as venues for the collaboration. The first is Cromford Mills is a key location in the Derwent Valley Mills World Heritage Site in Derbyshire, designated due to its pioneering cotton textile industry. The second is Newstead Abbey is a well-known country estate particularly due to its associations with the poet Bryon. In both cases the collaborating groups have committed to a series of discussions, visits and co-production of new ways of presenting these sites and enhancing their meaning and appeal for ethnic minority groups and wider society.

Planned Impact

The project seeks to create benefits for a range of non-academic and academic groups who operate at scales from the local to the international. A core group is Black and Asian Minority Ethnic groups (from Britain or international visitors) whose ancestors have links to the British cotton industry and/or country estates and whose histories are typically neglected in such heritage sites. Visitors from these groups will benefit through seeing their histories more deeply considered and the enhanced sense of value and belonging that this engenders.This could encourage more BAME people (adult and children) to visit or work in heritage sites. The actively participating local BAME groups (SHSH and NSTL) will benefit from further engagement with academic, public and third sector bodies, further reflection on their connections with country estate and/or cotton heritage sites, the development of new skills in creative displays of these connections, enhanced senses of collective esteem, belonging and achievement, strengthening of community and cross-cultural interactions.
The managers of the heritage sites, their staff and volunteer guides are also key potential beneficiaries as they play a central role in presenting the sites to public visitors, including school groups. Very few of this group are currently from BAME backgrounds. They will benefit from increased interaction with BAME groups, their histories and perspectives with the aim of creating institutional change in terms of ethnic diversity. These interactions will increase the range of histories and perspectives presented and enhance the ability to communicate on challenging topics such as enslavement and colonialism.
Visitors (British and international) to the heritage sites will also benefit from exposure to enriched and more internationally connected histories. School children, students and their teachers will benefit from more diverse educational resources and learning experiences at the sites. This may also impact on teaching within schools, colleges and universities.
International experts in the heritage field, including the invited guests, as well as audiences of professional journals and World Heritage Site networks will benefit from the sharing of the project outputs in person, through webpages or through presentations. The international guests will also be able to share their own experiences and enrich further the perspectives of British BAME groups and heritage managers. The sharing of these experiences may also have impacts on heritage management and HEI teaching in international as well as national contexts. Teaching at the host HEI will be further enhanced by use of the project's heritage outcomes in student modules. These will also be shared via professional discipline networks in Geography and History at institutional, national and international levels though relevant presentations and publications.

Publications

10 25 50
 
Title Blood Sugar poem film 
Description This film has been produced by the Nottingham Slave Trade Legacies (NSTL) group in collaboration with Nottingham-based African Caribbean creative writer, Michelle Hubbard, Nottingham-based African Caribbean illustrator, Kim Thompson, and African Caribbean director, Dr Shawn Sobers (UWE). It reflects creatively on the connections of Newstead Abbey with the transatlantic slave trade - through owner, Thomas Wildman's ownership of sugar plantations and enslaved African people in Jamaica. The poem was written by Michelle Hubbard drawing on creative workshops held with the NSTL group and she reads the narrative. Kim Thompson has provided creative visuals, again drawing on ideas from creative workshops held with the NSTL. The NSTL group perform to the story board created by Shawn Sobers in the setting of Newstead Abbey, Nottinghamshire. The film has been co-funded by Nottingham City Museums and Galleries. It will be installed as part of the new interpretative displays in the Beckett room at Newstead Abbey by April 2018 and hosted on the websites of Newstead Abbey and the NSTL group. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2018 
Impact The film has been completed but not yet made public. The impacts to date relate to those involved in its making, the Nottingham Slave trade Legacies group members, the local and national artists commissioned, and the academic and heritage partners. 
 
Title Cotton and Slavery embroidery and applique art work 
Description This material artwork of embroidery and applique reflects creatively on the linkages between Cromford Mills and mills in the wider Derwent Valley in Derbyshire, the slave trade triangle and cotton plantations in the Americas. It has been created by a member of the Nottingham Slave Trade Legacies group, Evadney Jalloh, drawing on a creative workshop held with the group. It highlights the historical linkages between cotton grown on the Caribbean island of Carriacou and the Derwent Valley Mills World Heritage Site and reworks problematic plantation images from the slavery era. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2018 
Impact This artwork is being used as an illustration in the new interpretation panels at the Gateway Visitor Centre of the Derwent Valley Mills World Heritage Site at Cromford Mills, due to open in April 2018. 
 
Title Spinning a Yarn, Weaving a Story poetry collection 
Description A collection of cotton-related poetry created by members of South Asian groups in Sheffield through workshops facilitated by Sheffield-based Indian heritage writer, Dr Debjani Chatterjee. These poems reflect on the cultural, political, religious and economic importance of cotton in the Indian subcontinent. 
Type Of Art Creative Writing 
Year Produced 2018 
Impact The collection is in press. 
 
Description The main developments of this grant have been as follows. 1) The heritage outputs detailed elsewhere (cotton heritage interpretation panels and audios at DVMWHS Gateway Visitor Centre, Cromford Mills; the country house and slavery interpretation and Blood Sugar poem film at Newstead Abbey; the Sheffield cotton poetry collection; the Nottingham cotton art work). 2)The development (Newstead Abbey) and enhancement (Cromford Mills) of research and heritage interpretation collaborations between heritage professionals, BAME community groups and university researchers, as evidenced through the heritage materials produced to date for the sites. Of particular note here has been the use of terminology and visual imagery derived from BAME groups for use in heritage interpretation and the co-writing of text. 3) The identification of further avenues of research and heritage interpretation both within the DVMWHS and at Newstead Abbey. Some further funding has been secured to develop these with the DVMWHS (through the Arkwright Society small grant and the Vital Valley initiative) and sources are currently being explored in relation to Newstead Abbey.
Exploitation Route These findings have the potential be taken further by all the collaborating partners (heritage professionals, BAME community groups and academics) in their future work, for example through the development by heritage professionals of co-production protocols for future BAME heritage interpretation and through the commissioning of BAME creative artists. They also hold interest as examples of collaboration over so-called 'difficult histories' for other heritage, academic and community groups in the UK and internationally - an element being encouraged through the project's international workshop and presentations at other national events and in the development of publications. The findings are of interest to academic colleagues for teaching and research purposes.
Sectors Creative Economy,Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections,Other

 
Description The project has to date developed societal impact, with the potential for economic impact. This has been achieved in the following ways. Firstly through support of BAME community heritage groups in Nottingham and Sheffield to develop heritage materials relating to cotton histories (both groups) and country estate, slavery and sugar histories (Nottingham group) and to contribute to the development of heritage interpretation at the Derwent Valley Mills World Heritage Site Gateway Visitor Centre at Cromford Mills, Derbyshire (second phase - both groups) and at Newstead Abbey (Nottingham group). The key products here are: interpretation panels and audios developed for the DVMWHS Gateway Visitor Centre, Cromford Mills (both groups) (opening April 2018); an in-press cotton poetry collection (Sheffield South Asian groups); a cotton art work (Nottingham Slave Trade Legacies group); a film of the poem Blood Sugar (NSTL group); and contributions to the heritage interpretation in the Beckett room at Newstead Abbey, including the Blood Sugar film (opening late Mar 2018). The creative materials have been produced mainly in collaboration with local artists, writers and creative makers commissioned from the BAME communities, with input also from a national film expert from the African Caribbean community. Secondly, through the enhanced (DVMWHS) and new (Newstead Abbey) heritage interpretation materials (panels and audios - DVMWHS - and Blood Sugar film and narrative interpretation - Newstead Abbey) - both due to open in spring 2018. Thirdly through the on-going support of institutional cultural change as evidenced in collaborations with the heritage teams at The Arkwright Society and Newstead Abbey over the development of new on-site heritage materials.
First Year Of Impact 2018
Sector Creative Economy,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections,Other
Impact Types Cultural,Societal

 
Description Vital Valley (DVMWHS) Scheme Board member
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
 
Description Archival research on Derwent Valley Mills cotton
Amount £3,000 (GBP)
Organisation The Arkwright Society 
Start 09/2017 
End 07/2018
 
Description Nottingham City Museums and Galleries 
Organisation Nottingham City Council
Department Museums, Galleries and Attractions
PI Contribution Under this partnership the PRH project is supporting the work of NCMG at Newstead Abbey through the provision of new historical background materials and creative writing and film heritage interpretation materials on sugar, slavery and the Wildmans for use in the new interpretation rooms at Newstead and on the Newstead website; through facilitating interactions and cultural learning with other project partners, including African Caribbean community groups; and through facilitating the sharing of this project work more widely.
Collaborator Contribution Nottingham City Museums and Galleries representatives have joined the project Steering Group and have contributed to the co-design of PRH activities. They have hosted community group visits from the Nottingham Slave Trade Legacies group to Newstead Abbey and facilitated interactions with NCMG staff and volunteers. They have contributed exhibition space for the project activities at Newstead Abbey and on the Newstead website. They have provided expert input and additional funding in relation to the NSTL group film of the poem Blood Sugar.
Impact The main outputs to date are: Heritage interpretation materials on sugar, slavery and the Wildmans in the Beckett room at Newstead Abbey (due to open in April 2018); Creative heritage materials in the form of the film of the Blood Sugar poem in the Beckett room at Newstead Abbey (due to open in April 2018). The disciplines involved are: geography, history, heritage.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Sheffield South Asian groups 
Organisation Hindu Samaj Sheffield & District
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Practising Reparative Histories project staff have built on the previous GCC collaboration with the Sheffield Hindu Samaj through facilitating further engagement with cotton heritage venues and staff, including contributions to the design of heritage interpretation facilities in the Derwent Valley Mills World Heritage Site (DVMWHS) Gateway Visitor Centre at Cromford Mills (due to open in April 2018).They are supporting the group in the realisation of a key output: a new poetry collection (in production).
Collaborator Contribution Members of the Sheffield Hindu Samaj and other South Asian groups in Sheffield (Bal Gokulam, Aastha over 50s group, and the Bengali Women's Support Group) have been involved in a third strand of heritage focused work on cotton, under the Practising Reparative Histories (PRH) grant. They have called their part of the project, Spinning a Yarn, Weaving a Story, and have brought South Asian historical, artistic and creative perspectives to the impact and engagement work. Under this grant they have contributed to the design of interpretation panels and audio points in the Derwent Valley Mills World Heritage Site at Cromford Mills (due to open in April 2018), put together a poetry collection (in production) and run events involving story telling, creative textile work and children's puppet shows. A member of the Sheffield Hindu Samaj has facilitated the PRH grant work in Sheffield, sitting on the project steering group, organising involvement in visits and workshops and running poetry and story-telling events.
Impact The preparation of a volume of poetry entitled, 'Spinning a Yarn, Weaving a Story'. Input into the second phase of the DVMWHS Gateway Visitor Centre at Cromford Mills through audio recordings and interpretation panels (due to open in April 2018). Disciplines involved are: geography, history, creative writing, heritage.
Start Year 2017
 
Description The Arkwright Society 
Organisation Cromford Mill
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution This official partnership builds on previous collaboration through the GCC project. Under the Practising Reparative Histories project, a representative of the Arkwright Society is a member of the project Steering Group. The PRH project is supporting the work of The Arkwright Society and the Derwent Valley Mills World Heritage Site (DVMWHS) more broadly through the provision of new interpretative materials on the global cotton story for use in the DVMWHS Gateway Visitor Centre located at Cromford Mills, Derbyshire and on the Arkwright Society website, through facilitating interactions and cultural learning with other project partners, including African Caribbean and South Asian community groups, and through facilitating the sharing of this project work more widely.
Collaborator Contribution A member of the Arkwright Society heritage staff is a Co-Investigator on the Practising Reparative Histories project and sits on the Project Steering group. The Arkwright Society has contributed to the co-design of the cotton-related project activities based in the Derwent Valley Mills World Heritage Site (DVMWHS), Derbyshire. The Arkwright Society has hosted community group visits to Cromford Mills and facilitated interactions with its staff and volunteers, contributed exhibition space for the project activities in the DVMWHS Gateway Visitor Centre at Cromford Mills and on its website, and provided expert input and additional funding in relation to the development of interpretation panels and audio points in the DVMWHS Gateway Visitor Centre.
Impact The main outputs to date are: Heritage interpretation panels in the Derwent Valley Mills World Heritage Site (DVMWHS) Gateway Visitor Centre, Cromford Mills (due to open in April 2018); Audio point recordings in the DVMWHS Gateway Visitor Centre, Cromford Mills (due to open in April 2018) The disciplines involved are: geography, history, heritage.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Cotton audio recordings, Cromford, 3 Feb 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Representatives of the Nottingham Slave Trade Legacies group, Sheffield South Asian groups, the Arkwright Society and Carriacou descendants met to record audios for use in the DVMWHS Gateway Visitor Centre at Cromford Mills, Derbyshire.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Country estate workshop Newstead, 12 Sept 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Around 20 members of the Nottingham Slave Trade Legacies group, including Michelle Hubbard and Kim Thompson, met to discuss and refine poetry and illustrations suggested for use in the interpretation at Newstead Abbey, hosted by the Newstead curator. Michelle performed a new poem, Blood Sugar, inspired by her previous workshop with the group.The heritage partners and the group agreed on the use of the poem at Newstead in a film format.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Country estate workshop Nottingham, 22 July 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Around 15 members of the Nottingham Slave Trade Legacies group discussed historical materials (words and images) on sugar production and enslaved sugar workers and explored the potential of creative writing and illustration for use in the interpretation of Newstead Abbey. The creative writing was facilitated by Michelle Hubbard and a group poem drafted; the creative illustration was facilitated by Kim Thompson and ideas proposed.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Cromford Mills visit 29 April 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Members of Nottingham Slave Trade Legacies group and Sheffield South Asian groups visited Cromford Mills, the project's key cotton heritage site, hosted by The Arkwright Society. The visit allowed the Nottingham and Sheffield groups to view and provide feedback on the heritage interpretation work achieved as part of the Global Cotton Connections project, to interact with heritage partners, to make suggestions for further interpretation and to collect materials relevant to further interpretative work.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Newstead Abbey visit 9 May 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Around 25 members of the Nottingham Slave Trade Legacies group visited Newstead Abbey, hosted by Nottingham City Museums and Galleries, including the curator for Newstead. The main purpose was to allow the group to view the site through a tour led by the curator, to provide feedback on the tour, to gather ideas and make suggestions for further interpretation at the site and to share their perspectives with heritage staff and volunteers.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Newstead slavery heritage film planning, 20 Dec 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Members of Nottingham Slave Trade Legacies group, African Caribbean poet Michelle Hubbard and illustrator Kim Thompson met with film maker Shawn Sobers and heritage partners at Newstead to plan approach to film of Blood Sugar poem.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Newstead slavery heritage filming, 9 Jan 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Around 20 members of the Nottingham Slave Trade Legacies group, including poet Michelle Hubbard, took part in the filming of Blood Sugar poem at Newstead Abbey with film maker, Shawn Sobers.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Nottingham cotton workshop I, 14 July 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Around 12 members of the Nottingham Slave Trade Legacies group took part in a workshop which involved the discussion of historical materials on cotton plantations, reflection on key images and words for inclusion in interpretation panels at Cromford Mills and exploration of creative ways of engaging with cotton and slavery histories using textiles (led by Evadney Jalloh, STL group member).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Nottingham cotton workshop II, 14 Oct 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Around 18 members of the Nottingham Slave Trade Legacies group met to hear the ancestor stories of Abigail Bernard and Daniel Shade whose families are from Carriacou and develop/select materials for use in the proposed interpretation panels at Cromford Mills. The group discussed and amended drafts of interpretation panel texts and identified and prioritised image for inclusion in the Cromford panels. The project also shared its work with Abigail Bernard and Daniel Shade.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Nottingham cotton workshop III, 10 Nov 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Around 15 members of the Nottingham Slave Trade Legacies group met to discuss materials for inclusion in the proposed audio points at Cromford Mills, including using the words of formerly enslaved people and African Caribbean songs.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Presentation at RGS-IBG Annual conference session on Decolonsing Participatory Geographies, London, 30 Aug 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The presentation entitled 'Decolonising without recolonising?: practising reparative historical geographies in rural heritage sites' was co-delivered by Susanne Seymour (University of Nottingham) and Lisa Robinson (Bright Ideas, Nottingham). Lisa was a non-academic activist guest of the Participatory Geographers Research Group for this Fuller Geographies session on 'Decolonising Participatory Geographies'. The purpose was to examine the challenges of research and engagement collaborations which seek to enhance the coverage of colonial, enslavement and Black histories in rural heritage venues, as a form of 'reparative' work (see Bergin and Rupprecht, 2016; Beckles, 2012). It considered especially the challenges of collaborations between academia and heritage organisations, typically characterised by few BAME employees and dominated by white-centred ways of thinking (Alexander and Arday, 2015; BOP Consulting, 2012) and BAME community groups and organisations. The presentation and discussion was attended by c.30 international conference delegates and generated many questions and further discussion in and beyond the session.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Project launch with Nottingham Slave Trade Legacies group 29 Mar 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Around 35 members of Nottingham's African Caribbean community attended this launch of the Nottingham strand of the Practising Reparative Histories project. Some had been involved with the Nottingham Slave Trade Legacies (NSTL) initiative previously; others were new to the group. The main purpose was to relaunch the NSTL initiative, to introduce the cotton and country house heritage partners, to outline the scope for work to enhance interpretation at the heritage sites, and to gather ideas for types of interpretative and creative approaches.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Project launch with Sheffield South Asian groups 7 Mar 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Around 20 members of Sheffield South Asian groups attended this launch of the Sheffield strand of the Practising Reparative Histories project. Some had been involved with the Sheffield Hindu Samaj heritage projects previously; others were new to the projects. The main purpose was to introduce the PRH project in relation to cotton, to outline the scope for work to enhance interpretation at the heritage sites, and to gather ideas for types of interpretative and creative approaches.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Quarry Bank Mill visit 21 May 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Around 40 members of Nottingham Slave Trade Legacies and Sheffield South Asian groups visited Quarry Bank Mill, Cheshire, hosted by the National Trust. The main purpose of the visit was to examine the extent and nature of coverage of global cotton history at this important cotton heritage site (particularly histories related to enslavement in the Americas and India's cotton industry), to learn about the National Trust's heritage interpretation strategies, to gather materials to inform the groups' interpretative strategies at Cromford Mills and to share the groups' perspectives and feedback with the National Trust.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Sheffield Kabir Jayanti, 11 June 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact This event was held to celebrate the birth of the Indian cotton weaver-saint Kabir. It involved story-telling about Kabir's life (by Debjani Chatterjee), dance and readings about Kabir (by Hindu Samaj children) and an informal painting workshop (by Aastha Over 50s group).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.burngreavemessenger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/burngreace-messenger-july-2017-web.pd...
 
Description Sheffield cotton story-telling and writing workshop I, 7 May 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact The workshop led by Dr Debjani Chatterjee was held with Bal Gokulam, a Hindu parents and children group. It involved cotton-related storytelling and creative writing and stimulated interest in storytelling and shadow puppet shows amongst the group.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Sheffield cotton storytelling and writing workshop II, 16 July 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Members of Bal Gokulam (a Hindu parents and children group) attended a creative writing and storytelling workshop led by Dr Debjani Chatterjee. It involved cotton-related story-telling and development of material for a shadow puppet show.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Sheffield cotton wall-hanging workshop, 1 June 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Members of the Aastha Over 50s group and Bengali Women's Support Group attended a creative cotton wall-hanging and painting workshop led by Dr Debjani Chatterjee and a community textile expert.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Sheffield cotton writing workshop I, 30 July 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Dr Debjani Chatterjee led a poetry writing workshop with members of for Bal Gokulam (Hindu parents and children group) and the Sheffield Hindu Samaj. The purpose was to develop materials for a collection of cotton-related poetry.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017