Rodney Harrison Heritage Priority Area Leadership Fellowship

Lead Research Organisation: University College London
Department Name: Institute of Archaeology

Abstract

Central to my vision for the leadership of the priority area is the idea that heritage should not be understood as something which is 'stuck in the past', but rather as a series of highly variable practical and discursive fields which employ diverse and contingent strategies for building resilient and sustainable futures. Equally important is a commitment to interdisciplinarity, and the acknowledgement of the need to develop and expand existing and emergent networks which connect scholars, practitioners and publics in new and innovative ways as co-researchers. It is clear that it is not possible to study heritage from a single disciplinary vantage point. In the light of the acknowledgement of the Anthropocene epoch as one in which humans have become the primary geological force of change, it is similarly no longer possible to argue that the divisions between 'nature' and 'culture' are meaningful. My vision for the development of the theme draws on an expanded understanding of heritage which works across traditional boundaries, bringing 'natural' and 'cultural' heritage research and practice into closer conversation with one another, whilst simultaneously troubling and seeking to explore the connections between other conventional dichotomies; 'tangible' and 'intangible' heritage, and 'western' and 'non-western' approaches, for example. It is strongly comparative in approach, and aims to connect heritage with the most important global challenges of our time. The research project element would comprise the writing of one synthetic monograph; further development of a current pilot research project; and a new line of research into the implications of 'posthumanities' thinking for heritage studies. All three of these aim to complement the proposed leadership activity by making an argument for an expansive view of heritage; by showing how heritage intersects with key global challenges (particularly Global Food Security, Global Uncertainties/Security in a Changing World, Living with Environmental Change and Lifelong Health and Wellbeing); by demonstrating the value of comparative approaches to heritage research; by developing connections with key heritage international, national and regional organisations; and by modelling programmes of research in which heritage organisations and publics are engaged actively and creatively as co-researchers.

Planned Impact

My plan for leadership activities has been developed to align with, and extend, AHRC's Heritage Strategic Priority Area Future Strategy (February 2016). Accordingly, it has three broad aims: to further develop heritage research as an innovative and broad cross-disciplinary field; to extend collaborations, partnerships, knowledge exchange and pathways to impact in cultural heritage research; and to enhance research capability for heritage research as a cross-disciplinary and collaborative field of enquiry. These plans should be seen as tentative, and I would aim to work closely and collaboratively with AHRC and other senior research council staff, as well as the other theme and priority area leadership fellows, to identify synergies and draw closely on their advice to develop the most strategic mix of activities and to advise AHRC on planning, funding calls and other activities should I be successful.

Publications

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Acheson Roberts L (2018) Entangled Concepts and Participatory Practices across Archaeology, Heritage and Art in Journal of Contemporary Archaeology

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DeSilvey C (2019) Anticipating loss: rethinking endangerment in heritage futures in International Journal of Heritage Studies

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Gardner A (2017) Brexit, Archaeology and Heritage: Reflections and Agendas in Papers from the Institute of Archaeology

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Harrison R (2017) Archaeologies of the Contemporary World in Annual Review of Anthropology

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Harrison R (2018) Heritage Research : The AHRC Heritage Priority Area in Archaeology International

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Harrison R (2018) Heritage Research: The AHRC Heritage Priority Area in Archaeology International

 
Title Heritage Futures Exhibition at the Manchester Museum 
Description Combining latest academic research with incredible objects, the exhibition looks at heritage as the building blocks of the future, through four themes: Profusion explores what we should we pass on to future generations in an age of mass production and consumption. Diversity reflects on how diversity in nature and in cultural traditions can help people and nature cope with future uncertainty. Transformation looks atheritage as something that is not fixed, but that changes over time. Uncertainty considers what should we pass on to future generations, when we can't be sure what they will want or need. We can't be certain what the future will be like, but through Heritage Futures, we can at least try to ensure that the decisions we make today help provide people with the things they might need and want in the future. In our Heritage Futures Studio we are asking people to help us imagine, design and begin to create the future together. Alongside the exhibition, artist Shelley Castle from Encounter Arts is creating an installation; the Human Bower, taking inspiration from the extraordinary craftwork of the Bowerbird. These amazing birds gather, display, and exhibit the things they appear to hold of high value outside their twig constructions. The work will encourage conversations around what we hope the future would look like, what we could hold onto to make that happen, and what we need to let go of. The exhibition is inspired by work being undertaken by the "Heritage Futures" research programme, funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC). Professor Rodney Harrison (UCL) acted as principal academic consultant on the exhibition, drawing on contributions from its team of academic researchers. It includes a series of films produced for the Heritage Futures research programme, and other creative outputs including a series of tiles produced by Antony Lyons which duplicate a set of tiles now stored in the Memory of Mankind archive in Austria. 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2018 
Impact The exhibition will run until Autumn 2021, and forms the centrepiece of the museum's major redevelopment project "Manchester, Hello Future" 
URL http://www.museum.manchester.ac.uk/whats-on/exhibitions/currentexhibitions/heritagefutures/
 
Description Through the fellowship we have engaged directly with a number of different non-academic heritage organisations-from international organisations such as ICOMOS and UNESCO, to national and regional governmental and non-governmental bodies such as the National Trust, Historic England, Cardiff Council, Rescue, Arts Council England, ICOMOS-UK, Woodland Trust, Birmingham City Council, Bristol Museum, PAN Intercultural Arts, ICOM, CIFA, Arts Catalyst, Arts Cabinet, Heritage Alliance, University Museums Group, DEFRA, to influence policy and practice relating to heritage and the ways in which it is defined and researched.
First Year Of Impact 2017
Sector Environment,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections
Impact Types Cultural,Societal,Policy & public services

 
Description All Party Parliamentary Archaeology Group
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description Consultation on Revision of National Planning Policy Framework
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a national consultation
Impact The revised NPPF had significant changes in which the protection of the historic environment was visibly reduced. The national consultation was welcomed and concerns towards the deletion of words and removal of key texts to footnotes was reversed.
URL https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/draft-revised-national-planning-policy-framework
 
Description Contribution to letter responding to the Fisheries Bill Committee
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description Defra Inquiry: Scrutiny of the Draft Environment Bill
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a national consultation
URL https://www.parliament.uk/business/committees/committees-a-z/commons-select/environment-food-and-rur...
 
Description Development of Course Materials for Cultural Memory MA Module
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact Developed new approaches to cultural memory for Masters levels students, based on questions of environment, ecology, the Anthropocene and posthumanism
 
Description Engaging w/ Independent Research Organisations: Exploring Research, Policy and Practice Interfaces
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
URL https://heritage-research.org/events/engaging-iros-exploring-research-policy-practice-interfaces/
 
Description Engaging with Policy in the UK event
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact The aim of this initiative was to realise links across sectors impacted by seemingly unrelated policies. The event brought together a range of different stakeholders, from civil society organisations, to professional bodies to civil servant organisations and worked across some of the challenges and issues they face directly from changes to policy as well as challenges of working together. The output will be a publication, but has also led to invitations to advisory groups.
 
Description Heritage and Policy Engagement Workshop: How to influence decision-making
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
URL https://heritage-research.org/events/heritage-policy-engagement-workshop-influence-decision-making/
 
Description Inclusion of a definition to the consultation of Defra's Environment BIll
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description Praxis: Heritage and Policy Workshop, 6 Dec 2019, for Global Challenge Research Fund principal investigators/researchers
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
URL https://changingthestory.leeds.ac.uk/2019/09/16/praxis-launches-the-first-in-a-series-of-events-on-t...
 
Description R Harrison - contribution to ICOMOS Resolution 19GA 2017/21 Mobilising ICOMOS and the Cultural Heritage Community to Help Meet the Challenge of Climate Change
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
URL https://www.icomos.org/images/DOCUMENTS/Secretariat/2017/GA19/GA19_DraftResolutions/GA2017_DraftReso...
 
Description R Harrison - contribution to revision of AHRC Heritage Research Strategy
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
URL http://www.ahrc.ac.uk/innovation/heritage-research/
 
Description R Harrison contribution to new AHRC strategic delivery plan
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
 
Description Report on 'Exploring Heritage in IPCC Documents'.
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
URL https://heritage-research.org/2018/07/08/climate-change-report-exploring-heritage-ipcc-documents/
 
Description Seminar on 'From Global to Local: Exploring the Concept of Governance and its Impact on Practitioners'
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description AHRC Leadership Fellows (Early Career Route)
Amount £200,000 (GBP)
Funding ID AH/S00436X/1 
Organisation Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 02/2019 
End 01/2021
 
Description UCL Centre for Critical Heritage Studies Cluster Leader Funding
Amount £6,000 (GBP)
Organisation University College London 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2018 
End 12/2018
 
Description UCL GCRF QR Faculty allocation
Amount £50,000 (GBP)
Organisation University College London 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 11/2018 
End 07/2019
 
Description Arts Catalyst 
Organisation The Arts Catalyst
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Colin Sterling and Rodney Harrison have initiated a partnership with Arts Catalyst via meetings and a co-organised 'in conversation' event between archaeologist Denis Byrne and Mongolian artist Tuguldur Yondonjamts. Colin has further attended workshops at Arts Catalyst around survival scenarios.
Collaborator Contribution Arts Catalyst have worked on the above collaborative arts event, and Anna Santomauro and Tuguldur Yondonjamts will be contributing to an edited volume based on the symposium Deterritorialising the Future.
Impact Outputs forthcoming
Start Year 2017
 
Description ICOMOS Universities Forum 
Organisation International Council on Monuments and Sites
Country France 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Cornelius Holtorf and Rodney Harrison both contributed to the first seminar of this working group. Holtorf has supported the development of the group, with the intention of pursuing a Heritage Futures research group in the context of ICOMOS.
Collaborator Contribution ICOMOS members have committed to arranging further seminars that bring together ICOMOS practitioners with academics to improve practice
Impact a publication (listed under the Publications tab)
Start Year 2017
 
Description Kick the Dust Dont Settle BeatFreeks collaboration 
Organisation Beatfreeks
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution In kind support running workshops and acting in an advisory capacity to project
Collaborator Contribution n/a
Impact ongoing
Start Year 2017
 
Description Nesta Future Fest 
Organisation Nesta
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The AHRC Heritage Research team contributed to Nesta's 2018 Future Fest on the theme of 'Occupy Your Future' through talks and co-organised panels. AHRC Heritage Research acted as content partners for the event, working with Nesta over several months to develop two panels for the festival, both of which were chaired by Professor Rodney Harrison. The first panel, Frozen Futures, explored the role of new preservation technologies in securing our present, and how decisions about what to keep and what to lose actively shape our futures. It featured presentations by Mafalda Costa from the Frozen Ark, Asmund Asdal who works for Nordgen at the Svalbard Global Seed Vault, and Martin Kunze from the Memory of Mankind project. The second panel, Curated Decay, explored the inevitability of change and the notion of embracing decay and destruction through an alternative understanding of heritage value. It featured presentations by Vyki Sparkes, the curator of the London Fatberg at the Museum of London, Marcos Buser, a geologist who works with nuclear waste disposal, and Caitlin DeSilvey, a geographer and author of the book Curated Decay (University of Minnesota Press, 2017) from which the panel took its title.
Collaborator Contribution Nesta organised the event and paid some speaker costs.
Impact N/A
Start Year 2018
 
Description Curated Decay: Heritage Beyond Saving Panel Discussion 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The author proposes rethinking the care of certain vulnerable sites in terms of ecology and entropy, explaining how we must adopt an ethical stance that allows us to collaborate with - rather than defend against - natural processes.

Caitlin was joined in conversation by a panel who discussed and debated her contributions to rethinking the conservation of natural and cultural heritage. Panellists included:

David Lowenthal (Emeritus Professor of Geography, UCL and author of The Past is a Foreign Country)
Haidy Geismar (Department of Anthropology, UCL, author of Treasured Possessions: Indigenous Interventions into Cultural and Intellectual Property),
Rodney Harrison (AHRC Heritage Priority Area Leadership Fellow, UCL Institute of Archaeology)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bGFRoRdJPtg
 
Description "From the Ruins of Preservation" A symposium on rethinking heritage through counter-archives 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact From the Ruins of Preservation: A Symposium on Rethinking Heritage Through Counter-Archives
London, 11-12 July 2019. Venue: German Historical Institute London. Co-organized by Rodney Harrison (AHRC Heritage Priority Area Leadership Fellow/Professor of Heritage Studies at the UCL Institute of Archaeology) and Mirjam Brusius (Research Fellow in Colonial and Global History, German Historical Institute London).

Keynote Speakers
Rachel Ama Asaa Engmann, Assistant Professor of African Studies, Hampshire College
Trinidad Rico, Director of Cultural Heritage and Preservation Studies, Rutgers University
Karen Salt, Director of the Centre for Research in Race and Rights (C3R), University of Nottingham

Colonial legacies in heritage preservation have intersected and clashed with local realities since their inception. Heritage sites have often been created by way of processes which segregate them both temporally and geographically from the contemporary world, and the people who live with and amongst them. This might result in restrictions of habitation and cultivation, religious and ritual practice, and the removal of entire local settlements from inside and around natural and cultural heritage sites. Individuals and communities, however, have always had their own ways of preserving and engaging with material and immaterial significances. Objects, places and landscapes were and are embedded and reactivated in the domains of contemporary life. These realities defy and challenge the disciplinary baggage, canons and categories as well as prevailing methods, discourses, concepts and practices of heritage studies, which in many cases have proved unhelpful in engaging such records outside of "the archive" as it is conventionally understood. The problem of adequately engaging the histories of these intersections has been exacerbated by methodological challenges. Historians have long ignored the gaps and unspoken emotions and bodies in written and visual archival sources. Visual analyses often lack the methods to engage with different iterations of the diverse and heterogenous agencies of both humans and nonhumans outside of the scope of official archives-the locals going about their lives in ancient ruins; the workers who labour on archaeological excavations; those often nameless individuals who serve as human scales next to an excavated building; the local guides who help "open up" landscapes to preservationists; or the agencies and affordances of forms of material culture themselves. Due to a turn against the forms of authority empowered in conventional archival sources, critical heritage studies have largely denied the usefulness and significance of archives for the study of such non-official forms of heritage preservation, which has led to the de-privileging of historical and visual analysis. This frustration has resulted in a general turning away from such sources by researchers within heritage studies to focus on contemporary issues, and their accompanying methods, especially "oral history" and ethnography. However, this move has frustrated historians who have seen heritage studies as a field in which the historical contexts of the contemporary phenomena which such scholars study has been effectively written out of the picture.

This conference presents a methodological intervention into reductionist preservation histories by developing a new diachronic, more diverse vocabulary and directions for future research in and on this field. Reconstructing new histories and viewpoints in order to re-examine the "ruins of preservation" it aims to rethink the varied agencies which surround both natural and cultural heritage preservation practices through new conceptual and methodological approaches. Re-engaging such histories is not only important in building a new historical approach to heritage, but will also help researchers to reconceptualise and recontextualise contemporary heritage phenomena. By re-centring the discourse about "heritage" to examine specific non-state practices through such methods we also seek a more nuanced and effective understanding of how preservation has been determined over time and from different perspectives.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://heritage-research.org/events/ruins-preservation-symposium-rethinking-heritage-counter-archiv...
 
Description #HeritageCaseStudies Twitter Special 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact This initiative is a social media one in which each month we showcase AHRC-funded research on our Twitter account of 7,000 followers, using the #HeritageCaseStudies hashtag. The AHRC Heritage Priority Area website hosts a series of blogs provided by Principal Investigators to update and showcase their work. This has been said to inspire researchers to see what work is being funded, and how the work has progressed, to what sort of outputs are possible.
There has been enthusiastic responses from research teams who are excited to showcase their work, and have it promoted via twitter,
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018,2019
URL https://heritage-research.org/case-studies/
 
Description 'Crossing Borders: Heritage and Brexit in the North of England and Scotland' 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The workshop focused on the different spatialities of Brexit and Heritage between the north of England and Scotland happened on the 18th of April 2018. We did some 'real' workshopping to start off with, and continued to discuss the various issues the participants experience in their daily practices as well as the possible futures they see.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://heritagevalue.wordpress.com/crossing-borders-heritage-and-brexit-in-the-north-of-england-and...
 
Description ACHS Crossing Boundaries: Urban Conservation and Urban: Sharing Responsibilities, Crossing Borders? 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The 2018 Association of Critical Heritage Studies conference, held in Hangzhou, China, thus takes 'borders' as a broadly defined, yet key, concept for better understanding how heritage is valued, preserved, politicised, mobilised, financed, planned and destroyed. Thinking through borders raises questions about theories of heritage, its methodologies of research, and where its boundaries lie with tourism, urban development, post-disaster recovery, collective identities, climate change, memory or violent conflict.
ACHS 2018 was the largest ever international conference in Asia dedicated to the topic of heritage. It attracted around 500 participants from 43 countries and included 560 presentations around 84 sessions.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.criticalheritagestudies.org/hangzhou-conference/
 
Description AHRC Advisory Board Presentation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Reporting progress on our PALF work over 2017
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description AHRC Post Graduate and Early Career Heritage Researcher Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Workshop specifically for ECRs working on heritage research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://heritage-research.org/events/post-graduate-early-career-heritage-research-workshop/
 
Description AHRC/UKRI Heritage Workshop: Develop & Write Successful Grant Applications 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact The UKRI and the AHRC Heritage Priority Area team will be running a workshop to support grant applications for Early Career Researchers in heritage and related fields (including archaeology, museum studies, conservation and public history).

As well as offering general advice on writing and developing successful grant and fellowship applications, the workshop aims to encourage heritage scholars to apply to the UK Research and Innovation Future Leaders Fellowships, which has been created to support Early Career Researchers and innovators who have outstanding potential. The Fellowships offer long-term and flexible support for projects between four and seven years, with up to £1.2m available per applicant.

AHRC Heritage Priority Area Leadership Fellow Professor Rodney Harrison is leading this workshop to support the heritage research community, and provide practical advice to help understand this opportunity and begin thinking about potential research applications.

The workshop will place the UKRI Future Leaders programme in the context of the wider funding landscape, and explore how you might approach different grant and fellowship schemes. On the day there will be opportunities to meet with AHRC and UKRI representatives to ask questions, as well as network with other heritage researchers.

The agenda will include a briefing from the AHRC Heritage Leadership Fellow, a hands-on workshop to focus on preparing aspects of your application, a Q&A session, and a working lunch.

Who should attend?
The workshop is open to researchers in the early stages of developing an application, as well as those who already have a firm idea of their proposals but may benefit from feedback.

The UKRI Future Leader Fellowships are for early career academics and innovators who are transitioning to and/or establishing their independence. Senior academics and innovators are not permitted to apply. Eligibility rules do not restrict application based on the number of years since PhD completion nor whether the applicant currently holds a permanent or open-ended academic position.

What will you get out of it?
Get inspired and learn how to create a grant application with impact.
Opportunity to discuss the funding and application process with the AHRC and UKRI teams.
Meet and network with potential research partners.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://heritage-research.org/events/ahrc-ukri-heritage-workshop-develop-write-successful-grant-appl...
 
Description Archaeology and heritage studies in, of, and after the Anthropocene; Theoretical Archaeology Group (TAG) Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Session at Theoretical Archaeology Group Conference. Session # 46: Archaeology and heritage studies in, of, and after the Anthropocene

Organised by Rodney Harrison, UCL Institute of Archaeology (r.harrison@ucl.ac.uk)

What does it mean to live in a self-proclaimed "age of humans"? And what is the role of archaeology and heritage studies in the current planetary "crisis" which this age is widely recognised as having heralded? Over the past decade, the "Anthropocene" has stimulated significant comment across archaeology and heritage studies, appearing in a number of different guises-as temporal marker, extinction crisis, human niche, climatological catastrophe, socio-cultural formation, economic and political critique, and posthumanist rallying cry to name but a few. But these debates and discussions have tended to happen in isolation from one another, limiting their usefulness and impeding broader discussion of the significance of the concept for archaeology and heritage studies more generally. The aim of this session is to facilitate interdisciplinary conversations across a broad range of scientific, artistic and humanistic approaches to the Anthropocene (and associated past, present and future environmental and climate related issues) to begin to explore the ways in which archaeology and heritage studies might reorganise themselves to address the new research agendas which such interdisciplinary approaches, and the broader recognition of these associated contemporary planetary crises, urgently demand.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://heritage-research.org/2019/06/17/cfp-archaeology-heritage-studies-anthropocene-theoretical-a...
 
Description Archaeology in the UK: Is Armageddon really around the corner? Or can we continue to be complacent? 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The authors, Hana Morel and Daniel Phillips, were informed that the professional body, The Chartered Institute of Archaeology, received dozens of calls asking for more information following the blog. It also led to practitioners requesting more information on policy. Following, a open letter was created and submitted to members of parliament, which was signed by over 3,000 individual interested or involved with the historic and natural environment.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://www.bajrfed.co.uk/bajrpress/is-armageddon-around-the-corner/
 
Description Brexit, Heritage and Archaeology workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact In May 2017, Rodney Harrison with UCL Institute of Archaeology colleague Andrew Gardner, held a one day workshop in London which addressed the role of heritage and archaeology in the lead up to the 2016 EU Referendum, as well as the potential impact our separation from the EU will have on the sector.

Following the workshop, the Papers from the Institute of Archaeology (PIA) Journal published a forum piece, with the lead article authored by Rodney Harrison and Andrew Gardner. The forum collated responses from Gaygysyz Jorayev, Megan Arnot, and Lorna-Jane Richardson with Tom Booth, and was closed by final reflections from Gardner and Harrison.

The workshop and forum contribute towards a series of future activities we will host under our research theme, The UK in Europe.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Chartered Institute for Archaeologists: Archaeology and the Planning System: Evidencing Success, Confronting Change 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This workshop was held to discuss how we can nationally evidence success and work together across sectors to explore how to address change in policy.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Climate Heritage Network Launch, Edinburgh 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact The Network was conceived in 2018 at the Climate Heritage Mobilization at the 2018 Global Climate Action Summit and is being launched in October 2019 at the Climate Heritage Network Global Launch. Interested agencies, organizations and businsses can join by signing or endorsing the Climate Heritage Network MOU (Memorandum of Understanding). The MOU will not introduce new legal constraints on participants but will demonstrate clear commitment to support mobilization of the cultural heritage sector for climate action.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL http://climateheritage.org/
 
Description Colin Sterling ACHS 2018 Presentation: Critical Heritage and the Aesthetics of Posthumanism 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Talk by Research Associate Colin Sterling as part of the Heritage and Posthumanism session at the 2018 Association of Critical Heritage Studies Conference in Hangzhou, China. Audience of c70 people who asked related questions.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Deterritorialising the Future: Heritage in, of and after the Anthropocene 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Symposium with nine invited international speakers looking at the subject of heritage in, of and after the Anthropocene from different disciplinary perspectives. Edited volume based on symposium forthcoming.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://heritage-research.org/events/deterritorialising-the-future/
 
Description Digital Heritage in a World of Big Data 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Despite growing debate about the qualities of big data and the ways it might be changing knowledge creation and paradigms in the social sciences, opinions on these themes remain rather fragmented and heritage scholars' contribution to the conversation has been very limited so far. This conference was generate focussed discussion on the ontologies, epistemologies and ethics of undertaking heritage research drawing on big data. Our aim was to discuss possible uses of big data to study contemporary interventions on the past. To do so, we reflected on empirical work that has been undertaken on this topic until now, and foster critical thinking and theory development from the ground up. Together, speakers and delegates unpacked the multiple forms of 'technicity' that lie behind digital heritage research, and engaged with the conceptual implications of applying data science in and for heritage studies. As part of this, we considered the heritage we are producing while performing our research - through collecting, deleting, editing, synthesising and rehashing.

We were pleased to welcome keynote speakers Richard Rogers (Professor of new Media and Digital Culture, University of Amsterdam) and Ben Marwick (Professor of Archaeology, University of Washington).

Speakers at the conference were:
Mark Altaweel, Reader in Near Eastern Archaeology, UCL Institute of Archaeology.
Chiara Bonacchi, Lecturer in Heritage, University of Stirling.
Nicola Bingham and Helena Byrne, Lead curator and Curator of Web Archives, The British Library.
Rodney Harrison, Professor of Heritage Studies, UCL Institute of Archaeology.
Lorna Hughes, Professor of Digital Humanities, University of Glasgow.
Lise Jaillant, Lecturer, University of Loughborough.
Marta Krzyzanska, PhD Candidate, Cambridge University.
Stuart Lewis, Associate Director of Digital, National Library of Scotland.
Shaleph O'Neill, Senior Lecturer and Head of Communication Design, University of Dundee.
Daniel Pett, Head of Digital and IT, Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge University.
Andrew Prescott (TBC), Professor of Digital Humanities, University of Glasgow.
Melissa Terras, Professor of Digital Cultural Heritage, Edinburgh Futures Institute, University of Edinburgh.
Terrie-Lynn Thompson, Lecturer in Digital Media and Professional Education, University of Stirling.

This event was organised by Chiara Bonacchi (University of Stirling), Rodney Harrison (UCL Institute of Archaeology) and Daniel Pett (Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge) as part of the AHRC-funded project Ancient Identities in Modern Britain and the AHRC Heritage Priority Area Leadership Fellowship.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://heritage-research.org/events/digital-heritage-world-big-data/
 
Description E. Breithoff and R. Harrison Contribution to Conference Session on Heritage and Posthumanism at Association of Critical Heritage Studies Conference in China 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Questions sparked discussion
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Evening Launch/Public Lecture 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The AHRC Heritage Priority Area team hosted an Evening Launch and Public Lecture which took place at the British Academy on Wednesday 4 October 2017, to officially mark Heritage Research's launch and kick off a series of events which took place over three days.

The Evening had AHRC's Chief Executive Andrew Thompson introduce the AHRC Heritage Priority Area, which was followed by the priority area's inaugural public lecture, Practicing Heritage in an Age of Twilight, delivered by Karen Salt (Co-Director of the Centre for Research in Race and Rights at the University of Nottingham and member of the AHRC Advisory Board). A scholar of race, sovereignty, power and politics, a significant portion of her work investigates how nation-states have claimed independence, demanded political recognition and fought for their continued sovereignty within a highly racialised world. She also provides service to the wider arts, humanities and social research communities, and is an active grant reviewer and a member of the Peer Review colleges for ESRC and AHRC.
The intended purpose of the event was to launch the AHRC Heritage Priority Area and to demonstrate the importance of power and politics in how heritage includes and excludes - one of our key themes for the Heritage Strategy.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://heritage-research.org/events/evening-launchpublic-lecture/
 
Description Future Histories Panel, International Network for the Theory of History Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Co-organised session on 'Future Histories' at the International Network for the Theory of History conference in Stockholm.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Heritage Research Case Studies 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact We are currently inviting AHRC-Funded Principal Investigators to contribute a piece on their research projects as part of the 'case studies' section of our website, which we then circulate on our Twitter which has 3000+ followers at present. The aim of this part of our website is to profile current and recently completed AHRC funded research projects and to show the breadth and range of research currently being undertaken on the Heritage Priority Area. We particularly aim to showcase projects which take innovative and creative approaches to heritage and which engage with areas identified as priorities within the AHRC Heritage Research Strategy. We showcase these case studies each month, with either one to two uploaded each month.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://heritage-research.org/case-studies/
 
Description Heritage Research, Policy and Practice Panel Discussion 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact This public panel discussion brought together academics, practitioners and policy makers from across the sector to discuss and debate the role of Heritage research in future policy and practice.

The panel was chaired by AHRC Heritage Priority Area Leadership Fellow Professor Rodney Harrison and included panelists:

Tim Boon
Head of Research and Public History, Science Museum

Ben Cowell
Director General, Historic Houses Association

Helen Graham
Research Fellow in Tangible and In
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://hr.thedistrict.co.uk/app/uploads/2017/10/Evening-Policy-Discussion-Flier-1.pdf
 
Description Heritage Section Lunchtime Seminar: Exploring UK Policy and its Impact on Archaeology 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Global and national policies have led to critical changes for sectors involved with the historic environment. Changes range from institutional restructuring, to personal dynamics, funding, and professional opportunities. This short talk will provide a brief background to archaeology within the UK planning framework, highlighting some of the relevant recent/ongoing government consultations impacting the historic environment, what they might mean for the historic environment, and the importance of research and hard evidence in influencing policy.
The room had approximately 10 audience members, who asked how to be involved with consultations in changes to policy and how academics can be more involved.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Heritage Studies: Critical Approaches and New Directions Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact In association with the UK Chapter of the Association of Critical Heritage Studies.The Conference programme held six sessions planned throughout the day, loosely themed around Politics and Policy, Diversity, Brexit & Heritage, the Environment and Heritage Management, Digital Heritage & Museum/Visitor Experience, and Conflict.
We had over 40 presentations which showcased current research projects or explore emerging and future research directions in critical heritage studies.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://storify.com/AHRCHeritage/heritage-studies-critical-approaches-and-new-direc
 
Description Heritage and Data Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The event held at the British Library on the 23rd June 2017 was envisaged as an initial scoping and investigative research workshop, bringing together key representatives from the UK heritage industry and academic community from humanities and social and computing science to discuss challenges and opportunities that data presents to the Heritage Sector.

The workshop was organised as a collaborative event between the AHRC Heritage Priority Area, the AHRC-funded Heritage Futures research programme, the Alan Turing Institute and the British Library with an intention to create an interdisciplinary space for discussion of the role of data in heritage research, bringing together practitioners with members of the academic community to discuss these issues. Key objectives were to:

Identify key research question that are arising as heritage industry embraces data;
Capture research interests and capability, including similarities and differences, across the sector that would have significant impact on the sector development;
Develop a broader understanding of key issues across the sector;
Establish next steps to address the issues identified at the workshop.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://heritage-research.org/events/heritage-data-workshop/
 
Description Heritage and Global Challenges Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The GCRF Delivery Partners have recently launched the UK Strategy for the Global Challenges Research Fund, which outlines the Delivery Partners' vision for GCRF over the lifetime of the fund (2016-2021). It focusses specifically on how GCRF will contribute to realising the ambitions of the UK aid strategy and to making progress on the global effort to address the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Culture and Heritage are now understood to play an integral role in both enabling and driving international development and to be central to meeting the SDGs. However, there is unequal knowledge across the UK Heritage Research community regarding GCRF, the SDGs and how heritage research might contribute to them.

The Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF) is a £1.5 billion fund announced by the UK Government to support cutting-edge research that addresses the challenges faced by developing countries. GCRF forms part of the UK's Official Development Assistance (ODA) commitment over the period, which is monitored by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). ODA-funded activity focuses on outcomes that promote the long-term sustainable growth of countries on the OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC) list. GCRF funding must be awarded in a manner that fits with Official ODA guidelines.

The GCRF Delivery Partners have recently launched the UK Strategy for the Global Challenges Research Fund, which outlines the Delivery Partners' vision for GCRF over the lifetime of the fund (2016-2021). It focusses specifically on how GCRF will contribute to realising the ambitions of the UK aid strategy and to making progress on the global effort to address the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Culture and Heritage are now understood to play an integral role in both enabling and driving international development and to be central to meeting the SDGs. However, there is unequal knowledge across the UK Heritage Research community regarding GCRF, the SDGs and how heritage research might contribute to them.

This workshop aimed to explore the intersections and relevance of heritage research to the GCRF research agenda, supported by case study presentations by GCRF-funded heritage researchers and relevant RCUK representatives.

The day was split into three sections, which focused specifically on:

Designing challenge-led and interdisciplinary heritage research;
Strengthening capacity for challenge-led heritage research in the UK and developing countries;
Addressing development needs: embedding ODA compliance within heritage research.
For more detail on the speakers and their projects, please see the programme for the day.

We also had the fantastic Somang Lee from Scriberia join us for the Workshop, who created this amazing illustration of the event.

Speakers included:

Mark Claydon-Smith, RCUK's GCRF Programme Manager

Dr Neelam Raina, Middlesex University
The Value of Culture in Conflict - Investigating the Sustainable Livelihood Generation for Craftswomen in Azad Kashmir

Professor Christopher Whitehead, Gonul Bozoglu, and Tom Schofield, University of Newcastle
The Katip-Celebi Newton fund project Plural Heritages of Istanbul: the case of the Land Walls

Professor Helen Chatterjee, University College London
Co-developing a method for assessing the psychosocial impact of cultural interventions with displaced people: Towards an integrated care framework

Professor Eleanor Robson, University College London
The Nahrein Network: Fostering the Sustainable Development of Middle Eastern Antiquity and Heritage

Professor Rodney Harrison, University College London
Restricted Access Pilot Project: Interdisciplinary perspectives on clean energy production and landscape conservation in North Patagonia

Dr Nicola Dempsey, University of Sheffield
Reflecting on the river: rapid urbanisation and representations of Indian cultural heritage

Professor Nicholas Thomas and Lucie Hazelgrove-Planel, University of Cambridge
Heritage matters: Culture and Development in the Pacific

Professor Robin Coningham, Durham University
Promoting the Promotion of Heritage Sites in Nepal's Western Terai in the Face of Accelerated Development & Can We Rebuild Kasthamandap? Promoting Post-Disaster Rescue Excavations, Salvage and Subsurface Heritage Protection Protocols in Kathmandu

Dr Jelke Boesten, King's College London
Debating, Performing & Curating Symbolic Reparations and Transformative Gender Justice in post conflict Societies

The workshop provided participants with the opportunity to:

Learn more about GCRF's strategy and the OECD ODA guidelines;
Engage with GCRF themes;
Share their research alongside other researchers involved with GCRF projects and address some of the opportunities and challenges of GCRF funding;
Form new networks and partnerships between and across institutions and the heritage sector;
Develop research agendas in line with GCRF aims;
Contribute to discussions which will shape future funding calls in this area.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://heritage-research.org/events/heritage-global-challenges-workshop/
 
Description Heritage and Posthumanism Session at ACHS China 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Session on Heritage and Posthumanism at the 2018 conference of the Association of Critical Heritages in Hangzhou, China. 12 speakers from around the world, initiated new dialogue around heritage in more-than-human worlds.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Heritage, Decolonisation and the Field: A Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Approximately 80 people signed up for this event, and those who could not attend requested a recording of the event, which is uploaded to our website. Due to the sensitivity of the topic, discussions after the talks stimulated a lot of discussion. Summary: Keynote Speakers Sudeshna Guha (Shiv Nadar University, India) and Daniel J. Sherman (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill).

The development of heritage as a distinctive, international field of governance regulated through institutions like UNESCO, ICOMOS, ICCROM and the IUCN is closely linked to practices of decolonisation and fieldwork.

Taking cultural heritage alone, anthropologists, archaeologists, architects and engineers worked across the decolonising world in countries like Egypt, Indonesia and Pakistan making the development of this new form of governance a reality; so too did experts from area studies, government survey agencies and philanthropic organisations. This work helped to (re-)constitute the fields that these practitioners were connected to, creating new disciplinary assemblages, new forms of knowledge, and rearranging the relationship of fieldworkers to the places where they laboured.

At the same time, this process was not simply a product of decolonisation; in fact, it had its origins in knowledge practices which were often closely connected to practices of colonial governance and the complex administrative relationship between colonies and metropoles. These older, colonial practices were simultaneously reconstituted and entangled within these newly emergent disciplinary assemblages and knowledge practices as decolonisation gathered pace.

Yet despite increased interest in the histories and practice of cultural and natural heritage, there is little understanding of how their interconnection with decolonisation and the field actually took place.

How did these three things work together to make heritage governance a reality?
How did decolonisation shape the form of that governance and the sorts of fieldwork that took place?
How, vice versa, did these forms of fieldwork and governance shape decolonisation, and how also did colonial practices play a role?
Moreover, how (if at all) do the answers to such questions vary across time and space?

If we are to understand the relationship between heritage, decolonisation and the field-and, by extension, the development of heritage governance itself-providing answers to these questions is a necessity, as is considering the methodologies which we might use to make these answers effective.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://heritage-research.org/events/heritage-decolonisation-field-conference/
 
Description IROs Heads of Research Group Meeting 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Invitation to speak on PALF's aspirations as heritage leadership fellow, and first thoughts about how IROs might work with the Heritage Priority Area plus any sense of any strategic funding.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Institute of Archaeology Research Lecture Series: Global Challenges, Governance and Heritage 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact The lecture was part of an evening series to showcase new research to researchers and students. Approximately 15 audience members attended. Hana Morel has recently been contacted by one of the audience members who is from Historic England who would like to collaborate further on research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Marcy Rockman - Heritage and Climate Change: The Power of Archaeological Thinking for addressing Modern Problems 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact This was an event that took place at one of UCL's Lecture theatres and was open to the wider public. A range of audience members attended including those from Historic England.
Marcy Rockman is an archaeologist turned international climate change policy wonk. Her research focus is how humans gather, share, remember, and transmit environmental information, particularly during colonization, and she's used this to address situations as diverse as cultural resource management in the American Southwest and homeland security risk communication in Washington, DC. Currently she serves as the US National Park Service (NPS) Climate Change Adaptation Coordinator for Cultural Resources and will be speaking in the capacity of her role in the newly formed International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS) Climate Change and Heritage Working Group as team lead for coordination with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Mobilising Global Voices 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The AHRC International Development Summit- 'Mobilising Global Voices' being held at the British Library, London on Wednesday 7th June 2017. The day consisted of three sessions for breakout workshops. We organised a session called 'Mobilising Heritage and Voices from the Past in the Present for the Future' in which four case studies were presented. 60 people signed up for the session.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.ahrc.ac.uk/funding/internationalfunding/the-global-challenges-research-fund/mobilising-gl...
 
Description National Heritage Science Forum Trustee Meeting 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The AHRC Heritage Priority Area were invited to hear of the progress made with the implementation of the AHRC Heritage Strategy and to hear of the opportunities available for contribution. Our slideshow presentation was circulated to the group afterwards. A response from the administrator wrote 'The trustees really appreciated hearing of your work and the opportunities that it presents for taking forward some of the areas that NHSF is currently engaged in (.e.g Brexit and industrial strategy). I hope that many of them will be able to attend some of the October events and will re-circulate the information (and interim website) to them.'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Nesta Future Fest Panels 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Two panels organised as part of Nesta Future Fest 2018: Frozen Futures and Curated Decay. See Partnerships for further details.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Paper Presented at the Theoretical Archaeology Group Conference, December 2017: "A Veritable Collection of Erotomaniacs": Archaeology, Memory and the Post-Apocalyptic Museum 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The museum has long provided an uncanny and even diabolical environment for science fiction and fantasy imaginaries. Objects come to life and wreak havoc on unsuspecting visitors, cursed artefacts lead to horrific murder, ancient horrors lie hidden in the dark recesses of the store room. The otherworldly atmosphere of the museum provides space for exotic encounters and unsettling narratives, always circling back to the ultimate unknowability of the world. Time and space are compressed in such settings, which seem to vibrate with an untapped potentiality. But what happens when the museum contains us, when the things dug up and put on display are from a world we claim to understand? This paper takes Chris Marker's seminal science-fiction short film La Jetée (1962) and Nicolas de Crécy's graphic novel Glacial Period (2007) as starting points for a wider discussion of the post-apocalyptic rediscovery of the present. In these startling works we are projected into futures where the natural, artistic and archaeological collections of today act as powerful anchors for re-awakening what have become long forgotten pasts. This has consequences horrifying and absurd: stuffed animals lead inadvertently to the saviour of humanity; sculptures debate their own worth; paintings devour arrogant archaeologists. As characters piece together a fractured memory of our present they find comfort in the museum, but they are also stalked by its contents, which assume a perverted power in defiance of their supposedly musealised state. Exploring themes of time travel, ruination, memory and the terror of discovery, this paper will contribute to debates around the speculative nature of archaeology, and the implications of posthumanist thinking for the heritage field. Following the presentation further collaborative events and a publication on these themes have been discussed with colleagues in the UK
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Paper presented at the Contemporary and Historical Archaeology in Theory Conference in Amsterdam, December 2017: Speculative Archaeologies: Brief Histories of Future Misinterpretation. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Talk at Contemporary and Historical Archaeology in Theory Conference November 2017. Paper by Colin Sterling on a proposed research programme around the theme of 'speculative archaeologies' - defined here as the varied ways in which artists, writers and others have imagined future historians, archaeologists or their equivalents confronting 'the now' as an archaeological object. Tracing a hitherto unexplored thread across different artistic practices, the paper sought to show how the hypothetical (mis)interpretation of the present can help us to rethink various ethical and political concerns, from the articulation of new cosmopolitan memories to the shifting emphases of 'progress' away from economic development. Linking together creative works as diverse as Joseph Gandy's fantastical drawings, Umberto Eco's satirical short-stories, Azra Aksamija's Future Heritage Collection, and the music of indie-rock band Low, the paper responded to and built upon a broader 'speculative turn' in the humanities (Bryant, Srnicek & Harman 2011), connecting this new philosophical trend with the increasingly widespread projection of the archaeological imagination into the posthuman future. As a result of this talk further research on this theme has been discussed with colleagues in the UK, Sweden, and Austria.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description R Harrison Observing, Knowing and Governing the mood of Englands Natives, then and now: Rethinking Mass-Observation in the post-truth, Brexit era. Invited paper to Knowing through Collecting conference organised to discuss the implications of my co-authored book "Collecting, Ordering, Governing" to museum studies and the history of anthropology at the Centre for Research on Museums and Heritage (CARMAH), Institut für Europäische Ethnologie, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Observing, Knowing and Governing the mood of "England's Natives", then and now: Rethinking Mass-Observation in the post-truth, Brexit era. Invited paper to "Knowing through Collecting" conference organised to discuss the implications of my co-authored book "Collecting, Ordering, Governing" to museum studies and the history of anthropology at the Centre for Research on Museums and Heritage (CARMAH), Institut für Europäische Ethnologie, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description R Harrison and S May From the Lakes to Hebron: a history of UNESCO's heritage sites blog post for AHRC Website 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Contribution of blog to AHRC website
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.ahrc.ac.uk/research/readwatchlisten/features/from-the-lakes-to-hebron-a-history-of-unesco...
 
Description R Harrison and S Penrose-co-organisation of National Heritage and Data workshop with Alan Turing Institute and British Library 23 June 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The workshop was organised as a collaborative event between the AHRC Heritage Priority Area, the AHRC-funded Heritage Futures research programme, the Alan Turing Institute and the British Library with an intention to create an interdisciplinary space for discussion of the role of data in heritage research, bringing together practitioners with members of the academic community to discuss these issues. Key objectives were to:
Identify key research question that are arising as heritage industry embraces data;
Capture research interests and capability, including similarities and differences, across the sector that would have significant impact on the sector development;
Develop a broader understanding of key issues across the sector;
Establish next steps to address the issues identified at the workshop.
A report of the workshop is available here
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://hr.thedistrict.co.uk/app/uploads/2017/11/Heritage-Data-Challenges-Opportunities-Report.pdf
 
Description R. Harrison "What is Critical Heritage Studies?" presentation at Capital Normal University Beijing China 10th September 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact R. Harrison "What is Critical Heritage Studies?" presentation at Capital Normal University Beijing China 10th September 2018
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://heritage-research.org/2018/08/28/ahrc-heritage-research-team-visit-china-association-critica...
 
Description R. Harrison Contribution to Thematic Panel on the Future of Critical Heritage Studies at UK Chapter Association of Critical Heritage Studies Conference 4th July 2018 Newcastle University 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact R. Harrison Contribution to Thematic Panel on the Future of Critical Heritage Studies at UK Chapter Association of Critical Heritage Studies Conference 4th July 2018 Newcastle University
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://blogs.ncl.ac.uk/heritage-newcastle/2018/05/03/save-the-date-uk-chapter-achs-annual-event-03-...
 
Description R. Harrison Keynote Lecture at UK Chapter Association of Critical Heritage Studies Conference Newcastle University 4th July 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact R. Harrison Keynote Lecture at UK Chapter Association of Critical Heritage Studies Conference Newcastle University 4th July 2018
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://blogs.ncl.ac.uk/heritage-newcastle/2018/05/03/save-the-date-uk-chapter-achs-annual-event-03-...
 
Description R. Harrison organisation and contributions to Unsustainable Heritage Session at Association of Critical Heritage Studies Conference in China 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact R. Harrison organisation and contributions to Unsustainable Heritage Session at Association of Critical Heritage Studies Conference in China
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://heritage-futures.org/hf-at-achs18/
 
Description R. Harrison research paper presentation to School for Archaeology and Museology at Peking University, China 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Paper presentation to School for Archaeology and Museology at Peking University, China, 7th Sept 2018
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://heritage-research.org/2018/08/28/ahrc-heritage-research-team-visit-china-association-critica...
 
Description Restricted Access Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The concept and content for the Los Ecos del Proyecto Huemul exhibition was co-developed at an international, interdisciplinary design charrette involving representatives from the Balseiro Institute, historians, architects and archaeologists from Chile, Argentina, the US and UK. The charrette was hosted by Dr Jorge Muñoz Sougarret at the Centro de Estudios del Desarrollo Local y Regional (CEDER) of the University of Los Lagos in Osorno, Chile, 20-21 May 2017. A key outcome of the charrette has been the establishment of the Restricted Access Research Network, an international, interdisciplinary group of scholars concerned with exploring the nexus between arts and humanities based and science based approaches to the interconnected histories of conservation and energy production in Chile and Argentina.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://heritage-futures.org/los-ecos-del-proyecto-huemul-exhibition-opens-in-argentina/
 
Description Seminar Series: Global Challenges, Heritage and Archaeology 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Over a series of Mondays, ten talks aimed to highlight research which engages with global challenges seen through the UCL Grand Challenges or the UN Sustainable Development Goals will be presented at UCL's Institute of Archaeology.

As an entity, the Global Challenges agenda is a complex and multifaceted development that is interpreted and understood in different ways. Issues of sustainability outlined in the UN SDGs address a number of environmental issues which are aligned closely with cultural and social issues, such as social inclusion and rights to social resources.

In some instances, it is difficult for the social and archaeological sciences to raise their profile in contributing to the global challenges agenda particularly with STEM subjects receiving more support and funding. Yet, we have seen a wealth of heritage and archaeological research and knowledge applied theoretically as well as in practice, which addresses many of the goals understood through the global challenges discussion. These ten presentations highlight ways in which heritage and archaeological research, skills and practice contribute towards sustainable development, and how in many instances have always been addressing sustainable issues through its connection and understanding of past landscapes in the present, past narratives in the present, and past cultures in the present.

The presentations are seen below, and will commence at 4pm at the UCL Institute of Archaeology, London.

January 13, Planning, Values and Engagement in the Historic Environment
Hannah Fluck, Head of Environmental Research, Historic England

January 20, Another Dead Lady: Looking at Women Looking at Women in Archaeology
Brenna Hassett

January 27, Co-Creating Sustainable Food Future with Communities
Theano Moussouri and George Alexopoulos

February 3, The Forging of Anthropocene? Metals, Fires and Fuels in prehistoric Eurasia
Dorian Fuller and Miljana Radivojevic

February 10, The Memorialising Ancestral Amazonian Landscapes: Challenges and Opportunities
Manuel Arroyo-Kalin

February 24, The Climate Crisis and a Call for Action: A View to the Future of Heritage Management
Sarah Forgesson and Louise Cooke

March 2 , Archaeologies Against Inequality? Power, Social Structure and the aDNA Revolution
Elisa Perego

March 9, Transformative Technologies, GIS and Central Asia
Gai Jorayev and Marco Nebbia

March 16, Heritage and Engagement in a Post-Democracy
Hana Morel

March 23, Energy Efficiency and Heritage values in Historic Cities
Kalliopi Fouseki

All welcome.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://heritage-research.org/events/seminar-series-global-challenges-heritage-archaeology/
 
Description The Archaeological Forum: a group of independent bodies concerned with the natural/historic environment 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Ongoing meeting on setting out the operational principles of The Archaeological Forum (TAF) to provide guidelines for heritage-related organisations, describing function, purpose and policy priorities of the forum. The group of independent bodies is attended by a range of civil servants and key heritage organisations within the UK, including - of course, Scotland, Wales and N. Ireland.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018,2019
 
Description The Society of Antiquaries Future of Archaeology Working Group 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact This is a working group organised by the London Society of Antiquaries to explore alternative models for the practice of archaeology and heritage in the UK. Its aim, to develop an alternative model to be proposed to the wider Archaeology Forum and various civil servants.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description The Theoretical Archaeology Group 2019 Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact What counts as knowledge in the museum and heritage sector, and how can this influence the quality of decision-making using diverse sources of knowledge and evidence? | Tue Dec 17 14:00:00 | Room 828

This session will examine different types of knowledge, how they are produced, exchanged, used, interact with each other, but also how they are used to inform policy and decision-making in the heritage and museum sector. The papers will examine everyday or vernacular knowledge as well as epistemic knowledge; how different types of knowledge are represented and given a voice in heritage and museum organisations; and the mechanisms through which we do that (e.g. Responsible Research and Innovation, co-creation and other participatory approaches to developing knowledge).

The event brought in a crowd that were interested in following up on policy, some of who attended workshops on Policy the following month on.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.ucl.ac.uk/archaeology/news-events/conferences/tag-2019/tagucl-ioa-conference-sessions/se...