The Verbatim Formula: Creative Practice for Young People in Twenty-first Century UK Care

Lead Research Organisation: Queen Mary, University of London
Department Name: Drama

Abstract

Various indicators show that looked-after children need better support from care and education providers. National Audit Office statistics from 2014 show that 20% of young homeless people, 24% of the adult prison population, and 70% of sex workers have been in care. In 2013, only 6% of care leavers were in Higher Education compared to 30% of that age demographic nationally. In 2015, 33% of looked-after children had been 'placed' more than once in a year in a children's home or with a foster family, and 10% had three placements or more. Such instability exacerbates looked-after children's well-documented vulnerability to mental health problems and jeopardises the stability needed for their educational and life success. In spite of the statutory requirement of the 1989 Children's Act to hear children's voices, an over emphasis on procedures and paperwork blocks effective communication and hinders the trusting relationships that children need to project a positive future.

THE VERBATIM FORMULA (TVF) will explore the potential of applied arts practice to provide vital interventions, providing life-changing support for young people, as well as opportunities for adults and institutions to make time, to listen, and to reflect on current practices. At a time when the care system is failing badly, and when universities are likely to have more responsibility for ensuring diverse participation following the White Paper for Higher Education (2016), TVF will give opportunities for adult professionals in both sectors to work together and to make changes that respond to young people's needs. Using Verbatim Theatre practices to support the articulation and confidence of young people's voices, the project positions children as creative evaluators of the services that are responsible for their care and wellbeing.

Based at QMUL and People's Palace Projects (PPP), a core operational team has been formed from QMUL's Departments of Drama, Business and Management, and Admissions and Widening Participation. Further collaborators include young adults from the Greater London Authority's Peer Outreach Team, and young adult care leavers from across London. Together, this team has facilitated a series of workshops that have supported 40 looked after children (14-18 years) in the South East and across the UK. Building on this experience, core activities in TVF will include a series of creative residential workshops facilitated in partnership with four universities in London to offer practical support to young people in articulating and planning their careers and education. In addition, a Young Researcher (YR) will develop a Portable Testimony Service (PTS) with the support and mentorship of Battersea Arts Centre (BAC). At QMUL, the PTS will be used to perform recorded, anonymised testimonies from looked-after children, care leavers, and adult care professionals, at an event to launch the university's new contextualised admissions policy. The PTS will share the audio testimonies further, providing a performative tool that creates space for dialogue and discussion around supporting looked-after children better. The YR and project's young partners will help to build an Alumni Network that will become a capable community of young people and adults who support each other in their journeys through care and beyond.

Through a series of events to be held with BAC including a Festival of Creative Evaluative Practice, the project will support the development of and reflection on innovatory artistic and participatory practice as a means of evaluation and provision of services in loval governments and the third sector. A website and E-book for practitioners will disseminate the research, as well as a series of academic articles, papers, presentations and performances at major academic and professional conferences. Work with Parliament's Youth Select Committee will explore the utility of particpatory verbatim practice to wider policy contexts.

Planned Impact

Young People and their Carers
Young people in/leaving care themselves will be the primary beneficiaries of this research through the impact it will have on their confidence, visibility, self-awareness and improvements in their dialogue with adults. The project will benefit participants through participatory evaluation activities that will improve their ability to articulate their needs, desires and future plans clearly, as well as exposing them to educational and employment pathways according to their interests. Carers will benefit from the support the project will give them to help children plan for their futures, as well as from the opportunities it will provide to see and hear the children they care for in fresh and positive ways.

Care and Education Service Providers
Royal Society of Arts research emphasises the advantages to local authorities and other service providers in working with arts projects to tackle seemingly intransigent social challenges (RSA, 2013). TVF will support foster carers, social workers and corporate parents (eg. local authorities, residential home managers) by offering practical, informed support in planning for teenagers' futures, and also by supporting the statutory duty to listen to children's voices. In Higher Education (HE) the PTS will make an embodied impact on staff and their practices in Admissions, Finance, and Advice and Counselling, providing a cost efficient and highly effective way of raising and tackling the issues that affect the recruitment, retention and engagement of looked after young people. The jointly run workshops will also benefit University partners in reaching out to wider excluded cohorts. All universities will be able to benefit from an on-line Overnight Residency Guide for Widening Participation.

Practitioners and Arts Organisations
Practitioners and theatre companies will benefit from the project's findings on the potential for applied arts methods to be used to make an impact on participants' wellbeing, and on the use of participatory evaluation practice to provide training and reflection on professional practice in care and education contexts. Taking its lead from the AHRC's Cultural Value Project, the project will intervene in the hierarchy of evidence that privileges quantitative techniques in evaluative practice, putting child-centred creative approaches at the ideological and pedagogical centre. The proposed 'Scratch Tank' at BAC will enable practitioners to share applied arts projects and ideas widely with local authorities and other service providers. The project's website, the e-book for practitioners, and the proposed Festival and Manual of Creative Evaluative Practice will provide opportunities for knowledge exchange between practitioners and arts organisations, and for critical reflection on innovative applied projects and practices.

Third Sector, Government and Policy
Having facilitated the GLA Care Week Conference for the last three years, and as a founding members of the Care Consortium which meets quarterly at City Hall to share good practice and advocate for change, INCHLEY and BAKER will continue to facilitate and contribute to meetings and events to which they are regularly invited, bringing performative modes of delivery and contributions from verbatim workshop participants. The 2017 Care Week Conference will be in partnership with the Fostering Network, and will incorporate verbatim material on children's experiences of their social work files, and of the treatment of child migrants. These activities disseminate research to professionals and policy makers performatively, making the profound impact that the Office of the Children's Commissioner has confirmed is needed to supplement written evidence. The team's embodied dissemination techniques will also be used to amplify the voices of young people with the Youth Select Committee in disseminating its upcoming Report on Race and Religious Hatred (2016).

Publications

10 25 50
 
Title Immersive Audio Event, Battersea Arts Centre 
Description Young people devised and performed the testimony based site-specific immersive experience for a public audience at Battersea Ats Centre. 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2018 
Impact Growth in public awareness, and reflection by social workers attending the event. 
URL http://www.theverbatimformula.org.uk/hear-it-see-it/
 
Title Sound Installation and Training 
Description A sound installation with live verbatim preference was created at the QMUL Professional Services Conference July 2017. This was followed by an inter-service training session that brought together staff from a range of Departments including Housing, Finance, Advice and Counselling, and Security. Care-Experienced alumni of TVF summer residential performed and supported the delivery of the training session. 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact Care-experienced young people used performative techniques to show the rage of difficulties they face in accessing and staying at university. Staff were made more aware of such situations, and were able to talk to each other about providing services that were more responsive to students' needs. 
URL http://www.qmul.ac.uk/media/news/items/198861.html
 
Description Emergent findings include:

THE RESIDENCY
The model is contextual as it is led by staff and participants which differ in each university. Each iteration of the residency at QMUL has been and continues to be reworked and re-calibrated each year and this seems to be an intrinsic part of it's success.

VERBATIM PERFORMANCE
Verbatim performance encourages attentive listening, fosters dialogue between staff, students and management which can lead to personal growth and changes in professional practices. Young people respond to the anonymised format, and audiences listen respectfully and carefully to real experiences.


UNIVERSITY
Students have to declare themselves as a young people with experience of care online at the point of application. Some may choose not to do this. This starts the feeling of being processed and a number or statistic, not a whole person. It also extends a feeling of alienation and not being listened to that young people in care have reported.

Signposting is not enough: Despite being signposted to help some young people with experience of care need to be encouraged and sometimes escorted by a tutor, personal adviser to make an appointment with the relevant person.

Personal Adviser role: role is there but at times can also add to the 'passing around' of students, especially due to staff leaving or sabbaticals. Personal adivisers are poorly trained, and not always aware of needs of students.

WP role : QMUL also has a WP representative in every academic department who are academic staff but (as far as we know) this group do not meet to share learning and experiences.

Pockets of Care: There are pockets of caring practices across QMUL. Separate departments (admissions, housing, advice & counselling and widening participation) have varying degrees of expertise in understanding specific issues to do with young people with experience of care. However, they are silos so innovative practices of care/ challenges staff face are not being shared across the university as a whole.

Training : Whilst there is general desire to improve this across all the departments we have spoken with - it is evident that there is no comprehensive and consistent training in place which addresses the issues.

Time / Target pressures: Workloads of administrative and academic staff are considerable at the present time. Time is needed to create a caring relational practice and this is also a barrier to some administrative and academic staff we spoke with.

Homogeneity :Young people with experience of care are spoken about in terms of comprising one homogenous group. This ignores that there are a multitude of different experiences which cause young people to be in care such as migration, estrangement as well as bereavement. Some may have experienced time in pupil referral units, detention centres, refugee camps, mental health organisations. Moreover, gender, ethnicity, race sexuality also influence their experience on being in care and the university staff should be aware of the multiple identities and labels any care experienced person may be living through. For instance, unaccompanied minors in care who may face Home office interviews/ deportation before their 18th birthday.

Institutional memory - QMUL did have a Buttle Quality mark 2013/14 but as the employee in question left her post this was dropped and now only one member of staff in Housing we spoke to remembered it and continues to employ many of the working practices it advocated.

Motivated Staff- Action often depends on individual or small teams of staff taking initiatives. Socially engaged and participatory projects can build important bridges across silos in and between institutions (eg. academic/ students services; higher education/ social services).
Exploitation Route Training staff and management practices in the university. We are aiming to use our techniques in the context of public services by building on our collaboration with Battersea Arts Centre and Wandsworth Council.
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Education,Financial Services, and Management Consultancy,Healthcare,Government, Democracy and Justice

 
Description The young person-responsive methodologies and practice developed by Inchley and her co-investigators through the Verbatim Formula supports children and carers by fostering dialogue, listening and trust and enables care and education organisations to review their systems and fulfil their statutory and moral obligations to listen to the most vulnerable children. The project deploys recorded testimonials and their public performance in order to facilitate the self-expression and self-narration of children in the care system and supporting others (including policy-makers) to hear them. The project therefore aims to support the young person-participants along with the policy and practice of those who care for them. Impacts include: 1. Young people in care, and care leavers: Through their participation in TVF workshops, performances and events, improvements in confidence, self-awareness and aspirations of young people have been reported by their carers and social workers. They have discovered educational and employment pathways according to their needs and interests, and are better equipped to plan for the future.The project benefits participants through co-researcher status and participatory evaluation activities that improve their ability to articulate their needs, desires and future plans clearly, as well as access help from adults, 2. Foster Carers and Social Workers: Carers benefit from the support the project gives them to help children plan for their futures, as well as from the opportunities it provides to see and hear the children they care for contributing to public fora. By supporting foster carers and social workers in helping young people make informed and sensible plans, the project helps to improve the quality of social care that young people receive, and enable carers to celebrate and reflect on their own caring practices. Foster carers and social workers have reported that the increased confidence and raised aspiration that the project has brought. 3. Care and Education Service Providers: This project supports foster carers, social workers and corporate parents (eg. local authorities, residential home managers) by offering practical, informed support in planning for teenagers' futures, and also by supporting the statutory duty to listen to children's voices. It raises awareness of a young person's multiple needs and challenges, and encourages and activates changes in practice, particularly by encouraging human contact and relations as part of a caring system. A reflective practice at Wandsworth Town Hall for young people's Personal Advisers led to discussion and reflection on how they could make changes to practices in response to young people's advice. The TVF team have shares their model of the creative residential for care-experienced young people with three other universities, and this has enabled partnerships to develop between universities and local authorities. The University of East London has been working closely with Newham Local Authority Virtual Head social work team. A training session has been held which brought together LA staff, TVF verbatim facilitators, TVF partner Emily Hunka of Theatre Troupe, and students from UEL's Drama and Social Work degree. The interdisciplinary session shared knowledge and experience across local authority, higher education and third sector of working with diverse care-experienced, migrant and traumatised young people. UEL has recently opened a Centre for Applied Participatory Arts, and are keen to use TVF as a model, and Goldsmiths WP staff are working with Drama and Social Work students to put on activities for care-experienced young people in Lewisham. In addition, pop-up performances held in QMUL's Housing and Student Service offices, as well as a Sound Installation and Training Session (2017) enabled staff to become more aware of the multiple needs of care-experienced young people, have direct conversation with potential applicants, and share good practice across the university in training sessions partly facilitated by care-experienced young people. 4. Applied Arts and Youth Practitioners Applied Arts practitioners and Drama students are finding new applications for headphone and testimony research. Since participating in TVF, RCSSD MA Applied Arts students are integrating verbatim based performance practice into a range of other areas including Diversity and Inclusion and intergenerational projects. In London Youth Services, the GLA Peer Outreach Team are adopting the TVF method to work on the 'Our Time' project, which will support young people who have caring responsibilities for parents. 5. Third Sector and Government Policy Makers: Having facilitated the GLA Care Week Conference since (2014) and as a founding members of the Care Consortium which met quarterly at City Hall to share good practice and advocate for change 2016-7, Inchley and her co-investigators have used performative modes of delivery to relay the testimonies of young people into various professional and policy fora. The 2016 Care Week Conference was held in partnership with the Fostering Network, and incorporated this project's use of verbatim material on children's experiences of their social work files, and of the treatment of child migrants. The conference was attended by representatives from the Department for Education and the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills. These activities have disseminated research to professionals and policy makers performatively, offering an embodied approach in order to transform attitudes and values, an approach that the Office of the Children's Commissioner has confirmed is needed to supplement written evidence. In November 2016, Inchley and Baker were called as expert witnesses and performed testimonies at the GLA Children's Rights Enquiry at the Youth Week Select Committee in Parliament (see Hansards record). In 2018, Inchley was invited to participate in a series of consultation meetings led by Become and funded by the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers which brought together numerous stakeholders from the third sector, social and youth work, local authorities (Virtual Heads), and higher education. Our participatory methodologies are being used to ensure that young people's voices and views are fed into policy making fora. The TVF team and young people it works with in Wandsworth have been invited to the Department for Education to perform the testimonies and have direct dialogue with the Minister for Education.
First Year Of Impact 2015
Sector Communities and Social Services/Policy,Education,Government, Democracy and Justice
Impact Types Cultural,Societal,Policy & public services

 
Description Creative Participatory Techniques in Care and Education
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact In a series of events with social workers and students, university staff and applied arts practitioners we have used our living audio archive as a training tool and means of service evaluation. Major examples include the Wandsworth Town Hall event in 2018, where young people performed their testimonies and engaged in dialogue with 20 social workers. Adult professionals have become aware of the challenges faced by care-experienced young people and have reflected on their practices with them. We have also held two events to train academic and student services staff at QMUL.
URL http://www.theverbatimformula.org.uk/creative-evaluation/
 
Description Gave Evidence to Greater London Authority Peer Outreach Team Enquiry into Children's Rights, 2017 and 2018
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
Impact Our evidence to the enquiry ensured that young people's testimonies of care were heard rather than adults reporting on them.
URL http://www.theverbatimformula.org.uk/2016/12/06/westminster-childrens-rights-enquiry/
 
Description Participation in Become Consultation of Educational Needs of Looked-After Children
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a national consultation
URL http://becomecharity.org.uk/our-work/improving-the-care-system/
 
Title Portable Testimony Service - Performative Intervention 
Description The Portable Testimony Service is a research, participatory evaluation and training tool. It uses personal testimonies gathered from care leavers to make spaces for understanding and dialogues around their experiences and needs. It can also be used as a research tool to find out and share staff's own experiences of service provision within an organisation. The performances make pop-up interventions in office spaces that disrupt the day to day routines of staff and which provide a non-judgemental space and opportunity for dialogue that leads to practical changes in working practices. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2017 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact Care experienced young people become more aware of the services that are provided for them already, and have an opportunity to suggest how this provision could be improved. Staff have more understanding of the needs of care leavers, and how their part of service provision is part of a bigger - and fragmented - picture for its users. Affective experience and direct rather than digital contact is recognised by staff as an important aspect of a caring service. 
 
Title University Residential Practice 
Description The TVF team have developed an interdisciplinary practice for a residential for a group of care-experienced young people using creative practices including verbatim theatre techniques that can be adapted by other universities. In 2017, a group of 8 care-experienced 14-18 year olds from the UK participated in an overnight residential stay with two days of activities. The participants learnt to use verbatim theatre techniques, puppetry, and devised their own performance and sharing with foster carers, social workers and other adults. As well as using creative techniques to visualise and articulate a positive future, each young person had a one on one meeting with a university Widening Participation staff member to discuss and plan their next steps in education and training. They also spent time with students as well as with young adult facilitators and care-experienced mentors. The model has now been adapted for use 7 times in three different universities, and in partnership with several local authorities, including Wandsworth, Lewisham, Newham, and Kensington and Chelsea. with different groups of young people. In the process we have generated new insights around using creative practices with this cohort of care-experienced young people, and provided opportunities for them to have constructive dialogue with adults responsible for their care and education. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact A series of meetings and training days with UEL, Goldsmiths and Greenwich Universities has been held where partners from a range of university disciplines and departments and the public sector have already been engaged (see Collaborations entries). We have published a Making Places Guide which has been made widely available to all HEIs. There is also a video that explains our processes on the TVF website. 
URL http://www.theverbatimformula.org.uk/universities-and-student-care-leavers/
 
Title 'Living' Audio Archive 
Description We have a collection of audio recorded testimonies from social workers, foster carers, care-experienced young people. care leaves and university staff. They are anoymised and made available through Portable Testimony Service performances. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2017 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact Dialogue between care-experienced young people, foster carers and social workers has been created. Social workers and university staff have become more aware of the needs of care leavers and have made adjustments to their own working practices. Awareness of the lived experiences of young people in care has been raised in a range of contexts. 
URL http://www.theverbatimformula.org.uk/
 
Description Battersea Arts Centre 
Organisation Battersea Arts Centre
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Multiple 
PI Contribution We held two preliminary meetings in 2017 to discuss how to work with BAC and its related theatre companies and partners to create opportunities for using our practice of participatory evaluation with local authority partners. We held the Battersea Arts Centre Chatback for a public audience at BAC in June 2018. This was an immersive audience experience, followed by public dialogue around the care system led by young people.
Collaborator Contribution Meghan Peterson has attended two key team planning meetings at QMUL, as well as arranging a planning meeting with Henrietta Imoreh of Re-define Theatre also based at BAC in February 2018. Henrietta has approached her contact based in Wandsworth Children's services.
Impact Battersea Arts Centre Audio Chatback.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Become 
Organisation Become: The Charity for Children in Care and Young Care Leavers
PI Contribution We have participated in and presented TVF in a series of seminars run by Become (2017-8) which have brought together a diverse range of national stakeholders to review the educational needs of and educational policy in relation to care leavers. We have also been invited by Become to participate in the All Party Parliamentary Group on Looked After ChIldren, which the charity runs.
Collaborator Contribution Francis Taylor, of Become, attended a Steering Group meeting for TVF, and gave advice and guidance on setting up the project. We particpated in three seminars and presented our methodologies in one.
Impact Educational Needs review of children in care and care leavers.
Start Year 2017
 
Description GLA Peer Outreach Team 
Organisation Greater London Authority (GLA)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Members of the Verbatim Formula team have an ongoing partnership with the Peer Outreach team - a group of young people based at City Hall who support youth work throughout the capital and feed into policy fora. We have sat on the steering group of the Care Week Conference at City Hall and used verbatim theatre techniques to facilitate and provoke dialogues amongst delegates since 2015.
Collaborator Contribution We have a valuable and ongoing relationship with several members of the Peer Outreach Team, who facilitate our residential workshops, perform as part of the Portable Testimony Service, and act as advisers to the project, helping to steer and shape its work.
Impact Residential workshops, Portable Testimony Events and training sessions, conference facilitation, Parliamentary Children's Rights Enquiry (see relevant sections of this form).
Start Year 2017
 
Description London University TVF Partnership - UEL 
Organisation University of East London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The QMUL TVF team are sharing their knowledge with UEL in holding a residential workshop for looked-after children and care leavers. There were two meetings at UEL in November 2017 and February 2018 where Sylvan Baker and Maggie Inchley shared verbatim theatre practice and gave advice on residential workshops. As part of one of these, there was also a workshop with Emily Hunka of Theatre Troupe which shared knowledge of working with care-experienced young people. There was also a workshop by Paula Siqueira that shared her documentation techniques.
Collaborator Contribution Sheila Preston (Drama) and Gail May (Head of Education and Community Partnerships) UEL put together a wide team from across UEL that includes Lauren Hedges (Widening Participation) and Dawn Ludick (Social Work). The team held a series of meetings and recruited students from both Drama and Social Work degrees. The workshop was held at UEL in July 2018 in collaboration with Newham Virtual School.
Impact Training of Drama and Social Work undergraduate students. Training in Discrete Artistic Documentation. Residential Workshop at UEL July 2018.
Start Year 2017
 
Description London University TVF Partnership -University of Greenwich (2017 - Still Active) 
Organisation University of Greenwich
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The TVF team has held four knowledge sharing meetings for our university partners, and supplied them with the Making Places guide to holding a university residential for care-experienced young people.
Collaborator Contribution Natasha Oxley and Harry Derbyshire have attended the knowledge sharing meetings and workshops at QMUL. They have made contact with the WP team and have assembled a plan and staffing for the workshop to take place in June 2019.
Impact There will be a residential workshop at Greenwich in 2019.
Start Year 2017
 
Description NNECL 
Organisation National Network for the Education of Care Leavers
PI Contribution Members of the TVF team have participated in the annual NNECL conference and workshops.
Collaborator Contribution Priya Clarke, who is Chairman of NNECL is a close collaborator, sitting on the TVF Steering Group and giving regular advice on project planning.
Impact TVF participation in NNECL funded Become consultation on education of care-experienced young people and care leavers.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Battersea Arts Centre Audio ChatBack 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A three day workshop with 20 Wandsworth young people led to Battersea Arts Centre Audio Chatback, where young people designed and delivered an immersive audience experience with testimonies of their life experience. Two public performances were followed by dialogue in which young people shared their ideas with the audience about what would improve the care they receive. Feedback from the event shows raised awareness and the desire to change personal and systemic practices. Following he event the young people were invited to visit the Department for Education to perform their testimonies.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://www.theverbatimformula.org.uk/hear-it-see-it/
 
Description Bow School Verbatim Masterclass 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Dr Maggie Inchley held a Verbatim Masterclass for 40 Gifted and Talented Drama Students at Bow School, June 2018, assisted by three QMUL Drama and English students.
Pupils gained experience of a new theatre process, and their teacher, Ms Crombie, reported that they were successfully using it in their GCSE devising paper.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Cross-sectoral University Dialogue Event at QMUL 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This event at QMUL brought together local authority children's services staff with university academics, widening participation staff and care leaver students. The testimonies performed made these practitioners more aware of the multiple challenges faced by care experienced young people as they try to make progress in their educational careers, and led to reflection on how personal and systemic practices need to change. Audience members were asked to reflect particularly on the transition between care and education, and how universities can do more to generate a sense of belonging.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Handle with Care, Wellcome Trust 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact 'Handle with Care' was a The Late Night Care Event at the Wellcome Trust was curated by Lois Weaver, July 2018.

This was a mix of live performances, conversations and a live radio show, in which Dr Maggie Inchley was interviewed by J P Devlin (BBC Radio 4 Saturday Live). The TVF testimonies were performed, broadcast live in the building and streamed online.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://wellcomecollection.org/pages/WyEAXScAAFshfCw7.
 
Description No Dream is Too Big Sharing 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact At a sharing event at the end of the Verbatim Formula residential at QMUL there was a young people led performance and dialogue event for foster carers, social workers, other members of children's services, and university staff. It was also attended by Ian Valvona, from the Department for Education. Sharing their dreams as well as the challenges they were facing with adults in their lives and with university staff gave opportunities for productive dialogue centred around the young people's needs, sparking awareness and understanding of the multiple needs of care leavers. As a result of this work, in which young people's performance enabled staff to reflect on their own working practice, has led to departments and services working together better to support care leaver students.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description School Campus Visit 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact A group of 30 selected pupils - amongst whom were care-experienced young people - from Idenham school came with teachers to a QMUL campus visit organised through Widening Participation. Using the verbatim techniques and with contact with the project's facilitators pupils were able to ask questions, find out about university in an enjoyable way, and self-narrate their aspirations for careers and education in the future. The school reported how much pupils had enjoyed and learnt about university from the visit. A blog on the project website gives more details and impact evidence.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.blogs.sed.qmul.ac.uk/2017/04/05/verbatim-formula-report-josh-gardner/
 
Description TVF De-colonization Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This was a Decolonial Transformations Workshop, at the Teaching and Learning Centre, University of Sussex, November 2018. Participants considered adapting TVF methodologies in the light of their own research projects across the world.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description TVF Website 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact The Verbatim Formula Website engages with a range of audiences to give information about our research and service. It has a range of different content, notably an Audio Collage, which contains clips of care-experienced young people, foster carers, social workers, audience members and other stake holders reflecting on the project and its practices. It also has reports/pieces on the project's activities and awards (eg. on the use of verbatim theatre techniques as part of campus visits by schools to QMUL; a blog by Dr Sadhvi Dar on the use of creative evaluation practices; and a link to a Hansard record of Dr Inchley and Dr Baker's contribution to the GLA Inquiry into Children's Rights at Parliament, 2017, to which they were called as experts and used verbatim performance).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.theverbatimformula.org.uk