'One by One': building the digital literacies of UK museums

Lead Research Organisation: University of Leicester
Department Name: Museum Studies

Abstract

The impact of digital media on museums has been pervasive and profound. The notions of visit and object, collection and exhibition, have all been recoded by the presence and influence of five decades of digital technology. Constructively disruptive, 'digital' has changed the idiom of 'museum' (Parry 2007, 2010). And yet, it is widely recognised that the digital literacy of the museum workforce remains one of the key challenges continuing to impede the adoption of technology within the sector (NMC, 2015; 2016). According to Nesta, the AHRC and Arts Council England (2014; 2015), over a third of museums in the UK still feel that they do not have the in-house skills to meet their digital aspirations, and rather than improving, some digital skills areas have decreased.

Addressing this pressing issue, the aim of the 'One by One' project is to leverage interdisciplinary scholarship to understand how to deliver a transformative framework for museum workforce digital literacy.

Our project builds upon two years of foundation research and international collaboration, and a call by the international community of digital heritage researchers, enshrined in the 'Baltimore Principles' (NMC 2016), for a shift in the way we think about digital training in museums. Our response is to use the idea of the 'postdigital museum' (Parry 2013) as a conceptual framework in which to use humanities scholarship to design, empirically test and propose an alternative training and development provision.

A form of practice-led research, 'One by One' uses the protocols and sequencing of Design Thinking to organise and drive its activities, with Action Research as the method to carry out a series of design experiments (interventions) in an array of localised museum settings across the UK. Having used a series of case studies to review the skills ecosystem for digital skills in the UK museums sector, our project uses a set of 'Literacy Labs' with museum professionals to help generate typologies of museum digital literacy to identify relevant 'activations' for developing each of these digital literacies. Led by our network of six 'Digital Fellows', these typologies of digital literacies and activation are then tested through a series of action research interventions situated in Amgueddfa Cymru - National Museum Wales, National Museums Scotland, The National Army Museum, The Royal Pavilion & Museums Brighton and Hove, Derby Museums Trust, and The Museum of London. 'One by One' will synthesise the findings of this test phase of the project into a refined 'Framework of Museum Digital Literacy', which it will then share at a major national Skills Summit co-hosted with Arts Council England, as well as in a single open online professional development resource, hosted by FutureLearn, free and accessible for the whole museum sector.

We aim to produce measurable changes in the confidence and competence of the museums workforce to use technology in their practice, as well as the awareness and understanding of policy makers surrounding the use of digital in museums. This is research that will benefit not just the museum workforce in the UK, but policy makers working in the fields of cultural policy, heritage and creative economy. 'One by One' is an ambitious collaboration between academics, museums and national cultural agencies: the Museums Association; the Association of Independent Museums; the Museum Development Network; Arts Council England; Culture24; the Heritage Lottery Fund; Nesta; the Collections Trust; and the National Museums Directors' Conference. And, as such, our project responds directly to the new Minister of State for Digital and Culture, who in his first major speech on museums, 22 Sept. 2016), called for museums to harness 'academic collaboration', to 'work better together in the digital age'.

Planned Impact

Our impact goals are to produce measurable changes in:
- The confidence and competence of the museums workforce to use technology in their practice
- The awareness and understanding of policy makers surrounding the use of digital in museums

Who will benefit from this research?
We have identified two key beneficiary communities:
- The museums workforce in the UK
- Policy makers working in the fields of cultural policy, heritage and creative economy

How will stakeholders benefit from the research?
1. The museums workforce: We will work with a range of organisations, Culture24, (Museums Association, Association of Independent Museums, the Museum Development Network, Heritage Lottery Fund, Arts Council England, Nesta, the Collections Trust, National Museum Directors' Conference) to produce an online professional development resource [M10], sharing our new Museum Digital Literacy Framework', free of charge via FutureLearn, to the entire sector in the UK and beyond.

In addition, we will have a presence at key events in the museums diary (Museum Computer Network international conference, the 'AIM' UK national Conference, the 'Museums Association' national conference, and the 'Museums and the Web' international conference) to explore the implications of our findings with those working in the sector. We will also make use of key trade and interface publications including Museums Journal and Museum International. Co-creation of our research impact outputs together with our museum practitioners is at the heart of our impact strategy. As a result, the learning resource will be meaningfully embedded in practice, and more palatable and adaptable to adopt to a range of museum settings.

2. Policy makers: Our policy stakeholders will benefit from our research in two ways. First through representatives on our International Advisory Board, we will improve the awareness and depth of understanding of digital matters in the museums setting, and actualise opportunities to directly influence policy-making. Second, we will produce a Policy Pack [M9] which presents the research in a range of usable formats such as policy and ministerial briefings, case studies, slides and video clips to ensure our evidence informs emerging policy thinking. We aim to launch this at an informal breakfast event in Westminster.

As a result of this impact strategy, we will make a demonstrable, measurable difference on the ways in which museum professionals use technology to enhance their practice for the benefit of our culturally-rich wider society.
 
Description The PHASE ONE findings of the 'One by One' research project pointed to an existing mindset, evident within the UK museum sector, that assumes digital skills relate to specific technical skills. This is a mindset in which the key digital challenge for museums is seen in terms of needing to react to a changing set of specific hardware and software technologies. This is a system in which specific technical skills are then prioritised, leading to the recruitment of particular sets of qualifications and expertise. These finite technical competences are then not only limited in how they can be deployed in the institution, but lead to siloed and more traditional forms of training and development, which then self-determines a demand for yet more of these technical skills. In this context (and cycle), museums create specific projects relying on particular competences that only a few IT professionals can master. This creates a relationship with digital that is reactive, narrow and disconnected both from the needs of audiences and the wider needs of museums, resulting in a fundamental lack of digital confidence across the museum.

However, importantly, this research is also showed evidence of the traditional skills ecosystem having the potential to adapt - incorporating a new set of interdependencies. This alternative system (if only in aspiration rather than practice) is one in which the museum prioritises a wider digital literacy (rather than a more narrow set of technical skills), leading to the recruitment of more varied forms of digital competency and - perhaps more significantly - confidence. With, then, a more adaptable workforce, there is greater flexibility in how these wider literacies and varied confidences can influence the organisation, including in the development of a more responsive culture of learning and development, which in turn sustains the value given to prioritising digital literacy over specific technical skills. This more progressive, more digitally mature system (and cycle), is less about generic technical skills being determined by a higher national skill set or curriculum. Instead - crucially - these are digital literacies that grow from below, out of the needs of individuals, within particular professional settings, in the local contexts of their specific institutions. This adapted ecosystem is characterised by the movement from the mindset of developing technical skills within a small specialist group such as IT teams, to instead cultivating digital literacies within everyone's roles within the institution.

PHASE TWO of the project explored the digital skills and literacies that people who work and volunteer in museums need. We looked at ways of defining, articulating and understanding those needs, building upon the findings of Phase One and using a range of research and consultation methods. Phase Two found that the museum sector's approaches to understanding and building digital skills and literacies need to be:
• Person-centred, led by individuals' needs rather than technologies or other external drivers;
• Purposeful and values-led, clearly related to organisational missions; and
• Nuanced and contextualised - helping people understand and relate skills to their own practice and setting.
Phase Two found that museum people need:
• Clear, consistent and widely recognised terms and definitions around digital skills and literacies, but not a single, set list;
• Responses that are both strategic and practical - helping them to set priorities and plan and track progress and proficiency;
• Support in recognising and then creating and enabling the conditions needed for organisational change to happen and thrive; and
• Guidance, tools and resources to support them in building their digital skills and literacy effectively.

In PHASES THREE and FOUR, building on this foundation (over the first year of the project), a series of year-long, action-research interventions at a diverse range of museums across the UK, led by a network of five project 'Digital Fellows', experimented with alternative approaches to building institutional and individual digital confidence.

The research demonstrated the value of a more nuanced model of 'digital' within museums that differentiated between the use of digital (tools and technology), the management of digital (processes and strategy), the creation of digital (production and collections), and the understanding of digital (culture and values).

Second, the research evidenced that rather than a uniform 'curriculum' or single (top-down) shared set of core skills (the orthodox approach to development over the last two decades), the museum sector needs, instead, a context-based and person-centred (bottom-up) approach, by which each institution and each employee can identify their own pathway to digital maturity.

The research also revealed how the development of museum digital confidence needs to be a holistic (whole organisation) initiative. Specifically, the research constructed and evidenced a multi-dimensional view of how in museums visioning can prioritise digital, leadership can activate digital, business processes can enable digital, institutional culture can support digital, and how people can drive digital.
Exploitation Route From PHASE ONE. It is anticipated that the 'Skills Ecosystem' map, produced by the first phase of the 'One by One' project will provide the museum sector with a reliable, robust and high-resolution evidential base from which to consider the context of digital transformation. More specifically, the value added by applying an 'employment studies' lens to this familiar set of questions and challenges for the museum sector, not only provides practitioners and policy makers alike with a new more nuanced and differentiated typology with which to frame this discourse, but a much clearer picture of why museums have found a block to developing digital skills. In particular, it is the key difference between 'technical skills' and 'digital literacy' (and how much the former locks museums into a specific limiting mindset and cycle, and how the latter enables a more mobile and agile workforce) that is the initial key finding that will allow other researchers, sector leaders and policy-makers (many of whom are partners on the project) to vision new strategies for sector development and transformation around digital.

From PHASE TWO then modelled definitions of both 'Digital' and 'Skills' for the museum sector in a clear and evidenced way. These models have been validated through the fieldwork phase of the project, and now sit at the centre of the conceptual framework of the project.

From PHASE THREE and FOUR a portfolio of practice-focused outputs have been shared in an open online professional development resources for the entire sector in the UK and beyond. This portfolio of resources comprises six case study insight reports, nine practical 'How to' guides, and three in-depth 'Explainer' studies on key digital literacy concepts - all made available free of charge via Culture24's 'Digital Pathways' platform.
Sectors Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections

URL https://one-by-one.uk/category/findings/
 
Description PHASE 1 - Empathise The first (six month) phase of the (30 month) 'One by One' project (September 2017 - February 2018) has been to build a map of the existing digital skills ecosystem within the UK museum sector. Led by CAMEo (Research Institute for Cultural and Media Economies) at the University of Leicester, and the Warwick Institute for Employment Research, this work has involved an extensive literature review (of over 300 key reports and professional documents), 5 x fieldwork visits to our museum partners, 48 x case study interviews undertaken as part of field visits, a museum professionals focus group, and the production of 4 x case study reports. Initial findings from this work was submitted for international peer review in January 2017 to the 'Museums and the Web' museum professionals international conference, and accepted for inclusion in the event proceedings. The paper was published prior to the conference in April 2017, and presented (in Vancouver) the same month, where the completed findings and the final report for the Phase were also formally published and launched. The Key findings were that: - There are different practices in how digital responsibilities and skills are distributed, managed and shared across UK museums. Three models were found that exemplify the patterns of digital engagement, how organisational structures and digital responsibilities are evolving, and what this means in practice for digital skills. - Digital is increasingly seen as part of everyone's skill set and all roles have some kind of digital element. Digital skills are not in ready supply throughout the workforce. Using, translating and developing in-house skills is a dominant approach to supplying digital skills. This is being achieved through internal recruitment, informal development and, to a limited extent, formal training. - Digital is becoming professionalised in the museum as digital roles and responsibilities become standard practice. This denotes a shift from responsibility for digital as an 'add-on' to people's roles, towards dedicated digital roles and the democratisation of digital. - As digital becomes institutionalised, museums are restructuring and evolving. There has been the introduction of new roles and departments, as well as changes to existing roles and a greater demand for digital skills. The distinction between specialist digital roles and other roles is becoming blurred. - Museums are exploring, learning and demanding new digital skills as they innovate and create with digital. - There is a deeper understanding by museums of the digital skills, knowledge and expertise needed, as they reflect on the current and potential future of the museum. - Museums are engaging increasingly in evidence-based digital practice as data from web analytics and social media accounts are being reflected upon and used in decision-making processes. - Currently, there is little evidence that museums are systematically assessing and identifying digital skills needs. The need and strategic importance of doing some kind of skills needs assessment or analysis to identify in-house digital skills was recognised, but the challenge has been finding the time. - There is little evidence of in-house formal and planned training around digital skills or digital literacy. However, informal and ad hoc training to upskill and reskill staff and volunteers is being provided. Much development activity around digital is informal, with staff supporting each other and sharing skills. - There is evidence of an assumption in museums that 'digital skills' relate to a specific set of technical competencies. This can create a relationship with digital that is reactive, resulting in low digital literacy across the museum. However, importantly, there is also evidence showing that the museum sector has the potential and intention to adapt. PHASE 2 - Define The second six months of the project (March-August 2018) identified the specific digital skills needs of the UK museum sector. Led by research partners Culture24, evidence was gathered through a high-profile online survey (and campaign) to the sector supported by a series of 'Literacy Lab' focus group events in Cardiff, Edinburgh and Brighton - involving over 60 practitioners. A parallel piece of work conducted an extensive survey of over 50 international digital literacy models and frameworks from education, government, NGOs, charities and commercial organisations. The outcomes of the Phase were shared with the sector at the national Museums Association conference, held in Belfast in November 2018, in a specially arranged highlight session in the event's programme, and a follow-on panel discussion. The key findings were that: - The museum sector needs a response to digital skills development that is person centred, purposeful and useful. - The museum sector does not need a single list of digital competencies, but instead the means to allow workers to understand (and define) digital skills generally, to set strategic priorities, and to plan and track proficiency. - The museum sector needs a consistent set of terms and definitions around 'skills' (differentiating between competency, capability and literacy), and museum-based categories of 'digital literacy. - Museum people have a need to understand their particular contexts within which their digital skills operate. - Museum people need to be supported in developing their different digital literacies in different contexts, through the appropriate conditions, activations, tools and resources. PHASE 3 - Ideate and Prototype The third phase of the project (September-November 2018) brought all of the project partners together for a two-day immersive 'Design Workshop' with phase leads, Derby Museums. Taking the needs identified and evidence in Phase 2, a design thinking method was used to design six action research projects that would take place in each of the partner museum - each 'intervention' a test and experiment of how each of the needs might be met. The Phase identified the following challenges: - How might we empower museum people with everything they need to grow digital skills for where they are? - How might we nurture a culture in which museum people easily understand the opportunities and parameters of their individual context, in order to develop their digital skills? - How might we help museum people have confidence to create a plan to identify and use the digital skills they already have, improve where they need to, and understand the impact on themselves and beyond? - How might we ensure all museum people encourage and influence the permeation and flourishing of digital skills across their organization? - And how might we jumpstart adaptable conditions and skills to enable all museum people to work digitally? Working close with each museum partner, six detailed project plans were then developed. PHASE 4 and 5 - Test and Share The findings from Phase 4 and 5 have been used in a number of ways. CHARTER: At a national and policy level, the key concepts of the 'One by One' research have been adopted by the UK government's new 'Digital Culture Compass' (DCC). Commissioned by Arts Council England and the National Lottery Heritage Fund (following the recommendations of DCMS's 'Culture is Digital' report, 2018), the DCC includes a new 'Digital Charter' that sets out the principles for all digital projects within the UK culture sector. Prof. Parry co-authored the Charter - embedding the 'person-centred' and 'context-based' principles of the One by One research within it. TRACKER: The insights, principles and definitions from the 'One by One' project have also been adopted by the DCC's 'Digital Tracker' - a government supported, online, sector-wide self-auditing tool to help any cultural institution understand its digital maturity. All cultural institutions that will use this government tool will do so using the principles, insights and definitions around digital skills developed by the 'One by One' project. RESOURCES: A key practice-focused output from the 'One by One' project is the open online professional development resources that share the new digital skills framework to the entire sector in the UK and beyond. This portfolio of resources comprises six case study insight reports, nine practical 'How to' guides, and three in-depth 'Explainer' studies on key digital literacy concepts - all made available free of charge via Culture24's 'Digital Pathways' platform. PARTNERSHIP: As a consortium, 'One by One' continues to work with its partners (Museums Association, Association of Independent Museums, Museum Development Network, Collections Trust and National Museums Directors' Council) to engage the sector with the understanding and development of the new 'Framework'. However, this partnership has also extended to include new international partners. Workshops sharing the Framework have taken place in Hong Kong, in Xi'an City (with support of the Chinese Association of Museums) and in Taiwan (with the Chinese Museums Association). Furthermore, a new sector-wide transatlantic partnership ('One by One (UK-US)') continues the development of the 'Framework' by bringing together national professional bodies (the 35,000 members of the American Alliance of Museums and the 12,000 individual members of the Museums Association) and established communities of practice (the 1,221 active Special Interest Group members of the US Museum Computer Network and UK Museums Computer Group), with a core group of museum teams with an international reputation for digital leadership: at the Smithsonian Institution (Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian American Art Museum, and the cross-organisation American Women's History Initiative); and across the UK (including Science Museum Group and Victoria and Albert Museum. CHANGE: The 'One by One' Digital Fellows, have managed substantive change in each of the partner museums; valuing digital thinking in museums through institutional visioning processes [Derby Museums]; sharing digital leadership in museums through collaborative and distributive models of working [National Army Museum / Museum of London]; adapting digital capability in museums through context-based and person-centred business processes [National Museums Scotland]; leveraging digital knowledge capital in museums through the cultivation of communities of practice [National Museum Wales]; and building digital confidence in museums through creative agency of the workforce [Royal Pavilion Museum Brighton & Hove]. EVENTS: the research continues to be shared at key national and international events in the museum diary, including the Museum Computer Network international conference, the AIM national conference, the Museums Association conference and the Museums and the Web international conference. These platforms are used to explore the implications of the project findings with those working in the sector, and to publicise the new 'Framework'. A programme of 'Roadshows' (supported by bursaries to assist the attendance of smaller organisations) have also taken the findings of the projects (the concepts, resources and tools) out to museums across the UK; events in Leeds, Cardiff, Edinburgh and Belfast have supported over 40 organisations to engage with and adopt the 'Framework'. SUMMIT: A major 'Digital Skills Summit' in London (February 2020), convened by the project partners, has brought together funders (UKRI), policy makers (ACE and NLHF), as well as professional bodies, directors and leaders from across the sector - the aim to establish an on-going consortium, with the support of DCMS, to embed the Framework with the strategy and operation of the UK museum sector. TRAINING: The concepts, resources and tools from 'One by One' are also now embedded within the Culture24's 'Leading the Sector' programme - an eight-month professional development initiative in digital leadership for 16 CEOs within the heritage sector, funded by The National Lottery Heritage Fund (NLHF) as part of its national multi-million pound 'Digital Skills for Heritage' campaign. The 'One by One' consortium has also been invited to support the Head of Digital Policy at NLHF on the development of its new priority to benchmark digital skills within the wider heritage sector.
Sector Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections
Impact Types Cultural,Policy & public services

 
Description 2 by 2: Structuring Museums to Deliver New Digital Experiences
Amount £100,546 (GBP)
Funding ID AH/T013192/1 
Organisation Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 02/2020 
End 11/2020
 
Description Digital Culture Compass 
Organisation Arts Council England
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution x
Collaborator Contribution x
Impact x
Start Year 2019
 
Description Annual MA Conference  
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Discussed possible skills and technology exchange with industry and business and International museum partners.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Building digitally confident museums, DEN Conference  
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Introduced One by One Project to Netherlands digital culture sector.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Chaired the MA Technology Day  
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Chaired the MA Tech Day.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Clore Leadership Development Day  
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Participated in a skills design workshop for broader culture sector development.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Conference Presentation - Institut national d'histoire de l'art (Paris) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The 'One by One' research team was asked by the French Cultural Ministry to share its recent findings at this 'Professional Day' on how museums might develop digital strategies.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://traduction.culture.gouv.fr/url/Result.aspx?to=en&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.culture.gouv.fr%2FThema...
 
Description Curator Computer Creator: Museums + AI Network  
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Asked to share and discuss future skills needed for artificial intelligence projects.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description DEN Digital Management Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presented 'Pathways to Maturity' concept featuring the Digital Culture Compass and One by One Project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Interviewed for Digital Workplace Group podcast  
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Co-presented about the impact of the University of Leicester Digital Campus and discussed the One by One Project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Museums Computer Group Museums Tech Conference  
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Event attendee and participated in skills exchange workshop
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description MuseumsNext Digital  
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Participated in and One by One Project mentioned in formal presentation during this conference.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description One by One Skills Roadshow Belfast 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Facilitated / presented One by One Project findings and tools.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description One by One Skills Roadshow Cardiff 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Facilitated / presented One by One Project findings and tools.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Panel discussion at national event for museum practitioners - organised by Museums Computer Group, Imperial War Museum London, 3 November 2017. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The PI on the 'One by One' digital literacies project, Dr Ross Parry, was part of a panel discussion at the Imperial War Museum, London, that formed part of the 'Museums+Tech conference 2017: Museums and tech in a divided world' (3 November 2017). The event was attended by over 100 members of the 'Museums Computer Group', an international community of practice for those interested in (and working with) cultural technology. Coming just two months after the start of the 'One by One' project, the event was the formal public launch of the project, with many of the partner organisations in the project (Culture24, National Museum Wales, Museum of London, Brighton and Hove Museums, Derby Museums Trust) present. This 'launch' was co-ordinated with the start of the social media channels (and campaign) of the project, co-ordinated by Culture24. A key outcome from the project was the approach to the PI and the project team of other museums and organisations keen to be part of the work of 'One by One' over the next two years.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://museumscomputergroup.org.uk/events/museumstech-2017/
 
Description Regimental Museums Training Day  
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Asked to present about One by One Project and deliver a skills identification workshop.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019