GCRF GlobalGRACE (Global Gender and Cultures of Equality)

Lead Research Organisation: Goldsmiths College
Department Name: Anthropology

Abstract

In recent years there have been significant advances made internationally to raise awareness about gender inequalities. International organisations including the United Nations have also sought to ensure that the creation of more equitable futures for women and men are at the heart of global change and sustainable development. Despite those advances, gender inequalities persist in myriad forms and negatively affect the health and wellbeing of people the world over in a variety of ways, from constraining access to opportunities and resources to fostering gender based violence. We recognise the importance of both international bodies and national states and governments in agenda setting, enacting progressive legislation and adopting gender positive policies, as well as the work of those political activists who are at the forefront of pressing for these changes. However, this project is focused on the way that cultures of equality are being built and created from the ground up. We do so by investigating the creative ways that people and organisations in developing countries respond to and seek to address existing inequalities and enhance the wellbeing of people marginalised as a result of those. Our aim is disclose the ways that those everyday responses not only address harms, but also become opportunities for broader societal impact through creating new and alternative cultures of equality.

How and in what ways does the proposed research use art, curation, literature and performance to address these challenges? Our answer, following the novelist Jeanette Winterson, is that, 'Everything starts as a story we tell ourselves about ourselves'. By that Winterson means that so long as we remain capable of telling different stories about our own and other lives, there is the possibility of creating more equitable and sustainable futures for all of us. That is our understanding of what cultures of equality are about: working with and alongside people both to disclose the situations of inequality and the bodily and mental impacts of that on them and the people they care for, and to begin to tell different stories about what their lives ought and could be. As scholars working across the humanities and social sciences we think there are considerable advantages to using different arts based practice including creative writing, dance, exhibitions, music, theatre, performance or social media in this process. These different multisensory methods enable people to share things about their lives that may be too sensitive and threatening to talk about directly. They also create opportunities not just to tell different stories but also to tell them in new and different sorts of ways. Our project draws together and creates new partnerships between people and organisations from across the world in and beyond the academy. In so doing we will share expertise and learn from each other about how we can best use these arts based research practices, both to enable us to better hear and understand the stories people tell, and to find better ways of using those stories to create the conditions that underpin and will enhance the economic development and welfare of all people.

Planned Impact

This project is concerned with the development, welfare and wellbeing of people in lower income countries who are marginalised by a range of intersecting gender inequalities. Through art events and exhibitions we seek to make visible the embodied experiences of those intersecting forms of inequality and their impact on people's wellbeing, broadly conceived, and demonstrate how these situations of marginality may become sites for challenging social divisions and producing new cultures of equality.

1. Marginalised people in DAC listed lower - middle income countries
The first beneficiaries of our work will be the people who participate as co-curators in the community based art events. Participating in performative events and curating visual images will afford people opportunity to creatively convey something of the everyday and embodied impacts of intersecting inequalities on their wellbeing, reflect on the key issues or interventions that might enhance their situation and enable them to make visible the way that their own work and lives contribute to making cultures of equality otherwise.

2. Project Partners and Community Based Organisations
The participation of third sector organisations in planning the research and contributing to community based art events will both encourage, and provide models for, an expanded use of art and other performative events to stimulate critical conversations about the relation between gender and development, wellbeing and the production of cultures of equality. These may then be extended to other similar community based organisations. The events aim also to increase investment in, and participation of marginalised people, in the work of these civic organisations that provide vital welfare services for their constituents but frequently struggle to find the resources needed to continue their work.

3. Policy Makers and Advocacy Groups
The principle benefits for policy makers and advocacy groups are threefold:
a) an enhanced awareness of the relation between intersecting inequalities and diminished wellbeing;
b) better appreciation of the way that NGOs and other project partners are meeting the welfare needs of marginalised peoples and pressing for changes to address the underlying issues of inequality; and
c) an opportunity to consider whether, and if so how, official equalities discourse may be critiqued and extended through engagement and encounter with alternative visions and versions of equality.

4. Impact on arts practitioners & museums
The exhibitions and events will include curated images, sound and text from the community arts based projects. Together the events and exhibitions will encourage art practitioners to consider how and in what ways visual and performing arts might become involved in dialogues about gender, wellbeing and development. More broadly this project proposes an alternative to how anthropological museums and exhibitions deal with contemporary forms of diversity issues: usually objects from the stores, dealing with the lives of past peoples. Our project will encourage museums and galleries to consider their role in dialogues about contemporary development and to reflect on ways that they might practically become sites for the production of cultures of equality.

5. General public impact
Wide public engagement at the exhibitions, workshops, discussions held as part of this project, as well as through digital forms of dissemination and dialogue, is seen as an essential element of this project. That includes, but is not limited to, the planned Global Museum of Equalities and the GlobalGRACE open access online course. Our aim is to raise public interest in and awareness about the relations between intersecting inequalities and diminished wellbeing, and encourage better appreciation and understanding of the creative cultural practices that enable people to overcome the obstacles they face in sustaining their lives.

Publications

10 25 50
 
Title 'Exchanging Cultures of Equality' 
Description Exchanging Cultures of Equality was installed in the Kingsway Corridor of the Richard Hoggart Building at Goldsmiths, University of London, 21 June-1 July 2018, co-curated by Siobhán McGuirk and Nirmal Puwar. The exhibition marked the launch of the Global Gender and Cultures of Equality (GlobalGRACE) project. The exhibition explored modes of exchange between Goldsmiths and collaborators from six countries: Bangladesh, Brazil, Mexico, the Philippines, South Africa, and the UK, and was the first iteration of an ongoing artistic project which sees the project partners collaboratively creating a 'global museum of equalities.' The exhibition Exchanging Cultures of Equality marks the starting point of a curatorial conversation in which we consider: what does it mean to create, and to communicate "cultures of equality" transnationally? What does it mean to request, send, exchange and migrate materials, ideas and visuals in a global and historical context? We began our modality of exchange by requesting from each team six Postcards, each featuring one image and up to fifty words, and one Object labelled with a text of up to fifty words. 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2018 
Impact As the first practical step in the GlobalGRACE project's commitment to developing a 'global museum of equalities' this exhibition had a very effective pre-planned impact on the researchers of the project, as the development of the exhibition included all researchers, the majority of whom had no previous experience in this field. Firstly through email and then face-to-face in London (where the researchers had all gathered for the first of the project's planned 'Partnership and Capability Events') the network collaborated on the preparation of the exhibition, led by Siobhán McGuirk and Nirmal Puwar from WP6. Working relationships were developed, common definitions and understandings were produced and practical skills and knowledge were shared, leaving the whole network considerably better trained and prepared for the future artistic and creative activities that all will be involved in. The public were also impacted upon, with evidence collected through creative feedback methods at the exhibition which involved visitors completing postcards, continuing a theme developed through the exhibition. 
URL https://exchangingculturesofequality.wordpress.com/2018/07/24/about/
 
Description GlobalGRACE Partnership Network 
Organisation Goldsmiths, University of London
Department Department of Anthropology
PI Contribution The GlobalGRACE project is led by a team of researchers based in the Departments of Anthropology and Sociology at Goldsmiths, University of London, leading departments that are focused on contemporary issues, the use of innovative methods and the cultivation of the sociological and anthropological imagination. We assembled the above listed network of partner institutions through preparing the bid, and since the commencement of the project on 1st October 2017 have led GlobalGRACE. The following academic staff are funded participants in the project: - Suzanne Clisby, Senior Research Fellow in Anthropology & Co-Director of GlobalGRACE - Yasmin Gunaratnam, Reader in Sociology - Mark Johnson, Reader in Anthropology & Co-Director of GlobalGRACE - Siobhán McGuirk, Early Career Researcher, GlobalGRACE - Nirmal Puwar, Reader in Sociology - Jimmy Turner, Senior Research Associate and Project Manager, GlobalGRACE In addition Goldsmiths are leading Work Package 6 (Space Invading: Curatorial Practice and the Making of a Global Museum of Equality), which focuses on how gender and intersecting differences impact on women and post-colonial lives in the UK and South Africa in the organisational spaces of museums and galleries. Attention will be drawn to how impact occurs on everyday working practices and to the different methods deployed to exert changes in organisations. These ongoing contributions are directed towards the following objectives: 1. Survey the field of gender and racialised relations in Museums in the UK and South Africa, with a specific interest in leadership and change, generate a finely tuned understanding of the inter-weaving of organisational in/equalities and lend a comparative frame to understandings of museums. 2. To build capacity within the sector for sharing and analysing experiences of gender and 'race' amongst professionals in the museums and galleries sector through academic facilitation and partnership. 3. To collate creative curatorial practices of space invading in both the UK and South Africa. Gathering a collection of practices which speak to different methods in which gender and intersecting differences can be highlighted in institutions. 4. To explore non-hierarchical collaborative methods for building transnational exhibitions on global equalities with attention to North-South, as well as South-South, inequalities within the research team. 5. To produce a mobile and revolving physical and virtual resource for a Global Museum of Equality, with consideration to scale, audience and ethics
Collaborator Contribution The University of Cape Town's African Gender Institute and Department of Drama are leading Work Package One (Working Women: Participatory theatre and the production of cultures of equality with and by sex workers in South Africa), working with NGO partner the Sex Workers' Education and Advocacy Trust. WP 1 uses participatory theatre to engage with and learn from existing initiatives among sex workers to challenge systems of sexual violence and raise the aspirations and self-confidence of women who undertake sex work in order to sustain themselves and others. Their ongoing contributions are directed towards the following objectives: 1. To build research capacity and capabilities of interdisciplinary, feminist, queer and critical race researchers in the package. 2. To create new collaborative partnerships between academics, NGOs, sex workers, and the public in South Africa with regards to sex work, gendered inequalities and wellbeing. 3. To create a research space wherein sex workers feel safe and enabled to narrate and convey their varied experiences of intersecting inequalities and resultant impacts on their wellbeing. 4. To use participatory theatre, narrative and audio-visual methods to elicit the relationships between sex workers' everyday lives, intersecting inequalities and existing practices and strategies that challenge such inequalities. 5. To build pathways to impact and enable the sharing of creative and critical cultural competencies through audio-visual representations, narratives and participatory theatre. Shahjalal University of Science and Technology are leading Work Package Two (Women Working in Men's Worlds: Visualising female construction workers and the quest for more equitable futures in Sylhet, Bangladesh), working with NGO the Institute of Development Affairs. WP 2 explores how collaborative film and photography led and curated by a group of female construction workers can be used to generate public awareness and make visible the intersecting inequalities they face and that shape their everyday struggles for survival. Their ongoing contributions are directed towards the following objectives: 1. To build research capacity and capabilities of interdisciplinary, feminist researchers. 2. To create collaborative partnerships between academics, NGOs, female construction workers, and publics in Bangladesh with regards to women's work and wellbeing. 3. To create a research space wherein female construction workers feel safe and enabled to convey their varied experiences of intersecting inequalities and resultant impacts on their wellbeing. 4. To use film making, photography and material curation and related training with, for and led by participants to elicit artistic representations of gendered precarity, struggles and achievements. 5. To build pathways to impact and enable the sharing of creative and critical cultural competencies in support of women's aspirations and in producing new public cultures of equality. PUC-Rio are leading Work Package 3 (Decolonizing Knowledge and Doing Masculinity 'Otherwise': Street art, dance and the production of cultures of equality in a Brazilian favela), working with NGO partners Promundo and IMJA. WP 3 focuses on the production of non-violent masculinities in Brazil's urban peripheries. It aims to promote cultures of equality through the decolonization of knowledge that challenges representations of the favela as a space of lack and violence and demonstrates the power and potentiality of the favela to create gender positive futures. Their ongoing contributions are directed towards the following objectives: 1. To build research capacity and capabilities of researchers in the package by learning from producers of knowledge regarding non-violent masculinities from Brazil's urban peripheries. 2. To create new collaborative partnerships between academics, NGOs, and the public in Brazil with regards to masculinity, violence, gendered (in)equalities and wellbeing. 3. To create a research space wherein people marginalised by gender, race, sexuality, and class feel safe and enabled to explore their varied experiences of intersecting inequalities and their impacts on wellbeing. 4. To learn from and extend critically modes of research and knowledge production outside traditional academic realms, most specifically street art, dance and music as generators of knowledge to promote well-being, equality and transformation of existing power relations. 5. To build pathways to impact and enable the sharing of creative and critical cultural competencies with and between artists, activists and academics. The University of the Philippines - Diliman are leading Work Package 4 (Making Life Lovable: Digital and Literary Productions of Cultures of Equality Among LGBTQ young people in the Philippines) in partnership with the NGO YMCA San Pablo. WP 4 uses creative writing workshops to engage with LGBTQ identified writers and young people in the Philippines and explore their subjectivities and the intersecting forms of inequality they experience. Their ongoing contributions are directed towards the following objectives: 1. To build research capacity and capabilities of interdisciplinary, feminist and queer researchers. 2. To create new collaborative partnerships between academics, NGOs, writers, educators and the public in the Philippines with regards to LGBTQ rights and well-being. 3. To create a research space wherein LGBTQ people feel safe and enabled to narrate and convey their varied experiences of intersecting inequalities and resultant impacts on their wellbeing. 4. To use creative writing and spoken word to elicit the relationships between LGBTQ people's everyday lives, intersecting inequalities and existing practices and strategies that challenge such inequalities. 5. To build pathways to impact and enable the sharing of creative and critical cultural competencies focused especially on literary production of cultures of equality within and across GG work packages. The Autonomous University of Chiapas are leading Work Package 5 (Por el buen vivir y el buen migrar: Creating cultures of equality through the Migrant Museum (MuMi) in indigenous communities of Chiapas, Mexico) in partnership with the NGO VocesMesoamericanas. WP5 explores the Migrant Museum (MuMi) in Los Altos de Chiapas and uses participatory art and film to investigate the lives of indigenous young women and men, the problems they face and possibilities for "Good Living" (Buen Vivir) and "Good Migration" (Buen Migrar) in the face of disappearance, detention and the violation of labour rights. Their ongoing contributions are directed towards the following objectives: 1. Strengthen the capabilities of the team of researchers through courses and specific training in theoretical and conceptual approaches, visual arts and participatory action research. 2. Create new collaborations and deepen relationships between academic teams, civil society organizations, artists and other social groups, to share experiences and enrich the MuMi project. 3. Facilitate, through art and action research, critical spaces for reflection on issues related to migration, human rights and gender inequalities in the communities of Los Altos de Chiapas. 4. Explore, analyse and document the methods, methodologies and conceptual frameworks underpinning the educational and cultural approaches of MuMi as a model for strengthening the collective action of indigenous women, men and youth in the life of their communities.
Impact 21 June-1 July 2018 - The partnership network co-curated the exhibition 'Exchanging Cultures of Equality', which was installed at Goldsmiths, University of London. This was multi-disciplinary, involving all the academic and NGO sector partners, and drawing from personnel across Gender Studies, Anthropology, Sociology, Literature Studies and Creative Writing, Drama, International Relations, and Visual Anthropology. 23-27 July 2018 - The first GlobalGRACE- University of the Philippines National LGBTQ Writers Workshop was held in Manila. Ten young LGBTQ poets writing in Filipino and other regional languages, as well as English were selected as fellows from an open national competition, and they then benefitted from the mentorship of a panel of nationally recognised poets and scholars. Partners Goldsmiths and the University of the Philippines were involved, drawing on a multi-disciplinary group of personnel from Gender Studies, Literature Studies and Creative Writing, and Anthropology.
Start Year 2017
 
Description GlobalGRACE Partnership Network 
Organisation Goldsmiths, University of London
Department Department of Sociology
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The GlobalGRACE project is led by a team of researchers based in the Departments of Anthropology and Sociology at Goldsmiths, University of London, leading departments that are focused on contemporary issues, the use of innovative methods and the cultivation of the sociological and anthropological imagination. We assembled the above listed network of partner institutions through preparing the bid, and since the commencement of the project on 1st October 2017 have led GlobalGRACE. The following academic staff are funded participants in the project: - Suzanne Clisby, Senior Research Fellow in Anthropology & Co-Director of GlobalGRACE - Yasmin Gunaratnam, Reader in Sociology - Mark Johnson, Reader in Anthropology & Co-Director of GlobalGRACE - Siobhán McGuirk, Early Career Researcher, GlobalGRACE - Nirmal Puwar, Reader in Sociology - Jimmy Turner, Senior Research Associate and Project Manager, GlobalGRACE In addition Goldsmiths are leading Work Package 6 (Space Invading: Curatorial Practice and the Making of a Global Museum of Equality), which focuses on how gender and intersecting differences impact on women and post-colonial lives in the UK and South Africa in the organisational spaces of museums and galleries. Attention will be drawn to how impact occurs on everyday working practices and to the different methods deployed to exert changes in organisations. These ongoing contributions are directed towards the following objectives: 1. Survey the field of gender and racialised relations in Museums in the UK and South Africa, with a specific interest in leadership and change, generate a finely tuned understanding of the inter-weaving of organisational in/equalities and lend a comparative frame to understandings of museums. 2. To build capacity within the sector for sharing and analysing experiences of gender and 'race' amongst professionals in the museums and galleries sector through academic facilitation and partnership. 3. To collate creative curatorial practices of space invading in both the UK and South Africa. Gathering a collection of practices which speak to different methods in which gender and intersecting differences can be highlighted in institutions. 4. To explore non-hierarchical collaborative methods for building transnational exhibitions on global equalities with attention to North-South, as well as South-South, inequalities within the research team. 5. To produce a mobile and revolving physical and virtual resource for a Global Museum of Equality, with consideration to scale, audience and ethics
Collaborator Contribution The University of Cape Town's African Gender Institute and Department of Drama are leading Work Package One (Working Women: Participatory theatre and the production of cultures of equality with and by sex workers in South Africa), working with NGO partner the Sex Workers' Education and Advocacy Trust. WP 1 uses participatory theatre to engage with and learn from existing initiatives among sex workers to challenge systems of sexual violence and raise the aspirations and self-confidence of women who undertake sex work in order to sustain themselves and others. Their ongoing contributions are directed towards the following objectives: 1. To build research capacity and capabilities of interdisciplinary, feminist, queer and critical race researchers in the package. 2. To create new collaborative partnerships between academics, NGOs, sex workers, and the public in South Africa with regards to sex work, gendered inequalities and wellbeing. 3. To create a research space wherein sex workers feel safe and enabled to narrate and convey their varied experiences of intersecting inequalities and resultant impacts on their wellbeing. 4. To use participatory theatre, narrative and audio-visual methods to elicit the relationships between sex workers' everyday lives, intersecting inequalities and existing practices and strategies that challenge such inequalities. 5. To build pathways to impact and enable the sharing of creative and critical cultural competencies through audio-visual representations, narratives and participatory theatre. Shahjalal University of Science and Technology are leading Work Package Two (Women Working in Men's Worlds: Visualising female construction workers and the quest for more equitable futures in Sylhet, Bangladesh), working with NGO the Institute of Development Affairs. WP 2 explores how collaborative film and photography led and curated by a group of female construction workers can be used to generate public awareness and make visible the intersecting inequalities they face and that shape their everyday struggles for survival. Their ongoing contributions are directed towards the following objectives: 1. To build research capacity and capabilities of interdisciplinary, feminist researchers. 2. To create collaborative partnerships between academics, NGOs, female construction workers, and publics in Bangladesh with regards to women's work and wellbeing. 3. To create a research space wherein female construction workers feel safe and enabled to convey their varied experiences of intersecting inequalities and resultant impacts on their wellbeing. 4. To use film making, photography and material curation and related training with, for and led by participants to elicit artistic representations of gendered precarity, struggles and achievements. 5. To build pathways to impact and enable the sharing of creative and critical cultural competencies in support of women's aspirations and in producing new public cultures of equality. PUC-Rio are leading Work Package 3 (Decolonizing Knowledge and Doing Masculinity 'Otherwise': Street art, dance and the production of cultures of equality in a Brazilian favela), working with NGO partners Promundo and IMJA. WP 3 focuses on the production of non-violent masculinities in Brazil's urban peripheries. It aims to promote cultures of equality through the decolonization of knowledge that challenges representations of the favela as a space of lack and violence and demonstrates the power and potentiality of the favela to create gender positive futures. Their ongoing contributions are directed towards the following objectives: 1. To build research capacity and capabilities of researchers in the package by learning from producers of knowledge regarding non-violent masculinities from Brazil's urban peripheries. 2. To create new collaborative partnerships between academics, NGOs, and the public in Brazil with regards to masculinity, violence, gendered (in)equalities and wellbeing. 3. To create a research space wherein people marginalised by gender, race, sexuality, and class feel safe and enabled to explore their varied experiences of intersecting inequalities and their impacts on wellbeing. 4. To learn from and extend critically modes of research and knowledge production outside traditional academic realms, most specifically street art, dance and music as generators of knowledge to promote well-being, equality and transformation of existing power relations. 5. To build pathways to impact and enable the sharing of creative and critical cultural competencies with and between artists, activists and academics. The University of the Philippines - Diliman are leading Work Package 4 (Making Life Lovable: Digital and Literary Productions of Cultures of Equality Among LGBTQ young people in the Philippines) in partnership with the NGO YMCA San Pablo. WP 4 uses creative writing workshops to engage with LGBTQ identified writers and young people in the Philippines and explore their subjectivities and the intersecting forms of inequality they experience. Their ongoing contributions are directed towards the following objectives: 1. To build research capacity and capabilities of interdisciplinary, feminist and queer researchers. 2. To create new collaborative partnerships between academics, NGOs, writers, educators and the public in the Philippines with regards to LGBTQ rights and well-being. 3. To create a research space wherein LGBTQ people feel safe and enabled to narrate and convey their varied experiences of intersecting inequalities and resultant impacts on their wellbeing. 4. To use creative writing and spoken word to elicit the relationships between LGBTQ people's everyday lives, intersecting inequalities and existing practices and strategies that challenge such inequalities. 5. To build pathways to impact and enable the sharing of creative and critical cultural competencies focused especially on literary production of cultures of equality within and across GG work packages. The Autonomous University of Chiapas are leading Work Package 5 (Por el buen vivir y el buen migrar: Creating cultures of equality through the Migrant Museum (MuMi) in indigenous communities of Chiapas, Mexico) in partnership with the NGO VocesMesoamericanas. WP5 explores the Migrant Museum (MuMi) in Los Altos de Chiapas and uses participatory art and film to investigate the lives of indigenous young women and men, the problems they face and possibilities for "Good Living" (Buen Vivir) and "Good Migration" (Buen Migrar) in the face of disappearance, detention and the violation of labour rights. Their ongoing contributions are directed towards the following objectives: 1. Strengthen the capabilities of the team of researchers through courses and specific training in theoretical and conceptual approaches, visual arts and participatory action research. 2. Create new collaborations and deepen relationships between academic teams, civil society organizations, artists and other social groups, to share experiences and enrich the MuMi project. 3. Facilitate, through art and action research, critical spaces for reflection on issues related to migration, human rights and gender inequalities in the communities of Los Altos de Chiapas. 4. Explore, analyse and document the methods, methodologies and conceptual frameworks underpinning the educational and cultural approaches of MuMi as a model for strengthening the collective action of indigenous women, men and youth in the life of their communities.
Impact 21 June-1 July 2018 - The partnership network co-curated the exhibition 'Exchanging Cultures of Equality', which was installed at Goldsmiths, University of London. This was multi-disciplinary, involving all the academic and NGO sector partners, and drawing from personnel across Gender Studies, Anthropology, Sociology, Literature Studies and Creative Writing, Drama, International Relations, and Visual Anthropology. 23-27 July 2018 - The first GlobalGRACE- University of the Philippines National LGBTQ Writers Workshop was held in Manila. Ten young LGBTQ poets writing in Filipino and other regional languages, as well as English were selected as fellows from an open national competition, and they then benefitted from the mentorship of a panel of nationally recognised poets and scholars. Partners Goldsmiths and the University of the Philippines were involved, drawing on a multi-disciplinary group of personnel from Gender Studies, Literature Studies and Creative Writing, and Anthropology.
Start Year 2017
 
Description GlobalGRACE Partnership Network 
Organisation University of Cape Town
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The GlobalGRACE project is led by a team of researchers based in the Departments of Anthropology and Sociology at Goldsmiths, University of London, leading departments that are focused on contemporary issues, the use of innovative methods and the cultivation of the sociological and anthropological imagination. We assembled the above listed network of partner institutions through preparing the bid, and since the commencement of the project on 1st October 2017 have led GlobalGRACE. The following academic staff are funded participants in the project: - Suzanne Clisby, Senior Research Fellow in Anthropology & Co-Director of GlobalGRACE - Yasmin Gunaratnam, Reader in Sociology - Mark Johnson, Reader in Anthropology & Co-Director of GlobalGRACE - Siobhán McGuirk, Early Career Researcher, GlobalGRACE - Nirmal Puwar, Reader in Sociology - Jimmy Turner, Senior Research Associate and Project Manager, GlobalGRACE In addition Goldsmiths are leading Work Package 6 (Space Invading: Curatorial Practice and the Making of a Global Museum of Equality), which focuses on how gender and intersecting differences impact on women and post-colonial lives in the UK and South Africa in the organisational spaces of museums and galleries. Attention will be drawn to how impact occurs on everyday working practices and to the different methods deployed to exert changes in organisations. These ongoing contributions are directed towards the following objectives: 1. Survey the field of gender and racialised relations in Museums in the UK and South Africa, with a specific interest in leadership and change, generate a finely tuned understanding of the inter-weaving of organisational in/equalities and lend a comparative frame to understandings of museums. 2. To build capacity within the sector for sharing and analysing experiences of gender and 'race' amongst professionals in the museums and galleries sector through academic facilitation and partnership. 3. To collate creative curatorial practices of space invading in both the UK and South Africa. Gathering a collection of practices which speak to different methods in which gender and intersecting differences can be highlighted in institutions. 4. To explore non-hierarchical collaborative methods for building transnational exhibitions on global equalities with attention to North-South, as well as South-South, inequalities within the research team. 5. To produce a mobile and revolving physical and virtual resource for a Global Museum of Equality, with consideration to scale, audience and ethics
Collaborator Contribution The University of Cape Town's African Gender Institute and Department of Drama are leading Work Package One (Working Women: Participatory theatre and the production of cultures of equality with and by sex workers in South Africa), working with NGO partner the Sex Workers' Education and Advocacy Trust. WP 1 uses participatory theatre to engage with and learn from existing initiatives among sex workers to challenge systems of sexual violence and raise the aspirations and self-confidence of women who undertake sex work in order to sustain themselves and others. Their ongoing contributions are directed towards the following objectives: 1. To build research capacity and capabilities of interdisciplinary, feminist, queer and critical race researchers in the package. 2. To create new collaborative partnerships between academics, NGOs, sex workers, and the public in South Africa with regards to sex work, gendered inequalities and wellbeing. 3. To create a research space wherein sex workers feel safe and enabled to narrate and convey their varied experiences of intersecting inequalities and resultant impacts on their wellbeing. 4. To use participatory theatre, narrative and audio-visual methods to elicit the relationships between sex workers' everyday lives, intersecting inequalities and existing practices and strategies that challenge such inequalities. 5. To build pathways to impact and enable the sharing of creative and critical cultural competencies through audio-visual representations, narratives and participatory theatre. Shahjalal University of Science and Technology are leading Work Package Two (Women Working in Men's Worlds: Visualising female construction workers and the quest for more equitable futures in Sylhet, Bangladesh), working with NGO the Institute of Development Affairs. WP 2 explores how collaborative film and photography led and curated by a group of female construction workers can be used to generate public awareness and make visible the intersecting inequalities they face and that shape their everyday struggles for survival. Their ongoing contributions are directed towards the following objectives: 1. To build research capacity and capabilities of interdisciplinary, feminist researchers. 2. To create collaborative partnerships between academics, NGOs, female construction workers, and publics in Bangladesh with regards to women's work and wellbeing. 3. To create a research space wherein female construction workers feel safe and enabled to convey their varied experiences of intersecting inequalities and resultant impacts on their wellbeing. 4. To use film making, photography and material curation and related training with, for and led by participants to elicit artistic representations of gendered precarity, struggles and achievements. 5. To build pathways to impact and enable the sharing of creative and critical cultural competencies in support of women's aspirations and in producing new public cultures of equality. PUC-Rio are leading Work Package 3 (Decolonizing Knowledge and Doing Masculinity 'Otherwise': Street art, dance and the production of cultures of equality in a Brazilian favela), working with NGO partners Promundo and IMJA. WP 3 focuses on the production of non-violent masculinities in Brazil's urban peripheries. It aims to promote cultures of equality through the decolonization of knowledge that challenges representations of the favela as a space of lack and violence and demonstrates the power and potentiality of the favela to create gender positive futures. Their ongoing contributions are directed towards the following objectives: 1. To build research capacity and capabilities of researchers in the package by learning from producers of knowledge regarding non-violent masculinities from Brazil's urban peripheries. 2. To create new collaborative partnerships between academics, NGOs, and the public in Brazil with regards to masculinity, violence, gendered (in)equalities and wellbeing. 3. To create a research space wherein people marginalised by gender, race, sexuality, and class feel safe and enabled to explore their varied experiences of intersecting inequalities and their impacts on wellbeing. 4. To learn from and extend critically modes of research and knowledge production outside traditional academic realms, most specifically street art, dance and music as generators of knowledge to promote well-being, equality and transformation of existing power relations. 5. To build pathways to impact and enable the sharing of creative and critical cultural competencies with and between artists, activists and academics. The University of the Philippines - Diliman are leading Work Package 4 (Making Life Lovable: Digital and Literary Productions of Cultures of Equality Among LGBTQ young people in the Philippines) in partnership with the NGO YMCA San Pablo. WP 4 uses creative writing workshops to engage with LGBTQ identified writers and young people in the Philippines and explore their subjectivities and the intersecting forms of inequality they experience. Their ongoing contributions are directed towards the following objectives: 1. To build research capacity and capabilities of interdisciplinary, feminist and queer researchers. 2. To create new collaborative partnerships between academics, NGOs, writers, educators and the public in the Philippines with regards to LGBTQ rights and well-being. 3. To create a research space wherein LGBTQ people feel safe and enabled to narrate and convey their varied experiences of intersecting inequalities and resultant impacts on their wellbeing. 4. To use creative writing and spoken word to elicit the relationships between LGBTQ people's everyday lives, intersecting inequalities and existing practices and strategies that challenge such inequalities. 5. To build pathways to impact and enable the sharing of creative and critical cultural competencies focused especially on literary production of cultures of equality within and across GG work packages. The Autonomous University of Chiapas are leading Work Package 5 (Por el buen vivir y el buen migrar: Creating cultures of equality through the Migrant Museum (MuMi) in indigenous communities of Chiapas, Mexico) in partnership with the NGO VocesMesoamericanas. WP5 explores the Migrant Museum (MuMi) in Los Altos de Chiapas and uses participatory art and film to investigate the lives of indigenous young women and men, the problems they face and possibilities for "Good Living" (Buen Vivir) and "Good Migration" (Buen Migrar) in the face of disappearance, detention and the violation of labour rights. Their ongoing contributions are directed towards the following objectives: 1. Strengthen the capabilities of the team of researchers through courses and specific training in theoretical and conceptual approaches, visual arts and participatory action research. 2. Create new collaborations and deepen relationships between academic teams, civil society organizations, artists and other social groups, to share experiences and enrich the MuMi project. 3. Facilitate, through art and action research, critical spaces for reflection on issues related to migration, human rights and gender inequalities in the communities of Los Altos de Chiapas. 4. Explore, analyse and document the methods, methodologies and conceptual frameworks underpinning the educational and cultural approaches of MuMi as a model for strengthening the collective action of indigenous women, men and youth in the life of their communities.
Impact 21 June-1 July 2018 - The partnership network co-curated the exhibition 'Exchanging Cultures of Equality', which was installed at Goldsmiths, University of London. This was multi-disciplinary, involving all the academic and NGO sector partners, and drawing from personnel across Gender Studies, Anthropology, Sociology, Literature Studies and Creative Writing, Drama, International Relations, and Visual Anthropology. 23-27 July 2018 - The first GlobalGRACE- University of the Philippines National LGBTQ Writers Workshop was held in Manila. Ten young LGBTQ poets writing in Filipino and other regional languages, as well as English were selected as fellows from an open national competition, and they then benefitted from the mentorship of a panel of nationally recognised poets and scholars. Partners Goldsmiths and the University of the Philippines were involved, drawing on a multi-disciplinary group of personnel from Gender Studies, Literature Studies and Creative Writing, and Anthropology.
Start Year 2017
 
Description GlobalGRACE Launch Event 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact On Friday 29th June 2018 the GlobalGRACE project hosted its first public event at Goldsmiths, University of London. The all day event consisted of a series of roundtable sessions at which the different research work packages of the project introduced their projects to an international audience of scholars, NGO representatives, members of the artist and creative industries and other members of civil society. Each roundtable was chaired by an independent gender specialist discussant, and the day finished with a panel comprised of internationally renowned gender studies professors from the USA (Professors Susan Stanford Friedman and Frances Negron Muntaner from the University of Wisconsin and Columbia University respectively), Africa (Professor Srila Roy from the University of Witwatersrand, South Africa), and Europe (Professor Rosemarie Buikema from Utrecht University, the Netherlands). These experts provided a detailed analysis of the plans for the project, and many pieces of advice for how it might proceed.
The main impacts of this event were fourfold:
1. Substantial benefits accrued to the GlobalGRACE network itself, through the feedback, both formal and informal, provided by the audiences to the roundtable sessions. During the stage of the project when concrete and practical plans for the empirical research ahead were being developed this feedback from scholars, NGO professionals, the artistic and creative community, and the general public were highly useful, and have had a considerably positive impact on the ongoing research design process.
2. Capacities and capabilities of all participants were enhanced through participation in the roundtables and attendant discussions and networking. This is particularly so for the ECRs, who as would be expected are less experienced than their more senior colleagues in both public speaking and engaging with a varied audience that stretched beyond the academic sector that they are most familiar with.
3. Awareness of the project was raised, most importantly beyond Goldsmiths, across the wide range of attendees. The impact of this is somewhat intangible at this stage, but members of the project networked extensively with professionals across the range of sectors highlighted above. This opened the door to potential future impacts in the form of collaborations with individuals and organisations, and we hope in future reporting periods to be able to concretise these discussions in the form of partnerships, collaborations, and other impactful activities.
4. Awareness was also raised more generally of the substantive and theoretical themes with which the project engages. These most prominently include, but are not limited to, gender equality; gendered impacts on wellbeing and livelihoods; the intersections of art, scholarship and decoloniality in development; and the importance of the concept of curation, which crosscuts these themes.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description GlobalGRACE- University of the Philippines National LGBTQ Writers Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact From 23-27 July 2018, the first GlobalGRACE- University of the Philippines National LGBTQ Writers Workshop was held in Manila. Ten young LGBTQ poets writing in Filipino and other regional languages, as well as English were selected as fellows from an open national competition, and they then benefitted from the mentorship of a panel of nationally recognised poets and scholars. Significantly, a number of the fellows were from outside the capital region including southern Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao. Here very clearly the varying impacts of inequality on mental and physical wellbeing were expressed through the poetry developed through the workshop. The workshop fellows have been invited to submit their revised poems to be published by UP press. This will be the first of a series of planned volumes arising from the annual series of writing workshops, with a further anthology planned as a learning and teaching resource for high school teachers. These resources will also contribute to the GlobalGRACE 'museum of global equalities' and online course. Moreover, in addition to the national benefits accruing from these eventual outputs, selected fellows and panellists will attend and act as mentors at the first community-based workshop which will be held later this year in the city of San Pablo, organised and hosted by project partners the YMCA San Pablo. This artistic exploration of the gender/wellbeing intersection will be an invaluable resource both in that country and for the project as a whole as all WPs develop and research this intersection through a variety of multisensory methods and artistic expressions.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.globalgrace.net/blog/the-first-globalgrace-up-national-lgbtq-writers-workshop
 
Description Key Note Panelist on Intersectionality 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact GG PI Mark Johnson was keynote panelist at the UKRI GCRF Collective Programme: Education, Gender and Resilience Town Hall Meeting Town Hall Meeting in London on 7 February discussing intersectionality from a GlobalGrace perspective.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Loving Oneself, Living with Others: 1st GlobalGRACE - YMCA community writing and performance workshop for LGBTQI + allies 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact The first planned local workshop event, 'Loving Oneself, Living with Others: 1st GlobalGRACE - YMCA community writing and performance workshop for LGBTQI + allies was held on 13 - 16 December. The event drew together young people from the community of San Pablo, Laguna. The workshop, which followed on from a launch event in the YMCA in October, 2018, was organised by Kate Ramil, our NGO project lead at YMCA San Pablo, and was comprised of both SOGIE awareness raising and a series of intensive day long workshops on creative writing, theatre and performance by academics and practitioners from Manila. The young people were also able to meet and receive mentoring from three of the writers from the initial national level writing workshop, who also performed poetry readings at the launch event previously in San Pablo
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Mobilising Global Voices 2019 participation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact GlobalGRACE was represented through poster and PI participation at the Mobilising Global Voices 2019: Perspectives from the Global South" event at Westminster, 27-28th February 2019 organised by GCRF AHRC in conjunction with the International Development Committee.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description PUC-IRI Seminar "Gender, Violence and Construction in peace: perspectives and debates in international politics" 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact The Seminar brought together academics, gender specialists and students form the state of Rio de Janeiro, and the roundtable "Intersectional Pathways to Transformational Policies. Rethinking Gender and (In)security beyond the maintenance of order" was organized by WP3 ECR Andrea Gill, with project researchers Linda Miriam (Promundo), Andrea Gill (PUC-Rio) and Marta Fernandez (PUC-Rio) participating as speakers.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://www.iri.puc-rio.br/evento/detalhe/201
 
Description WP2 - Participatory Film and Photography Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact WP2 (Bangladesh) held a participatory film and photography training symposium at the partner university Shahjalal University of Science and Technology (SUST) from 15th-21st February 2019. This opened with events open to under-and-post graduates at the university, where they had the opportunity to hear from award-winning Bangladeshi photographers and documentarians Tanveer Mokammel and Jashim Salam, with workshops lead by these professionals the following day for members of student film and photography societies SUPA and CHOKH and project researchers.
The remaining days saw concentrated gender filmmaking training provided by experts from the pan-Asian NGO 'Voices of Women Media' (http://www.voicesofwomenmedia.org/?page_id=10) to the project research team at SUST, which includes SUPA and CHOKH members.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description WP5 - MuMi presentation in Sonora State 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Project researchers from UNACH and VocesMesoamericanos travelled from Chiapas to the northern Mexican state of Sonora to give a presentation of the Migrant Museum (MuMi), a documentary screening and participatory workshop to day laborers in Sonora on November 29 and 30th 2018. This state attracts the largest number of migrant workers from other parts of Mexico, but these workers are often forgotten due to the focus on those migrants who cross the border into the USA.
The main objective during the event was to disseminate MuMi and the project and engage the day laborers in discussions of their rights and to seek answers to the problems they faced by the thousands of agricultural workers in Sonora. The main objective for future engagements is to open spaces for dialogue between day laborers and stakeholders to develop proposals that provide alternative solutions to the different problems and contribute to the visibility of this social group.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description WP5 - Transnational Encounter of Migrant Youth 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact In San Cristóbal de Las Casas in Chiapas on the 25th and 26th January 2019 project researchers participated in the third annual Encuentro transnacional Juventud Migrante (Transnational Encounter of Migrant Youth) organised by project partners VocesMesoAmericanos. Using a Participatory Film Workshop and a presentation of the Migrant Museum (MuMi) the team reflected with young people on the identity changes that they experience in migratory contexts, and the possibilities of building new forms of relationship and participation in communities, as well as to encourage the creation of a transnational network of young migrants in the Central American region who seek to strengthen their empowerment, their rights, and an articulated work that promotes interculturality.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Women of the World Festival, Rio November 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The Brazil-based Work Package Three team were involved in the organisation and participation in WOW (Women of the World Festival), held over the 16-18 November 2018 in Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). The WOW Festival is a space for women to celebrate their stories of struggles and achievements, and project lead Marta Fernandes and NGO lead Isabela Souza both contributed to public events: respectively round-tables entitled 'Nossa arma é nossa voz: a produção artística contemporânea pela promoção da igualdade de gênero' (Our voice is our weapon: Contemporary artistic production for the promotion of gender equality) and 'É possível e necessária uma cidade segura e humana para as mulheres' (A safe and humane city for women is possible and necessary).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://www.festivalmulheresdomundo.com.br/br/participantes/dialogos