Victoria's Self-Fashioning: curating the royal image for dynasty, nation, and empire

Lead Research Organisation: Historic Royal Palaces
Department Name: Kensington Palace

Abstract

Queen Victoria's name is used to identify an era. Over her long reign the British Empire covered a quarter of the globe. The birth of photography, and an explosion in print culture and the press, allowed her image to touch its furthest reaches. Her image, painted and sculpted, still dominates public spaces scattered throughout every continent. The narrative of Victoria's life has been rehearsed continuously since her death, testament to an enduring significance of her legacy. However, these narratives have not cast her as the focus of a culturally political study. Instead, orthodox approaches have set her up as a curiously inert figure, detached from public life and from the political shaping of the monarchy.

This project challenges these orthodoxies by examining Victoria herself as a pro-active political agent in the construction of an image for nineteenth century monarchy, and therefore directly implicated in what would become the Queen Victoria phenomenon. Bringing together an international group of scholars from the academy, research institutes, museums and collections, and heritage organisations, we propose three related workshops, and a conference.

The first workshop will discuss Victoria's creation of her own image, and the ways in which she managed her conflicted role, as a Queen Regnant, but also a wife and mother. Through a consideration of her surviving dress, together with the royal photographic collection, and Victoria's own amateur art works, it will assess how this image took physical form and was tested, honed, and developed by her, to serve the needs of the monarchy over the seventy-four years of her reign.

The second workshop will map the journey of this self-curated image from Victoria's private sphere to the public realm, and particularly across the British Empire. It will explore her involvement in the commissioning and purchase of painted, sculpted and photographic images to celebrate her family and its dynastic ambition. It will investigate their dissemination through print culture, and a burgeoning press, and their movement and use through many contexts, locally and globally. This will include the ways in which the image was used to counter critical responses to Queen and Empress, in attempts to quench the flames of colonial resentment at British rule in ceremonial events or to challenge republican sentiment from groups like the Chartists. This workshop will also explore how Victoria, as curator, presented the material of her life, for a public audience, in the first museum displays in her celebration, and how these were received.

The third workshop will discuss how the image of Victoria might be curated today in the digital sphere: how this material can be made available not only to scholars but to a wide, global public fascinated by Victoria. This will involve devising ways in which a project can be undertaken across a set of institutions around the globe, providing a methodological and practical template for further projects nationally and internationally. The workshop will consider ways in which the 'digital museum' can challenge the notion of the physical ownership of the material culture associated with this globally important figure, and can allow curation by a wider and more diverse audience.

We will inaugurate this project in late 2018, and bring it to a conclusion with the conference in 2019, the bicentenary of Queen Victoria's birth, which will bring it a special resonance. The conference will consider and test the project as a whole, synthesizing the workshop debates. The anniversary will also allow us to empower the pilot digital projects, which we will devise with the aim to touch a contemporary international audience in locations where her image still presides in sculpted form, or which are named after her, for instance, and use them to ask how Victoria's contested legacy is understood now.

Planned Impact

Victoria's Self-Fashioning has been designed to have impact in two related ways. First, we shall achieve impact through the content of our project; that is, the re-assessment of Victoria's image and the ways in which the queen curated her material legacy in the interests of monarchy and empire will change public and scholarly understanding of the queen and the legacy of the world she created. Second, we shall achieve impact by developing new digital curatorial methods for the interpretation and presentation of material culture, methods which can then be used for any project.

Particular impact activities will include:

Victoria's Bicentenary
Our project is scheduled to coincide with the bicentenary of Victoria's birth in 2019, an appropriate moment for a critical reassessment of her image, her approach to queenship, and the material legacy she curated. We aim to overturn the familiar images of the queen as the obsessive widow ossified by mourning or the dour matriarch who withdrew her presence from political life, and reveal a queen committed to nation, monarchy and empire, and an active agent in their development. Because our project will directly involve scholars from museums and collections leading this commemoration, this reassessment will re-shape the presentation of and debate about Victoria and her legacy across these institutions. This impact will, of course, be substantial in the activities of the HRP and our project partner, the Royal Collection, but will extend to institutions such as the V&A and Museum of London. Moreover, we explicitly address how to curate and present Victoria's image today in a post-colonial world, our impact will extend around the globe, first, in museums in India, New Zealand and Canada from which our participants will be coming, and more widely thereafter.

Public Events and Conference
HRP, which includes Kensington Palace, Queen Victoria's birthplace, and the site of an early royal museum in her commemoration, has a network of many thousand members and patrons who can be drawn into the subject, through public events. The major event will be a two-day conference at the end of the project, which will enable our project's impact on the general public, as well as providing a springboard for further public and educational events at Kensington Palace.

Websites
The web will be a crucial aspect of our impact activity. Films made at the workshops will be available through the websites of HRP and the Paul Mellon Centre, and discussions are in train with other digital platforms, including that maintained by the Royal Collection Trust. Again, this will not only provide impact through the content of the film, but will also provide impact by offering a template for the animation of material culture online, which can be be used by other museums and galleries, local historical organisations, amenity societies and others.

Museum Practices
While our project will have an immediate impact on museum displays crafted for the bicentenary commemoration, it will also have impact in the longer term, helping shape major research projects in collections holding Victoria's material legacy. These include a research project to log the first collection at the V+A, future displays and discussions planned in Germany, and elsewhere, as well as the cataloguing of Victoria's wardrobe at HRP.

Cultural Events
By involving broadcasters, theatre-makers, and other cultural practitioners in the project, we shall ensure that public cultural events such as radio and TV broadcasts, theatre productions, lectures and education events will be generated nationally and locally. Of particular importance will be the impact for post-colonial communities, not least in the UK. We shall ensure that publicity and marketing associated with events at HRP and elsewhere are directed towards these communities, in order to ensure a diverse marking of the bicentenary and thinking about the legacy of Victoria in the future.

Publications

10 25 50
 
Title Contribution to 'Bright Nights'. Three late night public 'salons' at Kensington Palace 
Description On October 7th, October 29th and 13th November 2019, 'Bright Night' salons were held at Kensington Palace. These were experimental evening events put together with the ambition to attract new audiences, to test alternative palace operating regimes, and to introduce more powerfully political narratives into the palace interpretation. The design of each event was led by the HRP Learning and Engagement team, but the team leader, Rosanagh Fuller, attended the 'Victoria's Self-Fashioning' workshops and conference, and both the PI (Marschner) and CI (Hatt) later advised on the themes to explore within these events. Each Bright Night was conceived as an evening of pop-up talks, and poetry, games, theatre, dance and art sessions. The theme selected was to explore how Victoria's history, and the history of empire is discussed and negotiated from multi-national perspectives. History text books from Text books from Commonwealth countries around the world were used to compare alternative readings of the same historical events. Items from the palace handling collection were used to encourage attendees to discuss the many narratives they opened up. A dance performance by ....................... used photography recording the nineteenth century black community to explore how interactions with contemporary society were negotiated. Each event was attended by 300-400 guests 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2019 
Impact The 'Bright Night' salons brought a significant new younger audience into the palace. It began to establish possibilities for evening opening of the palace. Even though these events were the first public evening events in nearly ten years they proved immediately popular to a sizeable visiting community. The activities which formed part of each salon allowed encouraged an active debate of the powerful and troubling political narratives of empire and imperialism, subjects which historically have been touched on lightly and sporadically, if at all in earlier exhibitions and public programming. The salon series was formally evaluated, with the ambition that this would inform and revitalise future palace programming. 
 
Title Contribution to exhibition: Victoria: Woman and Crown. Kensington Palace 24th May 2019- 6th January 2020 
Description 'Victoria: Woman and Crown' exhibition opened at Kensington Palace on 24th May 2019, and run until 6th January 2020. Occupying six rooms, it was multimedia, incorporating paintings, prints and drawings, photography, sculpture, and costume. it was enriched with contemporary artwork from installation artist Jane Wildgoose, who took inspiration from the underpinning exhibition premise. information giving within the exhibition incorporated multiple vices, to give alternative perspectives and interpretations of the artefact content. This was achieved through the medium of poetry commissioned from local communities having South-East Asian heritage. The exhibition premise was to explore using the material legacy of Victoria's life, how she had negotiated in an active and imaginative way, the various roles which her position and gender placed upon her - queen, wife, and mother. The key members of the exhibition tea, attended the 'Victoria's Self-Fashioning' workshops, and took advantage from learning from the invited delegates from the nations and regions, as well as from museums and universities in India, Canada, Australia, the USA, Germany. Through the research networks contacts and onward networks were established which would eventually underpin the multi-voice artefact captions model. The exhibition received widespread very positive press coverage within newspapers, TV, and other broadcast media. It was visited by approximately ......... palace visitors. 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2019 
Impact Shaping of the underpinning narrative of an successful exhibition visited by approximately ....... palace visitor. The workshop research and debate directly informing the information given through exhibition captions and other information giving devises. 
 
Description The funded phase of the project 'Victoria's Self-Fashioning: Curating Royal Image for Dynasty, Nation and Empire' came to an end in the early summer 2019. Three research workshops were held, in September, November 2018, and in March 2019. These brought together 35 scholars for workshop 1 held at Windsor Castle, 37 scholars for workshop 2 held at Kensington Palace, and 35 scholars at workshop 3 held at the Paul Mellon Centre, London. Discussants to Workshop 1 were drawn from both museums and universities in the UK and the US. Discussants for Workshop 2 were drawn from Germany, Belgium, Canada, India, and Australia. Discussants for Workshop 3 were drawn from the UK, the US, and Pakistan. In anticipation of the Workshop 3, which debated the opportunities the digital sphere presents towards a greater global reach, and democracy in curation two discussion forums were held at the University of Oxford. These brought together faculty and representatives from the student body- 8 discussants to forum 2, and 11 discussants to forum 2 - to debate means by which recent developments in digital technologies, including those in the sciences, could be mobilised in the humanities to assist with a more diversified, decentralised curation of a global subject. The interlinked debates held in the workshops were bought together at an international conference held at Kensington Palace in May 2019. For the conference there was an open call for papers, allowing 31 scholars to join the group of 7 invited international speakers. The conference was attended by 110 delegates, a balance of university, research institute, and museum based scholars, people working within the media and digital sphere, the general public. A team of volunteer facilitators was put together after a call was made to HRP's Members community. The call was over-subscribed and volunteers were organised in teams to ensure that the greatest number could be involved and have opportunity to engage in the discussions.

As part of the conference programme a private view, and tours of the exhibition 'Queen Victoria: Woman and Crown', and the new re-presented rooms within the palace used by Queen Victoria as a child, were provided by Polly Puttnam and Claudia Williams from the Historic Royal Palace curatorial team Both Puttam and Williams had attended the 'Victoria's Self-Fashioning' workshop series, and these contributed importantly to the underpinning premise, especially of the exhibition, where it informed the selection of exhibits, and was articulated in the textual commentary.

A number of significant discoveries were made as a result of the Victoria's Self-Fashioning research network. The first was the reattribution of a work 'The First Council of Queen Victoria' within the Royal Collection (RCIN 407146) from James Brooks(1825-1901) to Henry Jamyn Brooks (1865-1925). An corrected attribution will be placed on the Royal Collection Trust website in the next information updating round. At the first workshop the significance of Queen Victoria's extensive interventions into the publishing of her diary as 'Leaves from the Journal of Our Life in the Highlands' was recognised by the scholarly community assembled. HM The Queen has given permission for PI Joanna Marschner, to make a new critical edition of the 'Leaves' to include for the first time Victoria's commentary. Marschner will be working with workshop 1 delegates Professor Margaret Homans and Professor Adrienne Munich. A contract for the publishing of the critical edition is in the process of being signed with Oford World Classics (Oxford University Press).

The project saw the making of an international network of scholars within the academy and the museum studying Victoria focused histories. This allowed a new internationally based discussion to be initiated about how Victoria's history is perceived by the global community. It established the value of bringing these, and other international research communities more closely together in the future to achieve a more nuanced curation of a powerful, but troubling global figure. Discussion revealed the unrest and anger within the BAME community that their involvement in the presentation of imperial and global histories was tokenistic rather than serving more meaningful diversification and de-centring ambitions.

The debate at workshop 3 proved especially important in suggesting the responsibilities for organisations and institutions with the charge of, or ambition to, curate the histories of contested global figures. It opened up questions about how a greater democracy could be achieved in curating artefacts, allowing different lenses to be deployed in looking at objects and a multiplicity of narratives to be derived. After a lively discussion about the politics of the digital sphere, Historic Royal Palaces resolved that as an organisation it should explore means by which information about its collections can be made audience facing, and in a form that would allow multiple interpretations to be invited from communities nationally and internationally, as both research communities and the widest of popular audiences are encouraged through the new networks. This has led to the preparation of a Knowledge Transfer Partnership funding application with the Department of Digital Humanities at the University of Oxford.

The exhibition 'Victoria: Woman and Crown' opened at Kensington Palace on 24th May 2019, and ran until 6th January 2020. The underpinning premise that informed the selection of exhibits, and the narrative set up around these, was anchored in the debates of the 'Victoria's Self-Fashioning' workshops. It explored how Victoria, as female monarch regnant negotiated competing gender expectations imposed by contemporary society, Victoria as queen, wife and mother, found that each role had its place in political constrictions, and this is reflected in the creation of her visual imagery. The exhibition also explored new ways of presenting alternative readings of familiar narratives. This was achieved by commissioning poems inspired by the exhibits from members of local communities having South-East Asian heritage. Part of the commentary was also provided through the medium of artist installation by Jane Wildgoose, an artist who had shaped the thinking behind Workshop 3 and had contributed a paper towards it. The exhibition was viewed by approximately 350.443 visitors.

Following the 'Victoria's Self-Fashioning' conference Marschner and Hatt negotiated a publishing opportunity with digital journal ''19: Interdisciplinary Studies in the Long Nineteenth Century'. The special edition, will bring together essays, digital exhibitions, film content, and a 'conversation piece' from 14 scholars who contributed to both the workshop series and the conference, and also a wider international community of artists, writers, policy makers, community activists and more, who will be challenged to provide a short commentary on their engagement with and navigation of Victoria's complicated legacy now. Publication anticipated 2021.

Over October and Noveber 2019 the Learning and Engagement team from Historic Royal Palaces held three evening salons called 'Bright Nights'. The intention behinds these was a attract a new audience for the palace, and to experiment with alternative opening regimes. The underpinning theme for the salons was based in the debate enabled by the 'Victoria's Self-Fashioning: Curating Royal Image for Dynasty, Nation and Empire', which members of the Learning and Engagement team attended. Both Marschner and Hatt, PI and CI for 'Victoria's Self-Fashioning' subsequently provided advice and materials which helped shape the ambition and design of the events. The evenings involved performance, dance, pop-up talks, poetry, games and art sessions exploring questions of Britain and Empire, and the place of Victoria at the heart of this. They were attended by 900 people. 78% of these people were London based. they were mixed aged with younger than 35 at 40%. They were ethnically diverse, with BAME 38%. 68% of the audience had never visited the palace before. Perceptions of the events was favourable. 93% agreed 'it made then feel welcome regardless who I am'. The majority (84%) felt that the event offered something very different and had contemporary relevance (81%).There were positive learning and engagement outcomes with 'transformation' (I felt inspired to find out more about some of the topics' being agreed or strongly agreed by 87% of those attending. The events had a positive impact on the profile of Kensington Palace, creating an awareness of it as a place to visit, fostering emotional engagement, and projecting positive values as 'accessible' and 'progressive'.

As the research for 'Victoria's Self-Fashioning' continued Dr Lucy Worsley approached us about a potential TV programme which would explore Queen Victoria's engagement with, and patronage and promotion of contemporary music and musicians. Marschner and Hatt met with the production company to provide information and advice which shaped the narrative. 'Queen Victoria: My Musical Britain' was shown on BBC two on 11 May, 2019. It attracted 419,000 viewers, and a 2.5% share of BBC Two's slot average share. Adults ABC1 made up 74% of the audience profile. We hope to be able to retrieve iplayer and catch up figures to add to these totals.
Exploitation Route Publication of new research uncovered in the course of the research network to be published in a special edition of the journal '19: Interdisciplinary Studies in the Long Nineteenth Century' managed by Birkbeck, University of London. This will ensure that new research undertaken by eleven scholars as a result of this project is made available to the widest academic audience

One of the research assets identified and interrogated as part of the 'Victoria's Self-Fashioning: Curating Royal Image for Dynasty, Nation and Empire' was the series of edited texts for Queen Victoria's 'Leaves from the Journal of our Life in the Highlands'. Victoria's involvement in the editing process is evident. she critiques both text and illustrations, showing a keen appreciation that this insight into her life would need to be handled strategically, as once it left her province they would circulate internationally, shaping the perceptions of an international community of the woman who sat at the heart of empire. Permission has been granted by HM The Queen for a new critical edition of 'Leaves' to include the important evidence of Victoria's approach to their editing, to be brought together by Joanna Marschner, PI of the project, and project discussants Professor Margaret Homans (Yale) and Professor Adrienne Munich (Stonybrook). The volume will be published by Oxford World Classics.

Professor Margaret Homans has devised a course for Yale University, to be taught in London grounded in the premise of 'Victoria's Self-Fashioning: Curating Royal Image for Dynasty, Nation and Empire'. The first iteration of this is held January-March 2020.


Three podcasts are in preparation to ensure that there remains a legacy of the discussion which built up though the workshop series. Recordings were made following workshops 1 and workshop 2, to capture discussions about the extent and nature of Queen Victoria's self-curation, and then to map the journeys of her image internationally, and to establish how this was variously negotiated, appropriated, manipulated and rejected. The third podcast, still in preparation, will gather key discussants at the third workshop to debate with the project PI and CI the reasons for the continued potency of Victoria's image, and the implication this brings for those involved in curating her history.
Sectors Creative Economy,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Education,Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections

 
Description Two paintings owned by HM The Queen have been re-attributed from the artist James Brooks (1825-1901) to Henry Jamyn Brooks (1865-1925). This information will be added to the publically accessible Royal Collection Trust collection database at the next information up-date round. The premise which underpinned 'Victoria's Self-Fashioning: Curating Royal Image for Dynasty, Nation and Empire' has been used by one of the discussants, Professor Margaret Homans, to design a course for Yale University, to be taught in London.The first iteration of the course runs between January - March 2020. The debate which built through the series of three project workshops has been used to inform the selection of artefacts, and the interpretative narrative constructed around them in the exhibition 'Victoria: Woman and Crown' held at Kensington Palace, May 24th 2019 - 6 January, 2020. This exhibition was viewed by approximately350,443 visitors. The debate which built though the series of three project workshops has been used to inform, and inspire the performance, dance, pop-up lectures, poetry, games and art sessions, which formed 'Bright Nights' at Kensington Palace. there were three 'Bright Nights': late night salons held in October and November 2019. The salons were attended by 900 visitors. They have provided important diagnostic information about alternative operating regimes, and became an experiment for ways in which new a variety of new visitor demographics could be drawn into Historic Royal Palaces' sites. As a result of the workshops, Historic Royal Palaces has resolved that it needs to research and implement a way to provide audience facing access to its collections information. This is with the intention of better managing co-curation projects, artistic and research collaborations, and providing another form of access into the history of the buildings and collections in their charge. Finance to underpin a Research Transfer Partnership with the Department of Digital Humanities at the University of Oxford has been allocated with the HRP annual operating plan 2020-2021. The KTP which is being prepared will explore the opportunities CABINET software developed by the Oxford team could provide for HRP. Permission has been given by HM The Queen for the preparing of a critical edition of Queen Victoria's 'Leaves from the Journal of Our Life in the Highlands', to include for the first time the extensive annotations made by Victoria herself. PI Marschner, will work on this publishing venture with project Workshop 1 delegates Professor Margaret Homans, and Professor Adrienne Munich. A publishing contract has been negotiated with Oxford World Classics (Oxford University Press). Publication date anticipated 2022. PI Marschner and Dr Lucy Worsley have negotiated a contract with Yale University Press to published a book titled provisionally 'Queen Victoria's Wardrobe' The book will comprise a series of curated chapters written by 7 scholars who attended both Workshop 1, Workshop 2 and the 'Victoria's Self-Fashioning' conference. It will draw together new research undertaken as part of the project, which established the nature and the extent of Victoria's self-curation, especially in the case of self-image. Publication date anticipated 2021.
First Year Of Impact 2019
Sector Creative Economy,Education,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections
Impact Types Cultural

 
Description Knowledge Transfer Partnership with Department of Digital Humanities, University of Oxford 
Organisation University of Oxford
Department Digital Humanities
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution During the course of the three 'Victoria's Self-Fashioning: Curating Royal Image for Dynasty, Nation and Empire' workshops, and the conference, the need to explore and improve new ways of de-centring and diversifying of royal histories became evident. Historic Royal Palaces, the lead institution in collaboration with project partner the University of Oxford initiated discussions towards establishing a Knowledge Transfer Partnership with the Centre for Digital Humanities to support work in developing new, more interactive, audience facing collections information for Historic Royal Palaces. This is with the intention of drawing many voices from the nations and regions, and also internationally, into the re-contextualising of the palace sites and collections.
Collaborator Contribution Under a Knowledge exchange partnership arrangement the University of Oxford will contribute 50% funding support to a post-doc post for a period of approximately two years.
Impact Setting up arrangements in progress
Start Year 2020
 
Description Preparation of special edition of journal with Birkbeck College University of London to support 'Victoria's Self-Fashioning: Curating Royal Image for Dynasty, Nation and Empire' 
Organisation Birkbeck, University of London
Department Centre for Nineteenth Century Studies
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Project PI Marschner, and CI Hatt have negotiated with the editorial team of '19: interdisciplinary Studies in the Long Nineteenth Century' for a special edition to publish new research retrieved in the course of the 'Victoria's Self-Fashioning: Curating Royal Image for Dynasty, Nation and Empire'. '19: Interdisciplinary Studies in the Long Nineteenth Century' is a publishing arm of Birkbeck College University of London. The journal will provide an enduring record for the project.
Collaborator Contribution The volume of '19: Interdisciplinary Studies in the Long Nineteenth Century' will serve as vehicle for eleven scholars who controbuted various to Workshop 1, Workshop 2, Workshop 3, and the conference convened as part of the 'Victoria's Self-Fashioning: Curating Royal Image for Dynasty, Nation and Empire'. The scholars have been drawn from from the UK, Europe, and US to publish new material.
Impact Still active
Start Year 2019
 
Description Fashioning Victoria: curating royal image for dynasty, nation and empire. International conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact International conference
Date: 20-21 May 2019
Location: State Apartments, Kensington Palace
Number of attendees: 99
Subsidised invites: Dr Joanna Marschner (PI), Professor Michael Hatt (CI), Dr Sara Ayres (Project Administrator) Dr Kate Heard (Project partner), Dr David Tompkins (Project partner) , Dr Sarah Turner (Project partner), Professor John Plunkett, Dr Jeremy Brooker
Overseas invitees: Professor Margaret Homans (Yale), Professor Adrienne Munich (Stonybrooke University NY), Professor Sarah Carter (University of Alberta, Canada), Professor Maria Nugent (ANU, Canberra, Australia),
Other delegates from Germany, The Netherlands, France, Canada, USA
Impact: Evaluation forms: thank you letters
Audio recording and transcripts available
Publication: Digital Journal proposed: Victoria's Self-Fashioning: Curating Royal Image for Dynasty, Nation and Empire. Papers from conference and workshop community identified, the authors agreement for chapters, digital exhibitions, interviews and films secured. Proposal prepared. Proposal submitted to British Art Journal, and not accepted by editorial committee. Proposal re-written and submitted to 19: Interdisciplinary Studies in the History of the Long Nineteenth Century.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Fashioning Victoria: curating royal image for dynasty, nation and empire. Radio series: Encounters with Queen Victoria: Frieda Arnold and managing the wardrobe' 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Radio series: Encounters with Queen Victoria: Frieda Arnold and managing the wardrobe' with Lucy Worsley and Beatrice Behlen (Museum of London)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Fashioning Victoria: curating royal image for dynasty, nation and empire. University of Oxford Digital Workshop 1 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Oxford Digital Workshop 1
Date: 12 December 2018
Location: Radcliffe Humanities Centre
Number of attendees: 10
Impact
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Fashioning Victoria: curating royal image for dynasty, nation and empire. University of Oxford Digital Workshop 2 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Oxford Digital Workshop 2
Date: 17 January 2019
Location: Quillen Room, Mathematics Department, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter
Number of attendees: 11
Impact:
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Fashioning Victoria: curating royal image for dynasty, nation and empire. Workshop 1, The many Victorias: exploring Victoria's curation of herself, 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Workshop 1
Date: 17 September 2018
Location: The Royal Collection Trust
Number of attendees: 35
Subsidised invitees: Dr Joanna Marschner (PI), Professor Michael Hatt (CI), Dr Sara Ayres (Project Administrator) Dr Kate Heard (Project partner) , Dr David Tompkins (Project partner) , Dr Sarah Turner (Project partner), Professor John Plunkett,
Overseas invitees: Professor Margaret Homans, Professor Adrienne Munich
Impact: Thank you letters
Audio recording and transcript available
Interviews: Professor Margaret Homans, Professor Adrienne Munich
Podcast: Nadja Noel with Dr Joanna Marschner (PI), Professor Michael Hatt (CI), Professor Margaret Homans, Professor Adrienne Munich
Publication: Research asset identified and initially explored in anticipation of Workshop 1. Proposal for critical edition of Queen Victoria's Leaves from the Journal of our Life in the Highlands. Prof. Margaret Homans (Yale), Prof. Adrienne Munich (Stonybrook University NY) and Dr Joanna Marschner (HRP). Preliminary research undertaken at the Royal Archives, Windsor Castle. Proposal prepared. Proposal submitted to Oxford University Press
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Fashioning Victoria: curating royal image for dynasty, nation and empire. Workshop 2, Workshop 2 Private Sphere to Public Realm: Mapping the journeys of Victoria's image 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Date: 30 October, 2018
Location: State Apartments, Kensington Palace
Number of attendees: 37
Subsidised invitees: Dr Joanna Marschner (PI), Professor Michael Hatt (CI), Dr Sara Ayres (Project Administrator) Dr Kate Heard (Project partner), Dr David Tompkins (Project partner) , Dr Sarah Turner (Project partner), Professor John Plunkett,
Overseas invitees: Dr Yvonne Ward (La Toube University, Australia), Professor Sarah Carter (University of Alberta, Canada), Professor Maria Nugent (ANU, Canberra, Australia), Professor Harish Trivedi (University of Delhi)
Other delegates from Belgium
Impact: Thank you letters
Audio recording and transcript available
Interviews: Dr Joanna Marschner (PI), Professor Michael Hatt (CI), Dr Yvonne Ward (La Toube University, Australia), Professor Sarah Carter (University of Alberta, Canada), Professor Maria Nugent (ANU, Canberra, Australia), Professor Harish Trivedi (University of Delhi)
Podcast: Nadja Noel with Dr Joanna Marschne (PI), Professor Michael Hatt (CI), Dr Yvonne Ward (La Toube University, Australia), Professor Sarah Carter (University of Alberta, Canada), Professor Maria Nugent (ANU, Canberra, Australia), Professor Harish Trivedi (University of Delhi)
Publication:
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Fashioning Victoria: curating royal image for dynasty, nation and empire. Workshop 3. Workshop 3 Curating Victoria's Image in the Digital Sphere, 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Workshop 3 Curating Victoria's Image in the Digital Sphere,
Date: 13 March 2019
Location: Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, London
Number of attendees: 38
Subsidised invitees: Dr Joanna Marschner (PI), Professor Michael Hatt (CI), Dr Sara Ayres (Project Administrator) Dr Kate Heard (Project partner) , Dr David Tompkins (Project partner) , Dr Sarah Turner (Project partner), Professor John Plunkett, Emily Kasriel (BBC World Service). Mercedes Kemp (Poet), Dr Jane Wildgoose (artist), David Micklem (Arts Council England Consultant), Abeera Kamram (digital producer, Birmingham, Karachi)
Overseas invitees: Professor Laura Wexler (Yale)
Impact: Suggestion from the University of Oxford that a Knowledge Exchange Partnership is set up. Thank you letters
Audio recording and transcript available
Interviews: Discussion: Professor Laura Wexler
Podcast
Publication
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Fashioning Victoria: curating royal image for dynasty, nation and empire.TV programme. Queen Victoria and her Music 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact TV programme; Queen Victoria and Music: (Producer Chloe Penman) with Lucy Worsley
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019