Belonging and learning: Using co-produced arts methodologies to explore youth participation in contexts of conflict in Kenya, Uganda and the DRC

Lead Research Organisation: Manchester Metropolitan University
Department Name: Faculty of Education

Abstract

The proposed network will explore the potential contribution of arts-based methods to research concerning education provision in situations of conflict and protracted crisis. Researchers from Manchester Metropolitan University (MMU), Makerere University (MU) and PEDER will collaborate with local artists in Kenya, Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) to bring together displaced populations of young people with teachers, social workers and the local education officials who make the policy and practice decisions that affect them as part of three networking meetings. The proposed network will explore the potential of different forms of artistic expression as a way of overcoming power imbalances and communication difficulties, and promoting mutual learning between stakeholders at different levels of the education system. It aims to re-think displaced young people's experience using artistic expression, supporting community artists to be co-investigators and encouraging academics to decentre their knowledge production practice to prioritise local knowledge and coproduce information using performance, poetry, oral traditions and non-linguistic forms of knowledge rather than words.

In Kenya, Dr Su Corcoran (MMU) will collaborate with Mike Wamaya, an award winning ballet teacher, to facilitate coproduction of knowledge about street-connected young people's experiences of education, through the medium of dance. The Uganda meeting, which will explore education provision for refugees, will be organised by Dr Virginie Tallio (MU) and illustrator Charity Atakunda. In DRC, Thomas D'Aquin Rubambura (PEDER) will collaborate with Faustin Muliri Miruhu, a poet and playwright, to organise a workshop with street-connected young people who have been displaced by ongoing conflict in the country. The approach of the networking meetings, of using community artists as co-investigators and artistic expression to encourage stakeholders from various levels of the education sector to co-produce knowledge, aims to enable all participants to contribute through the performance art chosen for the session. Group making activities will encourage the participants to attune, listen to and debate with each other.

In focusing on young people who are street-connected, internally displaced or refugees, the project takes an interdisciplinary, cross-sectoral approach - exploring intersections of experience of these populations of young people as they gain access to and transition (back) into education. Displaced populations of young people such as these, problematise the boundaries between humanitarian and international development fields of research and practice, and potentially contribute useful perspectives to research into the provision of education in emergencies and translating Sustainable Development Goal 4 into practice in protracted situations of conflict and crisis.

The project will be led by Corcoran, in collaboration with Prof. Kate Pahl (MMU) who specialises in using arts-based methods and work with community artists as co-investigators. Pahl will chair an initial planning meeting in Uganda that will bring the network's four key collaborators together with the three artists who will co-facilitate the networking meetings, to ensure that together, the networking meetings form an integrated whole that contributes to the aim of informing future research into education provision in situations of conflict and protracted crisis. A future planning meeting, after the networking meetings, will take place in Manchester UK, to reflect on the Networking Meetings and the art produced at each one. This art will be curated into a self-published book and a web-space that will showcase the learning that has taken place as part of the co-production process. In addition, this meeting will be used to develop a future research plan based on the local knowledge developed during the networking meetings that will translate into a bid for further funding.

Planned Impact

The network focuses on benefitting young people from displaced communities whose access to inclusive education has been limited as a result of this displacement. The network members, which include the core group of researchers and artists planning and facilitating the Networking Meetings and the stakeholders who take part in them, will also benefit through their shared contributions to the networking meeting. The network will develop as part of the project. Each meeting will bring together three of the four key collaborators (Tallio - IR, Corcoran - R-CoI, and Rubambura - OP); one of the three artists; local stakeholders working within the particular field focus chosen for that country context; and young people who are refugees and/or street-connected. The key collaborators will draw upon the contacts developed through their previous work in each country to invite members to participate. Potential network members could include, but are not limited to:
Kenya: Hon. Isaac Mwaura - nominated MP for Special Interest Groups; Joanna Wakia - Research coordinator at Retrak; District Children's and Education Officers, and representatives of organisations such as Amref, Undugu Society, Pendekezo Letu, and the street-connected young people they support;
Uganda: refugees from Nakivake settlement, urban refugees from Kampala, local government officials and representatives from the refugee organisation YARID;
DRC: local officials and NGO representatives from the cities of Bukavu and Goma and the surrounding territories of South and North Kivu provinces, which have been affected by conflict on and off since 1996 and multiple socio-economic, food security and humanitarian crises, and staff and young people supported by the organisation PEDER.
Indirectly this research will benefit user communities - namely stakeholders working in education in the 3 countries of focus and in other LMIC contexts.
The immediate benefit for all beneficiaries is the ability to participate in the Networking meetings, to share in the exchanges and debates around education for displaced communities and the potential contribution of arts-based research to education and learning in LMIC contexts affected by conflict and/or protracted crises. Those attending the Networking meetings will be encouraged to use them as the beginning of ongoing research and practice-based collaborations.
The learning that takes place, of using arts-based methods to decentre academic and policy makers' knowledge production practices, may impact upon working practice of the various stakeholders who attend - encouraging more participatory processes of decision making. Teachers and youth workers' may reflect upon their experiences of networking to begin the process of adapting their pedogogies of practice to better represent the needs of the young people they support. Policy makers, such as MPs, government officials and local district children's or education officers, may reflect upon how they can better attune and listen to young people through active and participatory consultation processes to inform policy and practice development. Rubambura and PEDER will build on their work on the Growing up on the Streets research project, extending their networks to different countries in the region.
The project aims to develop the network collaboration and coproduce foundational knowledge to inform a longer-term research programme that will develop, implement and evaluate the use of performance art and coproduction in education research. A self-published book and a web-space will be developed to showcase the art produced as part of the Networking meetings and aspects of the recordings taken at the meetings, which will outline the points of dissonance and convergence that are identified and mapped across the three meetings. The networking meetings should provide the groundwork for the development of a collaborative research proposal, which will apply the knowledge coproduced during the meetings.

Publications

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Description Significant Achievements:
We adapted the project to take a different approach to the use of our stakeholder group of critical friends. Because of the logistics of trying to organise meetings with young people, practitioners and the UK-based chair remotely, we decided that as the chair was with us for he entirety of the Uganda and Kenya meetings we would take advantage of her ability to observe everything. We therefore took an evaluative approach, and prioritising a young person-focused observation of the project as a whole. In so doing she was able to critique the extent to which networking projects such as this should be conducted with vulnerable young people and what should be considered for future work. We discussed this as part of the analysis meetings held after each workshop and at the future planning meeting at the end of the project. Therefore, our achievements include recommendations for how future work should be conducted.
Objectives met:
There were varying degrees to which the objectives were met. These were long-term objectives that focus on a series of projects to be undertaken. This was the initial pilot stage that was focused more on piloting methods, ascertaining the extent to which the objectives were met, and the lessons to be learned for future project development. In all three settings, we managed to enable dialogue between young people and policy makers. But the degree to which the young people's voices were held at the centre of these conversations varied and provided us with a set of challenges to work out in future work - such as how to develop a code of conduct for adults to listen to children, when they feel like they should be the people who are listened to.
Findings:
There were some key messages to take forward:
1 - To ensure we are able to resituate power relations and ensure young people have a stronger voice then we must consider how we plan our programmes to ensure young people are centre stage. We can do this by ensuring practitioners, and where their safety in ensured young people, are included from an earlier stage in the planning process. We must ensure that the spaces in which we expect young people to interact and contribute are safe and appropriate, to ensure that those who hold the power are appropriately briefed and understand the challenges and complexities that these young people face and are respectful of their voices and experiences.
2- If we are using arts-based methods with young people in vulnerable situations we need to focus on nurturing their talent. Young people's artistic choices need to be matched in the programmes we develop and we should facilitate their talent development and not just use the arts methods to listen to their voices.
3- There is scope to develop the use of arts pedagogies in education and practitioners are very keen to understand and use these methods, which requires training. Future projects should look at a long-term approach to the development of arts pedagogies, aiming to change curricula through co-creation with teachers and practitioners.
4- When working with vulnerable people we must empower the artists to be better equipped to facilitate the creative process by developing partnerships with the practitioners who understand the young people's lived experiences better.
5. It would be good to develop tools to evaluate arts methods. We were focusing on arts methodologies as a communication tool, and more research would be useful into why certain methods were more effective with young people.
6. Finally, with regards to education it is possible to say that the experiences of urban refugees and street-connected young people as they attempt to access or be retained in education intersect across all three settings. These encompass being made to repeat school, being kept back with children of a young age, being unable to get ID, and a lack of government support for teachers. The complete findings in this regard will be published in an open access document that will be uploaded onto this webpage: https://www2.mmu.ac.uk/esri/research/projects/kenya-uganda-drc/
Exploitation Route Please note that the evaluation report and open access report will not be be uploaded onto the above URL until the end of March 2020

As mentioned in the findings, there is considerable scope for the exploration of arts-based methods in advocacy work that aims to amplify young people's voices and engage with policy makers, as well as the potential to work with educators to develop arts-based pedagogies as part of their practice. Our report and evaluation report both highlight the degree to which any such projects should scaffold the research and practice within clear safeguarding parameters - especially when working with vulnerable young people - that ensure the gatekeeper organisations who will be supporting these young people are given the status of equal partnership. This should ensure that those who understand the context better frame the project and ensure that the young people are at the centre of the work. This requires that the lead academics set up situations in which the artists and practitioners are able to define the project around which the research takes place - particularly in relation to apprenticeship models that develop young people's talent as art of the project.

Therefore, these outcomes could be taken forward by non-governmental and community-based organisations aiming to integrate arts into their practice as well as teachers and other educators. One area that Dr Corcoran wishes to explore further is the role of arts-based pedagogies in developing the capacity of teachers to meet the needs of competency-based curricula currently being rolled out in a number of countries, Kenya and Uganda included.
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Creative Economy,Education

URL http://www2.mmu.ac.uk/esri/research/projects/kenya-uganda-drc
 
Description It must be remembered that this project is a networking project that aimed to pilot research methods and explore their role in re-situating power relations that have traditionally been top down and provide young people with a much stronger voice. As such the impact of the findings very much focuses on: a) the artists: b) the practitioners; c) the academic members of the research team; d) the young people; and e) the planning of future research projects. As e is discussed in the findings section, we will focus on a - d here. a) Impact on the artists: In order to do the artists justice we have asked they write the sections themselves: Charity (Uganda) explains that the importance of 'play' (or the creative process) within our sessions was particularly impactful on me as an artist. The culture of formal education often reserves 'play' as separate from learning or gaining knowledge. Because 'play' is process focused and not result oriented it seems contradictory to the immediate needs that vulnerable peoples face. However it should not be discounted but rather integrated in all areas of life. I have learned that it is through the creative process, the moments of continuous play, experimentation and self-expression that the mind is allowed to explore a different perspective, it allows then for a more fertile 'ground' in our minds. Faustin (DRC) explains that from his experience while music and radio plays are very common way of engaging people in advocacy messages in DRC, the use of sung poetry and skits in a peace education are less developed. The enthusiasm and interest aroused by the interaction between the two arts with a focus on children's right to education, deserves to be tested on a broader scale, providing time to develop products of the creative process as outputs that can further the advocacy messages. Mike (Kenya) as both an artist and the director of a community-based organisations delivering extra-curricular dance and arts education to children in order to improve school attendance and academic performance, focuses on the development of networks. He explains that the project is a networking project and being involved provided the opportunity to develop networks of organisations working with children in vulnerable situations with Project Elimu, to figure out how they could work together to improve the impact of the intervention programmes. As such, the project has enabled the start of a process of collaboration between the four organisations. In addition, there is great value to positioning young people at the centre of decision making and what I have learned from the project is the importance on centring children's voices in decision-making processes, which I will continue to work on in the future. b) Just as Mike is developing a network as part of the legacy of the project, Thomas (in DRC) used the workshop to invite practitioners working with conflict affected young people, so that they could discuss their models of practice and ascertain what they can learn from each other. Discussions are underway for a future project that will develop this collaboration further. In addition, the DRC and Kenya workshops provided opportunities for the practitioners of the NGOs to talk to the policy makers directly and establish connections that would be useful for further discussions and advocacy for street-connected young people. In DRC and Kenya, all the practitioners commented on how useful it was to have been brought into the space so that as well as listening to the young people they were able to talk to each other and discuss their experiences and challenges. This was especially so for the educators present at the DRC workshop. Therefore, the future projects should also ensure an aspect of this networking, which can often be difficult when organisations are very busy and underfunded. c) The academics are Professor Kate Pahl, Dr Su Corcoran and Dr Virginie Tallio. Each of the team gained from the project. Su was unable to apply for the funding in her own right being less than two years post PhD, but she had all the connections, experience and networks to be able to conduct this project in each of the three contexts. Therefore, despite not being named as PI or CoI, she led the project in practice - being responsible for all project management. This provided her with useful experience for future research and extended and deepened her networks in the region. With Kate's mentorship and expertise she learned how to move away from her previous use of arts methods in social science research to take more of an arts-based approach to research. Kate had never worked in these contexts before and so she was able to gain an insight into how different it is from working in the UK, but also the intersections of the research with her previous projects - particularly the Taking yourself Seriously project. As a result of the networks developed in Uganda while working on this project, both Kate and Su are involved in an AHRC follow up project called Questioning the Form. This was Virginie's first time working with arts-based and creative methodologies and she has gained both experience of working in this way and an understanding of how to apply them to future work. All three academics learned more about the intricacies of involving artists and practitioners in research and the ways in which the non-academic impact can be further strengthened within the projects, ensuring effective impact for all participants that provides greater sustainability. This is especially so for young people who considered vulnerable. d) In all contexts the young people felt listened to. The degree to which their messages were taken on board by the decision makers in the room varies. However, in Kenya the young people enjoyed being able to talk to other young people who shared their experiences but came from different places and in Uganda the young people developed their own contact list so that they could continue their conversations and develop a network of 'artists' that could support each other. In the DRC, the young people all came from the same organisation and therefore the day was more focused on the art. They all wanted to develop this further and explore their own talents. The overall impact can be summarised as: 1) The development of local networks for future collaboration - of practitioners, of young people, of practitioners with policy makers. 2) The interaction of county-level policy-makers (and in Uganda an embassy attaché) with young people, and the potential for future engagement as the practitioners aim to follow up on these new connections. 3) Raising the profile of arts-based methodologies and pedagogies with social work practitioners and educators, and inspiring changes in their practice. 4) Defining frameworks within which future research projects (and potentially practice-based interventions) are developed - both the networks of people who will constitute future research teams and the guidelines that we recommend should be followed.
First Year Of Impact 2019
Sector Communities and Social Services/Policy,Creative Economy,Education
Impact Types Cultural,Societal,Policy & public services

 
Description Questioning the form: Re-imagining identities through zine-making in Kampala, Uganda
Amount £39,967 (GBP)
Organisation Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 03/2020 
End 12/2020
 
Description Network meetings 
Organisation Fikisha
Country Kenya 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Staff from Peder and Project Elimu were part of the original research team; the other organisations acted as gatekeepers to the participants and in Kenya were part of the planning process. - PEDER deliver a comprehensive programme of support for street-connected young people in Bukavu, DRC, running multiple centres that provide psycho-social support and/or intensive vocational training. They hosted the event in Bukavu and facilitated the discussions. - Project Elimu aims to support quality education for children living in Kibera and Mathare informal settlements in Nairobi, Kenya, through extra-curricular activities in schools and by supporting teachers to develop and refine their teaching skills. They provided the ideas for the workshop in Nairobi, Kenya. - Fikisha provide an holistic support programme for street-connected young people in Kawangware informal settlement, Nairobi, Kenya. - InterAid worked with urban refugees in Kampala, Uganda. They provided the young people for the workshops. - Kito International deliver education and training for formerly street-connected and disadvantaged young people in Kawangware informal settlement in Nairobi. - Zero Street works with street-connected young people in Mathare informal settlement in Nairobi, providing an holistic programme of support that centres on the provision of effective housing. * Dr Corcoran led the project in practice with mentorship from Prof. Pahl. * Mike Wamaya from Project Elimu is one of the eight members of the research team. He facilitated the dance-based workshop in Nairobi in collaboration with Dr Corcoran. He also played an active role in the initial planning meeting conducted in February 2019 in Uganda. * Charity Atukunda, a self employed artist, facilitated the Uganda workshop with Dr Virginie Tallio of Makerere University. Charity and Virginie played an active role in the initial planning meeting conducted in February 2019 in Uganda. Charity also attended the DRC workshop, contributing to the planning of the event and the facilitation where required, as well as the last meeting of the project that reflected on the project as a whole and looked forward. * Thomas D'Aquin attended every single meeting conducted as part oft he project. He was integral to planning and reflecting on each of the meetings, taking and active facilitation role with the French speaking refugees in Uganda. He planned the DRC workshop in collaboration with Faustin Muliri, a self-employed poet and author. Faustin was the lead facilitator of the workshop. He played an active role in the initial planning meeting conducted in February 2019 in Uganda as well as the final meetings at the end of the project in DRC.
Collaborator Contribution This project would not have been possible without the 33 young people who attended the workshops in Kenya, Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), rolled up their sleeves and involved themselves in the different artistic activities, and shared their experiences with the research team. In Uganda and DRC this involved young people who were interested in the art form being developed and therefore the workshop provided a little training into the arts methods provided. In Kenya the workshop was more a taster session on dance. In addition, in Kenya it depended on the staff from the organisations who facilitated the participation of the young people who attended the workshops as they contributed to the planning process and the debrief. In addition to the staff of the above organisations, a number of guests were invited to take part in the workshops. In Kenya this involved them dancing with the young people, and in the DRC they co-wrote the poems and plays as part of the workshop. They were also encouraged to talk to and listen to the young people. In Uganda, the guests came to an exhibition held at the end of the workshop and discussed the art on display with the young people. The guests' roles and the organisations they represent include: The county officer for children and families within the Department of Youth and Gender for Nairobi County, Kenya and his colleague. Head teachers from two primary schools based in Matahare Informal Settlement, Nairobi, Kenya. The Attaché for Development Cooperation at the Embassy of Belgium in Uganda and his two colleagues. A Doctoral Researcher at Makerere Institute of Social Research, Makerere University who focuses on Burundian Refugees in Uganda. A secondary school teacher on secondment as an intern at the Uganda Ministry of Education. Chief in charge of the division of Education and Health at the Division of Primary, Secondary and technical Education, Bukavu DRC. Chief in charge of the provincial office of the Division of Social Affairs, Bukavu DRC. Executive Director of GHOVODI (Group of men dedicated to intercommunity development) based in Goma, DRC. The monitoring and evaluation officer for the Union for Peace and Promotion of Children's Rights in the Congo (union pour la paix et la promotion des droits de l'enfant au Congo). The coordinator of the OPDE (Organization for the Protection and Development of Children / Congo - Organisation pour la protection et le développement de l'enfant/Congo)
Impact We have been actively engaged in planning for future bids with Peder and Project Elimu. Thee will take a long-term approach to developing artistic pedagogies in contexts affected by conflict and crisis. In DRC this includes GHOVODI, an organisation in Goma that sent one of their practitioners to the Bukavu workshop. In Kenya, Project Elimu and the other Kenya-based organisations (Fikisha, Kito International, Zero Street) have been building on the initial networking done as part of the project and have been looking at how they can work together on different projects with the young people they support. As an initial project, Mike is looking at how he can deliver dance classes at the other organisations, and Fikisha are sending young people to benefit from Kito International's training projects. One aim that they all spoke about was working together to develop a combined message that can be taken to local government now they have made a connection with an officer from the county office.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Network meetings 
Organisation InterAid Uganda
Country Uganda 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Staff from Peder and Project Elimu were part of the original research team; the other organisations acted as gatekeepers to the participants and in Kenya were part of the planning process. - PEDER deliver a comprehensive programme of support for street-connected young people in Bukavu, DRC, running multiple centres that provide psycho-social support and/or intensive vocational training. They hosted the event in Bukavu and facilitated the discussions. - Project Elimu aims to support quality education for children living in Kibera and Mathare informal settlements in Nairobi, Kenya, through extra-curricular activities in schools and by supporting teachers to develop and refine their teaching skills. They provided the ideas for the workshop in Nairobi, Kenya. - Fikisha provide an holistic support programme for street-connected young people in Kawangware informal settlement, Nairobi, Kenya. - InterAid worked with urban refugees in Kampala, Uganda. They provided the young people for the workshops. - Kito International deliver education and training for formerly street-connected and disadvantaged young people in Kawangware informal settlement in Nairobi. - Zero Street works with street-connected young people in Mathare informal settlement in Nairobi, providing an holistic programme of support that centres on the provision of effective housing. * Dr Corcoran led the project in practice with mentorship from Prof. Pahl. * Mike Wamaya from Project Elimu is one of the eight members of the research team. He facilitated the dance-based workshop in Nairobi in collaboration with Dr Corcoran. He also played an active role in the initial planning meeting conducted in February 2019 in Uganda. * Charity Atukunda, a self employed artist, facilitated the Uganda workshop with Dr Virginie Tallio of Makerere University. Charity and Virginie played an active role in the initial planning meeting conducted in February 2019 in Uganda. Charity also attended the DRC workshop, contributing to the planning of the event and the facilitation where required, as well as the last meeting of the project that reflected on the project as a whole and looked forward. * Thomas D'Aquin attended every single meeting conducted as part oft he project. He was integral to planning and reflecting on each of the meetings, taking and active facilitation role with the French speaking refugees in Uganda. He planned the DRC workshop in collaboration with Faustin Muliri, a self-employed poet and author. Faustin was the lead facilitator of the workshop. He played an active role in the initial planning meeting conducted in February 2019 in Uganda as well as the final meetings at the end of the project in DRC.
Collaborator Contribution This project would not have been possible without the 33 young people who attended the workshops in Kenya, Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), rolled up their sleeves and involved themselves in the different artistic activities, and shared their experiences with the research team. In Uganda and DRC this involved young people who were interested in the art form being developed and therefore the workshop provided a little training into the arts methods provided. In Kenya the workshop was more a taster session on dance. In addition, in Kenya it depended on the staff from the organisations who facilitated the participation of the young people who attended the workshops as they contributed to the planning process and the debrief. In addition to the staff of the above organisations, a number of guests were invited to take part in the workshops. In Kenya this involved them dancing with the young people, and in the DRC they co-wrote the poems and plays as part of the workshop. They were also encouraged to talk to and listen to the young people. In Uganda, the guests came to an exhibition held at the end of the workshop and discussed the art on display with the young people. The guests' roles and the organisations they represent include: The county officer for children and families within the Department of Youth and Gender for Nairobi County, Kenya and his colleague. Head teachers from two primary schools based in Matahare Informal Settlement, Nairobi, Kenya. The Attaché for Development Cooperation at the Embassy of Belgium in Uganda and his two colleagues. A Doctoral Researcher at Makerere Institute of Social Research, Makerere University who focuses on Burundian Refugees in Uganda. A secondary school teacher on secondment as an intern at the Uganda Ministry of Education. Chief in charge of the division of Education and Health at the Division of Primary, Secondary and technical Education, Bukavu DRC. Chief in charge of the provincial office of the Division of Social Affairs, Bukavu DRC. Executive Director of GHOVODI (Group of men dedicated to intercommunity development) based in Goma, DRC. The monitoring and evaluation officer for the Union for Peace and Promotion of Children's Rights in the Congo (union pour la paix et la promotion des droits de l'enfant au Congo). The coordinator of the OPDE (Organization for the Protection and Development of Children / Congo - Organisation pour la protection et le développement de l'enfant/Congo)
Impact We have been actively engaged in planning for future bids with Peder and Project Elimu. Thee will take a long-term approach to developing artistic pedagogies in contexts affected by conflict and crisis. In DRC this includes GHOVODI, an organisation in Goma that sent one of their practitioners to the Bukavu workshop. In Kenya, Project Elimu and the other Kenya-based organisations (Fikisha, Kito International, Zero Street) have been building on the initial networking done as part of the project and have been looking at how they can work together on different projects with the young people they support. As an initial project, Mike is looking at how he can deliver dance classes at the other organisations, and Fikisha are sending young people to benefit from Kito International's training projects. One aim that they all spoke about was working together to develop a combined message that can be taken to local government now they have made a connection with an officer from the county office.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Network meetings 
Organisation Kito international
Country Kenya 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Staff from Peder and Project Elimu were part of the original research team; the other organisations acted as gatekeepers to the participants and in Kenya were part of the planning process. - PEDER deliver a comprehensive programme of support for street-connected young people in Bukavu, DRC, running multiple centres that provide psycho-social support and/or intensive vocational training. They hosted the event in Bukavu and facilitated the discussions. - Project Elimu aims to support quality education for children living in Kibera and Mathare informal settlements in Nairobi, Kenya, through extra-curricular activities in schools and by supporting teachers to develop and refine their teaching skills. They provided the ideas for the workshop in Nairobi, Kenya. - Fikisha provide an holistic support programme for street-connected young people in Kawangware informal settlement, Nairobi, Kenya. - InterAid worked with urban refugees in Kampala, Uganda. They provided the young people for the workshops. - Kito International deliver education and training for formerly street-connected and disadvantaged young people in Kawangware informal settlement in Nairobi. - Zero Street works with street-connected young people in Mathare informal settlement in Nairobi, providing an holistic programme of support that centres on the provision of effective housing. * Dr Corcoran led the project in practice with mentorship from Prof. Pahl. * Mike Wamaya from Project Elimu is one of the eight members of the research team. He facilitated the dance-based workshop in Nairobi in collaboration with Dr Corcoran. He also played an active role in the initial planning meeting conducted in February 2019 in Uganda. * Charity Atukunda, a self employed artist, facilitated the Uganda workshop with Dr Virginie Tallio of Makerere University. Charity and Virginie played an active role in the initial planning meeting conducted in February 2019 in Uganda. Charity also attended the DRC workshop, contributing to the planning of the event and the facilitation where required, as well as the last meeting of the project that reflected on the project as a whole and looked forward. * Thomas D'Aquin attended every single meeting conducted as part oft he project. He was integral to planning and reflecting on each of the meetings, taking and active facilitation role with the French speaking refugees in Uganda. He planned the DRC workshop in collaboration with Faustin Muliri, a self-employed poet and author. Faustin was the lead facilitator of the workshop. He played an active role in the initial planning meeting conducted in February 2019 in Uganda as well as the final meetings at the end of the project in DRC.
Collaborator Contribution This project would not have been possible without the 33 young people who attended the workshops in Kenya, Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), rolled up their sleeves and involved themselves in the different artistic activities, and shared their experiences with the research team. In Uganda and DRC this involved young people who were interested in the art form being developed and therefore the workshop provided a little training into the arts methods provided. In Kenya the workshop was more a taster session on dance. In addition, in Kenya it depended on the staff from the organisations who facilitated the participation of the young people who attended the workshops as they contributed to the planning process and the debrief. In addition to the staff of the above organisations, a number of guests were invited to take part in the workshops. In Kenya this involved them dancing with the young people, and in the DRC they co-wrote the poems and plays as part of the workshop. They were also encouraged to talk to and listen to the young people. In Uganda, the guests came to an exhibition held at the end of the workshop and discussed the art on display with the young people. The guests' roles and the organisations they represent include: The county officer for children and families within the Department of Youth and Gender for Nairobi County, Kenya and his colleague. Head teachers from two primary schools based in Matahare Informal Settlement, Nairobi, Kenya. The Attaché for Development Cooperation at the Embassy of Belgium in Uganda and his two colleagues. A Doctoral Researcher at Makerere Institute of Social Research, Makerere University who focuses on Burundian Refugees in Uganda. A secondary school teacher on secondment as an intern at the Uganda Ministry of Education. Chief in charge of the division of Education and Health at the Division of Primary, Secondary and technical Education, Bukavu DRC. Chief in charge of the provincial office of the Division of Social Affairs, Bukavu DRC. Executive Director of GHOVODI (Group of men dedicated to intercommunity development) based in Goma, DRC. The monitoring and evaluation officer for the Union for Peace and Promotion of Children's Rights in the Congo (union pour la paix et la promotion des droits de l'enfant au Congo). The coordinator of the OPDE (Organization for the Protection and Development of Children / Congo - Organisation pour la protection et le développement de l'enfant/Congo)
Impact We have been actively engaged in planning for future bids with Peder and Project Elimu. Thee will take a long-term approach to developing artistic pedagogies in contexts affected by conflict and crisis. In DRC this includes GHOVODI, an organisation in Goma that sent one of their practitioners to the Bukavu workshop. In Kenya, Project Elimu and the other Kenya-based organisations (Fikisha, Kito International, Zero Street) have been building on the initial networking done as part of the project and have been looking at how they can work together on different projects with the young people they support. As an initial project, Mike is looking at how he can deliver dance classes at the other organisations, and Fikisha are sending young people to benefit from Kito International's training projects. One aim that they all spoke about was working together to develop a combined message that can be taken to local government now they have made a connection with an officer from the county office.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Network meetings 
Organisation Makerere University
Country Uganda 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Staff from Peder and Project Elimu were part of the original research team; the other organisations acted as gatekeepers to the participants and in Kenya were part of the planning process. - PEDER deliver a comprehensive programme of support for street-connected young people in Bukavu, DRC, running multiple centres that provide psycho-social support and/or intensive vocational training. They hosted the event in Bukavu and facilitated the discussions. - Project Elimu aims to support quality education for children living in Kibera and Mathare informal settlements in Nairobi, Kenya, through extra-curricular activities in schools and by supporting teachers to develop and refine their teaching skills. They provided the ideas for the workshop in Nairobi, Kenya. - Fikisha provide an holistic support programme for street-connected young people in Kawangware informal settlement, Nairobi, Kenya. - InterAid worked with urban refugees in Kampala, Uganda. They provided the young people for the workshops. - Kito International deliver education and training for formerly street-connected and disadvantaged young people in Kawangware informal settlement in Nairobi. - Zero Street works with street-connected young people in Mathare informal settlement in Nairobi, providing an holistic programme of support that centres on the provision of effective housing. * Dr Corcoran led the project in practice with mentorship from Prof. Pahl. * Mike Wamaya from Project Elimu is one of the eight members of the research team. He facilitated the dance-based workshop in Nairobi in collaboration with Dr Corcoran. He also played an active role in the initial planning meeting conducted in February 2019 in Uganda. * Charity Atukunda, a self employed artist, facilitated the Uganda workshop with Dr Virginie Tallio of Makerere University. Charity and Virginie played an active role in the initial planning meeting conducted in February 2019 in Uganda. Charity also attended the DRC workshop, contributing to the planning of the event and the facilitation where required, as well as the last meeting of the project that reflected on the project as a whole and looked forward. * Thomas D'Aquin attended every single meeting conducted as part oft he project. He was integral to planning and reflecting on each of the meetings, taking and active facilitation role with the French speaking refugees in Uganda. He planned the DRC workshop in collaboration with Faustin Muliri, a self-employed poet and author. Faustin was the lead facilitator of the workshop. He played an active role in the initial planning meeting conducted in February 2019 in Uganda as well as the final meetings at the end of the project in DRC.
Collaborator Contribution This project would not have been possible without the 33 young people who attended the workshops in Kenya, Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), rolled up their sleeves and involved themselves in the different artistic activities, and shared their experiences with the research team. In Uganda and DRC this involved young people who were interested in the art form being developed and therefore the workshop provided a little training into the arts methods provided. In Kenya the workshop was more a taster session on dance. In addition, in Kenya it depended on the staff from the organisations who facilitated the participation of the young people who attended the workshops as they contributed to the planning process and the debrief. In addition to the staff of the above organisations, a number of guests were invited to take part in the workshops. In Kenya this involved them dancing with the young people, and in the DRC they co-wrote the poems and plays as part of the workshop. They were also encouraged to talk to and listen to the young people. In Uganda, the guests came to an exhibition held at the end of the workshop and discussed the art on display with the young people. The guests' roles and the organisations they represent include: The county officer for children and families within the Department of Youth and Gender for Nairobi County, Kenya and his colleague. Head teachers from two primary schools based in Matahare Informal Settlement, Nairobi, Kenya. The Attaché for Development Cooperation at the Embassy of Belgium in Uganda and his two colleagues. A Doctoral Researcher at Makerere Institute of Social Research, Makerere University who focuses on Burundian Refugees in Uganda. A secondary school teacher on secondment as an intern at the Uganda Ministry of Education. Chief in charge of the division of Education and Health at the Division of Primary, Secondary and technical Education, Bukavu DRC. Chief in charge of the provincial office of the Division of Social Affairs, Bukavu DRC. Executive Director of GHOVODI (Group of men dedicated to intercommunity development) based in Goma, DRC. The monitoring and evaluation officer for the Union for Peace and Promotion of Children's Rights in the Congo (union pour la paix et la promotion des droits de l'enfant au Congo). The coordinator of the OPDE (Organization for the Protection and Development of Children / Congo - Organisation pour la protection et le développement de l'enfant/Congo)
Impact We have been actively engaged in planning for future bids with Peder and Project Elimu. Thee will take a long-term approach to developing artistic pedagogies in contexts affected by conflict and crisis. In DRC this includes GHOVODI, an organisation in Goma that sent one of their practitioners to the Bukavu workshop. In Kenya, Project Elimu and the other Kenya-based organisations (Fikisha, Kito International, Zero Street) have been building on the initial networking done as part of the project and have been looking at how they can work together on different projects with the young people they support. As an initial project, Mike is looking at how he can deliver dance classes at the other organisations, and Fikisha are sending young people to benefit from Kito International's training projects. One aim that they all spoke about was working together to develop a combined message that can be taken to local government now they have made a connection with an officer from the county office.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Network meetings 
Organisation Project Elimu
Country Kenya 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Staff from Peder and Project Elimu were part of the original research team; the other organisations acted as gatekeepers to the participants and in Kenya were part of the planning process. - PEDER deliver a comprehensive programme of support for street-connected young people in Bukavu, DRC, running multiple centres that provide psycho-social support and/or intensive vocational training. They hosted the event in Bukavu and facilitated the discussions. - Project Elimu aims to support quality education for children living in Kibera and Mathare informal settlements in Nairobi, Kenya, through extra-curricular activities in schools and by supporting teachers to develop and refine their teaching skills. They provided the ideas for the workshop in Nairobi, Kenya. - Fikisha provide an holistic support programme for street-connected young people in Kawangware informal settlement, Nairobi, Kenya. - InterAid worked with urban refugees in Kampala, Uganda. They provided the young people for the workshops. - Kito International deliver education and training for formerly street-connected and disadvantaged young people in Kawangware informal settlement in Nairobi. - Zero Street works with street-connected young people in Mathare informal settlement in Nairobi, providing an holistic programme of support that centres on the provision of effective housing. * Dr Corcoran led the project in practice with mentorship from Prof. Pahl. * Mike Wamaya from Project Elimu is one of the eight members of the research team. He facilitated the dance-based workshop in Nairobi in collaboration with Dr Corcoran. He also played an active role in the initial planning meeting conducted in February 2019 in Uganda. * Charity Atukunda, a self employed artist, facilitated the Uganda workshop with Dr Virginie Tallio of Makerere University. Charity and Virginie played an active role in the initial planning meeting conducted in February 2019 in Uganda. Charity also attended the DRC workshop, contributing to the planning of the event and the facilitation where required, as well as the last meeting of the project that reflected on the project as a whole and looked forward. * Thomas D'Aquin attended every single meeting conducted as part oft he project. He was integral to planning and reflecting on each of the meetings, taking and active facilitation role with the French speaking refugees in Uganda. He planned the DRC workshop in collaboration with Faustin Muliri, a self-employed poet and author. Faustin was the lead facilitator of the workshop. He played an active role in the initial planning meeting conducted in February 2019 in Uganda as well as the final meetings at the end of the project in DRC.
Collaborator Contribution This project would not have been possible without the 33 young people who attended the workshops in Kenya, Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), rolled up their sleeves and involved themselves in the different artistic activities, and shared their experiences with the research team. In Uganda and DRC this involved young people who were interested in the art form being developed and therefore the workshop provided a little training into the arts methods provided. In Kenya the workshop was more a taster session on dance. In addition, in Kenya it depended on the staff from the organisations who facilitated the participation of the young people who attended the workshops as they contributed to the planning process and the debrief. In addition to the staff of the above organisations, a number of guests were invited to take part in the workshops. In Kenya this involved them dancing with the young people, and in the DRC they co-wrote the poems and plays as part of the workshop. They were also encouraged to talk to and listen to the young people. In Uganda, the guests came to an exhibition held at the end of the workshop and discussed the art on display with the young people. The guests' roles and the organisations they represent include: The county officer for children and families within the Department of Youth and Gender for Nairobi County, Kenya and his colleague. Head teachers from two primary schools based in Matahare Informal Settlement, Nairobi, Kenya. The Attaché for Development Cooperation at the Embassy of Belgium in Uganda and his two colleagues. A Doctoral Researcher at Makerere Institute of Social Research, Makerere University who focuses on Burundian Refugees in Uganda. A secondary school teacher on secondment as an intern at the Uganda Ministry of Education. Chief in charge of the division of Education and Health at the Division of Primary, Secondary and technical Education, Bukavu DRC. Chief in charge of the provincial office of the Division of Social Affairs, Bukavu DRC. Executive Director of GHOVODI (Group of men dedicated to intercommunity development) based in Goma, DRC. The monitoring and evaluation officer for the Union for Peace and Promotion of Children's Rights in the Congo (union pour la paix et la promotion des droits de l'enfant au Congo). The coordinator of the OPDE (Organization for the Protection and Development of Children / Congo - Organisation pour la protection et le développement de l'enfant/Congo)
Impact We have been actively engaged in planning for future bids with Peder and Project Elimu. Thee will take a long-term approach to developing artistic pedagogies in contexts affected by conflict and crisis. In DRC this includes GHOVODI, an organisation in Goma that sent one of their practitioners to the Bukavu workshop. In Kenya, Project Elimu and the other Kenya-based organisations (Fikisha, Kito International, Zero Street) have been building on the initial networking done as part of the project and have been looking at how they can work together on different projects with the young people they support. As an initial project, Mike is looking at how he can deliver dance classes at the other organisations, and Fikisha are sending young people to benefit from Kito International's training projects. One aim that they all spoke about was working together to develop a combined message that can be taken to local government now they have made a connection with an officer from the county office.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Network meetings 
Organisation Zero Street Children Foundation
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Staff from Peder and Project Elimu were part of the original research team; the other organisations acted as gatekeepers to the participants and in Kenya were part of the planning process. - PEDER deliver a comprehensive programme of support for street-connected young people in Bukavu, DRC, running multiple centres that provide psycho-social support and/or intensive vocational training. They hosted the event in Bukavu and facilitated the discussions. - Project Elimu aims to support quality education for children living in Kibera and Mathare informal settlements in Nairobi, Kenya, through extra-curricular activities in schools and by supporting teachers to develop and refine their teaching skills. They provided the ideas for the workshop in Nairobi, Kenya. - Fikisha provide an holistic support programme for street-connected young people in Kawangware informal settlement, Nairobi, Kenya. - InterAid worked with urban refugees in Kampala, Uganda. They provided the young people for the workshops. - Kito International deliver education and training for formerly street-connected and disadvantaged young people in Kawangware informal settlement in Nairobi. - Zero Street works with street-connected young people in Mathare informal settlement in Nairobi, providing an holistic programme of support that centres on the provision of effective housing. * Dr Corcoran led the project in practice with mentorship from Prof. Pahl. * Mike Wamaya from Project Elimu is one of the eight members of the research team. He facilitated the dance-based workshop in Nairobi in collaboration with Dr Corcoran. He also played an active role in the initial planning meeting conducted in February 2019 in Uganda. * Charity Atukunda, a self employed artist, facilitated the Uganda workshop with Dr Virginie Tallio of Makerere University. Charity and Virginie played an active role in the initial planning meeting conducted in February 2019 in Uganda. Charity also attended the DRC workshop, contributing to the planning of the event and the facilitation where required, as well as the last meeting of the project that reflected on the project as a whole and looked forward. * Thomas D'Aquin attended every single meeting conducted as part oft he project. He was integral to planning and reflecting on each of the meetings, taking and active facilitation role with the French speaking refugees in Uganda. He planned the DRC workshop in collaboration with Faustin Muliri, a self-employed poet and author. Faustin was the lead facilitator of the workshop. He played an active role in the initial planning meeting conducted in February 2019 in Uganda as well as the final meetings at the end of the project in DRC.
Collaborator Contribution This project would not have been possible without the 33 young people who attended the workshops in Kenya, Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), rolled up their sleeves and involved themselves in the different artistic activities, and shared their experiences with the research team. In Uganda and DRC this involved young people who were interested in the art form being developed and therefore the workshop provided a little training into the arts methods provided. In Kenya the workshop was more a taster session on dance. In addition, in Kenya it depended on the staff from the organisations who facilitated the participation of the young people who attended the workshops as they contributed to the planning process and the debrief. In addition to the staff of the above organisations, a number of guests were invited to take part in the workshops. In Kenya this involved them dancing with the young people, and in the DRC they co-wrote the poems and plays as part of the workshop. They were also encouraged to talk to and listen to the young people. In Uganda, the guests came to an exhibition held at the end of the workshop and discussed the art on display with the young people. The guests' roles and the organisations they represent include: The county officer for children and families within the Department of Youth and Gender for Nairobi County, Kenya and his colleague. Head teachers from two primary schools based in Matahare Informal Settlement, Nairobi, Kenya. The Attaché for Development Cooperation at the Embassy of Belgium in Uganda and his two colleagues. A Doctoral Researcher at Makerere Institute of Social Research, Makerere University who focuses on Burundian Refugees in Uganda. A secondary school teacher on secondment as an intern at the Uganda Ministry of Education. Chief in charge of the division of Education and Health at the Division of Primary, Secondary and technical Education, Bukavu DRC. Chief in charge of the provincial office of the Division of Social Affairs, Bukavu DRC. Executive Director of GHOVODI (Group of men dedicated to intercommunity development) based in Goma, DRC. The monitoring and evaluation officer for the Union for Peace and Promotion of Children's Rights in the Congo (union pour la paix et la promotion des droits de l'enfant au Congo). The coordinator of the OPDE (Organization for the Protection and Development of Children / Congo - Organisation pour la protection et le développement de l'enfant/Congo)
Impact We have been actively engaged in planning for future bids with Peder and Project Elimu. Thee will take a long-term approach to developing artistic pedagogies in contexts affected by conflict and crisis. In DRC this includes GHOVODI, an organisation in Goma that sent one of their practitioners to the Bukavu workshop. In Kenya, Project Elimu and the other Kenya-based organisations (Fikisha, Kito International, Zero Street) have been building on the initial networking done as part of the project and have been looking at how they can work together on different projects with the young people they support. As an initial project, Mike is looking at how he can deliver dance classes at the other organisations, and Fikisha are sending young people to benefit from Kito International's training projects. One aim that they all spoke about was working together to develop a combined message that can be taken to local government now they have made a connection with an officer from the county office.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Art workshop in Kampala 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact from Kampala, in collaboration with Virginie Tallio from Makerere University. Twelve young people living as urban refugees were brought to the workshop by InterAid. These young people had originally come from Burundi, DRC, Eritrea, Rwanda and South Sudan. All of the young people were artists and Charity used the workshop to show them new artistic techniques such as the use of unusual materials - like charcoal powder - and how to experiment with watercolours. The art was combined with discussions about the young people's experiences of accessing education after they arrived in Uganda.

A small scale exhibition of art-work by the young people was presented to an audience of practitioners and policy-makers including teachers, an intern working for the Ministry of Education, and an attache from the Belgian Embassy in Kampala.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www2.mmu.ac.uk/esri/research/projects/kenya-uganda-drc/
 
Description Dance workshop in Nairobi 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This was a one-day workshop facilitated by Mike Wamaya of Project Elimu in collaboration with Dr Corcoran. The aim of the workshop was to bring together policy-makers and street-connected young people using dance as a way to decrease the power differential between the two groups so that the policy-makers would listen to to the young people and better understand their needs. Eleven young people attended he workshop. They were brought to the event by the practitioners working for three civil society organisations that all work with street-connected young people:
Fikisha provide an holistic support programme for street-connected young people in Kawangware informal settlement, Nairobi, Kenya.
Kito International deliver education and training for formerly street-connected and disadvantaged young people in Kawangware informal settlement in Nairobi.
Zero Street works with street-connected young people in Mathare informal settlement in Nairobi, providing an holistic programme of support that centres on the provision of effective housing.
Dr Corcoran spent time in April meeting practitioners from the three organisations and in the case of Zero Street having a tour around Mathare to see their work. They were also invited to take part in the planning for the workshop in the day before it was conducted.
During the workshop all the adults in attendance (two headteachers and two representatives from the office responsible for Children and Families from the Nairobi County Government. After lunch the young people and adults formed small groups to discuss the young people's experiences of education and their concerns in relation to employment.
Emerging findings included the need to enable the young people to obtain indentification cards and to encourage policy makers to respond to young people's needs and not assume that they know best.

As a result of their involvement, the three street-connected organisations have continued to stay in touch and plan joint activities with young people.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www2.mmu.ac.uk/esri/research/projects/kenya-uganda-drc/
 
Description Guest lecturer at Uni of Huddersfield 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact Su has contributed to the first year undergraduate Childhood course at the University of Huddersfield, delivering a lecture in global childhoods inspired by her research work. In 2019 this was almost wholly based on her doctoral studies, but in 2020 it was adapted to also include elements of the Belonging and Learning project.

Su has started conversations with academics at Huddesrfield about future research collaborations as a result of this.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019,2020
 
Description Invitation to take part in first Global Coalition for Youth Employment consulattion meeting 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Corcoran was invited to take part in the consultation meeting based on her research with displaced communities of young people - including her doctoral and that of Belonging and Learning. This consultation was the beginning of the development of a document that will be presented at the next Commonwealth heads of government meeting in Rwanda 2020.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Key note delievered at Uni of Huddersfied's undergraduate conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact Su Corcoran gave the afternoon keynote at the "Finding a Voice" 3rd Year Student Conference in Childhood studies at the University of Huddersfield. She discussed the complexities around understanding and negotiating the power dynamics that arise when we claim and/or aim be including young person's voices in research and how we represent street-connected young people and refugees, focusing on her Doctoral work, a BA-funded small grant project and her AHRC-GCRF Belonging and Learning project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Presentation at Gothenburg University as part of the Pathways to inclusive and equitable quality education for people with disabilities symposium 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Corcoran attended the Pathways to inclusive and equitable quality education for people with disabilities symposium, hosted by the Platform for Research in Inclusive Education and School Development (PRIS) and Cambridge Network for Disability and Education Research (CaNDER) with support from the Swedish Research Council.

The symposium aimed to provide a space to forefront contextual complexities and dilemmas, but move the debates forward to critically examine where current hurdles exist, and how to better address the significant inequalities that exist in providing "inclusive and equitable quality education" (Sustainable Development Goal 4) for children and young people with disabilities across the globe.

Su presented her thinking on how she could take the learning - from her Doctoral study, her BA-funded small research grant, an internally funded scoping study conducted with teachers in Nairobi and her Belonging and learning project - and the opportunities provided by the current switch to a competency based curriculum in Kenya to work on developing more inclusive pedagogies in schools.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Presentation delivered at UKIET conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Su Corcoran delivered the interim findings of the project at the UKFIET conference that was held in Oxford in September 2019. As a result of the presentation Su made a connection with an academic based in Gulu who is was not only inspired by the talk - and later interactions - to increase the ways in which arts-pedagogies are being used within h work at the university and with a local community-based organisation, he is working Su Corcoran to develop a follow on project from Belonging and Learning focused on arts methodologies and peace education.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Verbal arts (Poetry/song and drama) workshop in Bukavu, DRC 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This two-day workshop was led by Faustin Muliri, a poet and playwrite based in Bukavu, in collaboration with Thomas D'Aquin Rubambura from PEDER. PEDER support street-connected young people in Bukavu and invited 12 young people to participate in the workshop. They joined practitioners (mainly social workers and teachers) and policy makers from Bukavu and Goma to discuss their right to education and the barriers they face to access. Using the discussion and their own experiences as inspiration, the adults and young people wrote poetry together that was later coproduced into a song. A second group created two short plays, one performed by the adults and the second by the young people. As the adults finished practicing their play very quickly an additional focus group discussion was conducted in which they talked about the issues they have with the education system, such as not being paid by the government and the need for arts-methods to implemented in schools and as part of psycho-social interventions for young people who have experienced trauma.
There was a great deal of learning from this workshop about how projects involving vulnerable young people should be conducted - particularly when the projects involve amplifying young people's voices for advocacy reasons. One of the main issues aspects of this was how young people' voices are respected in local cultures and the barriers that need to be addressed in order to help them to be heard. This learning will inform the development of a future project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www2.mmu.ac.uk/esri/research/projects/kenya-uganda-drc/
 
Description Workshop conducted at the Collaboration, Creativity and Complexities Conference 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Corcoran and Prof Pahl facilitated a workshop that shared the interim findings from the project so far (it took place in June 2019) and led the participants in an interactive arts sessions that mirrored the activities led by Charity in the Uganda workshop,
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019