Supporting Vulnerable Children to become Youth Leaders in South Africa: Shaping the Future of the Isibindi Safe Park Model Nationally

Lead Research Organisation: University of Leeds
Department Name: Sch of Languages, Cultures and Societies

Abstract

This project will apply the research findings from AH/P007511/1 (Troubling the National Brand and Voicing Hidden Histories: Participatory Filmmaking as a tool for International Development and Community Empowerment) in a new context, in order to generate significant new impact at community level, on the one hand, and at national policy level on the other.

In the original research, we explored how community-led arts interventions - in particular participatory filmmaking projects - could be used to challenge the way national level 'soft power' narratives are used to 'brand' the nation internationally in 3 ODA-recipient countries. Specifically, we aimed to support particular communities in these countries who feel themselves to be excluded from these narratives: the 'Denotified Tribes' in India, the 'Quilombos', or ex-slave communities in Brazil and the 'undocumented children' of illegal migrants in South Africa. Here we were particularly focussed on the potential of participatory filmmaking as a tool to support grass-roots advocacy to raise awareness of these groups' precarious place in society.

This follow-on project will focus on South Africa. We will apply our original research findings to:

1) use the model of grass-roots (in the case of South Africa, specifically youth-led) advocacy that emerged over the course of the previous project to develop an arts-based 'youth-leadership' programme to support the work of a number of Isibindi Safe Parks (ISP), community-based organisations that help vulnerable children and young people across Ekurhuleni Municipality in South Africa. In the process we will significantly extend the community-level impact of the original project, engaging new groups of young people.

2) generate significant national-level policy impact in South Africa by working with the National Association of Child Care Workers (NACCW), who have approached us with the aim of using our research to inform the national standards of the ISP programme, and to deliver training to support the implementation of these standards. In the process, we will also deliver a child-led advocacy campaign to support NACCW's efforts to raise awareness of the ISP programme and its value nationally.

Thus, our project will make a significant contribution the delivery of the UN Sustainable Development Goals in South Africa, in particular SDGs 4 (Quality Education), 5 (Gender Equality), 16 (Peace and Justice Strong Institutions), 17 (Partnerships to achieve the Goals). These are of course interrelated. However, this project also takes cognisance of the tension between them. To what extent, for example, can a focus on the creation of 'strong institutions' (SDG 17) in practice work against a focus on 'participatory decision-making at all levels' (SDG 16), or 'gender equality' (SDG 5)? How might the construction of a 'peaceful' society be challenged by the need for an 'inclusive' society, where everyone's voice can be heard and respected (SDG 16)? Understanding the intersections and tensions between the SDGs, as they are realised on the ground, was central to our original research, and our learning from this earlier project in this regard will be important to the success of this follow-on project. Moreover, our project will also support delivery of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, specifically Article 12: 'Every child has the right to express their views, feelings and wishes in all matters affecting them, and to have their views considered and taken seriously.'

Planned Impact

The aim of this project is to generate significant new impact on 2 levels, supporting and enhancing the work of our partner organisations, the Bishop Simeon Trust (BST) and the National Association of Child Care Workers (NACCW).

1) At community level, we will build on the research findings of our original project to develop an arts-based leadership programme that will be used directly to train approximately 240 children and young people across 8 Isibindi Safe Parks supported by BST to become 'youth leaders'. This group will then work with up to 150 further children and young people in their particular Safe Park (a total of approximately 1200 children and young people) to use film and other arts-based methods to develop advocacy campaigns that will raise awareness of a series of issue that directly effect their lives (issues that might be explored include xenophobia, the treatment of the 'undocumented' children of illegal migrants, or the problem of 'Blessers' - predatory older men - on school-age girls that use the Safe Parks). Crucially, the specific nature of these campaigns will be decided by the young people themselves, supported by the project team. These activities will then build towards a national campaign to be coordinated by NACCW (see 2 below). By building the confidence of participants - both those who will be directly trained as youth leaders, and those who will participate in the advocacy campaigns the youth leaders will organise - the project will help all concerned to see the potential of their 'voice' to effect change in their lives. In the process, the project will also have an impact on the wider community within which the Safe Parks are set. It will, for example, de facto provide extra support to the many child-led households that use the Safe Parks, the leadership skills developed as part of this project also helping to build the resilience of the child leaders of these families. The project will also help to develop transferable skills in participants, to raise their aspirations and so - for example - to enhance their employability.

2) The project will also have impact at a national level through our partnership with the NACCW. The NACCW has commissioned us to use the approach to youth leadership we developed during our initial research to create the national guidelines for the 'youth committees' that it stipulates must be put in place if an Isibindi Safe Park is to receive governmental statutory funding. Thus, it wishes to see our leadership programme rolled out to all 360 Safe Parks it currently accredits (supporting 1.4 million children and young people across the country). The NACCW also wishes us to develop a training programme to support this roll out. Further, via NACCW, the project will organise a national-level awareness raising campaign, to be shaped by the young people involved in the project (see 1 above). It will also support a policy development event that will create a dialogue with local, regional and national stakeholders, as well as key INGOs operating in South Africa (including the Departments of Social Development, Basic Education, Health and UNICEF South Africa, Hope and Homes for Children, along with Departmental Heads and Councillors within Ekurhuleni Municipality and Gauteng Provincial Government), both to raise awareness of the Isibindi Safe Park model and to ensure that our work is embedded in, and aligned with, the aims of these key agencies in the wider national support infrastructure. Finally, via its annual conference, the NACCW will also facilitate the dissemination of our project to Child and Youth Care Workers internationally, supporting the aspirations of NACCW and other agencies (including UNICEF) to see the Isibindi Safe Park model exported beyond South Africa.

Publications

10 25 50
 
Title BST Youth Advocacy Campaign Film: Amablesser - Nigel Caring Community 
Description This film was made by young participants of the Bishop Simeon Trust's and University of Leeds' Arts Based Youth Leadership Programme in Ekurhleni Municipality, South Africa. A central part of the programme involves training youth to use participatory filmmaking approaches to develop youth advocacy tools for themselves and their communities. During 2019 the Youth Committees advocacy campaign model ran on two six-month cycles. The Youth Committees supported within the Safe Parks launched their campaign films and performances at a central showcase event in Ekurhuleni, with all Youth Committees in attendance, along with key strategic stakeholders. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2019 
Impact The film showcase events within the Safe Parks were followed with showcasing of their films and performances in their own communities, with children from within their Safe Parks and broader community invited to attend. By doing so all 1,594 children and young people served by the Safe Parks were engaged in the delivery of the Youth Committee Advocacy campaigns, alongside other key stakeholders within their community. The films themselves will also be uploaded onto YouTube, providing the Youth Committees with the opportunity share with other young people in their community via social media. 
 
Title BST Youth Advocacy Campaign Film: Choices - KATHA Day Care Safe Park (2019) 
Description This film was made by young participants of the Bishop Simeon Trust's and University of Leeds' Arts Based Youth Leadership Programme in Ekurhleni Municipality, South Africa. A central part of the programme involves training youth to use participatory filmmaking approaches to develop youth advocacy tools for themselves and their communities. During 2019 the Youth Committees advocacy campaign model ran on two six-month cycles. The Youth Committees supported within the Safe Parks launched their campaign films and performances at a central showcase event in Ekurhuleni, with all Youth Committees in attendance, along with key strategic stakeholders. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2019 
Impact The film showcase events within the Safe Parks were followed with showcasing of their films and performances in their own communities, with children from within their Safe Parks and broader community invited to attend. By doing so all 1,594 children and young people served by the Safe Parks were engaged in the delivery of the Youth Committee Advocacy campaigns, alongside other key stakeholders within their community. The films themselves will also be uploaded onto YouTube, providing the Youth Committees with the opportunity share with other young people in their community via social media. 
 
Title BST Youth Advocacy Campaign Film: Choices 2 - KATHA Day Care Safe Park 
Description This film was made by young participants of the Bishop Simeon Trust's and University of Leeds' Arts Based Youth Leadership Programme in Ekurhleni Municipality, South Africa. A central part of the programme involves training youth to use participatory filmmaking approaches to develop youth advocacy tools for themselves and their communities. During 2019 the Youth Committees advocacy campaign model ran on two six-month cycles. The Youth Committees supported within the Safe Parks launched their campaign films and performances at a central showcase event in Ekurhuleni, with all Youth Committees in attendance, along with key strategic stakeholders. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2019 
Impact The film showcase events within the Safe Parks were followed with showcasing of their films and performances in their own communities, with children from within their Safe Parks and broader community invited to attend. By doing so all 1,594 children and young people served by the Safe Parks were engaged in the delivery of the Youth Committee Advocacy campaigns, alongside other key stakeholders within their community. The films themselves will also be uploaded onto YouTube, providing the Youth Committees with the opportunity share with other young people in their community via social media. 
 
Title BST Youth Advocacy Campaign Film: Human Trafficking - Bonisiwe 
Description This film was made by young participants of the Bishop Simeon Trust's and University of Leeds' Arts Based Youth Leadership Programme in Ekurhleni Municipality, South Africa. A central part of the programme involves training youth to use participatory filmmaking approaches to develop youth advocacy tools for themselves and their communities. During 2019 the Youth Committees advocacy campaign model ran on two six-month cycles. The Youth Committees supported within the Safe Parks launched their campaign films and performances at a central showcase event in Ekurhuleni, with all Youth Committees in attendance, along with key strategic stakeholders. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2019 
Impact The film showcase events within the Safe Parks were followed with showcasing of their films and performances in their own communities, with children from within their Safe Parks and broader community invited to attend. By doing so all 1,594 children and young people served by the Safe Parks were engaged in the delivery of the Youth Committee Advocacy campaigns, alongside other key stakeholders within their community. The films themselves will also be uploaded onto YouTube, providing the Youth Committees with the opportunity share with other young people in their community via social media. 
 
Title BST Youth Advocacy Campaign Film: I Kati Lilele Eziko - Uthando 
Description This film was made by young participants of the Bishop Simeon Trust's and University of Leeds' Arts Based Youth Leadership Programme in Ekurhleni Municipality, South Africa. A central part of the programme involves training youth to use participatory filmmaking approaches to develop youth advocacy tools for themselves and their communities. During 2019 the Youth Committees advocacy campaign model ran on two six-month cycles. The Youth Committees supported within the Safe Parks launched their campaign films and performances at a central showcase event in Ekurhuleni, with all Youth Committees in attendance, along with key strategic stakeholders. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2019 
Impact The film showcase events within the Safe Parks were followed with showcasing of their films and performances in their own communities, with children from within their Safe Parks and broader community invited to attend. By doing so all 1,594 children and young people served by the Safe Parks were engaged in the delivery of the Youth Committee Advocacy campaigns, alongside other key stakeholders within their community. The films themselves will also be uploaded onto YouTube, providing the Youth Committees with the opportunity share with other young people in their community via social media. 
 
Title BST Youth Advocacy Campaign Film: Malume Uya Lumana - Rearabilwe Tsakane 
Description This film was made by young participants of the Bishop Simeon Trust's and University of Leeds' Arts Based Youth Leadership Programme in Ekurhleni Municipality, South Africa. A central part of the programme involves training youth to use participatory filmmaking approaches to develop youth advocacy tools for themselves and their communities. During 2019 the Youth Committees advocacy campaign model ran on two six-month cycles. The Youth Committees supported within the Safe Parks launched their campaign films and performances at a central showcase event in Ekurhuleni, with all Youth Committees in attendance, along with key strategic stakeholders. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2019 
Impact The film showcase events within the Safe Parks were followed with showcasing of their films and performances in their own communities, with children from within their Safe Parks and broader community invited to attend. By doing so all 1,594 children and young people served by the Safe Parks were engaged in the delivery of the Youth Committee Advocacy campaigns, alongside other key stakeholders within their community. The films themselves will also be uploaded onto YouTube, providing the Youth Committees with the opportunity share with other young people in their community via social media. 
 
Title BST Youth Advocacy Campaign Film:Human Trafficking - Nigel Caring Community 
Description This film was made by young participants of the Bishop Simeon Trust's and University of Leeds' Arts Based Youth Leadership Programme in Ekurhleni Municipality, South Africa. A central part of the programme involves training youth to use participatory filmmaking approaches to develop youth advocacy tools for themselves and their communities. During 2019 the Youth Committees advocacy campaign model ran on two six-month cycles. The Youth Committees supported within the Safe Parks launched their campaign films and performances at a central showcase event in Ekurhuleni, with all Youth Committees in attendance, along with key strategic stakeholders. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2019 
Impact The film showcase events within the Safe Parks were followed with showcasing of their films and performances in their own communities, with children from within their Safe Parks and broader community invited to attend. By doing so all 1,594 children and young people served by the Safe Parks were engaged in the delivery of the Youth Committee Advocacy campaigns, alongside other key stakeholders within their community. The films themselves will also be uploaded onto YouTube, providing the Youth Committees with the opportunity share with other young people in their community via social media. 
 
Title BST Youth Advocacy Campaign Film:Twisted Souls - Reiger Park 
Description This film was made by young participants of the Bishop Simeon Trust's and University of Leeds' Arts Based Youth Leadership Programme in Ekurhleni Municipality, South Africa. A central part of the programme involves training youth to use participatory filmmaking approaches to develop youth advocacy tools for themselves and their communities. During 2019 the Youth Committees advocacy campaign model ran on two six-month cycles. The Youth Committees supported within the Safe Parks launched their campaign films and performances at a central showcase event in Ekurhuleni, with all Youth Committees in attendance, along with key strategic stakeholders. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2019 
Impact The film showcase events within the Safe Parks were followed with showcasing of their films and performances in their own communities, with children from within their Safe Parks and broader community invited to attend. By doing so all 1,594 children and young people served by the Safe Parks were engaged in the delivery of the Youth Committee Advocacy campaigns, alongside other key stakeholders within their community. The films themselves will also be uploaded onto YouTube, providing the Youth Committees with the opportunity share with other young people in their community via social media. 
 
Title BST Youth Advocacy Campaign Film:Zinhle - Rearabilwe Daveyton 
Description This film was made by young participants of the Bishop Simeon Trust's and University of Leeds' Arts Based Youth Leadership Programme in Ekurhleni Municipality, South Africa. A central part of the programme involves training youth to use participatory filmmaking approaches to develop youth advocacy tools for themselves and their communities. During 2019 the Youth Committees advocacy campaign model ran on two six-month cycles. The Youth Committees supported within the Safe Parks launched their campaign films and performances at a central showcase event in Ekurhuleni, with all Youth Committees in attendance, along with key strategic stakeholders. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2019 
Impact The film showcase events within the Safe Parks were followed with showcasing of their films and performances in their own communities, with children from within their Safe Parks and broader community invited to attend. By doing so all 1,594 children and young people served by the Safe Parks were engaged in the delivery of the Youth Committee Advocacy campaigns, alongside other key stakeholders within their community. The films themselves will also be uploaded onto YouTube, providing the Youth Committees with the opportunity share with other young people in their community via social media. 
 
Title BST Youth Advocacy Campaign film: Bad Boyz - Bambanani Safe Park 
Description This film was made by young participants of the Bishop Simeon Trust's and University of Leeds' Arts Based Youth Leadership Programme in Ekurhleni Municipality, South Africa. A central part of the programme involves training youth to use participatory filmmaking approaches to develop youth advocacy tools for themselves and their communities. During 2019 the Youth Committees advocacy campaign model ran on two six-month cycles. The Youth Committees supported within the Safe Parks launched their campaign films and performances at a central showcase event in Ekurhuleni, with all Youth Committees in attendance, along with key strategic stakeholders. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2019 
Impact The film showcase events within the Safe Parks were followed with showcasing of their films and performances in their own communities, with children from within their Safe Parks and broader community invited to attend. By doing so all 1,594 children and young people served by the Safe Parks were engaged in the delivery of the Youth Committee Advocacy campaigns, alongside other key stakeholders within their community. The films themselves will also be uploaded onto YouTube, providing the Youth Committees with the opportunity share with other young people in their community via social media. 
 
Title The Power of Art: Empowering Young People infographic 
Description The infographic is a visual representation of the achievements on the project 'Supporting Vulnerable Children to become Youth Leaders in South Africa', a collaboration between Changing the Story, the Bishop Simeon Trust and the National Association of Child Care Workers. The project worked with 8 safe parks and 500 children. 40 workshops were delivered and children reported an increase in confidence (7% on average). 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2019 
Impact The infographic has been shared with the projects funders (GCRF) and via Changing the Story and partner social media channels. 
 
Description This is very much an action-based approach to leadership development. By working with young people to build confidence in their own ability to identify and analyse issues, as well as the potential solutions to them, and communicate these to decision makers in their communities, we built leadership. Where young people are not accustomed to being able to inform and influence then leadership potential is minimised. Where we are able to provide opportunities to experience this then we are able to build this potential and their engagement in issues of rights and development.

With the support of the funding we were able to set in place arts-based youth leadership programme in 8 Safe Parks in Ekurhuleni Municipality. These were established using the model previously piloted with the support of the University of Leeds in the preceding year, which itself evolved over the course of the implementation of the project.
Youth Committees were established within each of the Safe Parks, with the support of the Auxiliary Social Workers working directly with the young people there. In doing so the model itself was introduced to the Safe Park staff prior to any implementation, their continued support being vital to the success of the programme, but also the sustainability of the approach following the conclusion of the project.
Two iterations of the project model were implemented, between February and June and then July to November. The model was evaluated at the end of each cycle with the operational team, incorporating feedback from the young people and the Safe Park staff. This saw adjustments to the model implemented in the second cycle, as well as further learning and adjustments added to the documentation of the model in December 2019. This documented model has now formed the basis of our delivery plans with our operational partners independent of this project in 2020.
In the first iteration of the project we observed that the level of success in terms of delivery and impact depended on a number of factors such as: the level of prior exposure to our model or similar participatory approaches to youth engagement and action; capacity of the partner organisation to engage in the development of the youth leadership programme alongside other commitments; appreciation of the model itself in terms of its contribution to the objectives of the community partners. The time taken to establish a relationship of trust with both the Safe Park staff and the young people is also important to consider - we cannot assume that this is instant and it is essential to effective delivery of community level programmes.

The Safe Park staff were keen to work with us on the youth leadership programme from the start, but the second iteration was superior to the first in terms of project outcomes, indicating that learning had been successfully captured. In part this was due to the level of ownership of the model itself by both the support staff and the members of the youth committees.

The first iteration of films all tended towards a familiar set of themes: teen pregnancy; sexual abuse; HIV/AIDS; 'Blessers' or 'sugar daddies;' drugs; gangsterism. In the majority of the first films we observed that the narrative arc concluded with the protagonist committing suicide, communicating a sense of hopelessness and powerlessness amongst the young people creating the stories. It is also possible that we experienced a certain level of 'observer's paradox' in the first cycle, the young people responding to what they perceived as being the agenda of ourselves as an external party in their community, i.e. to create narratives which communicated problems alone as a means of prompting response and support, a phenomenon often referred to as 'poverty porn.'

This was an important point of consideration in adjusting the model implementation, i.e. to find a means by which we may reinforce the fact that the process of participation was intended as a problem solving exercise, inviting the participants to use the creative space to tell stories which expressed the challenges as well as the potential solutions to them on their own terms. Trust again is essential to this process, which is gained through continued support over more than one iteration.

The operational team addressed this by adding to the model space for facilitated reflection sessions with the Youth Committees, which proved to be very productive. These fed into two further community level consultation sessions beyond the Ekurhuleni wide showcase events.

The first of these was a community level premier - inviting all the children and young people supported by the Safe Park to a showing of the films, alongside peers, adult and boundary partner representatives, such as clinics, police, schools, etc. These were followed by Q&A sessions with the Youth Committees.

The second was a Child and Parent Self Reflection sessions, where the members of the Youth Committees invited their parents and guardians to a showing of their films. Following the showing the actors from the film attended a Q&A session as the characters in the films - bringing some forum theatre practice into the process. This provided a safe space for them to enter into dialogue with parents and guardians on topics raised in the films that may otherwise be lost in the norms of generational and cultural dynamics in their communities.

The result of these sessions were very positive. A common theme from these sessions that was how negatively young people view the world and the adults around them, tending to try and solve their problems themselves, making a lot of mistakes as they do so. This left one big question: why are they not confident in asking their parents and guardians for advice and support?

A further issue across the sessions was the gap between adults and children which restricts and discourages dialogue and understanding. Adults tend to insist that children must abide by strict rules, regardless of how they think or feel, resorting to corporal punishment as the only way to raise a disciplined child. Children feel that their parents are old fashioned and don't fully understand the world now and their methods are not effective in raising the new generation. This gap creates a huge risk for children as they grow up feeling that they lack support, mentally and emotionally, even where their parents are present in their lives.

Many of the young people explained that their interaction with their parents are limited to instructions around household chores. Other conversations are limited due to the cultural limitations of how parents regard children - there is very small incidence of talking to parents about emotional or intellectual things. Thando from Nigel told us that "It's like our parents disregard the fact that we have brains too, so they always want to make decisions for us and that is not cool."

In their defence parents told us of their concern that where children are given too much freedom they can be prone to bad influence and the negative social issues in their communities: violence, gangsterism, drugs, teenage pregnancy, HIV/AIDS. They know this because they were once their children's age and they see these problems persisting in their communities. Parents find it difficult to speak with them about these issues as they feel it would normalise and encourage them.

The young people reflected further, explaining that their peers can get caught up in such negative behaviours because they are initially attracted by people who lend them an ear and develop a bond with them - something that they long for. If they could have better relationships with their parents then maybe this would not be the case.

These were complicated, intense and important sessions with the children and the adults in their lives. We have seen that they take them to a point where they realise that they need better relationships with each other to help them live in happier homes, something which they can translate into their communities. As a result most parents agreed to be involved in the second youth leadership programme cycle. Alongside the first self-reflection session with the broader community it also mobilised more support for both the Safe Parks and the work of the Youth Committees.

This also proved to be a very effective means of moving the conversation on with the Youth Committees, as they reflected on the focus of their next iteration of the youth leadership programme. The dialogue refined and focussed thinking, promoting ownership of the model, such that it became an effective tool for them to both develop and claim leadership with their community, rather than being an end in itself.

This was very clear in the second iteration where the films were more diverse in terms of the subject matters, although they did tackle issues of gangsterism, drugs and HIV/AIDS, they also brought in topics such as anti-social behaviour, harmful interpretations of traditional belief systems and the power of collective mobilisation. The narrative arcs in the films also moved to potential solutions, where protagonists identified the means by which they could resolve the problems identified or claim power in the face of challenge.

In one instance the Youth Committee in Nigel chose to make a sequel to their first film, commencing with the protagonist being resuscitated from their attempted suicide and resolving the story with the support of their community and recourse to the law.

The two iterations of the model also provided the space for the Auxiliary Social Workers and other Safe Park staff to develop their own understanding of the model, improve their ability to facilitate and support, as well as locate it in terms of their roles. This was successful to the point that with those Safe Parks we will continue to work with in 2020 there is a reduced need for as much hands on facilitation from our operational team. The more technical aspects around filming remain an issue, until we are able to help them secure their own film units - which the Youth Committees are highly motivated to do.

The Safe Park staff have identified very positively with the model in terms of both its relevance and utility to their work. The Youth Committees themselves act as a support body for outreach to the broader body of children and young people supported, particularly around the process of influencing positive changes in peer behaviour, communicating their work to the broader community and challenging negative stereotypes about Safe Parks and Drop-In Centres. This helps them to promote their facilities as key resource and support hubs for families and children, rather than a place for poor and sick people, a taboo which limits support and engagement.

The staff have also identified that the model helps them with those aspects of their work focussed on social support. The model itself has proved to be a positive process for early identification and intervention for those children and young people involved in the reflection and planning sessions. The creative arts used provide a space for them to communicate experiences or thoughts which may have otherwise not been expressed. As the staff attend, observe and support each session it helps them to identify where intervention and support is needed, or where further engagement with parents / guardians is required.

In short, the model developed has proved to be very powerful in a number of different ways, promoting youth leadership and youth voice, but also acting as process which enhances support services for vulnerable children. The implementation has also been sensitive to existing statutory structures and as such the documentation is well placed for scale up within policy frameworks, with the potential to inform practice which benefits many more children and young people than we can reach alone.
Exploitation Route We have developed a youth leadership model that can, and is, being taken up by other organisations- most noticably the NACCW and the Department of Social Development in South Africa.
Sectors Education,Government, Democracy and Justice

URL http://www.bstrust.org/
 
Description Given the strategic change in the location of support for the Safe Park model from the NACCW to the DSD this has been a process that we have tracked across from one strategic partner body to another. Although the approach has similarly adjusted the objective remains the same and progress has been made in this regard. Essential to this has been the documentation of the model for sharing and scale up. This has already been documented within our operational plans in South Africa for 2020 and it remains for us to work with the University of Leeds to document this in a manner that may be disseminated more broadly. The development of the Youth Advisory Board from representatives of each Youth Committee is an important step in helping us to inform policy. This takes us to the natural next level of participation, engaging young people in policy forums at a municipal and regional level. The DSD have now shown interest in how our model may be adopted within their YOLO (You Only Live Once) Programme, originally created as part of the Department's HIV/AIDS strategy, the key objectives of which are: • Build a sense of ownership among the youth for the YOLO programme; • Develop age-appropriate messaging and suggest relevant mediums to reach the target audience; • Develop an action plan for youth participation in the YOLO programme; • Identify innovative approaches which can be used to communicate the YOLO messages and promote the programme objectives. The DSD have been looking for means to innovate with young people to develop this programme and have identified our model as a means of doing so in a more successful manner than they have achieved to date. This is a matter for further development in 2020, bringing to bear the learning from the project.
First Year Of Impact 2020
Sector Education,Government, Democracy and Justice
Impact Types Societal,Policy & public services

 
Description Adoption of Youth Committee Model within the standards for 'Drop In Centres' within national policy by the South African Department of Social Development (DSD).
Geographic Reach Africa 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description Delivered workshop for policy makers at the NACCW Biannual Conference, South Africa (BST)
Geographic Reach Africa 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact In July 2019 Professor Paul Cooke and Dr Lou Harvey from the University of Leeds joined four representatives of the Bishop Simeon Trust and its South African operational partner, One Child One Family , at the biannual conference of the NACCW in Durban . At a very well attended workshop we had the opportunity to share the leadership model with key policy decision makers, NGO leads and practitioners. This eventually led to the integration of the leadership model into the standards set by the National Department of Social Development for their 'drop-in centres'.
 
Description Bishop Simeon Trust 
Organisation Bishop Simeon Trust
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The UoL team provided funding (through VHH) to allow for the trial and implementation of the film project, film expertise via Prof. Paul Cooke, logistical and facilitation support via the in-country Research Officer Daniela Wegrostek, marketing support via our social media channels and university blogs, and research support via publications and research into participatory video approaches.
Collaborator Contribution Bishop Simeon Trust enabled a vital connection with Themba Interactive, our on-the-ground delivery partners for the South Africa strand of the project. THey provided free venue hire and a work station for our research officer, and gave 200 hours of staff-time in kind. They provided invaluable expertise regarding the context on the ground, as well as experienced facilitators through which we co-delivered the project.
Impact Formal Memorandum of Understanding signed by Bishop Simeon Trust with UoL at the Voicing Hidden Histories celebration event in November 2017. All South Africa outcomes related to this project would not have been possible without this partnership. Further partnership work as BST now also a partner in our newly awarded major GCRF fund 'Changing the Story'. BST are now increasingly using the films we have used (and commissioning Prof. Paul Cooke to create new ones) as part of their marketing and awareness campaigns, helping BST to generate more funds for their work. The film's have also raised awareness of the 'safe parks' that BST/Themba support in South Africa by regional lobbyists who are now keen to work with the films created and the young people that made them to lobby for the continuation of the safe parks in the next round of public funding.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Departments of Social Development, South Africa 
Organisation South African National Department of Social Development
Country South Africa 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The key features of the Youth Committee model as developed through this project with Bishop Simeon Trust in South Africa and University of Leeds has now been adopted within the standards for 'Drop In Centres' within national policy by the Department of Social Development (DSD).
Collaborator Contribution Towards the start of the project there was a shift in national policy in South Africa which resulted in the ending of state support for the NACCW in delivering the Isibindi model. . Instead, the key features of the Youth Committee model as developed through this project with Bishop Simeon Trust in South Africa and University of Leeds has now been adopted within the standards for 'Drop In Centres' within national policy by the Department of Social Development (DSD).
Impact The Youth Committee model has now been adopted within the standards for 'Drop In Centres' within national policy by the Department of Social Development (DSD). This shift did not diminish the necessity of youth led campaigns to promote and support the services provided by Safe Parks. Instead, the focus has shifted to engagement with the DSD to assure that they are accountable for supporting Safe Park services as policy now states, but also for including within their policies greater support for youth participation, leadership and voice. For this reason, representatives of the DSD attended each of the showcase events. The formation of the Youth Advisory Board has also been very important in this regard, the Board now being a key forum for engagement with the DSD at municipal level during the project, as well as moving towards provincial in the coming year. Given the status of Gauteng as a 'bellwether' for national policy making this will be a key route to advocating for continued and improved support for Safe Parks.
Start Year 2019
 
Description National Association of Child Care Workers, South Africa 
Organisation National Association of Care and Support Workers
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution This project delivered by Bishop Simeon Trust and University of Leeds developed and established an effective Youth Leadership model for the Isibindi Safe Parks (the NACCW were required to include a Youth Leadership programme for funding of the safe parks to continue).
Collaborator Contribution Towards the start of the project there was a shift in national policy in South Africa which resulted in the ending of state support for the NACCW in delivering the Isibindi model. However, this does not mean that support for the model itself has ended. The NACCW has ownership of the Isibindi brand and as such the DSD may not use this. Instead, the key features of the model itself has now been adopted within the standards for 'Drop In Centres' within national policy by the Department of Social Development (DSD).
Impact There are indications that the NACCW may continue to be a key point of reference in policy building for South Africa; potentially for training and development support for Drop-In Centres. This is dependent on clarification of where the 140,000 Child & Youth Care Workers trained with state support through the NACCW will fit within the social work supervision structures which apply to the Drop-In Centre policy. We are monitoring policy decisions in this regard but have remain engaged with the NACCW whilst also seeking to build a stronger relationship with the DSD who now make core decisions on policy and resources. In July 2019 Professor Paul Cooke and Dr Lou Harvey from the University of Leeds joined four representatives of the Bishop Simeon Trust and its South African operational partner, One Child One Family , at the biannual conference of the NACCW in Durban . At a very well attended workshop we had the opportunity to share the leadership model with key policy decision makers, NGO leads and practitioners.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Rearabilwe - Daveyton CBO South Africa (BST) 
Organisation Rearabilwe Ekurhuleni Community Care
Country South Africa 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution BST and University of Leeds delivered and developed their Youth Committee model in collaboration with this CBO (Community Based Organisation), engaging young participants from the safe park as part of the programme.
Collaborator Contribution This CBO provided venue space for workshops and showcasing events, and access to their young participants, as well as expertise regarding the safe park system in South Africa and general support for the programme.
Impact See all outputs relating to activities and workshops at this CBO's safe park location.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Rearabilwe - Tsakane CBO South Africa (BST) 
Organisation Rearabilwe Ekurhuleni Community Care
Country South Africa 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution BST and University of Leeds delivered and developed their Youth Committee model in collaboration with this CBO (Community Based Organisation), engaging young participants from the safe park as part of the programme.
Collaborator Contribution This CBO provided venue space for workshops and showcasing events, and access to their young participants, as well as expertise regarding the safe park system in South Africa and general support for the programme.
Impact See all outputs relating to activities and workshops at this CBO's safe park location.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Uthando CBO South Africa (BST) 
Organisation Uthando CBO
Country South Africa 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution BST and University of Leeds delivered and developed their Youth Committee model in collaboration with this CBO (Community Based Organisation), engaging young participants from the safe park as part of the programme.
Collaborator Contribution This CBO provided venue space for workshops and showcasing events, and access to their young participants, as well as expertise regarding the safe park system in South Africa and general support for the programme.
Impact See all outputs relating to activities and workshops at this CBO's safe park location.
Start Year 2018
 
Description 10x Community Based Workshops in Rearabilwe-Tsakane safe park, South Africa (BST) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Community-based workshops (CBWs) were delivered to support the development of the Youth Committees and their advocacy campaigns. This series of CBWs took place in one of 8 Safe Parks in Ekurhuleni Municipality in Gauteng Province that took part. The workshops were delivered dependent on the level of prior engagement with the Bishop Simeon Trust on arts-based approaches and Youth Committee development. The development models devised during prior collaboration with the University of Leeds were used as the basis for intervention. This progressed from an initial youth mobilisation phase, supported by the Child and Youth Care Workers / Auxiliary Social Workers within Safe Parks, to the implementation of the participatory arts-based advocacy model. Using this approach leadership development is participatory in nature, children are provided with space to contribute to the collective action as individuals in a safe space.

The workshops across the 8 safe parks led to 189 children being supported to develop their skills as youth leaders through their membership of the Youth Committees and their involvement in the arts-based advocacy. The Youth Committees then engaged with 1,405 children supported by the Safe Park programmes within the community-based partners.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description 11 Community Based Workshops in Bambanani Safe Park, South Africa (BST) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Community-based workshops (CBWs) were delivered to support the development of the Youth Committees and their advocacy campaigns. This series of CBWs took place in one of 8 Safe Parks in Ekurhuleni Municipality in Gauteng Province that took part. The workshops were delivered dependent on the level of prior engagement with the Bishop Simeon Trust on arts-based approaches and Youth Committee development. The development models devised during prior collaboration with the University of Leeds were used as the basis for intervention. This progressed from an initial youth mobilisation phase, supported by the Child and Youth Care Workers / Auxiliary Social Workers within Safe Parks, to the implementation of the participatory arts-based advocacy model. Using this approach leadership development is participatory in nature, children are provided with space to contribute to the collective action as individuals in a safe space.

The workshops across the 8 safe parks led to 189 children being supported to develop their skills as youth leaders through their membership of the Youth Committees and their involvement in the arts-based advocacy. The Youth Committees then engaged with 1,405 children supported by the Safe Park programmes within the community-based partners.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description 12x Community Based Workshops in Uthando safe park, South Africa (BST) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Community-based workshops (CBWs) were delivered to support the development of the Youth Committees and their advocacy campaigns. This series of CBWs took place in one of 8 Safe Parks in Ekurhuleni Municipality in Gauteng Province that took part. The workshops were delivered dependent on the level of prior engagement with the Bishop Simeon Trust on arts-based approaches and Youth Committee development. The development models devised during prior collaboration with the University of Leeds were used as the basis for intervention. This progressed from an initial youth mobilisation phase, supported by the Child and Youth Care Workers / Auxiliary Social Workers within Safe Parks, to the implementation of the participatory arts-based advocacy model. Using this approach leadership development is participatory in nature, children are provided with space to contribute to the collective action as individuals in a safe space.

The workshops across the 8 safe parks led to 189 children being supported to develop their skills as youth leaders through their membership of the Youth Committees and their involvement in the arts-based advocacy. The Youth Committees then engaged with 1,405 children supported by the Safe Park programmes within the community-based partners.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description 19x Community Based Workshops at Community Crisis Centre safe park, South Africa (BST) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Community-based workshops (CBWs) were delivered to support the development of the Youth Committees and their advocacy campaigns. This series of CBWs took place in one of 8 Safe Parks in Ekurhuleni Municipality in Gauteng Province that took part. The workshops were delivered dependent on the level of prior engagement with the Bishop Simeon Trust on arts-based approaches and Youth Committee development. The development models devised during prior collaboration with the University of Leeds were used as the basis for intervention. This progressed from an initial youth mobilisation phase, supported by the Child and Youth Care Workers / Auxiliary Social Workers within Safe Parks, to the implementation of the participatory arts-based advocacy model. Using this approach leadership development is participatory in nature, children are provided with space to contribute to the collective action as individuals in a safe space.

The workshops across the 8 safe parks led to 189 children being supported to develop their skills as youth leaders through their membership of the Youth Committees and their involvement in the arts-based advocacy. The Youth Committees then engaged with 1,405 children supported by the Safe Park programmes within the community-based partners.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description 21 Community Based Workshops at Nigel Community Cares safe park, South Africa (BST) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Community-based workshops (CBWs) were delivered to support the development of the Youth Committees and their advocacy campaigns. This series of CBWs took place in one of 8 Safe Parks in Ekurhuleni Municipality in Gauteng Province that took part. The workshops were delivered dependent on the level of prior engagement with the Bishop Simeon Trust on arts-based approaches and Youth Committee development. The development models devised during prior collaboration with the University of Leeds were used as the basis for intervention. This progressed from an initial youth mobilisation phase, supported by the Child and Youth Care Workers / Auxiliary Social Workers within Safe Parks, to the implementation of the participatory arts-based advocacy model. Using this approach leadership development is participatory in nature, children are provided with space to contribute to the collective action as individuals in a safe space.

The workshops across the 8 safe parks led to 189 children being supported to develop their skills as youth leaders through their membership of the Youth Committees and their involvement in the arts-based advocacy. The Youth Committees then engaged with 1,405 children supported by the Safe Park programmes within the community-based partners.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description 26 Community Based Workshops in KATHA Day Care safe park, South Africa (BST) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Community-based workshops (CBWs) were delivered to support the development of the Youth Committees and their advocacy campaigns. This series of CBWs took place in one of 8 Safe Parks in Ekurhuleni Municipality in Gauteng Province that took part. The workshops were delivered dependent on the level of prior engagement with the Bishop Simeon Trust on arts-based approaches and Youth Committee development. The development models devised during prior collaboration with the University of Leeds were used as the basis for intervention. This progressed from an initial youth mobilisation phase, supported by the Child and Youth Care Workers / Auxiliary Social Workers within Safe Parks, to the implementation of the participatory arts-based advocacy model. Using this approach leadership development is participatory in nature, children are provided with space to contribute to the collective action as individuals in a safe space.

The workshops across the 8 safe parks led to 189 children being supported to develop their skills as youth leaders through their membership of the Youth Committees and their involvement in the arts-based advocacy. The Youth Committees then engaged with 1,405 children supported by the Safe Park programmes within the community-based partners.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description 8 community based workshops in Rearabilwe-Daveyton, South Africa (BST) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Community-based workshops (CBWs) were delivered to support the development of the Youth Committees and their advocacy campaigns. This series of CBWs took place in one of 8 Safe Parks in Ekurhuleni Municipality in Gauteng Province that took part. The workshops were delivered dependent on the level of prior engagement with the Bishop Simeon Trust on arts-based approaches and Youth Committee development. The development models devised during prior collaboration with the University of Leeds were used as the basis for intervention. This progressed from an initial youth mobilisation phase, supported by the Child and Youth Care Workers / Auxiliary Social Workers within Safe Parks, to the implementation of the participatory arts-based advocacy model. Using this approach leadership development is participatory in nature, children are provided with space to contribute to the collective action as individuals in a safe space.

The workshops across the 8 safe parks led to 189 children being supported to develop their skills as youth leaders through their membership of the Youth Committees and their involvement in the arts-based advocacy. The Youth Committees then engaged with 1,405 children supported by the Safe Park programmes within the community-based partners.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description 9 Community Based Workshops in Bonisiwe Safe Park, South Africa (BST) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Community-based workshops (CBWs) were delivered to support the development of the Youth Committees and their advocacy campaigns. This series of CBWs took place in one of 8 Safe Parks in Ekurhuleni Municipality in Gauteng Province that took part. The workshops were delivered dependent on the level of prior engagement with the Bishop Simeon Trust on arts-based approaches and Youth Committee development. The development models devised during prior collaboration with the University of Leeds were used as the basis for intervention. This progressed from an initial youth mobilisation phase, supported by the Child and Youth Care Workers / Auxiliary Social Workers within Safe Parks, to the implementation of the participatory arts-based advocacy model. Using this approach leadership development is participatory in nature, children are provided with space to contribute to the collective action as individuals in a safe space.

The workshops across the 8 safe parks led to 189 children being supported to develop their skills as youth leaders through their membership of the Youth Committees and their involvement in the arts-based advocacy. The Youth Committees then engaged with 1,405 children supported by the Safe Park programmes within the community-based partners.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description BST Showcase Event & Child Parent Self Reflection Session: Bambanani, Dukathole 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The Child Parent Self Reflection Session are a third level of showcase event limited to the sharing of the campaign message / film of the Youth Committees with the parents and guardians of children supported by the Safe Park. The children featuring in the films attend 'in character' and ready to respond to questions from the audience as such.

These sessions encouraged greater cross generational dialogue between the children and their parents / guardians, to help promote trust and safeguarding of children. They also helped engage adults in the work of the Safe Parks, as they can in turn support through their own connections with a broader range of stakeholders in their communities, helping establish the community partner organisations as more than just Drop-In Centres. This in turn helped them to reduce the stigma that may be attached to their work and enhance their role as a focal point of child focussed services and other relevant stakeholders in their communities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description BST Showcase Event & Child Parent Self Reflection Session: Community Crisis Centre, Reiger 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The Child Parent Self Reflection Session are a third level of showcase event limited to the sharing of the campaign message / film of the Youth Committees with the parents and guardians of children supported by the Safe Park. The children featuring in the films attend 'in character' and ready to respond to questions from the audience as such.

These sessions encouraged greater cross generational dialogue between the children and their parents / guardians, to help promote trust and safeguarding of children. They also helped engage adults in the work of the Safe Parks, as they can in turn support through their own connections with a broader range of stakeholders in their communities, helping establish the community partner organisations as more than just Drop-In Centres. This in turn helped them to reduce the stigma that may be attached to their work and enhance their role as a focal point of child focussed services and other relevant stakeholders in their communities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description BST Showcase Event & Child Parent Self Reflection Session: KATHA Day Care, Katlehong 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The Child Parent Self Reflection Session are a third level of showcase event limited to the sharing of the campaign message / film of the Youth Committees with the parents and guardians of children supported by the Safe Park. The children featuring in the films attend 'in character' and ready to respond to questions from the audience as such.

These sessions encouraged greater cross generational dialogue between the children and their parents / guardians, to help promote trust and safeguarding of children. They also helped engage adults in the work of the Safe Parks, as they can in turn support through their own connections with a broader range of stakeholders in their communities, helping establish the community partner organisations as more than just Drop-In Centres. This in turn helped them to reduce the stigma that may be attached to their work and enhance their role as a focal point of child focussed services and other relevant stakeholders in their communities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description BST Showcase Event & Child Parent Self Reflection Session: Nigel Caring Community, Duduza 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The Child Parent Self Reflection Session are a third level of showcase event limited to the sharing of the campaign message / film of the Youth Committees with the parents and guardians of children supported by the Safe Park. The children featuring in the films attend 'in character' and ready to respond to questions from the audience as such.

These sessions encouraged greater cross generational dialogue between the children and their parents / guardians, to help promote trust and safeguarding of children. They also helped engage adults in the work of the Safe Parks, as they can in turn support through their own connections with a broader range of stakeholders in their communities, helping establish the community partner organisations as more than just Drop-In Centres. This in turn helped them to reduce the stigma that may be attached to their work and enhance their role as a focal point of child focussed services and other relevant stakeholders in their communities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description BST Showcase Event: My Safe Park, My Home, June 2019 in Duduza, Nigel 1494, South Africa 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Two stakeholder engagement showcase events were held over the course of the project, the first in Duduza on 28th June 2019 and the second in Katlehong on 22nd November 2019. Each of the events were organised by one of the Safe Parks engaged in the project: Duduza by Nigel Caring Community and Katlehong by KATHA Day Care. This allowed them to build on their local social capital and connections, allowing us to keep costs low whilst also engaging with a broader range of stakeholders than possible had it been externally organised.

The proceedings of the events themselves were organised and hosted by a youth advisory board of young people selected by each of the Youth Committees. This helped to promote youth leadership and youth voice at the heart of the events.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description BST Showcase Event: My Safe Park, My Home; Tsolo, Katlehong, 1431, South Africa. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Two stakeholder engagement showcase events were held over the course of the project, the first in Duduza on 28th June 2019 and the second in Katlehong on 22nd November 2019. Each of the events were organised by one of the Safe Parks engaged in the project: Duduza by Nigel Caring Community and Katlehong by KATHA Day Care. This allowed them to build on their local social capital and connections, allowing us to keep costs low whilst also engaging with a broader range of stakeholders than possible had it been externally organised. The proceedings of the events themselves were organised and hosted by a youth advisory board of young people selected by each of the Youth Committees. This helped to promote youth leadership and youth voice at the heart of the events.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Participation in the NACCW Biannual Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact In July 2019 Professor Paul Cooke and Dr Lou Harvey from the University of Leeds joined four representatives of the Bishop Simeon Trust and its South African operational partner, One Child One Family , at the biannual conference of the NACCW in Durban . At a very well attended workshop we had the opportunity to share the leadership model with key policy decision makers, NGO leads and practitioners.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Presentation at NACCW conference in Durban (July 2019) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Paul Cooke and Martin Keat were asked to present at the NACCW conference in Durban, South Africa (July 2019).

NACCW Conference provides the professional training and infrastructure to promote healthy child and youth development and improve standards of care and treatment for orphaned, vulnerable and at-risk children and youth in the family, community and residential group care settings. Conference delegates can look forward to a spirited professional experience blending diverse child and youth care work experiences from across the globe in engagements on practice, programs and child and youth care work policy in a city renowned for summer days all year round.

Impact:
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Screening of Born Free Generation Film 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Film screening of the award winning 'The Born Free Generation: Phendulani's Story and Me.' on Saturday 08.06.19 at the Arts Mill Hebden Bridge. 50 people were in attendance including local councilors. The event was organised in collaboration with the Bishop Simeon Trust. In addition to Phendulani's Story a number of short films made by the Youth Committees the project supports in South Africa were shown.

Cllr Dr Carol Stow, Mayor of Hebden Bridge, told us "'This is an amazingly clever way of bringing the lives of children in South Africa to us here in the UK. People of my generation thought we had finished the fight to help people there, but it reminds us that we need to keep on helping so that people around the world can live with greater equality. Hebden Bridge is a caring town, we need to care about people in other countries too."
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://mailchi.mp/b570d5cbe6db/bst-june-2019-enewsletter