The Future of Indeterminacy: Datification, Memory, Bio-politics

Lead Research Organisation: University of Dundee
Department Name: Contemporary Art Practice

Abstract

The future is no longer seen as open. It is seen as precarious on the one hand and technologically over-determined on the other. Economic uncertainty, the rise of the risk society, the culture of fear and neoliberal necropolitics - the politics of 'making and letting die' (Mbembe 2003) - are seen as a serious threat. While the risk society attributes all hazards to human decisions, the culture of fear cultivates the tendency to catastrophise. Neoliberal necropolitics welds technology to the exploitation of natural and social reserves in an irreversible way creating a sense of closure and doom. Instead of lamenting the uncertainty of a 'cancelled future' (Berardi 2014) or the 'end of free will' induced by big-data's predictions (Han 2017), this interdisciplinary project reverses the question. It asks: what is the future of indeterminacy?

Initially derived from Gödel's undecidability and Stengers and Prirogine's non-linear dynamics in which order emerges spontaneously from chaotic systems, indeterminacy is a self-perpetuating dynamic of change. It has no beginning or end, no spatial or temporal constancy. It upsets the existing structures and ossified power regimes, which is why it was embraced as a liberating force by the 1960s, and, again, by the 1990s artists and theorists such as Cage, Fluxus, Xenakis, Derrida, Guattari, Hayles and Varela, all of whom sought to implement indeterminate procedures, in thought and action, in their respective fields.

In the digital age, in accelerated, informational capitalism, the situation is very different. First, permanent change is the rule. Second, art, culture, and politics are no longer separate; they are fused in the cultural sphere located in the infosphere. Consisting of the internet, cultural production, datification, algorithmic predetermination, symbolic as well as affective regimes, the infosphere has modified the language and forms of thought and action. It has also modified the structure of reality. Re-mobilising Poggioli's concept of the avant-garde as inherently reproducible in other art forms and, importantly, in mainstream culture (1972), this project will develop a new understanding of the relationship of artistic indeterminacy to current cultural practices via four distinct research activities:

1. Case studies of the 1960s and 1990s indeterminate practices (Fluxus, Situationists International, etoy and Knowbotic Research) that disrupt semantic, visual, aural and kinaesthetic ordering and normativity in order to understand the full impact of their methodologies on present-day artistic and cultural practices.

2. Comparing these analyses to the 2010s indeterminacy that sabotages tracking and dataveillance, namely: glitching, obfuscation, databending and dissipative networks found in the work of such artists-activists as Nissenbaum, Cardenas, Cates, Menkman, Norby, Szauder, Biggs and Fujihata, which reconfigure (virtual and actual) existential spaces by dis-ordering cultural memory. Here case studies will be combined with hands-on workshops.

3. Forming hypotheses about the relationship of the (rapidly changing) digital unconscious to future media ecologies as related to media's profound somatic, social and cultural working via a series of art-science talks, an international conference, and a special issue of Leonardo (MIT Press).

4. Re-evaluating artistic indeterminacy's deconstruction of the cause-effect, parts-and-wholes relationship in light of its 'big questions', questions that have persisted from Surrealist Craven's 1920s practice of 'impulsive living' to Davis's 2018 work with chance-operated genetic coding, namely: Is sequence (linear, circular or patterned) the only way of constructing knowledge? Is the constant linking of events to the experience archive - personal and cultural identity - a necessity? Or, can we engage heterogeneity independently of any whole-ness and constancy? These questions will be explored in a monograph.

Planned Impact

This project offers excellent opportunities for a wider social, cultural and educational impact as, for many, the very word 'indeterminacy' denotes an obscure academic field, much like 'intermedia' is often mistakenly taken to be a niche concern of nerdy artists. This project has five pathways to impact. The first three will enable the broader public, adults and young adults, to understand, appreciate and take part in past and present indeterminate artistic practices. The second two will benefit emerging and existing art practitioners and teachers. In addition, all five will enable cultural organisations, journalists, writers, art practitioners and lay audiences to participate in a debate about one of the most pressing issues of our times: digital (un)freedom: the increasing use of data tracking and biometrics to unclear and, in some cases, problematic purposes.

The general public:

1. The Digital Archive: the above-mentioned case studies will be thematically grouped in a thoughtfully curated, historically imaginative digital archive that draws on the work of one of the groups researched in this project: the Situationists International. The SI focused on the spontaneous, inventive engagement with the (physical) environment and the working of personal and social memory. The digital archive will be an interactive virtual territory where audiences of all ages will come into contact with the most well known indeterminate practices. It will be co-hosted, on a separate website, by the University of Dundee and Dundee Contemporary Arts, Dundee's foremost art centre, and launched in January 2021. In addition to exhibitions, films and talks, DCA specialises in wide-ranging educational and informal learning programmes that connect adults and children to the making and processes of cultural artifacts and wider cultural history.

2.Workshops and Public Talks: contemporary indeterminate practices will be explored via hands-on workshops with the following artists-activists: Ajana, Cates, Cardenas, Fuhijata, Menkman and Nissenbaum. These workshops will focus on the hands-on legacy of past indeterminate practices adapted for the contemporary context, for example, data tracking and farming, and how to subvert or divert it. They will take place throughout 2020. The workshops will take place in the University of Dundee's newly refurbished Digital Research Studio; the talks will be hosted by DCA. Both will be open to non-academic participants, adults and young adults and jointly advertised on the U of Dundee and DCA's website and social media.

3.Two Café Science events in which I will pair up with mathematician Tasic, who is also a literary writer, to deliver two presentations that will clarify indeterminacy from the mathematical, literary and artistic perspectives. The first of these talks will take place in Dundee in late March 2021, the second in London in early April 2021.

Practitioners and Teachers:

1. A platform for emerging artists will be organised in November 2020 as part of the international conference in collaboration with the Northeast of North Festival (henceforth NEoN). The aim of NEoN is to advance the understanding and accessibility of digital and technology-driven art forms and practices. The purpose of the platform is to host and fund up to 5 high-quality proposals for new indeterminate artistic works from emerging artists. These works will be presented within the NEoN Festival, featured on the NEoN website and on their advertising materials.

2. Teaching materials with a hands-on, DIY approach will be compiled from the above-mentioned case studies and workshops and made available online, on the same website as the digital archive, at the end of the project, in May 2021. These teaching materials will be available to all; amateurs and professionals, emerging and established artists from all artistic backgrounds.

Publications

10 25 50
 
Title Given to Chance 
Description An exhibition curated in collaboration with the NEoN Digital Arts Festival and NOMAS Projects Gallery (12 - 30 November 2020) Dundee, featuring the work of emerging artists who created the following works based on the Indeterminacy / Share commission (described in more detail in the 'collaboration & partnernships' section): Going Viral (neural network generated video and web application) by Derek Curry & Jennifer Gradecki, US; Study for Sponge Project (video assemblage Youtube ASMR videos) by Dina Kelberman, US; Future False Positive (AI generated, single-channel video loop) by Martin Disley, Scotland; DriNing (Videos from Google Street View scraping algorithm) by Enorê, Brazil; Sequencer (video / live-coded digital animation) by Sarah Groff Hennigh-Palermo, Germany 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2020 
Impact 1. The exhibition was widely advertised on social media and drew significant audience numbers despite the pandemc. The NOMAS Projects Gallery is a window gallery in central Dundee where viewers can view the displayed artworks 24 hrs a day. Because of this we don't have precise numbers but know from feeeback to the research project team, the curatorial team, NEoN ad NOMAS Projects that at least 300 people saw the exhibition. 2. The exhibition led to further collaborations between the invited artists (ongoing) 3. It also led to seminar tasks and discussions for Contemporary Art and the Interactive Design classes at Dundee and Abertay 4. A new pathway to impact has been identified: 'prototyping' cross-source GANs (currently in early stages of development) 
URL https://indeterminacy.ac.uk/events/given-to-chance-exhibition/
 
Description KEY FINDINGS: This award is still active and the below narrative is incomplete.

Many of the planned research activities - theoretical research, interviews with artists, theorists and scientists, the three-day transdisciplinary conference, workshops, and, to a lesser degree, research in the artists' private archives have gone on unperturbed by the pandemic. Some activities such as visits to the US, Japan and EU archives and to artists' studios have been postponed, as have knowledge-exchange activities with an international travel component. In late March 2020, the project was re-organised to enable a focus on and work with the available (digital and remotely viewable) sources and databases. Knowledge dissemination and public engagement activities (such as the three-day conference, the six hands-on workshops for practitioners, the emerging artist commission and exhibition - for more details please see the relevant parts of the outcomes section) have been carried out in virtual or hybrid form.

The different order in which the research was conducted from late March 2020 to February 2021 has had an impact on the project findings, not in terms of quality but research emphasis: the digital aspect of the research and digital case studies have so far been explored in more depth than the analogue ones although connections with the analogue have been made through interviews and remote use of artist/theorists' private archives, which will continue until June. The most relevant finding is that ontological indeterminacy (how things and phenomena come into being) and epistemological indeterminacy (how and why things can or cannot be known) are, in the digital realm, structurally inseparable.

The project's initial hypothesis that mid-20th century artistic experimentation with indeterminate procedures (as experiments in distributed thinking by doing) are germane to current cultural-digital practices (following Poggioli's theory of the avant-garde as reproducible in mainstream culture) has proven correct. Mid-20th century indeterminate procedures are key not only to current artistic-activist practices (such as obfuscation, glitch, and the dirty new media movement), but also to digital and cultural practices at large.

The most important finding thus far is that these historical artistic practices are related to what is today referred to as 'alien thought' - machinic and algorithmic operations that defy the linear programme-result, input-output logic, i.e. the ratioanality of programming. This is most obivous in machinic iteration; temporal swarming in algorithmic systems; and the spontaneous cretion of rules in neural networks. Temporality, autopoiesis and sedimentation play a key role in (human and machinic) mnemonic practices. Many of the early and mid-20th century indeterminate artistic practices, such as Surrealist frottage have direct connections to prosthetic memory via digital frottage.

OBJECTIVES appropriate for this point in time (mid-February 2021) have been met despite some C19-related delays.

The first objective - the development of a specific brand of interdisciplinary research leadership that brings together artistic practice and the (digital) humanities and combines theoretical with practice-led research has been (and continues to be) met as can be seen from the research and knowledge-exchange activities such as the three-day transdisciplinary conference Indeterminate Futures /The Future of Indeterminacy which drew over 80 speakers and 130 audience members from around the world; the engagement of inter- and cross-disciplinary scholars and practitioners in publications like Distributed Perception: Resonances and Axiologies (Routledge); dissemination currently being carried out in the form of proposals for edited collections and special issues; and a new interdisciplinary network.

The second objective - a comparative analysis of three key epochs in the history of artistic indeterminacy: the 1960s chance operations; the 1990s (h) activism and culture jamming; and the 2010s glitch and obfuscation practices - is still in progress. As mentioned in the key findings section, the 1960s epoch (linked to physical archives) has not been researched in desired depth yet but significant progress has been made through artists/theorists' private archives. In-depth investigation of the 1990s, 2010 and post-2020 practices has been (and continues to be) carried out. Given the uncertainty of the current health situation, contingency plans (the replacement of archival data with private archive data) are in place and will be actioned in April 2021 if there is no other alternative.

The third objective - the interdisciplinary reformulation of the aesthetic, cultural and bio-political aspects of indeterminacy relevant for the 21st century - has been partially met (through current and forthcoming publications). Work in this area continues.

The fourth objective - the development of interdisciplinary methodologies - has been aided by two principal research and public engagement activities (the conference, and the six workshops, which enabled focused conversations about cross-disciplinary methodologies (such as those that combine cognitive archaeology a/r/tography). Work in this area continues.

The fifth objective - the creation of a new network for academic and non-academic beneficiaries through hands-on workshops, an artistic platform for emerging artists, an international conference, a widely accessible interactive digital archive, and Café Science talks - has been partially met. We are currently working on the digital archive; the CS activities have been postponed (and may have to be delivered online).
Exploitation Route The findings have appeared (and will continue to appear) in forms intended for different audiences:

1. Publications will be taken forward by other interdisciplinary scholars or scholars from disciplines like art history and theory, cultural studies, philosophy, computer science and digital humanities;

2. Online sources (the conference; podcasts; project website; blog and dictionary) are and will be of use to scholars, practitioners and the general public;

3. The findings of the case study research and the 6 workshops (which will form part of the digital archive and teaching materials) will be taken forward by practitioners, archivists, curators, lecturers and students.
Sectors Education,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections,Other

 
Description There is emerging non-academic impact resulting from the content and methodologies that were introduced to a wide range of art practitioners in the 6 public engagement activities (workshops) listed in the outcomes section. Due to Covid19 these activities couldn't take place over a period of 3 months (September - November 2020) as was initially planned, but had to be delivered over a 3-week period in November 2020 in virtual form. This is why at this point in time, evidence of the practitioners' implementation and/or further development of the content/methodologies introduced in the workshops is only beginning to emerge. For more details, please see the PE section.
First Year Of Impact 2021
Sector Education,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections
Impact Types Cultural

 
Title Project website: The Future of Indeterminacy 
Description In addition to offering information about all of the project's events and activities (the conference, the workshops, commissions, exhibition, publications, and blog) the website also has a dictionary and podcasts (interviews with the artists, theorists and scientists relevant for understanding the project's approach to indeterminacy). We are in the process of uploading the 3-day international conference, and have started working on the digital archive, which will be uploaded to the website, too, alongside teaching materials as outlined in the project proposal. The website is conceptualised as a resource for historical, theoretical and artistic research useful to academics, artists, students and the general public. It is work in progress and will be until the end of the project (when all the sub-projects will be completed). 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2020 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The conference speakers, workshop participants and students have commented on the usefulness of the dictionary and the podcasts (in addition to the full conference programme). According to these comments, these tools delineate the project's research aims, contextualise them within the broader frame of indeterminacy and provide useful references. We anticipate that the digital archive will be a similarly useful resource, both because it will integrate audio-visual and textual materials and because of its design and approach - a reflection on the 'critical archiving' tradition. 
URL https://indeterminacy.ac.uk/
 
Description Given to Chance 
Organisation Abertay University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Future of Indeterminacy organised a platform for emerging artists in collaboration with the NEoN Digital Arts Festival. The curatiorial team consisted of Joseph De Lappe (NEoN & Abertay), Laura Leuzzi (NEoN), Adam Lockhart (Dundee) and Natasha Lushetich (Dundee). The exhibition, entitled Given to Chance was shown at the NOMAS Projects Gallery from 12 - 30 November 2020. NOMAS Projects is a window gallery where the five selected digital works by four emerging artists and an artist duo could be shown despite the pandemic. The Future of Indeteminacy team contributed curatorial expertise and organisational skills and effort. We also hosted the exhibition on our virtual Indeterminate Futures / The Future of Indeterminacy conference platform.
Collaborator Contribution The partners, including the NOMAS Projects Gallery, contributed curatorial expertise, technical equipment, the gallery space, help with installing and de-installing the exhibition, and publicity. They also organised a (Zoom) artists' panel on 19 November 2020.
Impact The exhibition Given to Chance, which was a response to the NEoN / The Future of Indeterminacy commisssion entitled Share / Indeterminacy explored connections and commonalities between sharing and indeterminacy. We casually use the word 'share' to describe distributing images, stories and information across social media networks. Sharing suggests ownership, and yet inclusivity, generosity, accessibility, and holding in common. Indeterminacy designates the interplay of design and chance, system and impulse, repeatability and change. From an international open call for early career artists (for which 115 applications were received), four artists and an artist duo were selected and invited to develop new works for the NOMAS window spaces. The exhibition's title reflects the works' themes as well as the artists' adaptability to the pandemic and the changed exhibition conditions.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Given to Chance 
Organisation Dundee Contemporary Arts
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The Future of Indeterminacy organised a platform for emerging artists in collaboration with the NEoN Digital Arts Festival. The curatiorial team consisted of Joseph De Lappe (NEoN & Abertay), Laura Leuzzi (NEoN), Adam Lockhart (Dundee) and Natasha Lushetich (Dundee). The exhibition, entitled Given to Chance was shown at the NOMAS Projects Gallery from 12 - 30 November 2020. NOMAS Projects is a window gallery where the five selected digital works by four emerging artists and an artist duo could be shown despite the pandemic. The Future of Indeteminacy team contributed curatorial expertise and organisational skills and effort. We also hosted the exhibition on our virtual Indeterminate Futures / The Future of Indeterminacy conference platform.
Collaborator Contribution The partners, including the NOMAS Projects Gallery, contributed curatorial expertise, technical equipment, the gallery space, help with installing and de-installing the exhibition, and publicity. They also organised a (Zoom) artists' panel on 19 November 2020.
Impact The exhibition Given to Chance, which was a response to the NEoN / The Future of Indeterminacy commisssion entitled Share / Indeterminacy explored connections and commonalities between sharing and indeterminacy. We casually use the word 'share' to describe distributing images, stories and information across social media networks. Sharing suggests ownership, and yet inclusivity, generosity, accessibility, and holding in common. Indeterminacy designates the interplay of design and chance, system and impulse, repeatability and change. From an international open call for early career artists (for which 115 applications were received), four artists and an artist duo were selected and invited to develop new works for the NOMAS window spaces. The exhibition's title reflects the works' themes as well as the artists' adaptability to the pandemic and the changed exhibition conditions.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Given to Chance 
Organisation NEoN
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The Future of Indeterminacy organised a platform for emerging artists in collaboration with the NEoN Digital Arts Festival. The curatiorial team consisted of Joseph De Lappe (NEoN & Abertay), Laura Leuzzi (NEoN), Adam Lockhart (Dundee) and Natasha Lushetich (Dundee). The exhibition, entitled Given to Chance was shown at the NOMAS Projects Gallery from 12 - 30 November 2020. NOMAS Projects is a window gallery where the five selected digital works by four emerging artists and an artist duo could be shown despite the pandemic. The Future of Indeteminacy team contributed curatorial expertise and organisational skills and effort. We also hosted the exhibition on our virtual Indeterminate Futures / The Future of Indeterminacy conference platform.
Collaborator Contribution The partners, including the NOMAS Projects Gallery, contributed curatorial expertise, technical equipment, the gallery space, help with installing and de-installing the exhibition, and publicity. They also organised a (Zoom) artists' panel on 19 November 2020.
Impact The exhibition Given to Chance, which was a response to the NEoN / The Future of Indeterminacy commisssion entitled Share / Indeterminacy explored connections and commonalities between sharing and indeterminacy. We casually use the word 'share' to describe distributing images, stories and information across social media networks. Sharing suggests ownership, and yet inclusivity, generosity, accessibility, and holding in common. Indeterminacy designates the interplay of design and chance, system and impulse, repeatability and change. From an international open call for early career artists (for which 115 applications were received), four artists and an artist duo were selected and invited to develop new works for the NOMAS window spaces. The exhibition's title reflects the works' themes as well as the artists' adaptability to the pandemic and the changed exhibition conditions.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Beyond Resolution: Impossible Image a workshop and talk delivered by Rosa Menkman 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Rosa Menkman's workshop in which 30 participants took part (the limit of the workshop) combined a presentation of Menkman's work at CERN, France with discussions of the participants' methodologies for artistic and cross-disciplinary work. The participants appreciated Menkman's step-by-step methodological explanations and the resulting discussions. They had a clear sense that they had learnt something new and had the opportunity to discuss it. This workshop was intially supposed to take place live and have a longer duration. Although shorter, the benefit of the virtual workshop (the Covid19 solution) was that the workshop had a wider geographical reach - participans from all over the world were able to take part in the workshop and attend the talk.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://indeterminacy.ac.uk/virtual-workshops-with-rosa-menkman-and-btihaj-ajana/
 
Description Glitch Western Film and Video Games a workshop and talk delivered by Jon Cates 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact In Jon Cates' workshop and talk, professional film and media-art practitioners, curators and students participated in several hands-on individual and small-group tasks, related to critical mediality and digital media. Given Cates's background as an artist and curator, the inception and spread of the glitch and dirty new media movements (in the US and globally) were discussed, too. The participants (37 in total) also engaged in a comparative analysis of media practice in different geographical regions, appraised the cultural/colonial genealogy of various film genres (such as the Western) and discussed the use of software and glitching techniques,

This workshop was intially supposed to take place live and have a longer duration. Although shorter, the benefit of the virtual workshop (the Covid19 solution) was that the workshop had a wider geographical reach - participans from all over the world were able to take part in the workshop and attend the talk.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://indeterminacy.ac.uk/virtual-workshops-with-jon-cates-warren-neidich/
 
Description Indeterminacy, Ontogenesis and Play a workshop delivered by Sha Xin Wei and Emiddio Vasquez 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This virtual workshop and talk delivered by Sha and Vasquez, intended primarily for artists at all career stages, was attended by practitioners, students and researchers. The workshop had a limit of 30 participants and consisted of a practical demonstration of Sha's cross-discplinary projects and methodologies, small-group and plenary discussions and a series of tasks, followed by participant feedback on and a discussion of the tasks. Most of the participant comments and questions focused on Sha and Vasquez's methodologies and their aplicability to other artistic and cross-disicplinary areas. The participants appreciated the originality of Sha and Vasquez's approaches and the opportunity to ask about how some of these methodologies can be applied in their own work.

This workshop was intially supposed to take place live and have a longer duration. Although shorter, the benefit of the virtual workshop (the Covid19 solution) was that the workshop had a wider geographical reach - participans from all over the world were able to take part in the workshop and attend the talk.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://indeterminacy.ac.uk/virtual-workshops-with-kuai-shen-sha-xin-wei-emiddio-vasquez/
 
Description RRR Rhythm Relations Resistance - a hands-on virtual workshop and talk by Kuai Shen 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This hands-on workshop, whose purpose was to disseminate artistic findings, methodologies and technical expertise, had a limit of 20 participants. It was followed by an artist's talk which drew 26 audience members. Most of the workshop participants were professional artists at different stages of their career. Several were MA and UG students. In addition to the hands-on tasks, the workshop was designed to facilitate large-group and smaller-group discussions.

The participants reported a high level of engagment; they were very positive about Shen's work methodologies; and appreciative of the digital sound and image mixing techniques the second part of the workshop was dedicated to. They also appreciated the opportunity to exchange opinions and share practices and techniques.

This workshop was intially supposed to take place live and have a longer duration. Although shorter, the benefit of the virtual workshop (the Covid19 solution) was that the workshop had a wider geographical reach - participans from all over the world were able to take part in the workshop and attend the talk.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://indeterminacy.ac.uk/virtual-workshops-with-kuai-shen-sha-xin-wei-emiddio-vasquez/
 
Description The Brain without Organs: Art and Indeterminacy - a workshop and talk delivered by Warren Neidich 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact In the workshop, which had a limit of 20 participants, Neidich engaged professional practitioners (from a range of artistic media) and students in individual tasks and small-group and plenary discussions. The workshop showcased Neidich's methodologies used in recent work presented at the Venice Bienale. Neidich discussed the use of media and diagrammatic concepts (like Deleuze's body without organs) in the practice of art making. Both his workshop and talk addressed neuroplasticity which many participants found particularly useful (because of Neidich's use of practical examples). This workshop was intially supposed to take place live and have a longer duration. Although shorter, the benefit of the virtual workshop (the Covid19 solution) a wider geographical reach - participans from all over the world were able to take part in the workshop and attend the talk.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://indeterminacy.ac.uk/virtual-workshops-with-jon-cates-warren-neidich/
 
Description The Burst of Surprise: Indeterminacy and the Viral Politics of Covid-19 - a worskhop and talk by Btihaj Ajana 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This workshop created a platform for discussing civic structures and mechanisms. The workshop's focus on the current pandemic and immunity (in all senses of the word) afforded an oportunity for artists, theorists and educators to exchange experiences, opinions and discuss policies. The workshop participants were particularly appreciative of the small-group discussions where themes and approaches relevant to their work were discussed in depth. This workshop was intially supposed to take place live and have a longer duration. Although shorter, the benefit of the virtual workshop (the Covid19 solution) was a wider geographical reach - participans from all over the world were able to take part in the workshop and attend the accompanying talk.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://indeterminacy.ac.uk/virtual-workshops-with-rosa-menkman-and-btihaj-ajana/