Investigating the impact of habitat structure on queen and worker bumblebees in the field

Lead Research Organisation: NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology
Department Name: Pywell

Abstract

This research will unravel fundamental aspects of bumblebee behaviour and ecology to show how habitat structure affects bumblebees at different stages in their colony cycle. Bumblebees are key pollinators of wildflowers and crops but their populations are declining worldwide. Although bumblebees have been well-studied in some respects, fundamental aspects of their ecology remain unknown. In this proposal we plan to fill some of these gaps so that we can implement the most effective measures to reverse declines. We have four specific objectives. First, little is known about the dispersal of nest-founding queens in spring, so we will determine the fine-scale spatial genetic structure and behaviour of nest-founding queens and relate this to the distribution of nesting and foraging habitats across an agricultural landscape. Second, although new genetic methods have permitted estimates of the foraging ranges of worker bees, we do not know how workers and colonies use space in relation to the fine-scale structure of their habitat; we will therefore quantify both workers' spatial distribution and habitat structure to determine this relationship. Third, some bumblebee species have long tongues and so are the most effective pollinators of wildflowers and crops in which the floral tube (corolla) is deep. The UK's longest-tongued bumblebee species, Bombus hortorum, remains common but the closely related B. ruderatus is scarce. We will compare the spatial genetic structure of these two species directly in the same landscape in order to elucidate the biological reasons for this difference. Fourth, because our study will take place at a site where targeted measures to provide forage for bumblebees (agri-environment schemes) have already been established, we will be able to use our results to model the impacts of these measures on bumblebee foraging range and nest density. To meet our objectives, we will study the five species B. lapidarius, B. pascuorum, B. terrestris B. hortorum and B. ruderatus, chosen to represent an appropriate range of ecological and behavioural differences. We will use a novel combination of genetic, ecological and modelling methods in a unique field setting: an agricultural landscape (2100ha) in England in which blocks of standardised agri-environment options targeted at insect pollinators have been established as part of an ongoing landscape-scale experiment. Our methods will consist of systematic nonlethal sampling of queens and workers for DNA, followed by microsatellite genotyping coupled with sibship reconstruction (grouping of individuals into families) to determine the spatial genetic distribution of queens and workers. We will also use advanced marking techniques (e.g. radio-frequency identification (RFID), pit-tags) to supplement our genetic investigations of queens and specifically to relate queen space use to the distribution of small mammals (whose nests queens are believed to exploit for nesting and which are already being monitored as part of ongoing studies). Finally, we have already characterized the study landscape using both high-resolution multi-spectral scanners and field surveys. The resulting detailed information on habitat composition and structure, when integrated with our data on bumblebee space use, will allow us accurately to model the impact of habitat structure on the bees. Overall, therefore, this project matches the requirements of the Insect Pollinators Initiative very well. First, because the study is taking place at a site where we have already characterized habitat structure and in which an experimental agri-environment scheme is established, it will serve to advance our understanding of the effects of agriculture and land-use change on bumblebee behaviour and colony dynamics. Second, it will use new tools and data analysis to discover fundamental aspects of bumblebee ecology relevant to pollinator declines from molecular to population levels.

Technical Summary

We will combine new molecular, technological and modelling approaches to determine how bumblebees use space at a local scale. The research will exploit a unique 2,100-ha agricultural landscape in which agri-environment flower mixes have been planted, habitat features have been aerially mapped in 2-D and 3-D detail, and the distribution and abundance of small mammals (whose disused nests potentially provide bumblebees with nest-sites) are being monitored. (1) To determine the spatial behaviour of nest-founding queens in relation to nesting and foraging habitats, we will sample queens (B. pascuorum, B. terrestris) nonlethally for DNA systematically across the landscape, genotype samples at a panel of microsatellite loci, and use the software COLONY and KINSHIP to determine dispersal distances of sister queens in relation to habitat features and small mammal distributions; we will supplement this approach with a mark-recapture study of founding queens using RFID (radio frequency identification) tags. (2) To quantify the spatial distribution of workers, we will sample foraging workers (B. hortorum, B. lapidarius, B. pascuorum, B. ruderatus, B. terrestris) systematically across the landscape for DNA, genotype them at our microsatellite loci, then estimate foraging ranges from the distribution of separation distances of sisters to determine foraging behaviour in relation to species ecology and habitat features. (3) To compare a declining species (B. ruderatus) with a related widespread species (B. hortorum), we will identify potentially important differences in these species' spatial ecology from Objective 2, confirming species identities via mtDNA differences (Ellis et al. 2006). (4) To provide an evidence base for optimising land management for bumblebee conservation, we will integrate all data to construct and parameterise models (e.g. with GIS) to predict how habitat structure and forage and nest-site availability determine local abundance of queens and workers.

Planned Impact

Who will benefit from this research? Our research is designed to address the requirements of the Initiative directly, therefore should have a substantial impact in terms of implementing actions to reverse declines in UK bumblebee populations. Academic beneficiaries will include those with interests in social insect biology as well as in agro-ecology and impacts of land-use on species and populations. Primary users of the proposed research from a policy perspective will be: i) Natural England (NE) - responsible for agri-environment schemes and promoting recovery of declining species in England; ii) Defra - the government department responsible for policy on the environment, food and rural affairs; iii) Joint Nature Conservation Committee (JNCC) - the statutory advisor to government on UK and international nature conservation; iv) The Scottish Government - responsible for agri-environment schemes in Scotland; v) The National Assembly for Wales - responsible for agri-environment schemes in Wales. Other important stakeholders include a number of NGOs working on plant and invertebrate conservation including: the local Wildlife Trusts; Bees, Wasps and Ants Recording Society (BWARS); Bumblebee Conservation Trust (BBCT), Butterfly Conservation (BC), Buglife and PlantLife. They also include the farming community, e.g. the Farming and Wildlife Advisory Group (FWAG). How will they benefit from this research? The project will allow us to model at new levels of resolution the optimal distribution of habitats for different bumblebee species. For the first time, key aspects of the behaviour of founding queens will be determined and common and rare species will be compared within the same study landscape against known distributions of their forage and nesting habitats. Together, these benefits will have relevance to those interested in the conservation of bumblebee populations worldwide. Our results will also directly inform strategies such as agri-environment schemes, thus increasing the effectiveness of major policies for reversing pollinator declines. Natural England's Environmental Stewardship (ES) scheme funds measures to benefit pollinators, specifically the sowing of a 'nectar flower mixture' which has been targeted for bumblebees. Although about 65% of English farmland is in ES, take-up of pollinator options has been low and only 2% of land actively managed under the scheme is currently under a nectar flower mixture, representing just 0.03% of the farmed landscape. It is therefore vital to both target this limited resource at the correct spatial resolution, and to gather evidence to support an increase in coverage of management options for pollinators across the UK. Our data will also help quantify the potential for pollen transport between patches or populations of plants which will be of relevance to crop production, risk assessment for novel crops and conservation strategies for native plants. What will be done to ensure that they benefit? As outlined in the Impact Plan, we will take targeted action to communicate our findings to each of the primary users named above, including a one-day workshop at the study site during the final project year for policy makers and advisors. This will help to formulate policy-relevant documentation and maximise the impacts of the research. Scientific findings will be published in high-impact scientific journals and via scientific conferences at national and international levels. Both scientific and policy conclusions will be communicated to the public at large through the CEH, ZSL and UEA websites and by press releases and follow-up media interviews. The project team has a strong history of engagement with the press and policymakers at both local and national levels. CEH maintains a Knowledge Exchange section that contains considerable expertise for activities relating to knowledge transfer. We will liaise with this department and use their expertise to achieve effective dissemination.

Publications

10 25 50
 
Description Our research contributes to a growing evidence base on how the management of agro-ecosystems impacts on the conservation and pollination services provided by bumblebees. The low levels of fine-scale, spatial genetic structure we detected suggest widespread gene flow via queen dispersal. As such there is potential for habitat creation schemes, e.g. agri-environment scheme options, to facilitate and maintain this gene flow by creating an even distribution of suitable habitats across the landscape. Our study suggests that even within a relatively small landscape area, bumblebees vary their workers' foraging distances according to resource availability. Conservation efforts, such as targeted agri-environment schemes that encourage farmers to sow wildflower mixtures alongside their crops, are therefore likely to reduce net energy expenditure and enhance the survival of colonies located within overall foraging distance. In addition, this finding may allow better planning to optimise pollination services to crops and wildflowers.
The composition of our study landscape included a range of habitats, with large areas that received specific conservation management (eg. sown wildflower mixtures). Our findings suggest that management applied at the landscape level can have important positive consequences for bumblebee populations.
Exploitation Route Agri-environmental policies aiming to enhance the value of agricultural landscapes for pollinators might incorporate our findings to better inform the scale of habitat restoration needed to optimise landscapes for bumblebees (eg. for use by Defra and Natural England in England).
Sectors Agriculture, Food and Drink,Environment

 
Description Our findings are highly relevant to current developments under the New Environmental Land Management Scheme and CAP reform of agri-environmental subsidies. As such we have shared our findings with Natural England specialists who are working on design of the Schemes. Our paper published in Nature "Bumblebee family lineage survival is enhanced in high quality landscapes" received widespread interest including a News & Views piece within the same issue of Nature and at least 27 online or printed articles in the media, including some aimed at encouraging gardeners to plant more flowers for bees.
First Year Of Impact 2013
Sector Agriculture, Food and Drink,Environment,Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism
Impact Types Societal,Policy & public services

 
Description Application of findings to new Countryside Stewardship guidance for Wild pollinator and Farm wildlife package in England
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact Our findings relating to bumblebee foraging distances and the proportion of the landscape with flower-rich habitats required to maintain bee populations directly informed the minimum area thresholds for option coverage that are required under the Wild Pollinator and Farm Wildlife Package. Section 6.3, page 53 of the CS manual states that "recent evidence suggests that applying the right combination of options over 3-5% of the arable, temporary grass or permanent grass included in an application will deliver meaningful benefits to farm wildlife". In addition, our work informed the advice on p. 55 that "Selecting a combination of options and spreading them across the farm will generally benefit more wildlife." It is too early to assess the impact of any establishment of new CS options on farms.
URL http://www.gov.uk/government/publications/countryside-stewardship-manual-print-version
 
Description Book aimed at farmers and agri-environment scheme advisors: Title: Habitat Creation and Management for Pollinators (Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, UK)
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description LWEC Policy and Practice Note No. 27 Managing farmed landscapes for pollinating insects
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Implementation circular/rapid advice/letter to e.g. Ministry of Health
URL http://www.nerc.ac.uk/research/partnerships/lwec/products/ppn/
 
Title Modified mark-recapture model from Nature paper 
Description We developed a novel extension of the standard Cormack-Jolly-Seber mark-recapture model to estimate survival rates and recapture probabilities for family lineages within wild bumblebee populations across an agricultural landscape/ 
Type Of Material Computer model/algorithm 
Year Produced 2017 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The model has been published in our Nature paper (Carvell et al. (2017) Bumblebee family lineage survival is enhanced in high quality landscapes) with the full R code available in Supplementary Information. 
URL http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature21709
 
Description Pollinator Conservation Delivery Group 
Organisation University of Cambridge
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Invited member of the Pollinator Conservation Delivery Group, co-ordinated by University of Cambridge. Workshops attended during May and September 2012, leading to co-authorship of publication Dicks et al (2012) in Insect Conservation and Diversity.
Start Year 2010
 
Description Advice provided for BBC Horizon programme on bees 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Advice provided to producers/ researchers of the BBC Horizon programme on bees. Telephone interviews and information provided by email.

no actual impacts realised to date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description All the Buzz 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact I and my research group assisted in the production of an animated film ('All the Buzz') and lesson plan about bumble bee conservation for use in primary schools, led by the Science, Art and Writing (SAW) Trust and Hedley Griffin Films. This was delivered to two primary schools in East Anglia and there are plans to roll it out to more schools across the UK.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Article "The Insect Pollinators Initiative" in BBKA News, December 2012 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Participants in your research or patient groups
Results and Impact Contribution to article 'The Insect Pollinators Initiative' - for BBKA (British Beekeepers Association) News publication, December 2012 Article in BBKA News

no actual impacts realised to date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description Articles arising from Press Release 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Articles picked up in local (eg. Norwich area) and national media, both online and in print.

no actual impacts realised to date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description BBKA Spring Convention 2011 
Form Of Engagement Activity Scientific meeting (conference/symposium etc.)
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Participants in your research or patient groups
Results and Impact Presentation at the IPI Colloquium of the British BeeKeepers Association Spring Convention, introducing the project aims and approaches.

no actual impacts realised to date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2011
 
Description Behind the paper Blog for Nature Ecology and Evolution 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Blog written by John Redhead to accompany the Nature paper.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://natureecoevocommunity.nature.com/users/35305-john-redhead/posts/15512-family-trees-for-bumbl...
 
Description Defra's Bees Needs Week 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Public engagement event with displays, hands on activities and educational games promoting pollinators and disseminating project outputs
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Filming and quote within Channel 4 Series "Jimmy's Big Bee Rescue" August 2020 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The PI of this Grant, Carvell, was interviewed several times during 2019 and 2020 as a scientific advisor for the Channel 4 Series "Jimmy's Big Bee Rescue". Jimmy Doherty (presenter, farmer and entomologist) then cited the main findings from this research (as reported in Nature 2017) within one of the programmes shown in Channel 4 in late August 2020. The programme had a high profile Saturday night slot and attracted good media interest on social media.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://jimmysfarm.com/jimmy-save-the-bees/
 
Description Friends of the Earth Bees Summit and Steering Group member 
Form Of Engagement Activity Scientific meeting (conference/symposium etc.)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Participants in your research or patient groups
Results and Impact Attendance of Bee Summit organised by Friends of the Earth, London, and invited member of Steering Group overseeing the development of the Bees Action Plan. Advice provided at Summit and subsequently during Steering Group consultations.

no actual impacts realised to date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Interview on R4 Farming Today programme 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Interview on Radio 4's Farming Today programme, following online publication of Carvell et al (2012) in the journal Oikos.

no actual impacts realised to date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2011
URL http://www.senseaboutscience.org/pages/what-would-your-super-wheat-look-like.html
 
Description Invited lecture for the UEA Seminar Series 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Research conducted under this award was featured strongly in my lunchtime talk to the UEA School of Biological Sciences.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Invited talk to Wild Oxfordshire AGM 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Invited talk to the Wild Oxfordshire groups' AGM featuring CEH research on "Conservation and monitoring of pollinators: from field to national scales" - attended by a range of local and national NGO representatives and interested stakeholders.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Invited talk: 2016 International Pollinator Conference, Penn State, USA 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Invited talk at the Penn State conference session: Nutrition and Habitat, attended by a large range of academics from across US institutions and beyond. I have since been invited back by one of the US research groups to lead a session at a forthcoming workshop.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Invited talk: Society for Ecological Restoration (SER) World Congress, Madison, WI, USA 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact C. Carvell invited speaker in session on 'Response of native bees to habitat restoration' - talk was the only one from a European researcher so provided interesting perspective on EU/ UK agri-environmental policy as well as research findings from this grant and others - sparked questions from the international audience.

Dialogue with leading bee researchers in US
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Open Farm Sunday Pollinator Survey 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Running a pollinator survey as part of Open Farm Sunday - engagement with the public for volunteer recording and explanation of the importance of bumblebees Display on insect pollinators, ID guides etc.

no actual impacts realised to date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Poster "Impacts of habitat structure on queen and worker bumblebees" 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Participants in your research or patient groups
Results and Impact Poster presented at the BBKA Spring convention 2012 Poster giving an outline of project aims, objectives and preliminary findings

no actual impacts realised to date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description Poster: 'Insights into bumblebee ecology from genetic analyses' 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Participants in your research or patient groups
Results and Impact Poster presented at the BBKA Spring Convention 2013 Poster

no actual impacts realised to date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation at IPI Dissemination Event, Wellcome Trust, London 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Presentation and project display stand both stimulated discussion and feedback from different stakeholder groups.

some follow-up enquiries by email.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Presentation at UEA School of Biological Sciences Annual Research Colloquium 
Form Of Engagement Activity Scientific meeting (conference/symposium etc.)
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Type Of Presentation paper presentation
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact Presentation at the University of East Anglia School of Biological Sciences Annual Research Colloquium on 'Bumblebee conservation', featuring an introduction to aims and approaches in the IPI project

no actual impacts realised to date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2011
 
Description Presentation at UK Bumblebee Working Group 2011 meeting 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Presentation at biennial meeting of the UK Bumblebee Working Group, introducing the project aims and approaches.

no actual impacts realised to date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2011
 
Description Presentation of findings within Lynn Dicks talk at Defra workshop on Pathways to International Pollinator Partnerships, UK Pavilion at Milan Expo 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Talk provided the evidence base from IPI and other research on UK initiatives to support pollinators. Sparked discussion afterwards, in the context of how to widen UK and EU partnerships for pollinator research and policy.

Participants were brought up to date on latest research behind policy solutions to pollinator declines, eg. new Countryside Stewardship scheme. Activity on Twitter during workshop.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Presentation: "Comparative molecular and spatial analysis of rare and common bumblebees" 
Form Of Engagement Activity Scientific meeting (conference/symposium etc.)
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach international
Primary Audience Participants in your research or patient groups
Results and Impact Presentation at the IUSSI European meeting, Montecatini, Italy.

Abstract: Bumblebees are among the most important insect pollinators of a number of arable, fruit and seed crops and wild plant species. However their populations are in decline, largely due to habitat loss and changes in farming practices having reduced the numbers of plants the insects forage on. We are using a novel combination of molecular microsatellite markers, intensive field studies and landscape modelling to determine the fine-scale spatial genetic structure of nest-founding queens and foraging workers, as a tool for predicting the impact of habitat structure onbumblebees at different stages in the colony cycle. . Here we focus on one common and one rare UK Bombus species (B. hortorum and B. ruderatus respectively).Using microsatellite markers, we reconstructed sibships for workers collected across an agricultural landscape structured by sets of experimental agri-environment scheme options. We detected lower colony densities and lower overall levels of allelic variation in the rare B. ruderatus than in B. hortorum. We discuss how the integration of the spatial genetic distribution of individuals from multiple pollinator species across the landscape can provide invaluable information on how habitat type influences their foraging behaviour and abundance. Such data will directly inform the targeting of strategies such as agri-environmentschemes for reversing bumblebee declines. A contributed talk to the IUSSI conference symposium on Biodiversity, community ecology, invasion biology and impact on human affairs. A powerpoint presentation on the work so far conducted on this project.

no actual impacts realised to date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
URL http://comp.chem.nottingham.ac.uk/dichrocalc
 
Description Presentation: Effects of landscape structure on space-use in wild bumblebee populations 
Form Of Engagement Activity Scientific meeting (conference/symposium etc.)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Type Of Presentation paper presentation
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Presentation at BES Conference INTECOL 2013: Pollinator Symposium "Threats to an ecosystem service: evaluating multifactorial pressures on insect pollinators" Presentation

no actual impacts realised to date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Press release Ecologists get first bumblebees' eye view of the landscape 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Press release produced by the British Ecological Society titled "Ecologists get first bumblebees' eye view of the landscape", to coincide with presentation at INTECOL 2013 conference. Press release/ news stories on BES and CEH websites

no actual impacts realised to date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Press release issued by CEH on publicaiton of Nature paper 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Press release entitled: Flower-rich habitats increase survival of bumblebee families
First 3 paragraphs: "New research led by the UK's Centre for Ecology & Hydrology has revealed for the first time that flower-rich habitats are key to enhancing the survival of bumblebee families between years. The results, which come from the largest ever study of its kind on wild bumblebee populations, will help farmers and policy makers manage the countryside more effectively to provide for these vital but declining pollinators.The new study, published in the journal Nature, used DNA technology and remote sensing to identify, map and track mother, daughter and sister bumblebees over two years to reveal that access to a range of pollen and nectar-rich flowers is vital to the survival of their populations. "
This press release together with the online publication in Nature sparked at least 27 online or printed articles in the media.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Research seminar at University of Goettingen, Germany 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Invited talk at the University of Goettingen department for Agroecology, sparked a long discussion session .
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Talk "Insights from genetics into the fine-scale ecology of common and scarce bumblebees" 
Form Of Engagement Activity Scientific meeting (conference/symposium etc.)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Presentation at the NW European IUSSI Winter meeting 2012, London Powerpoint presentation

no actual impacts realised to date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description Talk "Landscape heterogeneity and land-use effects on pollinator diversity and space use" 
Form Of Engagement Activity Scientific meeting (conference/symposium etc.)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Talk by M. G on behalf of both the AgriLand and Bumblebee IPI projects at the British Ecological Society annual meeting 2012,

no actual impacts realised to date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description Talk at Newton Grant SURPASS workshop to Latin American pollinator ecologists 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Workshop held in Bariloche, Argentina to bring together UK and Latin American pollinator ecologists on the theme of Safeguarding Pollination Services in a Changing World. Research findings and concepts from this grant well received and discussed in the light of application to the situation across Latin America.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Talk at POST Pollinators Update event in Parliament 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Invited Talk (as one of four speakers) at the POST Pollinators Update event in Parliament, attended by one Government MP.
Talk Title: Habitat creation for pollinators on farmland: a research update.
There was substantial activity on Twitter during the event, and I have had 2 follow-up enquiries about our work directly relating to it.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.parliament.uk/mps-lords-and-offices/offices/bicameral/post/post-events/pollinators-update...
 
Description Talk at SER 18: Restoring biodiversity and ecosystem services in intensive agricultural landscapes 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Talk about achieving sustainable agriculture and introduction to the ASSIST programme.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Talk at the ECCB conference: Ecological intensification: using wildlife-friendly farming to increases crop yield 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Presentation on sustainable land management incorporating the ASSISt project, Javskyla, Finand.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Talk at the IPI Grantholders workshop, York 
Form Of Engagement Activity Scientific meeting (conference/symposium etc.)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Participants in your research or patient groups
Results and Impact Talk giving an update on project findings and activities at the IPI Grantholders workshop, York

no actual impacts realised to date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description Talk on Ecology and Conservation of Bumblebees 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Invited lecture for the John Spedan Lewis Trust for the advancement of natural sciences, including description of the IPI project Powerpoint presentation, plus information leaflets and DVD from previous projects

no actual impacts realised to date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description Visit of the APPG for Biodiversity to CEH 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Visit of the All-Party Parliamentary Group for Biodiversity to the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Wallingford. Lab demonstration given including outline of the IPI project. Talk and demonstration of activities in the lab

no actual impacts realised to date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013