EPIZONE European Research Group Meeting: "Viruses on the move"

Lead Research Organisation: The Pirbright Institute
Department Name: UNLISTED

Abstract

Publications

10 25 50
 
Description A workshop "Viruses on the Move" and Satellite Symposium "Schmallenberg Virus" was held in Brighton June 12th to 15th 2012. This was attended by 280 researchers from more than 20 countries. The day precding the meeting a Young Epizone meeting was held for new researchers and postgraduate students to facilitate their integration into the meeting and provide training on presentations and poster preparation.

A number of collaborations have been developed and a new EU Grant Application was submitted
Exploitation Route The EPIZONE network also provides a forum for interaction of research scientists with other stakeholders such as funders and reelevant industry. The EPIZONE Network is following up with organisation of further annual meetings. The annual meetings and other activities of EPIZONE including workshops, training courses, joint applications for funding, a young scientists network (Young Epizone), a newsletter and website ( https://www.epizone-eu.net/) have continued for 12 years.
Sectors Agriculture, Food and Drink,Education,Healthcare

 
Description The impacts from the meeting have included dissemination of information about emerging epizootic diseases of farm animals including those with zoonotic potential. A special workshop on the newly emerged Schmallenberg virus identified key areas for collaborative research. Early career scientists were trained in science communication and had an opportunity to network with peers and established scientists in the field
First Year Of Impact 2012
Sector Agriculture, Food and Drink
Impact Types Cultural,Societal,Economic,Policy & public services

 
Description EPIZONE European Reserach Group Founded 
Organisation EPIZONE European Research Group
Country European Union (EU) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution We organise a conference in Brighton which was te first meeting of the EPIZONE European Research Network.. This was attended by ~ 280 scientists from more than 20 countries. Those attending presented their data relevant to EPIZONE aims. EPIZONE European Research Group (ERG) is the international network of veterinary research institutes working on epizootic animal diseases including those which may have zoonotic potential. It plays a key role in research on prevention, detection and control of animal diseases and zoonoses in order to reduce the risks and harm to animal health and the risks to public health in the EU and beyond. During recent years, the risk of introduction and spread of new infectious agents in the EU has increased due to global travel and trade. In addition, global warming is likely to increase the risk of spreading of arthropod borne (tick and midge) diseases. Borders pose no obstacle for diseases. Therefore, international cooperation is needed to develop innovative and rapid control strategies that combat animal diseases such as bluetongue, swine fever or foot and mouth disease. EPIZONE brings scientists together and thereby improves understanding of different regions concerning animal related food production in the various member states. As a result, scientific opinions and recommendations are internationally based, agreed upon and accepted. EPIZONE functions as a platform and provides a think-tank of highly qualified scientists who develop new strategies and tools to face future challenges. EPIZONE endorses the OneHealth concept, the overarching initiative to bring together research on animal health, public health and environmental health. Common goal In general EPIZONE focuses on infectious animal diseases of poultry, swine, fish, sheep, cattle, horses and wildlife, and also on infectious agents of the animals which may have zoonotic potential. The EPIZONE goal is to improve, standardise, and develop (new): ?diagnostic methods ?vaccines, intervention strategies ?surveillance, epidemiology studies ?risk analyses This is for better prevention and control of infectious animal diseases like foot and mouth disease, avian influenza, classical swine fever and arthropod borne (tick and midge) diseases such as bluetongue, Schmallenberg virus, African swine fever, African horse sickness, Crimean Congo haemorrhagic fever and West Nile fever. Using the solid research network, the EPIZONE experts aim to identify the infectious diseases with the highest risk of introduction early on. Knowledge of these risks increases our chances of avoiding introductions of such diseases. Potential routes of introduction can be shown by means of geo-information systems. Activities Rapid action at all levels and in all aspects is crucial to combat animal diseases. Communication and sharing knowledge and experiences is essential in supporting each other to combat animal diseases. EPIZONE continues to strengthen its research networking by [interne links bij ieder bullet]: ?Keeping the EPIZONE website up-to-date. ?Regularly sending out a newsletter. ?Organising an annual meeting. ?Integrating young scientists via its Young EPIZONE programme. ?Offering workshops and other events. ?Maintaining the EPIZONE database. Examples of success After the introduction of bluetongue in 2006 in Europe, there was an immediate exchange of protocols, materials and knowledge, which would have taken much more time in the absence of the established network of EPIZONE. The network quickly responded to requests from international organisations such as the FAO (within EPIZONE), WHO, and OIE, by providing access to experts, sharing experiences, and making standardised detection methods available to the affected countries. When the outbreak of Peste des Petits Ruminants in Morocco became a threat for Europe in 2008, EPIZONE organised a ring trial among EPIZONE partner institutes, disseminated reference materials and distributed a test kit in order to prepare institutes prepared. Again, in 2011, at the start of the outbreak of Schmallenberg virus, scientists of EPIZONE found each other easily and relied on one another to exchange and share knowledge.
Collaborator Contribution See above. EPIZONE European Research Group (ERG) is the international network of veterinary research institutes working on epizootic animal diseases including those which may have zoonotic potential. It plays a key role in research on prevention, detection and control of animal diseases and zoonoses in order to reduce the risks and harm to animal health and the risks to public health in the EU and beyond. During recent years, the risk of introduction and spread of new infectious agents in the EU has increased due to global travel and trade. In addition, global warming is likely to increase the risk of spreading of arthropod borne (tick and midge) diseases. Borders pose no obstacle for diseases. Therefore, international cooperation is needed to develop innovative and rapid control strategies that combat animal diseases such as bluetongue, swine fever or foot and mouth disease. EPIZONE brings scientists together and thereby improves understanding of different regions concerning animal related food production in the various member states. As a result, scientific opinions and recommendations are internationally based, agreed upon and accepted. EPIZONE functions as a platform and provides a think-tank of highly qualified scientists who develop new strategies and tools to face future challenges. EPIZONE endorses the OneHealth concept, the overarching initiative to bring together research on animal health, public health and environmental health. Common goal In general EPIZONE focuses on infectious animal diseases of poultry, swine, fish, sheep, cattle, horses and wildlife, and also on infectious agents of the animals which may have zoonotic potential. The EPIZONE goal is to improve, standardise, and develop (new): ?diagnostic methods ?vaccines, intervention strategies ?surveillance, epidemiology studies ?risk analyses This is for better prevention and control of infectious animal diseases like foot and mouth disease, avian influenza, classical swine fever and arthropod borne (tick and midge) diseases such as bluetongue, Schmallenberg virus, African swine fever, African horse sickness, Crimean Congo haemorrhagic fever and West Nile fever. Using the solid research network, the EPIZONE experts aim to identify the infectious diseases with the highest risk of introduction early on. Knowledge of these risks increases our chances of avoiding introductions of such diseases. Potential routes of introduction can be shown by means of geo-information systems. Activities Rapid action at all levels and in all aspects is crucial to combat animal diseases. Communication and sharing knowledge and experiences is essential in supporting each other to combat animal diseases. EPIZONE continues to strengthen its research networking by [interne links bij ieder bullet]: ?Keeping the EPIZONE website up-to-date. ?Regularly sending out a newsletter. ?Organising an annual meeting. ?Integrating young scientists via its Young EPIZONE programme. ?Offering workshops and other events. ?Maintaining the EPIZONE database. Examples of success After the introduction of bluetongue in 2006 in Europe, there was an immediate exchange of protocols, materials and knowledge, which would have taken much more time in the absence of the established network of EPIZONE. The network quickly responded to requests from international organisations such as the FAO (within EPIZONE), WHO, and OIE, by providing access to experts, sharing experiences, and making standardised detection methods available to the affected countries. When the outbreak of Peste des Petits Ruminants in Morocco became a threat for Europe in 2008, EPIZONE organised a ring trial among EPIZONE partner institutes, disseminated reference materials and distributed a test kit in order to prepare institutes prepared. Again, in 2011, at the start of the outbreak of Schmallenberg virus, scientists of EPIZONE found each other easily and relied on one another to exchange and share knowledge.
Impact Further meetings and exchange visits between partners have taken place. Collaborations have been developed leading to Joint Grant Applications for EU funding.
Start Year 2012
 
Description Organising Committee EPIZONE Annual Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact I have been a member of the scientific organizing committee of the EU EPIZONE Network every year since its founding in 2005 except for 2015.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013,2014,2016
URL http://www.epizone-eu.net