Genetic dissection of seasonal timing in Drosophila

Lead Research Organisation: University of Leicester
Department Name: Genetics

Abstract

Seasonal timing is a key process for survival for most organisms, especially in temperate regions. In broad ranges of species, from plants to mammals, the annual change in day-length is monitored the so-called a photoperiodic clock, allowing the accurate timing of the seasonal response. Many insects for example, including numerous agricultural pests, detect the shortening of the day during the autumn and switch to diapause (a developmental arrest), which allow them to survive the winter. Despite intensive study of the photoperiodic clock for the last 80 years, the underlying molecular mechanism is still largely unknown. This is in marked contrast to our understanding of the circadian clock that regulates daily rhythms, where studies in various model organisms, particularly Drosophila, have established firm principles and rich mechanistic detail, including genes conserved across diverse phyla.
In Drosophila, the genetic basis of the seasonal clock has focused on female diapause, manifested as a developmental arrest of the ovaries induced by short days and low temperatures. Unfortunately, this phenotype is not very robust, and practically is not amenable for large genetic screens. Recently, research in our laboratory has corroborated previous observations that flies developed under short days become significantly cold-resistant compared with flies raised in long-days. The difference in cold response can be easily quantified using the chill-coma recovery (CCR) assay, in which flies exposed to freezing temperatures enter reversible narcosis . The recovery time reflects how cold-adaptive the flies are, and our recent work has demonstrated that this response is largely regulated by the photoperiod (i.e. flies exposed to short photoperiods during development exhibit shorter recovery times). We have devised an automated system, allowing the monitoring of hundreds of flies, and here we propose to use this system for high-throughput genetic screen for genes involved in the photoperiodicresponse.

Technical Summary

In Drosophila, low temperatures short day-lengths induce developmental arrest of the ovaries, serving as an adaptive response that allows females to overwinter. To date, this form of reproduce diapause has been the sole phenotype in Drosophila for studying the genetics of seasonal timing. However, this phenotype involves the manual dissection of large number of female ovaries and consequently is not easily amenable for large-scale genetic screens. Here, we describe a new approach for studying the molecular basis for seasonal timing, based on the chill-coma recovery (CCR) phenotype of flies. Using a commercial automated locomotory monitoring system we have recently found that the CCR can be analysed in hundreds of flies within a few hours, paving the way for large-scale genetic screens for genes involved in the photoperiodic clock.
We will carry out a genome-wide screen using the Cambridge Protein Trap Insertion (CPTI) strain collection (Objective i). Around 400 hundreds strains of this collection, which has been created using the piggyBac method to insert an EYFP construct, will be tested for their CCR following development in short and long days. (ii) Building on previous global profiling experiments that we have performedusing microarrays to search for photoperiodically regulated transcripts (and micro-RNAs), we will test the role of 40 candidate genes that show photoperiodic differential expression, in photoperiodic timing of CCR, by dsRNAi knockdown and GAL4-UAS misexpression. We will also test the role of candidate microRNAs in the CCR response. The role of various brain neurons in photoperodic measurements will tested by genetic ablation of these cells using the GAL4-UAS system (Objective iii). In another set of experiments (Objective iv), we will investigate which photoreceptors are involved in the photoperiodic response, by establishing the action spectrum of this response, and by testing the response of various photoreceptor knockdown strains.

Planned Impact

We all notice the passing of the seasons, and marvel at how the plants and animals around us time their migrations, flowering or breeding with the changing of the seasons. Our study of seasonal timing and its underlying genetic, molecular and anatomical substrates will provide a novel perspective and theoretical framework by which to study seasonality in terms of both humans, and the organisms around us.

The appropriate daily and seasonal timing of physiological processes is essential to health. Disruption of the circadian clock or the seasonal timer results in illness. For example, in the USA alone, it is estimated that six of every 100 people suffer depressive disorders with seasonal pattern (seasonal affective disorder, SAD). Our work may have some direct implications for remedial action by shedding light (!) on the underlying molecular mechanisms. Based on the well established similarities between insects and mammals in the genetic basis of their circadian system, we predict that any new mechanism that we identify that underlie insect photoperiodic response, may have interesting mammalian homologues (or analogues), with similar functions.

While the research is 'pure', there are further downstream implications for our research, even if these are not immediate. Other beneficiaries apart from the academic beneficiaries would thus be
1. The medical profession and the pharmaceutical industry who might be interested in our genes as potential targets for developing therapies for those with seasonal problems.
2. Agricultural and medical entomologists interested in (i) controlling problem insects using diapause as a target or (ii) for manipulating diapause to improve storage of beneficial insects such as biocontrol agents ("shelf-life" is an issue for breeders and distributors of beneficial insects).
3. Policymakers who are concerned about the effects of global climate change and the impact on wild-populations and human health.
4. The public, who is always very curious and responsive to issues concerning "body clocks".

As with all basic research, it could be many years down the line before any of the discoveries we will make might be translated into drugs, treatments and policies. However, the work of many chronobiologists (including ourselves) has produced, through the years, a tangible effect: nowadays everybody is aware of the existence of a body clock and of its tremendous power in regulating our lives and our health. Moreover, we have ourselves a great deal of experience in talking to schoolchildren, their teachers, the general public in open lectures, to artists and to the press about how the days and the seasons influence our lives. We also communicate with the medical profession and with applied researches in the form of publications, and by dissemination at conferences. We also maintain websites, open to anyone, so that any informed citizen will have the opportunity to understand the problems we are concerned with in our research and to echo them to policy makers. Furthermore, we are open to collaborations with any interested groups, academic, or commercial.

Our project will also contribute to the cultural and economic growth of the UK by enhancing the skills of the PDRA and students that will be working on the proposed research. Typically, our labs host over 15 visiting students every year (including 3rd year undergraduate projects, MSc projects, Erasmus exchange students, and school work-experience placements). Students will gain specialised and much-needed skills through performing advanced laboratory techniques and data analysis. These are generally and widely applicable to subsequent career progression in molecular biology. In addition, transferable skills that will be acquired in the form of public speaking, computing and writing are again widely relevant to any professional forum.

Publications

10 25 50
 
Description The main aim of the research was to identify the genetic and cellular basis of the photoperiodic clock in Drosophila. Like many other insects in temperate regions, Drosophila melanogaster exploits the photoperiod shortening that occurs during the autumn as an important cue to trigger a seasonal response. Flies survives the winter by entering a state of reproductive arrest (diapause), which drives relocation of resources from reproduction to survival. Our major discovery was the important role of the recently discovered class of small RNA microRNA (miRNA) in photoperiodism. We have profiled miRNA in long and short photoperiods, and identified seven differentially expressed miRNAs (dme-mir-2b, dme-mir-11, dme-mir-34, dme-mir-274, dme-mir-184, dme-mir-184* and dme-mir-285). Misexpression of dme-mir-2b, dme-mir-184 and dme-mir-274 in pigment-dispersing factor-expressing neurons largely disrupted the normal photoperiodic response, suggesting that these miRNAs play functional roles in photoperiodic timing. We also analyzed the targets of photoperiodic miRNA by both computational predication and by Argonaute-1-mediated immunoprecipitation of long- and short-day RNA samples. Together with global transcriptome profiling, our results expand existing data on other Drosophila species, identifying genes and pathways that are differentially regulated in different photoperiods and reproductive status. Our data suggest that post-transcriptional regulation by miRNA is an important facet of photoperiodic timing.
Exploitation Route Our findings provide a list of microRNA and their targets that could serve as candidate genes for photoperiodism. Since many pest and vector insects are relaying on photoperiodic clock for seasonal timing, our candidate genes could be now explored in these insects. Development of molecular tools for disrupting the normal expression of these gene may yield an efficient way to control these pests.
Sectors Agriculture, Food and Drink,Environment,Healthcare

 
Description H2020-MSCA-ITN-2017
Amount € 3,809,005 (EUR)
Funding ID 765937 
Organisation European Commission H2020 
Sector Public
Country Belgium
Start 05/2018 
End 05/2021
 
Description Individual Research Grant
Amount 1,088,100 ש"ח (ILS)
Funding ID 1737/17 
Organisation Israeli Science Foundation 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country Israel
Start 10/2017 
End 10/2021
 
Description Responsive mode
Amount £429,515 (GBP)
Funding ID BB/L023520/1 
Organisation Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 05/2014 
End 04/2017
 
Description Standard
Amount £750,895 (GBP)
Funding ID BB/M012034/1 
Organisation Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 11/2014 
End 11/2015
 
Title Collection of Drosophila wild population samples UK 2014 
Description Collection of Drosophila melanogaster flies from wild populations in Leicester. Maintained as a set of isofemale lines. Useful for genomic and phenotypic analysis. 
Type Of Material Biological samples 
Year Produced 2014 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The impact has not realised yet. 
 
Title Gene expression in early and late eclosion Drosophila strains 
Description Drosphila pupae were sampled the day before eclosion at 4 h intervals in the Early and Late strains, and gene expression was profiled by RNA-seq. All the sequence reads were deposited in the Sequence Reads Archive (SRA) at the NCBI database under accession number SRP056783. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2015 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact NA 
URL http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bioproject/PRJNA275941
 
Title The methylome of Nasonia vitripennis 
Description DNA methylation dataset from Nasonia, induced by long and short day. Generated by Reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS). 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2014 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact This dataset estblishes Nasonia as an insect model system for studying the role of epigenetic regulation and DNA methyation in seasonal timing. The dataset contributes to Replacement and Reduction of animal use (3R's). 
URL http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bioproject/192579
 
Title WaspAtlas 
Description WaspAtlas is a depository for gene expression and DNA methylation data from various tissues of the parasitic wasp Nasonia vitripennis. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2014 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The database has been used by various researchers for designing RNA inhibition constructs (dsRNAi) and for looking for DNA methylation markers. The database promote the use of insect model organism for studying DNA methylation and therefore is a significant contribution to Replacement and Reduction of animal use (3R's). 
URL http://www.waspatlas.com
 
Title WaspAtlas: genomic database of the wasp Nasonia 
Description WaspAtlas is a new gene database in which we have compiled annotation data from all available genome sequences of the parasitic wasp Nasonia vitripennis, along with a wealth of transcriptomic data, methylation data and original analyses and annotations to form a comprehensive resource to aid the study of this emerging model organism. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2015 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The online database has been already been visited and used for data mining by hundreds of researchers from all over the world. The wasp Nasonia, is an emerging model organism that has great potential to contribute to the replacement, refinement or reduction of animal use. 
URL http://www.WaspAtlas.com
 
Description CINCHRON 
Organisation Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic
Country Czech Republic 
Sector Learned Society 
PI Contribution Planning and preparation of the consortium research proposal for a Marie Curie ETN (CINCHRON). Supervision and training of PhD students in our laboratory.
Collaborator Contribution Planning and preparation of the consortium research proposal for a Marie Curie ETN (CINCHRON). Supervision and training of PhD students in their laboratory.
Impact MSCA-ITN-ETN award by the Eurpean Comission (proposal number 765937). 3,809,005 EUR.
Start Year 2016
 
Description CINCHRON 
Organisation Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Country Israel 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Planning and preparation of the consortium research proposal for a Marie Curie ETN (CINCHRON). Supervision and training of PhD students in our laboratory.
Collaborator Contribution Planning and preparation of the consortium research proposal for a Marie Curie ETN (CINCHRON). Supervision and training of PhD students in their laboratory.
Impact MSCA-ITN-ETN award by the Eurpean Comission (proposal number 765937). 3,809,005 EUR.
Start Year 2016
 
Description CINCHRON 
Organisation Jagiellonian University
Country Poland 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Planning and preparation of the consortium research proposal for a Marie Curie ETN (CINCHRON). Supervision and training of PhD students in our laboratory.
Collaborator Contribution Planning and preparation of the consortium research proposal for a Marie Curie ETN (CINCHRON). Supervision and training of PhD students in their laboratory.
Impact MSCA-ITN-ETN award by the Eurpean Comission (proposal number 765937). 3,809,005 EUR.
Start Year 2016
 
Description CINCHRON 
Organisation National Center for Scientific Research (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique CNRS)
Country France 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Planning and preparation of the consortium research proposal for a Marie Curie ETN (CINCHRON). Supervision and training of PhD students in our laboratory.
Collaborator Contribution Planning and preparation of the consortium research proposal for a Marie Curie ETN (CINCHRON). Supervision and training of PhD students in their laboratory.
Impact MSCA-ITN-ETN award by the Eurpean Comission (proposal number 765937). 3,809,005 EUR.
Start Year 2016
 
Description CINCHRON 
Organisation University of Leicester
Department Department of Genetics
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Planning and preparation of the consortium research proposal for a Marie Curie ETN (CINCHRON). Supervision and training of PhD students in our laboratory.
Collaborator Contribution Planning and preparation of the consortium research proposal for a Marie Curie ETN (CINCHRON). Supervision and training of PhD students in their laboratory.
Impact MSCA-ITN-ETN award by the Eurpean Comission (proposal number 765937). 3,809,005 EUR.
Start Year 2016
 
Description CINCHRON 
Organisation University of Padova
Country Italy 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Planning and preparation of the consortium research proposal for a Marie Curie ETN (CINCHRON). Supervision and training of PhD students in our laboratory.
Collaborator Contribution Planning and preparation of the consortium research proposal for a Marie Curie ETN (CINCHRON). Supervision and training of PhD students in their laboratory.
Impact MSCA-ITN-ETN award by the Eurpean Comission (proposal number 765937). 3,809,005 EUR.
Start Year 2016
 
Description CINCHRON 
Organisation University of Wurzburg
Country Germany 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Planning and preparation of the consortium research proposal for a Marie Curie ETN (CINCHRON). Supervision and training of PhD students in our laboratory.
Collaborator Contribution Planning and preparation of the consortium research proposal for a Marie Curie ETN (CINCHRON). Supervision and training of PhD students in their laboratory.
Impact MSCA-ITN-ETN award by the Eurpean Comission (proposal number 765937). 3,809,005 EUR.
Start Year 2016
 
Description European Drosophila Population Genomics Consortium 
Organisation National Center for Scientific Research (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique CNRS)
Department UMR CNRS 5558 Laboratoire de Biométrie et Biologie Évolutive
Country France 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution We have collected samples of wild populations of fruitflies in the UK, prepared and contribured funding for genomic DNA sequencing.
Collaborator Contribution The partners collected samples of wild populations of fruitflies in various locations in Europe, prepared and contribured funding for genomic DNA sequencing.
Impact This collaboration fosterd the integration and exchange of population genomic information, and resulted in a joint effort in collecting and generating population genomic data for Drosophila species across Europe.
Start Year 2014
 
Description European Drosophila Population Genomics Consortium 
Organisation Pompeu Fabra University
Department Institute of Evolutionary Biology
Country Spain 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We have collected samples of wild populations of fruitflies in the UK, prepared and contribured funding for genomic DNA sequencing.
Collaborator Contribution The partners collected samples of wild populations of fruitflies in various locations in Europe, prepared and contribured funding for genomic DNA sequencing.
Impact This collaboration fosterd the integration and exchange of population genomic information, and resulted in a joint effort in collecting and generating population genomic data for Drosophila species across Europe.
Start Year 2014
 
Description European Drosophila Population Genomics Consortium 
Organisation Russian Academy of Sciences
Department Institute of Molecular Genetics
Country Russian Federation 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution We have collected samples of wild populations of fruitflies in the UK, prepared and contribured funding for genomic DNA sequencing.
Collaborator Contribution The partners collected samples of wild populations of fruitflies in various locations in Europe, prepared and contribured funding for genomic DNA sequencing.
Impact This collaboration fosterd the integration and exchange of population genomic information, and resulted in a joint effort in collecting and generating population genomic data for Drosophila species across Europe.
Start Year 2014
 
Description European Drosophila Population Genomics Consortium 
Organisation Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv
Country Ukraine 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We have collected samples of wild populations of fruitflies in the UK, prepared and contribured funding for genomic DNA sequencing.
Collaborator Contribution The partners collected samples of wild populations of fruitflies in various locations in Europe, prepared and contribured funding for genomic DNA sequencing.
Impact This collaboration fosterd the integration and exchange of population genomic information, and resulted in a joint effort in collecting and generating population genomic data for Drosophila species across Europe.
Start Year 2014
 
Description European Drosophila Population Genomics Consortium 
Organisation University of Jyvaskyla
Country Finland 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We have collected samples of wild populations of fruitflies in the UK, prepared and contribured funding for genomic DNA sequencing.
Collaborator Contribution The partners collected samples of wild populations of fruitflies in various locations in Europe, prepared and contribured funding for genomic DNA sequencing.
Impact This collaboration fosterd the integration and exchange of population genomic information, and resulted in a joint effort in collecting and generating population genomic data for Drosophila species across Europe.
Start Year 2014
 
Description European Drosophila Population Genomics Consortium 
Organisation University of Lausanne
Country Switzerland 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We have collected samples of wild populations of fruitflies in the UK, prepared and contribured funding for genomic DNA sequencing.
Collaborator Contribution The partners collected samples of wild populations of fruitflies in various locations in Europe, prepared and contribured funding for genomic DNA sequencing.
Impact This collaboration fosterd the integration and exchange of population genomic information, and resulted in a joint effort in collecting and generating population genomic data for Drosophila species across Europe.
Start Year 2014
 
Description ABC Radio Interview (Melbourne, Australia) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Interview to ABC Radio , Melbourne, Australia, covering our research on the genetics of diurnal preference and circadian clocks.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Interview BBC Radio Leicester 2014 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact t Jonathan Lampon morning show. The interview sparked questions and discussions.

Impact unknown
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p025jkkb
 
Description 'Plasticity in Circadian Rhythms and Sleep' workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact An invited talk at the 'Plasticity in Circadian Rhythms and Sleep' workshop at the Hebrew University orgenised by the Jerusalem Brain Community. The talk was entitled 'Epigenetic regulation of the photoperiodic clock' and sparked questions and discussion afterwards.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://scholars.huji.ac.il/jbc/event/save-date-jbc-organized-workshop-plasticity-circadian-rhythms-...
 
Description Career talk at Beauchamp College open day (MP) 2014 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact career talk I gave to the Beauchamp College open day. talk sparked questions and discussion afterwards.

Impacts are not known yet.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Does the Drosophila seasonal timer require a circadian clock? SRBR 2014 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The presentation sparked questions and discussion afterwards

Impact has not been realised yet.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.srbr.org/Pages/SRBR_Meeting.aspx
 
Description Dynamic DNA (2015) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact 9-10/9/2015. Lecture and hands-on activities with fruit-flies, demonstrating the importance of the concept of model organism in genetic research. Part of 'Dynamic DNA' two days orgenised by the GENIE CETL at the University of Leicester.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/genetics/genie/outreach/dynamic-dna
 
Description Dynamic DNA 2010 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact One day of presentations and hands-on activities in genetics for year 9 students, organised by the GENIE CETL.

Teachers reported that the session stimulate the student interest in genetics and made clear the importance of using model organisms such as fruitflies in genetic research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2010
 
Description Dynamic DNA 2013 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Hands-on activities for school children demonstrating the use of fruitflies in Genetics, as part of the Dynamic DNA day orgenised by GENIE, at the University of Leicester. The activities sparked questions and discussions afterwards.

no actual impacts realised to date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
URL http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/genetics/genie/outreach/dynamic-dna
 
Description Dynamic DNA 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact During two days 417 pupils from various schools have visited the department of genetics and carried out various hand-on activities on genetics. We have provided information and activities about the importance of the fruit-fly as model system for genetic research
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description EBRS lecture diurnal preference (Manchaster) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Lecture at the European Society for Biological Rhythms (SRBR), 2-6 August 2015 Manchester, entitled: "New insights into the genetics of diurnal/nocturnal
preference".
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.ebrswcc2015.ls.manchester.ac.uk/
 
Description GENIE summer school fruitflies session (2015) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact LiveGene! team run hands-on session during the GENIE summer school at the Department of Genetics, University of Leicester. The session demonstrated the use of fruit-flies for studying genetics (4 June 2015, 24 students).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.tinyURL.com/LiveGene
 
Description Interview to The Marker. Daily economic newspaper (Israel) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact An article discussing our research entitled "Find it difficult to get up in the morning ? The reason lies in the fruit fly" (in Hebrew). http://www.themarker.com/news/1.2735883
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.themarker.com/news/1.2735883
 
Description LiveGene! school visit at Beaumont Leys School 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact LiveGene! is a project run by the Tauber lab promoting using live fruitflies in the classroom for genetic education. The team visited Beaumont Leys School in Leicester and run various experiments with year 10 students (age 14-15)

no actual impacts realised to date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description LiveGene! teacher training session Newham Collegiate Sixth Form Centre 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact LiveGene! outreach. 14 July 2015 Teacher training session Newham Collegiate Sixth Form Centre biology teachers (inc head of biology) & technician. Training of using live fruit-flies for experiments in genetics in the classroom.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.tinyURL.com/LiveGene
 
Description LiveGene! teachers training session (2015) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact LiveGene! is an education programme developed by the Tauber lab in collaboration with GENIE and the LEBC, which brings genetics teaching to life by using live fruit-flies (and wasps) in the classroom. We have designed laboratory activities which make use of live organisms for school/college students, that fit well within the GCSE and A-level biology curriculums. This hands-on session was carried on the 18/2/2016 at the Department of Genetics at the University of Leicester and 10 teachers from various schools in Leicestershire have attended.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.tinyURL.com/LiveGene
 
Description LiveGene! training January 2014 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact LiveGene! is a project run by the Tauber Lab, promoting the use of live fruit flies in the classroom for genetic education. A training in handling flies was given to school teachers and technicians from 5 different schools in Leicestershire. The training was carried in the GENIE lab at the University of Leicester Kits and live strain of Drosophila for experiments in the classroom

Printed material with experiment and lesson plans.

After the training, teachers adopted the use of live fruitflies in the genetic lessons in the classroom.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.tinyURL.com/liveGene
 
Description LiveGene! training July 2013 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact LiveGene! is a project run by the Tauber Lab, promoting the use of live fruit flies in the classroom for genetic education. A training in handling flies was given to school teachers and technicians from 7 different schools in Leicestershire. The training was carried at the GENIE lab at the University of Leicester Kits and live strains of Drosophila for experiments in the classroom.

Printed material with background and lesson plans.

no actual impacts realised to date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description LiveGene! training June 2013 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact LiveGene! is a project run by the Tauber Lab, promoting the use of live fruit flies in the classroom for genetic education. A training in handling flies was given to school teachers from Ashby School. The traning was carried at the GENIE lab at the University of Leicester Kits and live strains of Drosophila for experiments in the classroom.

Printed material with experiment and lesson plans.

After the training, teachers have adopted the suggested activities with fruitflies in their school.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
URL http://www.tinyURL.com/liveGene
 
Description LiveGene! training at Southfield School 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact LiveGene! is a project run by the Tauber Lab, promoting the use of live fruit flies in the classroom for genetic education. A training in handling flies was given to school teachers and technicians at Southfield School, Kettering.

no actual impacts realised to date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description LiveGene! workshop for Weston Favell Academy students 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact LiveGene workshop carried at the Department of Genetics, University of Leicester (25 June 2015) Fly session with Weston Favell Academy 6th form (15 students ). Hands-on activities with fruitflies, demonstrating different topics in genetics.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.tinyURL.com/LiveGene
 
Description Modern genetic techniqes workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Full day of Lectures and practical sessions on molecular biology techniques (cloning, PCR) to six form students from Kettering Buccleuch Academy, run in GENIE lab at the Univeristy of Leicester, by the LiveGene! team.

After the session, the teacher said that students reported better understanding of the thought material in class and felt better prepared to GCSE.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description National Science & Engineering Week 2014 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact A lecture at Beauchamp College (Leicester) during National Science & Engineering Week, explaining the concept of model oragnism and the contribution of Drosophila to research in genetics. Year 12 students (age 16-17).

no actual impacts realised to date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Oakham School science careers 07/03/14 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Meeting with Form 5-7 students at Oakham Schook and providing information on different possilbe careers in the Biosciences.

After my talk, the school asked if current GCSE pupils could visit my lab
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Press release: ancient DNA sequences (2015) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact 28/10/2015. Press release by the University of Leicester Press office entitled: "Oldest DNA sequences may reveal secrets of ancient animal ancestors", to accompany the publication of our study in BMC Evolutionary Biology journal. This was covered media all over the world, and was followed by number of interview requests.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www2.le.ac.uk/offices/press/press-releases/2015/october/oldest-dna-sequences-may-reveal-secre...
 
Description Press release: genetics of 'larks' and 'owls' (2015) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact May 14, 2015. Press release by the University of Leicester, entitled "Geneticists clock genetic differences between 'larks' and 'owls' ". To accompany our study published in Frontiers in Neurology. The press release led to media coverage all over the world, and was followed by interview requests from various newspapers and radio stations.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www2.le.ac.uk/offices/press/press-releases/2015/may/geneticists-clock-genetic-differences-bet...
 
Description Radio interview (Perth, Western Australia) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact interview with 882 6PR Radio (Perth, Western Australia) covering our work on genetic differences associated with morningnenss/eveningnes preference in fruit-flies.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Role for DNA methylation in insect photoperiodic timing SRBR 2014 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact the talk sparked questions and discussion afterwards.

The impact has not been realised yet.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.srbr.org/Pages/SRBR_Meeting.aspx
 
Description School Visit (Haifa) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Giving a lecture on using Drosophila as a model system in genetic research in the local high school. 50 pupils (Year 11) have attended. The school reported increased interest in the related subject area.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Science Career day ( Beaumont Leys School ) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact 6 March 2015 Science careers day Beaumont Leys School ~400 students split into 8 workshops. Presentation and hands-on activities, presenting the important of fruit-flies as a model system for studying genetics.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015