14 ERA-CAPS Mechanistic Analysis of Quantitative Disease Resistance in Brassica by Associative Transcriptomics

Lead Research Organisation: University of Hertfordshire
Department Name: School of Life and Medical Sciences

Abstract

Brassica napus, a major world-wide crop, comprises a range of crop types including oilseed rape (OSR), grown for edible and industrial oil, biodiesel, protein for animal feed as well as leaf and root vegetables. Diseases are a major factor limiting production, a threat increasing due to climate change and the imminent withdrawal of agrochemicals in Europe. Improved disease control is an urgent priority and breeders are increasingly using quantitative disease resistance (QDR), which is considered broad-spectrum and durable.

This research will identify the most useful QDR genes for OSR breeding and understand the mechanisms behind this to enable predictions of their effectiveness and durability. Our consortium combines the leading expertise on the major OSR pathogens, the latest research on defence mechanisms of resistance and expertise in association genetics to identify effective QDR genes. Our industrial partner, KWS, will provide expertise on deployment of QDR in the field and on the development of genetic markers for molecular breeding of improved OSR varieties.

We will identify resistance to the most important pathogens of OSR: Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, Verticillium spp, Leptosphaeria maculans, Alternaria brassicicola, Pyrenopeziza brassicae, and the model pathogens Pseudomonas syringae and Botrytis cinerea. A panel of 192 diverse B. napus lines will be screened for resistance against these pathogens in controlled environments and at KWS field trial sites. Schools will contribute in a 'citizen science' project and evaluate resistance at locations throughout Europe. In the same lines, we will quantify induced defence responses to conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). We will also quantify salicylic acid, lignin, phenylpropanoid, glucosinolate, and indole metabolites that are implicated in resistance mechanisms. Using association transcriptomics, we will identify resistance gene loci against multiple pathogens and understand how this relates to metabolite production and PAMP-triggered immunity.

To test hypotheses about their contribution to resistance, we include studies on specific genes. Whilst glucosinolates contribute to resistance they can reduce the quality of seed. GTR1 and GTR2 are transporters in Arabidopsis that control the allocation of glucosinolates to seeds. We will test gtr1 gtr2 mutants for fitness and create gtr TILLING mutants in Brassica rapa (B. napus A genome) to measure the glucosinolate partitioning between leaves and seed. The work could enable development of OSR with high leaf glucosinolate content for resistance, without compromising seed quality. We will introduce tomato receptor Ve1 into B. napus and assess its ability to mediate resistance against Verticillium wilt.

This research will lead to more sustainable production of OSR, with higher productivity through lower vulnerability to biotic stress and less reliance on chemical inputs.

Technical Summary

Oilseed rape (OSR, Brassica napus) is a major crop worldwide, producing edible oil, biodiesel and protein for animal feed. Diseases are a major factor limiting OSR production and improved control is an urgent priority. Breeders are increasingly using quantitative disease resistance (QDR) which is considered broad-spectrum and durable. This proposal addresses the current gap in our knowledge which is the identification of the most useful QDR for breeding.

The first layer of active defence in plants is based on the perception of pathogen (or microbe) associated molecular patterns (PAMPs/MAMPs) leading to PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI). PAMPs are essential molecules, conserved in entire kingdoms of microbes, and are recognised by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) in plants. Within ERA-PG (PRR-CROP) we developed methods for studying PTI in Brassica crops.

We will identify gene loci contributing to QDR against the most important pathogens of OSR using the novel method of associative transcriptomics (AT), developed at JIC in B. napus by the Bancroft group. Using a 'B. napus diversity panel' of 192 diverse lines we will quantify resistance to the most important pathogens: Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, Verticillium spp, Leptosphaeria maculans, Alternaria brassicicola, Pyrenopeziza brassicae, Pseudomonas syringae and Botrytis cinerea. We will quantify induced defence responses to PAMPs and measure salicylic acid, lignin, phenylpropanoid, glucosinolate, and indole metabolites that are implicated in resistance mechanisms. Using AT, we will identify resistance gene loci against multiple pathogens and understand how this relates to metabolite production and PAMP-triggered immunity. We will also investigate glucosinolate partitioning between leaves and seed using mutants of GTR1 and GTR2 transporters and introduce tomato receptor Ve1 into B. napus and assess its ability to mediate resistance against Verticillium wilt.

Planned Impact

Pathways to Impact: Our impact plan for non-academic users and beneficiaries is designed primarily to target those communities that are either most affected by the disease problems or involved in formulating policy relevant to disease management. Light leaf spot, caused by the fungal pathogen Pyrenopeziza brassicae, and phoma stem canker, caused by Leptosphaeria spp., are damaging diseases on oilseed rape in the UK, causing substantial yield losses. The information gained from the project will help agronomists to make recommendations to growers on choice of cultivars. New knowledge from this project will help breeders avoid breakdown of cultivar resistance. It will also help improve disease resistance rating for the HGCA Recommended List (RL). Results of this project will be communicated to policy-makers to guide forward planning as part of strategies to achieve the government climate change mitigation target for UK agriculture (Food 2030) by reducing greenhouse gas emissions through improved disease control. The project consortium members have a good track record for engaging with all of these communities.

Scientific Impact: Advancing fundamental scientific knowledge. This project will generate fundamental knowledge on ill-defined pathosystems that are of major significance to oilseed rape production in the UK. The genome-enabled technologies are not only expected to ameliorate the impact of light leaf spot and phoma stem canker disease pressure in the UK, but also they will be applicable to closely related disease problems like barley leaf spot caused by Rhynchosporium commune. The techniques developed in this study are expected have a significant impact on UK and international agricultural industries. Results from the project will reach the scientific community, including plant pathologists, agronomists and crop scientists through publications in prestigious peer-reviewed international journals The principal investigators will actively promote the research at international conferences. New findings will also be communicated as topic sheets or posters at agricultural events (e.g. Cereals', field days, road-shows, workshops). Details of the project will be made available through the research pages of consortium members.

Economic Impact: New breeding lines and disease management. UK agriculture will benefit from the scientific knowledge gained through this project. The breeding company involved in the project will develop breeding lines and commercialize cultivars with stronger and more durable resistance. Through participation of industry in the consortium, needs of end-users are better addressed. New knowledge about light leaf spot and phoma stem canker control will be disseminated to the industry primarily through on-farm advisory and knowledge transfer teams and breeder commercial marketing teams, and more widely through inter-linked websites.

Social Impact: Improvement of food security. The proposed study will have a large impact on the treatment of crop diseases due to generation of more resistant breeding lines and cultivars. This will positively affect the UK population but also have implications for the rest of Europe and beyond. Using the results of the project, we will increase the awareness of the problems associated with crop diseases and subsequent food security. This information will be disseminated via press releases into the popular scientific press and through publically accessible websites.

Exploitation and Application. In order to maximise impact, findings need to be translated into practical solutions and placed in the public domain as quickly as possible. The communication and engagement mechanisms described have been developed specifically for this purpose. The involvement of a wide range of partners (scientists, breeders, advisors) will ensure that results are exploited directly in the arable sector of the agricultural industry during the course of the project.

Publications

10 25 50
 
Description Phoma stem canker
1. Phoma leaf spot (caused by Leptoshpaeria maculans and L. biglobosa) severity was assesed
at the leaf stage in autumn/winter and at the stem stage in summer on B. napus lines in field experiments run by KWS in the UK (Harpenden) in the 2015/2016, 2016/2017 and 2017/20178 cropping seasons.
2. Resistance/suscpeptibility to the phoma stem canker pathogens (Leptoshpaeria maculans and L. biglobosa) was examined on the 80 genotypes of the initial Diveristy Set in controlled environment experiments. The experiments were done using 4 single pycnidial isolates of each pathogen in 5 replicates with 16 control/normalising genotypes, including a susceptible genotype and its Near Isogenic Lines (NILs) with 4 different genes for resistance against L. maculans and cultivars that have been screened in previous field experiments.
3. - Samples of 17 selected genotypes with contrasting defence responses against pathogens that infect B. napus have been analysed for glucosinolate and indole alkaloids by DynaMo Center of Excellence following inoculation with the phoma stem canker pathogens (Leptoshpaeria maculans or L. biglobosa).
- NLP genes in L. maculans & L. biglobosa were identified and recombinant proteins were expressed.
The proteins were purified and were used to study the NPL activity in planta.
4. GWAS was done to examine associations between gene loci and resistant phenotypes of phoma stem cankers pathogens obtained from field experimets in the UK in four data sets with up to 87 genetypes each in the 2015/2016 cropping season and in three data sets with up to 164 genetypes each in the 2016/2017 cropping season. GWAS was also done to examine associations between gene loci and phenotypes of resistance against phoma stem canker pathogens on the 80 genotypes of the initial Diveristy Set examined for resistance/suscpeptibility to Leptoshpaeria maculans and L. biglobosa in controlled environment conditions.


Light leaf spot
1. Light leaf spot (Pyrenopeziza brassicae) severity was assessed at leaf and stem stages in field experiments run by KWS in the UK (Harpenden) in the 2015/2016, 2016/2017 and 2017/2018 cropping seasons and at the leaf stage in field experiments run by KWS in Fehmarn (Germany) in the 2015/2016 and 2017/2018 cropping seasons, and in Einbeck (Germany) in the 2017/2018 cropping season.
2. Resistance/suscpeptibility to P. brassicae was examined on 140 genotypes in controlled environment experiments. The experiments were done in 5 replicates in an alpha randomised block design including 4 control/normalising genotypes.
3. GWAS was done to examine associations between gene loci and phenotypes of resistance to the light leaf spot pathogen obtained in two data sets from field experimetns in the UK and in Germany with up to 79 genetypes each in the 2015/2016 cropping season and in two data sets from field experiments in the UK with up to 154 genotypes each in the 2016/2017 cropping season.
GWAS was also done to examine associations between gene loci and resistant phenotypes of the light leaf spot pathogen on 140 genotypes examined for resistance/suscpeptibility to P. brassicae in controlled environment conditions.
4. Early defence responses, associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, were assessed in Brassica napus genotypes deferring in their responses to P. brassicae, in order to study PTI against the light leaf spot pathogen.
Exploitation Route Findings can be exploited by the industry partner in the consortium.
Sectors Agriculture, Food and Drink

 
Description Partners in this project are keen to encourage the next generation of scientists, and have established a schools programme that enables schoolchildren to become involved in our work. Networks of schools throughout Europe have been established, and OSR seeds have been distributed to them. The children are measuring growth and disease resistance characteristics, and contributing important data to our research. Our research will lead to more sustainable production of OSR, with higher productivity through lower vulnerability to biotic stress and less reliance on chemical inputs.
First Year Of Impact 2017
Sector Agriculture, Food and Drink,Education
Impact Types Societal,Economic

 
Description Influence on Chinese government policy in relation to import of oilseed rape seed from other countries
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Implementation circular/rapid advice/letter to e.g. Ministry of Health
Impact In response to our work, in November 2009 the Chinese government issued a quarantine measure restricting import of oilseed rape seed to ports in regions without the crop, unless seed was certified free from the pathogen Leptosphaeria maculans. This pathogen causes phoma stem canker, a serious disease of oilseed rape. The Chinese decision to protect its crops from this invasive species affected trade with Canada and Australia, and thus to intergovernmental discussions. Our recommendations to prevent entry of the pathogen that have been implemented by China include testing imported seed, surveying crops and training farmers to recognise disease symptoms.Subsequently, recommendations about the risks of crop debris (dockage) in seed cargoes has resulted in discussions between China and Canada, resulting in a high level agreement witnessed by the two prime ministers.
URL https://www.reuters.com/article/canada-china-canola-idUSL2N1BY1A0
 
Description Analysis of early resistance against oilseed rape pathogens 
Organisation John Innes Centre
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Uh is a partner in a project led by John Innes Centre, with partners in Germany (univ Goettingen, KWS), Poland (University Lodz), Denmark(Copenhagen Univ), Netherlands (Wageningen). UH is involved in field and controlled environment experiments studying early stage resistance of brassicas against pathogens causing phoma stem canker and light leaf spot.
Collaborator Contribution Oilseed rape (OSR, Brassica napus L.) is a major crop grown worldwide for production of edible and industrial oil, biodiesel and protein containing animal feed. Diseases are a major factor limiting production, a threat increasing due to climate change and the imminent withdrawal of agrochemicals in Europe. Improved disease control is an urgent priority and for this breeders are increasingly using quantitative disease resistance (QDR) which is considered broad-spectrum and durable. the consortium is identifying and characterising QDR to the most important pathogens of OSR: Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, Verticillium spp, Leptosphaeria maculans, Alternaria brassicicola, Pyrenopeziza brassicae, and the model pathogens Pseudomonas syringae and Botrytis cinerea. We are using a panel of 192 diverse OSR cultivars to screen for resistance against these pathogens in controlled environments and at field trial sites provided by our industrial partner, KWS. We are also quantifying induced defence responses to conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and measuring salicylic acid, lignin, phenylpropanoid, glucosinolate and indole metabolites that are implicated in QDR mechanisms. By combining this data with transcribed sequence information, we are identifying candidate genes involved with defence responses and QDR to the OSR pathogens. We are also studying specific transporter genes GTR1 and GTR2 that control the allocation of glucosinolates to seeds and may impact on QDR.
Impact Mitrousia GK, Fell H, Gibbard C, Ridout CJ, Schoonbeek HJ, Stotz HU, Fitt BDL (2017) Potential identification of novel sources of resistance to pathogens in a Brassica diversity panel. Crop Production in Southern Britain. Aspects of Applied Biology 134, 213-219. Mitrousia G, Huang YJ, Noel K, Stotz H, Larkan N, Borhan H, Fitt B (2016) Effects of increased temperature on B. napus resistance against Leptosphaeria maculans. Abstracts. Brassica 2016, 3-7 October 2016, Melbourne, Australia, p. 93.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Analysis of early resistance against oilseed rape pathogens 
Organisation KWS Group
Country Germany 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Uh is a partner in a project led by John Innes Centre, with partners in Germany (univ Goettingen, KWS), Poland (University Lodz), Denmark(Copenhagen Univ), Netherlands (Wageningen). UH is involved in field and controlled environment experiments studying early stage resistance of brassicas against pathogens causing phoma stem canker and light leaf spot.
Collaborator Contribution Oilseed rape (OSR, Brassica napus L.) is a major crop grown worldwide for production of edible and industrial oil, biodiesel and protein containing animal feed. Diseases are a major factor limiting production, a threat increasing due to climate change and the imminent withdrawal of agrochemicals in Europe. Improved disease control is an urgent priority and for this breeders are increasingly using quantitative disease resistance (QDR) which is considered broad-spectrum and durable. the consortium is identifying and characterising QDR to the most important pathogens of OSR: Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, Verticillium spp, Leptosphaeria maculans, Alternaria brassicicola, Pyrenopeziza brassicae, and the model pathogens Pseudomonas syringae and Botrytis cinerea. We are using a panel of 192 diverse OSR cultivars to screen for resistance against these pathogens in controlled environments and at field trial sites provided by our industrial partner, KWS. We are also quantifying induced defence responses to conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and measuring salicylic acid, lignin, phenylpropanoid, glucosinolate and indole metabolites that are implicated in QDR mechanisms. By combining this data with transcribed sequence information, we are identifying candidate genes involved with defence responses and QDR to the OSR pathogens. We are also studying specific transporter genes GTR1 and GTR2 that control the allocation of glucosinolates to seeds and may impact on QDR.
Impact Mitrousia GK, Fell H, Gibbard C, Ridout CJ, Schoonbeek HJ, Stotz HU, Fitt BDL (2017) Potential identification of novel sources of resistance to pathogens in a Brassica diversity panel. Crop Production in Southern Britain. Aspects of Applied Biology 134, 213-219. Mitrousia G, Huang YJ, Noel K, Stotz H, Larkan N, Borhan H, Fitt B (2016) Effects of increased temperature on B. napus resistance against Leptosphaeria maculans. Abstracts. Brassica 2016, 3-7 October 2016, Melbourne, Australia, p. 93.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Analysis of early resistance against oilseed rape pathogens 
Organisation University of Copenhagen
Country Denmark 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Uh is a partner in a project led by John Innes Centre, with partners in Germany (univ Goettingen, KWS), Poland (University Lodz), Denmark(Copenhagen Univ), Netherlands (Wageningen). UH is involved in field and controlled environment experiments studying early stage resistance of brassicas against pathogens causing phoma stem canker and light leaf spot.
Collaborator Contribution Oilseed rape (OSR, Brassica napus L.) is a major crop grown worldwide for production of edible and industrial oil, biodiesel and protein containing animal feed. Diseases are a major factor limiting production, a threat increasing due to climate change and the imminent withdrawal of agrochemicals in Europe. Improved disease control is an urgent priority and for this breeders are increasingly using quantitative disease resistance (QDR) which is considered broad-spectrum and durable. the consortium is identifying and characterising QDR to the most important pathogens of OSR: Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, Verticillium spp, Leptosphaeria maculans, Alternaria brassicicola, Pyrenopeziza brassicae, and the model pathogens Pseudomonas syringae and Botrytis cinerea. We are using a panel of 192 diverse OSR cultivars to screen for resistance against these pathogens in controlled environments and at field trial sites provided by our industrial partner, KWS. We are also quantifying induced defence responses to conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and measuring salicylic acid, lignin, phenylpropanoid, glucosinolate and indole metabolites that are implicated in QDR mechanisms. By combining this data with transcribed sequence information, we are identifying candidate genes involved with defence responses and QDR to the OSR pathogens. We are also studying specific transporter genes GTR1 and GTR2 that control the allocation of glucosinolates to seeds and may impact on QDR.
Impact Mitrousia GK, Fell H, Gibbard C, Ridout CJ, Schoonbeek HJ, Stotz HU, Fitt BDL (2017) Potential identification of novel sources of resistance to pathogens in a Brassica diversity panel. Crop Production in Southern Britain. Aspects of Applied Biology 134, 213-219. Mitrousia G, Huang YJ, Noel K, Stotz H, Larkan N, Borhan H, Fitt B (2016) Effects of increased temperature on B. napus resistance against Leptosphaeria maculans. Abstracts. Brassica 2016, 3-7 October 2016, Melbourne, Australia, p. 93.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Analysis of early resistance against oilseed rape pathogens 
Organisation University of Göttingen
Country Germany 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Uh is a partner in a project led by John Innes Centre, with partners in Germany (univ Goettingen, KWS), Poland (University Lodz), Denmark(Copenhagen Univ), Netherlands (Wageningen). UH is involved in field and controlled environment experiments studying early stage resistance of brassicas against pathogens causing phoma stem canker and light leaf spot.
Collaborator Contribution Oilseed rape (OSR, Brassica napus L.) is a major crop grown worldwide for production of edible and industrial oil, biodiesel and protein containing animal feed. Diseases are a major factor limiting production, a threat increasing due to climate change and the imminent withdrawal of agrochemicals in Europe. Improved disease control is an urgent priority and for this breeders are increasingly using quantitative disease resistance (QDR) which is considered broad-spectrum and durable. the consortium is identifying and characterising QDR to the most important pathogens of OSR: Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, Verticillium spp, Leptosphaeria maculans, Alternaria brassicicola, Pyrenopeziza brassicae, and the model pathogens Pseudomonas syringae and Botrytis cinerea. We are using a panel of 192 diverse OSR cultivars to screen for resistance against these pathogens in controlled environments and at field trial sites provided by our industrial partner, KWS. We are also quantifying induced defence responses to conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and measuring salicylic acid, lignin, phenylpropanoid, glucosinolate and indole metabolites that are implicated in QDR mechanisms. By combining this data with transcribed sequence information, we are identifying candidate genes involved with defence responses and QDR to the OSR pathogens. We are also studying specific transporter genes GTR1 and GTR2 that control the allocation of glucosinolates to seeds and may impact on QDR.
Impact Mitrousia GK, Fell H, Gibbard C, Ridout CJ, Schoonbeek HJ, Stotz HU, Fitt BDL (2017) Potential identification of novel sources of resistance to pathogens in a Brassica diversity panel. Crop Production in Southern Britain. Aspects of Applied Biology 134, 213-219. Mitrousia G, Huang YJ, Noel K, Stotz H, Larkan N, Borhan H, Fitt B (2016) Effects of increased temperature on B. napus resistance against Leptosphaeria maculans. Abstracts. Brassica 2016, 3-7 October 2016, Melbourne, Australia, p. 93.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Analysis of early resistance against oilseed rape pathogens 
Organisation University of Lodz
Country Poland 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Uh is a partner in a project led by John Innes Centre, with partners in Germany (univ Goettingen, KWS), Poland (University Lodz), Denmark(Copenhagen Univ), Netherlands (Wageningen). UH is involved in field and controlled environment experiments studying early stage resistance of brassicas against pathogens causing phoma stem canker and light leaf spot.
Collaborator Contribution Oilseed rape (OSR, Brassica napus L.) is a major crop grown worldwide for production of edible and industrial oil, biodiesel and protein containing animal feed. Diseases are a major factor limiting production, a threat increasing due to climate change and the imminent withdrawal of agrochemicals in Europe. Improved disease control is an urgent priority and for this breeders are increasingly using quantitative disease resistance (QDR) which is considered broad-spectrum and durable. the consortium is identifying and characterising QDR to the most important pathogens of OSR: Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, Verticillium spp, Leptosphaeria maculans, Alternaria brassicicola, Pyrenopeziza brassicae, and the model pathogens Pseudomonas syringae and Botrytis cinerea. We are using a panel of 192 diverse OSR cultivars to screen for resistance against these pathogens in controlled environments and at field trial sites provided by our industrial partner, KWS. We are also quantifying induced defence responses to conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and measuring salicylic acid, lignin, phenylpropanoid, glucosinolate and indole metabolites that are implicated in QDR mechanisms. By combining this data with transcribed sequence information, we are identifying candidate genes involved with defence responses and QDR to the OSR pathogens. We are also studying specific transporter genes GTR1 and GTR2 that control the allocation of glucosinolates to seeds and may impact on QDR.
Impact Mitrousia GK, Fell H, Gibbard C, Ridout CJ, Schoonbeek HJ, Stotz HU, Fitt BDL (2017) Potential identification of novel sources of resistance to pathogens in a Brassica diversity panel. Crop Production in Southern Britain. Aspects of Applied Biology 134, 213-219. Mitrousia G, Huang YJ, Noel K, Stotz H, Larkan N, Borhan H, Fitt B (2016) Effects of increased temperature on B. napus resistance against Leptosphaeria maculans. Abstracts. Brassica 2016, 3-7 October 2016, Melbourne, Australia, p. 93.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Analysis of early resistance against oilseed rape pathogens 
Organisation Wageningen University & Research
Country Netherlands 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Uh is a partner in a project led by John Innes Centre, with partners in Germany (univ Goettingen, KWS), Poland (University Lodz), Denmark(Copenhagen Univ), Netherlands (Wageningen). UH is involved in field and controlled environment experiments studying early stage resistance of brassicas against pathogens causing phoma stem canker and light leaf spot.
Collaborator Contribution Oilseed rape (OSR, Brassica napus L.) is a major crop grown worldwide for production of edible and industrial oil, biodiesel and protein containing animal feed. Diseases are a major factor limiting production, a threat increasing due to climate change and the imminent withdrawal of agrochemicals in Europe. Improved disease control is an urgent priority and for this breeders are increasingly using quantitative disease resistance (QDR) which is considered broad-spectrum and durable. the consortium is identifying and characterising QDR to the most important pathogens of OSR: Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, Verticillium spp, Leptosphaeria maculans, Alternaria brassicicola, Pyrenopeziza brassicae, and the model pathogens Pseudomonas syringae and Botrytis cinerea. We are using a panel of 192 diverse OSR cultivars to screen for resistance against these pathogens in controlled environments and at field trial sites provided by our industrial partner, KWS. We are also quantifying induced defence responses to conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and measuring salicylic acid, lignin, phenylpropanoid, glucosinolate and indole metabolites that are implicated in QDR mechanisms. By combining this data with transcribed sequence information, we are identifying candidate genes involved with defence responses and QDR to the OSR pathogens. We are also studying specific transporter genes GTR1 and GTR2 that control the allocation of glucosinolates to seeds and may impact on QDR.
Impact Mitrousia GK, Fell H, Gibbard C, Ridout CJ, Schoonbeek HJ, Stotz HU, Fitt BDL (2017) Potential identification of novel sources of resistance to pathogens in a Brassica diversity panel. Crop Production in Southern Britain. Aspects of Applied Biology 134, 213-219. Mitrousia G, Huang YJ, Noel K, Stotz H, Larkan N, Borhan H, Fitt B (2016) Effects of increased temperature on B. napus resistance against Leptosphaeria maculans. Abstracts. Brassica 2016, 3-7 October 2016, Melbourne, Australia, p. 93.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Integrated control of Leptosphaeria pathogens on UK oilseed rape 
Organisation DuPont
Department DuPont (UK) Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Phoma stem canker is a major disease of oilseed rape in the UK, causing yield losses > £100M p.a. The disease is caused by two related pathogens that attack in different ways: Leptosphaeria maculans (Lm) and L. biglobosa (Lb). Current control focuses only on Lm. Recent work showed that Lb can cause substantial yield losses and is less sensitive to some triazole fungicides than Lm. The pathogen Lb is a growing threat to UK oilseed rape production since no existing methods control it. This project will investigate stem canker epidemics caused by Lb and develop new tools/strategies to control them. To achieve this, we will (1) survey severity of phoma stem canker epidemics caused by Lb; (2) exploit new oilseed rape genomic data to identify genes for resistance against Lb; (3) determine efficacy of new non-triazole fungicides for control of both Lb and Lm; and (4) use Lb genomic information to investigate mechanisms of fungicide insensitivity in Lb; (5) develop new integrated control strategies.
Collaborator Contribution Partners are involved in field trials and consortium meetings
Impact Huang YJ, Cai X, Karandeni-Dewage CS, Gajula LH, Javaid A, Li GQ, Fitt BDL (2016). Understanding phoma stem canker epidemics caused by Leptosphaeria biglobosa in the UK and China. Abstracts. Brassica 2016, 3-7 October 2016, Melbourne, Australia, p. 43. Javaid A, Gajula H, Fitt BDL, Huang YJ (2017) Investigating the risk of severe phoma stem canker caused by Leptosphaeria biglobosa on winter oilseed rape in UK. Crop Production in Southern Britain. Aspects of Applied Biology 134, 53-57.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Integrated control of Leptosphaeria pathogens on UK oilseed rape 
Organisation Grove Farm, UK
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Phoma stem canker is a major disease of oilseed rape in the UK, causing yield losses > £100M p.a. The disease is caused by two related pathogens that attack in different ways: Leptosphaeria maculans (Lm) and L. biglobosa (Lb). Current control focuses only on Lm. Recent work showed that Lb can cause substantial yield losses and is less sensitive to some triazole fungicides than Lm. The pathogen Lb is a growing threat to UK oilseed rape production since no existing methods control it. This project will investigate stem canker epidemics caused by Lb and develop new tools/strategies to control them. To achieve this, we will (1) survey severity of phoma stem canker epidemics caused by Lb; (2) exploit new oilseed rape genomic data to identify genes for resistance against Lb; (3) determine efficacy of new non-triazole fungicides for control of both Lb and Lm; and (4) use Lb genomic information to investigate mechanisms of fungicide insensitivity in Lb; (5) develop new integrated control strategies.
Collaborator Contribution Partners are involved in field trials and consortium meetings
Impact Huang YJ, Cai X, Karandeni-Dewage CS, Gajula LH, Javaid A, Li GQ, Fitt BDL (2016). Understanding phoma stem canker epidemics caused by Leptosphaeria biglobosa in the UK and China. Abstracts. Brassica 2016, 3-7 October 2016, Melbourne, Australia, p. 43. Javaid A, Gajula H, Fitt BDL, Huang YJ (2017) Investigating the risk of severe phoma stem canker caused by Leptosphaeria biglobosa on winter oilseed rape in UK. Crop Production in Southern Britain. Aspects of Applied Biology 134, 53-57.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Integrated control of Leptosphaeria pathogens on UK oilseed rape 
Organisation Hutchinson H L Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Phoma stem canker is a major disease of oilseed rape in the UK, causing yield losses > £100M p.a. The disease is caused by two related pathogens that attack in different ways: Leptosphaeria maculans (Lm) and L. biglobosa (Lb). Current control focuses only on Lm. Recent work showed that Lb can cause substantial yield losses and is less sensitive to some triazole fungicides than Lm. The pathogen Lb is a growing threat to UK oilseed rape production since no existing methods control it. This project will investigate stem canker epidemics caused by Lb and develop new tools/strategies to control them. To achieve this, we will (1) survey severity of phoma stem canker epidemics caused by Lb; (2) exploit new oilseed rape genomic data to identify genes for resistance against Lb; (3) determine efficacy of new non-triazole fungicides for control of both Lb and Lm; and (4) use Lb genomic information to investigate mechanisms of fungicide insensitivity in Lb; (5) develop new integrated control strategies.
Collaborator Contribution Partners are involved in field trials and consortium meetings
Impact Huang YJ, Cai X, Karandeni-Dewage CS, Gajula LH, Javaid A, Li GQ, Fitt BDL (2016). Understanding phoma stem canker epidemics caused by Leptosphaeria biglobosa in the UK and China. Abstracts. Brassica 2016, 3-7 October 2016, Melbourne, Australia, p. 43. Javaid A, Gajula H, Fitt BDL, Huang YJ (2017) Investigating the risk of severe phoma stem canker caused by Leptosphaeria biglobosa on winter oilseed rape in UK. Crop Production in Southern Britain. Aspects of Applied Biology 134, 53-57.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Integrated control of Leptosphaeria pathogens on UK oilseed rape 
Organisation Syntec Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Phoma stem canker is a major disease of oilseed rape in the UK, causing yield losses > £100M p.a. The disease is caused by two related pathogens that attack in different ways: Leptosphaeria maculans (Lm) and L. biglobosa (Lb). Current control focuses only on Lm. Recent work showed that Lb can cause substantial yield losses and is less sensitive to some triazole fungicides than Lm. The pathogen Lb is a growing threat to UK oilseed rape production since no existing methods control it. This project will investigate stem canker epidemics caused by Lb and develop new tools/strategies to control them. To achieve this, we will (1) survey severity of phoma stem canker epidemics caused by Lb; (2) exploit new oilseed rape genomic data to identify genes for resistance against Lb; (3) determine efficacy of new non-triazole fungicides for control of both Lb and Lm; and (4) use Lb genomic information to investigate mechanisms of fungicide insensitivity in Lb; (5) develop new integrated control strategies.
Collaborator Contribution Partners are involved in field trials and consortium meetings
Impact Huang YJ, Cai X, Karandeni-Dewage CS, Gajula LH, Javaid A, Li GQ, Fitt BDL (2016). Understanding phoma stem canker epidemics caused by Leptosphaeria biglobosa in the UK and China. Abstracts. Brassica 2016, 3-7 October 2016, Melbourne, Australia, p. 43. Javaid A, Gajula H, Fitt BDL, Huang YJ (2017) Investigating the risk of severe phoma stem canker caused by Leptosphaeria biglobosa on winter oilseed rape in UK. Crop Production in Southern Britain. Aspects of Applied Biology 134, 53-57.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Integrated control of Leptosphaeria pathogens on UK oilseed rape 
Organisation Weston Park Farm
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Phoma stem canker is a major disease of oilseed rape in the UK, causing yield losses > £100M p.a. The disease is caused by two related pathogens that attack in different ways: Leptosphaeria maculans (Lm) and L. biglobosa (Lb). Current control focuses only on Lm. Recent work showed that Lb can cause substantial yield losses and is less sensitive to some triazole fungicides than Lm. The pathogen Lb is a growing threat to UK oilseed rape production since no existing methods control it. This project will investigate stem canker epidemics caused by Lb and develop new tools/strategies to control them. To achieve this, we will (1) survey severity of phoma stem canker epidemics caused by Lb; (2) exploit new oilseed rape genomic data to identify genes for resistance against Lb; (3) determine efficacy of new non-triazole fungicides for control of both Lb and Lm; and (4) use Lb genomic information to investigate mechanisms of fungicide insensitivity in Lb; (5) develop new integrated control strategies.
Collaborator Contribution Partners are involved in field trials and consortium meetings
Impact Huang YJ, Cai X, Karandeni-Dewage CS, Gajula LH, Javaid A, Li GQ, Fitt BDL (2016). Understanding phoma stem canker epidemics caused by Leptosphaeria biglobosa in the UK and China. Abstracts. Brassica 2016, 3-7 October 2016, Melbourne, Australia, p. 43. Javaid A, Gajula H, Fitt BDL, Huang YJ (2017) Investigating the risk of severe phoma stem canker caused by Leptosphaeria biglobosa on winter oilseed rape in UK. Crop Production in Southern Britain. Aspects of Applied Biology 134, 53-57.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Strategies to increase durability of host resistance for effective control of phoma stem canker on oilseed rape 
Organisation Grainseed
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Phoma stem canker, caused by the fungal pathogen Leptosphaeria maculans, is a damaging disease on oilseed rape in the UK, causing annual yield losses > £100M despite use of fungicides. With recent loss of the most effective fungicides through EU legislation and predicted global warming, potential yield losses will increase. Use of host resistance to control this disease is becoming ever more important. However, new sources of resistance are often rendered ineffective due to pathogen population changes. This project will develop new control strategies to increase durability of host resistance. To achieve this, we will (1) monitor emergence of new virulent races of L. maculans; (2) investigate molecular mechanisms of mutation to virulence in L. maculans; (3) understand effects of environmental factors (e.g. temperature) on durability of resistance; (4) identify resistance genes that are durable by exploiting the most recent developments in pathogen and host genomics; (5) develop new targeted control strategies and deliver them to farmers. Effective control of this disease will save farmers £27M p.a., besides benefits to breeders, distributors and the environment.
Collaborator Contribution Partners are involved with field trials and attending consortium meetings
Impact Huang YJ, West JS, Mitrousia GK, Wood T, Bancroft I, Fitt BDL (2016) Identification of novel sources of pest and disease resistance in the UK OREGIN Brassica biodiversity collection. Abstracts. Brassica 2016, 3-7 October 2016, Melbourne, Australia, p. 151.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Strategies to increase durability of host resistance for effective control of phoma stem canker on oilseed rape 
Organisation Hutchinson H L Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Phoma stem canker, caused by the fungal pathogen Leptosphaeria maculans, is a damaging disease on oilseed rape in the UK, causing annual yield losses > £100M despite use of fungicides. With recent loss of the most effective fungicides through EU legislation and predicted global warming, potential yield losses will increase. Use of host resistance to control this disease is becoming ever more important. However, new sources of resistance are often rendered ineffective due to pathogen population changes. This project will develop new control strategies to increase durability of host resistance. To achieve this, we will (1) monitor emergence of new virulent races of L. maculans; (2) investigate molecular mechanisms of mutation to virulence in L. maculans; (3) understand effects of environmental factors (e.g. temperature) on durability of resistance; (4) identify resistance genes that are durable by exploiting the most recent developments in pathogen and host genomics; (5) develop new targeted control strategies and deliver them to farmers. Effective control of this disease will save farmers £27M p.a., besides benefits to breeders, distributors and the environment.
Collaborator Contribution Partners are involved with field trials and attending consortium meetings
Impact Huang YJ, West JS, Mitrousia GK, Wood T, Bancroft I, Fitt BDL (2016) Identification of novel sources of pest and disease resistance in the UK OREGIN Brassica biodiversity collection. Abstracts. Brassica 2016, 3-7 October 2016, Melbourne, Australia, p. 151.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Strategies to increase durability of host resistance for effective control of phoma stem canker on oilseed rape 
Organisation LS Plant Breeding
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Phoma stem canker, caused by the fungal pathogen Leptosphaeria maculans, is a damaging disease on oilseed rape in the UK, causing annual yield losses > £100M despite use of fungicides. With recent loss of the most effective fungicides through EU legislation and predicted global warming, potential yield losses will increase. Use of host resistance to control this disease is becoming ever more important. However, new sources of resistance are often rendered ineffective due to pathogen population changes. This project will develop new control strategies to increase durability of host resistance. To achieve this, we will (1) monitor emergence of new virulent races of L. maculans; (2) investigate molecular mechanisms of mutation to virulence in L. maculans; (3) understand effects of environmental factors (e.g. temperature) on durability of resistance; (4) identify resistance genes that are durable by exploiting the most recent developments in pathogen and host genomics; (5) develop new targeted control strategies and deliver them to farmers. Effective control of this disease will save farmers £27M p.a., besides benefits to breeders, distributors and the environment.
Collaborator Contribution Partners are involved with field trials and attending consortium meetings
Impact Huang YJ, West JS, Mitrousia GK, Wood T, Bancroft I, Fitt BDL (2016) Identification of novel sources of pest and disease resistance in the UK OREGIN Brassica biodiversity collection. Abstracts. Brassica 2016, 3-7 October 2016, Melbourne, Australia, p. 151.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Strategies to increase durability of host resistance for effective control of phoma stem canker on oilseed rape 
Organisation Limagrain
Country France 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Phoma stem canker, caused by the fungal pathogen Leptosphaeria maculans, is a damaging disease on oilseed rape in the UK, causing annual yield losses > £100M despite use of fungicides. With recent loss of the most effective fungicides through EU legislation and predicted global warming, potential yield losses will increase. Use of host resistance to control this disease is becoming ever more important. However, new sources of resistance are often rendered ineffective due to pathogen population changes. This project will develop new control strategies to increase durability of host resistance. To achieve this, we will (1) monitor emergence of new virulent races of L. maculans; (2) investigate molecular mechanisms of mutation to virulence in L. maculans; (3) understand effects of environmental factors (e.g. temperature) on durability of resistance; (4) identify resistance genes that are durable by exploiting the most recent developments in pathogen and host genomics; (5) develop new targeted control strategies and deliver them to farmers. Effective control of this disease will save farmers £27M p.a., besides benefits to breeders, distributors and the environment.
Collaborator Contribution Partners are involved with field trials and attending consortium meetings
Impact Huang YJ, West JS, Mitrousia GK, Wood T, Bancroft I, Fitt BDL (2016) Identification of novel sources of pest and disease resistance in the UK OREGIN Brassica biodiversity collection. Abstracts. Brassica 2016, 3-7 October 2016, Melbourne, Australia, p. 151.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Strategies to increase durability of host resistance for effective control of phoma stem canker on oilseed rape 
Organisation Monsanto
Department Monsanto
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Phoma stem canker, caused by the fungal pathogen Leptosphaeria maculans, is a damaging disease on oilseed rape in the UK, causing annual yield losses > £100M despite use of fungicides. With recent loss of the most effective fungicides through EU legislation and predicted global warming, potential yield losses will increase. Use of host resistance to control this disease is becoming ever more important. However, new sources of resistance are often rendered ineffective due to pathogen population changes. This project will develop new control strategies to increase durability of host resistance. To achieve this, we will (1) monitor emergence of new virulent races of L. maculans; (2) investigate molecular mechanisms of mutation to virulence in L. maculans; (3) understand effects of environmental factors (e.g. temperature) on durability of resistance; (4) identify resistance genes that are durable by exploiting the most recent developments in pathogen and host genomics; (5) develop new targeted control strategies and deliver them to farmers. Effective control of this disease will save farmers £27M p.a., besides benefits to breeders, distributors and the environment.
Collaborator Contribution Partners are involved with field trials and attending consortium meetings
Impact Huang YJ, West JS, Mitrousia GK, Wood T, Bancroft I, Fitt BDL (2016) Identification of novel sources of pest and disease resistance in the UK OREGIN Brassica biodiversity collection. Abstracts. Brassica 2016, 3-7 October 2016, Melbourne, Australia, p. 151.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Strategies to increase durability of host resistance for effective control of phoma stem canker on oilseed rape 
Organisation Woodhall Estate
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Phoma stem canker, caused by the fungal pathogen Leptosphaeria maculans, is a damaging disease on oilseed rape in the UK, causing annual yield losses > £100M despite use of fungicides. With recent loss of the most effective fungicides through EU legislation and predicted global warming, potential yield losses will increase. Use of host resistance to control this disease is becoming ever more important. However, new sources of resistance are often rendered ineffective due to pathogen population changes. This project will develop new control strategies to increase durability of host resistance. To achieve this, we will (1) monitor emergence of new virulent races of L. maculans; (2) investigate molecular mechanisms of mutation to virulence in L. maculans; (3) understand effects of environmental factors (e.g. temperature) on durability of resistance; (4) identify resistance genes that are durable by exploiting the most recent developments in pathogen and host genomics; (5) develop new targeted control strategies and deliver them to farmers. Effective control of this disease will save farmers £27M p.a., besides benefits to breeders, distributors and the environment.
Collaborator Contribution Partners are involved with field trials and attending consortium meetings
Impact Huang YJ, West JS, Mitrousia GK, Wood T, Bancroft I, Fitt BDL (2016) Identification of novel sources of pest and disease resistance in the UK OREGIN Brassica biodiversity collection. Abstracts. Brassica 2016, 3-7 October 2016, Melbourne, Australia, p. 151.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Understanding interactions between fungal pathogens Leptosphaeria maculans (phoma stem canker) and Pyrenopeziza brassicae (light leaf spot) on Brassica napus (oilseed rape) 
Organisation Chadacre Agricultural Trust
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Our research team has provided the Principal Supervisor and Second Supervisors for this Hertfordshire Knowledge Exchange PhD project . The student (James Fortune) has spent the first year based with ADAS at Boxworth and is now spending the remaining three years doing his PhD at the University of Hertfordshire.
Collaborator Contribution The industry partner RSK ADAS supervised the work done by the student (supervisor Dr Faye Ritchie) and regularly attend project meetings to assess progress of the project. The two agricultural charities have provided funding for the project and attend meetings from time to time.
Impact The student James Fortune has presented work done in this project at several scientific conferences, both in the UK (eg British Society of Plant Pathology conference, Sept 2019) and overseas (International Society of PLant Pathology Congress, Boston, USA, July 2018). His work is also featuring in a book to be published to celebrate the centenary of the Chadacre Agricultural Trust.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Understanding interactions between fungal pathogens Leptosphaeria maculans (phoma stem canker) and Pyrenopeziza brassicae (light leaf spot) on Brassica napus (oilseed rape) 
Organisation Felix Cobbold Trust
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Our research team has provided the Principal Supervisor and Second Supervisors for this Hertfordshire Knowledge Exchange PhD project . The student (James Fortune) has spent the first year based with ADAS at Boxworth and is now spending the remaining three years doing his PhD at the University of Hertfordshire.
Collaborator Contribution The industry partner RSK ADAS supervised the work done by the student (supervisor Dr Faye Ritchie) and regularly attend project meetings to assess progress of the project. The two agricultural charities have provided funding for the project and attend meetings from time to time.
Impact The student James Fortune has presented work done in this project at several scientific conferences, both in the UK (eg British Society of Plant Pathology conference, Sept 2019) and overseas (International Society of PLant Pathology Congress, Boston, USA, July 2018). His work is also featuring in a book to be published to celebrate the centenary of the Chadacre Agricultural Trust.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Understanding interactions between fungal pathogens Leptosphaeria maculans (phoma stem canker) and Pyrenopeziza brassicae (light leaf spot) on Brassica napus (oilseed rape) 
Organisation RSK ADAS Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Our research team has provided the Principal Supervisor and Second Supervisors for this Hertfordshire Knowledge Exchange PhD project . The student (James Fortune) has spent the first year based with ADAS at Boxworth and is now spending the remaining three years doing his PhD at the University of Hertfordshire.
Collaborator Contribution The industry partner RSK ADAS supervised the work done by the student (supervisor Dr Faye Ritchie) and regularly attend project meetings to assess progress of the project. The two agricultural charities have provided funding for the project and attend meetings from time to time.
Impact The student James Fortune has presented work done in this project at several scientific conferences, both in the UK (eg British Society of Plant Pathology conference, Sept 2019) and overseas (International Society of PLant Pathology Congress, Boston, USA, July 2018). His work is also featuring in a book to be published to celebrate the centenary of the Chadacre Agricultural Trust.
Start Year 2017
 
Description 2. Hutchinsons Winter Farmer Technical Conference 'More Science - more yield', 19th November 2015, the East of England Showground, Peterborough, PE2 6XE. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Presented work at Stand at Hutchinson's Winter Technical Conference attended by several hundred farmers and members of the agricultural industry.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Agri-Tech East REAP Conference Today's knowledge meets tomorrow's technology, 7 Nov 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Attendance at Agri-Tech East conference where one of our students gave an invited presentation
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Brassica 2018, Crucifer Genetics Workshop, St Malo, France 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact International workshop to discuss Brassica genetics; presented talks and posters
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description British Society for Plant Pathology Presidential Meeting, Bristol, Sept 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The BSPP presidential meeting was attended by a group of staff/students from the University of Hertfordshire. The event provided an opportunity to present our work as oral presentations and posters. It also gave opportunities to interact with collaborators.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.bspp.org.uk/conferences/arms-race-evolution-of-plant-pathogens-and-their-hosts/
 
Description British Society for Plant Pathology conference, Warwick, Dec 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Attended British Society of Plant Pathology presidential conference, Warwick, with staff and post-graduate students from our group. Posters and oral presentations were made.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Cereals 2015, 10th - 11th June, The Old Rocket Site, Heath Lane, Boothby Graffoe, Lincolnshire. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Presentation of research at University of Hertfordshire stand at Cereals' 2015, an event attended by thousands of farmers and members of the agricultural industry, as well as politicians, press etc
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description GCIRC 15th International Rapeseed Congress, Berlin, June 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A group of staff/post-graduate students from the University of Hertfordshire attended this Congress and accompanying workshops. Our work was presented as oral presentations and posters. There were opportunities to interact with collaborators from around the world. I was part of the International Organising Committee and am a UK representative on GCIRC Council.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.irc2019-berlin.com/
 
Description Genetic Improvement Network Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Talk on Oilseed Rape Genetic Improvement Network at Workshop for stakeholders of all GINs, organised by Defra, Feb 22 "016, Norwich
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description International Congress of Plant Pathology, Boston, USA, July/Aug 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This was an international conference. Attended with other staff and post-grad students from our group. Presented work as posters.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description OREGIN stakeholders forum, Elsoms, Spalding, Lincs, Nov 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Meeting of Oilseed Rape Genetic Improvement Network stakeholder forum, attended by industry and academic members of OREGIN.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Stand at Cereals 2017, Boothby Graffoe, Lincolnshire 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Presented research at University of Hertfordshire stand at this event
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Stand at Cereals' 2018, Duxford, Cambs 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Participated in University of Hertfordshire stand at Cereals' 2018, June 13-14 2018. Event attended by 1000s of farmers and other members of the agricultural industry, mostly from the UK but some from overseas
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Stand at Hutchinson's winter farming conference, Kingsgate Conference Centre, Peterborough, 15 Nov 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Manned stand to present our research to farming audience
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Talk at event organised by Felix Cobbold Trust, November 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Talk at event organised by Felix Cobbold Charitable Trust, November 2015
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Talk. Arable crop disease control, climate change and food security. 30 Sept 2016; Hawkesbury Institute, University of Western Sydney, New South Wales, Australia 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Visit to Hawkesbury Institute to discuss collaboration which is now occurring
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Talk; Arable crop disease control, climate change and food security. 28 Sept 2016; University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Seminar at University of Western Australia which we visited to discuss collaboration
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Talks to U3A science groups in Watford and Hemel Hempstead, Herts, Sept/Oct 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Talks about arable crop diseases, climate change and food security to U3A science groups in Watford (60 participants) and Hemel Hempstead (40 participants).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018