Targeted Drug Delivery to the Cornea of the Eye Via Thin-Film Slow Release Technology.

Lead Research Organisation: Cardiff University
Department Name: Optometry and Vision Sciences

Abstract

Getting a drug to where it is needed is essential if it is to be efficient. Some drugs are effective when injected into the bloodstream or taken as tablets. For the cornea at the front of the eye, drugs can also be applied as eye drops. The problem with this, however, is that eye drops flow away from the cornea and end up under the eyelid or in the nasal passage. Thus, the drug in the eye drop is not active where it is needed. To overcome this problem we will bind drugs to thin films, which will be a bit like contact lenses. But the binding of the drug will not be tight. This means that when the film is worn like a contact lens the drug is steadily released into the cornea, exactly where it is needed. A special type of drug called a ROCK inhibitor can help damaged cells in the cornea recover. And because of this we will use a ROCK inhibitor as the drug in our new contact lens-type films, to establish how it is released into the cornea in a more targeted manner than with eye drops.

Publications

10 25 50
 
Description How we can load various thin films and contact lenses with various antimicrobial drugs for targeted slow release delivery.
Exploitation Route Commercialization of medicated contact lenses by the industry. We have established a collaboration and NDA with Thea Pharmaceuticals to take this work forward as part of a Super Follow on Fund sponsored by BBSRC.
Sectors Healthcare,Pharmaceuticals and Medical Biotechnology

 
Description BBSRC Japan Partnering Award
Amount £46,000 (GBP)
Funding ID BB/R021244/1 
Organisation Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2018 
End 03/2021
 
Description Thea collaboration 
Organisation Thea Pharmaceuticals Ltd
PI Contribution Developing new drug delivery technology with commercial medical partner of contact lens drug delivery research
Collaborator Contribution Expertise in contact lens manufacture and sales
Impact NDA signed for new grant application
Start Year 2017
 
Title Japanese Patent Application No 2014-529066 Non-Evasive Therapy for Corneal Endothelial Dysfunction 
Description The development of a cryoprobe for transcorneal freezing including study of corneal structure-function relationships and freeze-injury changes based on our knowledge of corneal biology. Japanese Patent Application granted under the Patent No 6104249 on 10 March 2017. Prof Andrew Quantock, inventor 
IP Reference WO2013034907 
Protection Patent granted
Year Protection Granted 2017
Licensed No
Impact Pending
 
Description Melissa Granada 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Melissa Hewitt, Peter Morrison, Andrew Quantock, Charles M Heard. Enhanced Ocular Delivery of Chlorhexidine Using Loaded Contact Lenses. 11th World Meeting on Pharmaceutics, Biopharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Technology 19 March to 22 March 2018, Granada, Spain
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Peter Granada 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Peter Morrison, Melissa Hewitt, Andrew Quantock, Charles M Heard. Ocular Drug Delivery using Soluble, non-Soluble Polymer films and Hydrogel Contact Lenses. 11th World Meeting on Pharmaceutics, Biopharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Technology 19 March to 22 March 2018, Granada, Spain
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018