Nano- and Micro-scale Integration of Glass-on-Semiconductor for Photonic Components Engineering

Lead Research Organisation: University of Cambridge
Department Name: Engineering

Abstract

The proposed Basic Technology project aims to achieve a quantum leap in integration techniques for photonic devices by developing and using a range of micro- and nano-scale engineering tools for chemically dissimilar photonic materials; e.g. the glass-based materials with inorganic semiconductors. We anticipate that new tools will have a major impact on existing and emerging photonic components space used from ultra-violet to mid-IR. Potential applications, which we aim to demonstrate, are in signal processing for telecommunications, mid-IR sources and chemical and biological sensor technology, bio-photonics and imaging, space exploration and environment monitoring, data storage, security and military. The Basic Technology consortium comprises of 4 thematic areas / Materials Engineering and passive waveguide devices, Optoelectronic pump sources, Active Devices, and Applications. Complementary research for these 4 areas brings together a multi-disciplinary team encompassing Materials, Optics and Laser Physics, Optoelectronic and Photonic Devices, and the Medical Science and Chemicals Technology. Internationally well-known academic expertise from Leeds (IMR, IMP), Sheffield (EE), Cambridge (Photonic Systems), Heriot-Watt (Nonlinear Optics) and St.Andrews (Physics and Bute Medical School) Universities will demonstrate the key objectives, derived from the photonic integration of glass and inorganic semiconductor materials. The Basic Technology Programme is led by the University of Leeds and is supported by partners from industry, namely BP Chemicals, Renishaw, GlaxoSmithKline, QinetiQ, and NASA Langley (VA, USA).
 
Description This basic technology grant explored the integration of dissimilar optical materials in novel photonic devices that can be used in optical communication and sensing applications. The research was focussed on the integration of active glasses (glasses doped with rare earths) and carbon nanotubes with optical fibres and polymer waveguides. Key findings include the development of photonic waveguide engineering methods using pulsed laser sources, the formation of glass-polymer superlattices with good optical properties and the development of high-power mode-locked fibre lasers using carbon nanotubes. We anticipate that new micro- and nano-scale engineering tools that have been developed through this grant will have a major impact on existing and emerging photonic components space used from ultra-violet to mid-IR range. Potential applications for such devices are in signal processing for telecommunications, mid-IR sources and chemical and biological sensor technology, bio-photonics and imaging, space exploration and environment monitoring, data storage, security and military.
Exploitation Route The nano- and micro-fabrication and device engineering methods developed through this grant can enable the cost-effective formation of novel photonic devices for use in a wide range of applications. The project has been therefore of great interest to the relevant industry and has been supported by numerous industrial partners, namely BP Chemicals, Renishaw, GlaxoSmithKline, QinetiQ, and NASA Langley (VA, USA), which
can benefit from project outcomes in their field.
Sectors Aerospace, Defence and Marine,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Electronics,Environment,Manufacturing, including Industrial Biotechology

URL http://www.trivisage.com/photons/index.html
 
Description The Cambridge part of this project was to develop very high gain glass based lasers and amplifiers, and then to combine gain materials into polymer hosts. This was mainly carried out with the University of Leeds as the materials provider and Cambridge carrying out the device and systems research. The findings of this project have been disseminated in journal articles and reported in related conferences. Moreover, they have been used to secure further funding to continue the research in the area. We have been successful (with Leeds, Sheffield, York) in a £2.5M bid to the Advanced Functional Materials Manufacturing call ;
First Year Of Impact 2006
Sector Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Manufacturing, including Industrial Biotechology
Impact Types Economic

 
Description EPSRC
Amount £220,000 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/H00274X/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2010 
End 12/2012
 
Description Ultrafast Laser Plasma Implantation- Seamless Integration of Functional Materials for Advanced Photonics
Amount £2,484,937 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/M015165/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2015 
End 03/2020