Cavity-mediated cooling using nanostructured surfaces

Lead Research Organisation: University of Southampton
Department Name: School of Physics and Astronomy

Abstract

Cavity-mediated cooling has emerged as the only general technique with the potential to cool molecular species down to the microkelvin temperatures needed for quantum coherence and degeneracy. The EuroQUAM CMMC project will link leading theoreticians and experimentalists, including the technique's inventors and experimental pioneers, to develop it into a truly practical technique, reinforcing European leadership in this field. Four major experiments will explore a spectrum of complementary configurations and cavity-mediated cooling will be applied to molecules for the first time; a comprehensive theoretical programme will meanwhile examine the underlying mechanisms and identify the optimal route to practicality. The close connections between theory and experiment, and between pathfinding and underpinning studies, will allow each to guide and inform the others, ensuring that cavity-mediated cooling is swiftly developed as a broad enabling technology for new realms of quantum coherent molecular physics and chemistry.The Southampton component will address, both experimentally and theoretically, fundamental aspects of the cooling process that result from the retarded interaction of a trapped molecule with its reflection in a single mirror, and developments of this prototype scheme that exploit nanostructured mirror arrays that can be produced in our fabrication facilities, and which show both geometric and plasmonic resonances. Our particular aims are hence to understand and explore the most basic version of cavity-mediated cooling, and to develop new implementations suitable for nanoscale integration as a future technology.

Publications

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Bateman J (2010) Stimulated Raman transitions via multiple atomic levels in Physical Review A

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Cooper N (2013) Trapping of 85 Rb atoms by optical pumping between metastable hyperfine states in Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics

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Horak P (2010) Optical Cooling of Atoms in Microtraps by Time-Delayed Reflection in Journal of Computational and Theoretical Nanoscience

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P. Domokos (Author) (2011) Efficient optomechanical cooling in one-dimensional interferometers in Proceedings- Spie the International Society for Optical Engineering

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Peter Horak (Author) (2010) Optical Cooling of Atoms in Microtraps by Time-Delayed Reflection in Journal of Computational and Theoretical Nanoscience

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Xuereb A (2010) Optomechanical cooling with generalized interferometers. in Physical review letters

 
Description Cavity-mediated cooling has emerged as the only general technique with the potential to cool molecular species down to the microkelvin temperatures needed for quantum coherence and degeneracy. The EuroQUAM CMMC project has linked leading theoreticians and experimentalists, including the technique's inventors and experimental pioneers, to develop it into a truly practical technique, reinforcing European leadership in this field. Four major experiments continue to explore a spectrum of complementary configurations, and cavity-mediated cooling will soon be applied to molecules for the first time; a comprehensive theoretical programme has meanwhile examined the underlying mechanisms and identified the optimal routes to practicality. The close connections between theory and experiment, and between pathfinding and underpinning studies, have allowed each to guide and inform the others, ensuring that cavity-mediated cooling is swiftly developed as a broad enabling technology for new realms of quantum coherent molecular physics and chemistry. The Southampton component aimed to address, both experimentally and theoretically, fundamental aspects of the cooling process that result from the retarded interaction of a trapped molecule with its reflection in a single mirror, and developments of this prototype scheme that exploit nanostructured mirror arrays that can be produced in our fabrication facilities, and which show both geometric and plasmonic resonances. Our particular aims have been to understand and explore the most basic version of cavity-mediated cooling, and to develop new implementations suitable for nanoscale integration as a future technology. Our studies have explored cavity-mediated cooling, and its generic prototype of 'mirror-mediated cooling', through classical, semi-classical and classical optics approaches, allowing the investigation of a wide variety of configurations and enhancements as well as a the development of a profound understanding of the underlying mechanisms from a range of viewpoints. As a result, we have been able both to contribute to the understanding of cavity-mediated cooling itself, and to propose and evaluate a range of related schemes, including the use of external resonators, loop feedback and optical gain. Of particular interest has been the extension of these schemes to the cooling of microfabricated optomechanical structures and mechanisms. Optomechanics has emerged as a high-level research topic worldwide during the course of our project, and we have been quick to extend our cavity cooling work into this area.
Exploitation Route The extension of laser cooling to a wider variety of species potentially allows greater control of atomic and molecular reagents, with implications for studies and control of chemical reactions and synthesis. Combined with trapping near nanostructured surfaces, it could enhance the sensitivity of chemical and isotopic detection. Applied to micromechanical systems, our cooling techniques could increase the sensitivity of MEMS-style accelerometers, gyroscopes and electric/magnetic field detectors. These techniques will be of direct interest to others studying and developing optomechanically cooled and trapped species and samples for spectroscopy, quantum physics, inertial and electromagnetic sensing, quantum information processing, and investigation of the quantum-classical transition.
Sectors Aerospace/ Defence and Marine,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software)

URL http://phyweb.phys.soton.ac.uk/quantum/
 
Description Harvard University 
Organisation Harvard University
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
Start Year 2007
 
Description Institute of Photonic Sciences 
Organisation ICFO - The Institute of Photonic Sciences
Country Spain 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
Start Year 2007
 
Description Ludwig Maximilians University Munich 
Organisation Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich (LMU Munich)
Country Germany 
Sector Academic/University 
Start Year 2007
 
Description Max Planck Inst for Quantum Optics 
Organisation Max Planck Society
Department Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics
Country Germany 
Sector Academic/University 
Start Year 2007
 
Description Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona 
Organisation Autonomous University of Barcelona (UAB)
Country Spain 
Sector Academic/University 
Start Year 2007
 
Description University of Arhus 
Organisation Aarhus University
Country Denmark 
Sector Academic/University 
Start Year 2007