Theory and Tools for Complex Biological Systems

Lead Research Organisation: University of Strathclyde
Department Name: Mathematics and Statistics

Abstract

There are many circumstances in real life where patterns of connecitivityare important. For example, to understand how a disease may spread around a population,how a virus may spread around a computer network or how signals are passed around the brain, wemust have some idea of the `wiring' between components. By studying the typicalpatterns in many real life networks, including data concerning connectivity between brain neurons, computers, web pages, people, co-authors and telephone users, scientistshave discovered common features that seem to be universal. Also, they have come upwith rules that appear to govern the development of real life networks. Often, it is necessary to summarize such an enormously complex set of information, perhaps byfinding clusters of objects that behave similarly or by ordering the objects in a natrual manner,so that neighbours have similar features.This project will develop new computational tools for organizing large data sets and for explaining the patterens of connectivity that are observed. To give the work a firm grounding, all ideas will be tested on real, cutting-edge data concerning the behaviour of genes and proteinsin the cell. This aspect of the project work will be done in close collaboration with colleagues from the life sciences, notably cancer researchers from the Beatson Institute in Glasgow. These colleagues will help us to formulate the right questions. Further, after we have designed the new computational algorithms, these colleagues will also help us to interpret the answers. Any new findings in this important biological application could have direct benfits to healthcare and drug design.

Publications

10 25 50

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Dawson N (2014) Subanesthetic ketamine treatment promotes abnormal interactions between neural subsystems and alters the properties of functional brain networks. in Neuropsychopharmacology : official publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology

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Estrada E (2009) Communicability betweenness in complex networks in Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications

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Grindrod P (2009) Periodic reordering in IMA Journal of Numerical Analysis

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Grindrod P (2009) Evolving graphs: dynamical models, inverse problems and propagation in Proceedings of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences

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Intep S (2009) Switching and Diffusion Models for Gene Regulation Networks in Multiscale Modeling & Simulation

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Kuchaiev O (2009) Geometric de-noising of protein-protein interaction networks. in PLoS computational biology

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Taylor A (2009) CONTEST A Controllable Test Matrix Toolbox for MATLAB in ACM Transactions on Mathematical Software

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Taylor A (2011) Discovering bipartite substructure in directed networks in LMS Journal of Computation and Mathematics

 
Description New techniques for discovering communities and other structures in large scale biological networks
Exploitation Route Spectral clustering and its use in bioinformatics
DJ Higham, G Kalna, M Kibble
Journal of computational and applied mathematics 204 (1), 25-37 has 100 academic citations on Google Scholar.
This work also led naturally into our work on large scale technological networks:
EP/1016058/1
Sectors Healthcare,Pharmaceuticals and Medical Biotechnology

 
Description EPSRC
Amount £181,000 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/I016058/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start  
 
Description EPSRC
Amount £30,000 (GBP)
Funding ID RAIS at University of Strathclyde 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start  
 
Description Joint research with University of Bath 
Organisation University of Bath
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution University of Strathclyde researchers worked on this project with researchers from University of Bath
Start Year 2007