The Social Complexity of Immigration and Diversity

Lead Research Organisation: University of Manchester
Department Name: Social Sciences

Abstract

Ours has been dubbed the 'age of migration'. Immigration is a major political issue, with increasing media coverage, rising anti-immigration sentiment and the rise of anti-immigration political parties. The issue of migration sits centrally within the wider debate about ethnic and religious diversity and its effects on social cohesion. We are still, though, a long way from understanding these issues and their potential consequences. They seem to rest on beliefs about national identity and ethnicity, but cannot be divorced from the effects of social class, education, economic competition and inequality, as well as the influences of geographical and social segregation, social structures and institutions.This project will integrate the two very different disciplines, social science and complexity science, in order to gain new understanding of these complex, social issues. It will do this by building a series of computer simulation models of these social processes. One could think these as Serious Sims programmes that track the social interactions between many individuals. Such simulations allow 'what if' experiments to be performed so that a deeper understanding of the possible outcomes for the society as a whole can be established based on the interactions of many individuals. A difficulty with the computer simulation of complex systems is that if they are made realistic (in the sense of how people actually behave) it becomes very complex, which makes the simulation hard to understand, whilst if they are made simple enough to understand they can be too abstract to mean anything useful in terms of real people. This project aims to get around this by making chains of related models, starting with a complex, 'descriptive' model and then simplifying in stages, so that each simulation is a model of the one below it. The simpler models help us understand what is going on in the more complex ones. The more complex models reveal in what ways the simpler ones are accurate as well as the ways they over-simplify. In this way this project will combine the relevance of social science with the rigour of the hard sciences, but at the cost of having to build, check and maintain whole chains of models.Building on an established collaboration between social and complexity scientists in Manchester, this project will integrate the two disciplines to produce new insights, techniques and approaches for policy makers and their advisors. However this will require both the complexity and social scientists to develop new techniques. The complexity scientists will develop new families of computer models that capture several aspects of society in one simulation, including: how the membership of different groups, origins, classes, etc. are signalled by people (e.g. the way they dress, or their attitudes); the advantages and disadvantages of belonging to several different social groups at the same time; how different but parallel social networks might relate to each other; and how the views of people on specific issues might change in response to their friends, wider group and even politicians. The social scientists will develop ways of relating these kinds of models to the rich sources of social data that are available, and will collect additional social data where these sources prove inadequate. They will also ensure that the modelling results are interpreted meaningfully and usefully, in particular in ensuring that they are not over-interpreted. By bringing together the social science evidence, the layers of simulation models and the combined expertise of the researchers this project aims to make real progress in understanding the complex, important yet sensitive issues surrounding the processes that underlie the effects of immigration and diversity on social cohesion and integration. From the beginning it will involve policy experts and decision makers to help guide the project and ensure its relevance.

Planned Impact

This research programme will have impact in two areas. First, there will be an impact of the novel tools and methods for more established users of complexity science. Second, there is the impact of new insights into the social consequences of immigration and diversity. Most of the non-academic impact will be in these latter, policy-relevant areas. The TPG has a track record of advising on the application of complexity techniques to real-world issues, for example in ecological applications such as fisheries management and biodiversity. The CPM has applied agent-based simulation to domestic water usage and supply, influencing projects in Spain and Greece where this is now used to assess the possible impact of new developments. Its work on modelling a specific community in South Africa has had an impact on the understanding of managing patients with HIV/AIDS. These are examples of where we have alerted policy advisors to the potential power and utility of simulation and other complexity analyses for the explication of otherwise intractable issues. On the policy side, our ultimate aim is for SCID to ameliorate the economic and quality of life penalties that confront immigrant and minority groups, and to enhance the social cohesion and resilience of the wider population. How to improve social cohesion has been one of the major challenges to governments in industrial democracies. In the U.K. this has been a central feature of the policy agenda under the current government. We aim to achieve these goals via engagement with local and national government and their policy advisors. The ISC has an excellent track record of publicising its research in government and policy circles, for example with the National Employment Panel, the Cabinet Office and the Department of Communities and Local Government. ISC members also conduct research for government bodies including the Department of Work and Pensions, the Office for National Statistics and the Electoral Commission. We have good relations with these and other relevant bodies such as Equality and Human Rights Commission which we will draw upon. As well as national bodies the research will be of value to local government and community organisations. The ISC has links with local community networks, such as the Manchester Council for Community Relations, and our work with Manchester Beacons for Public Engagement will help provide the widest possible audience for our work and findings (www.rcuk.ac.uk/sis/beacons.htm). The ability of SCID to influence policy debate will be greatly enhanced by the ISC's close collaboration with Harvard University's Saguaro Seminar and its director Robert Putnam. This group is one of the world's leading influences on policy in the area of social capital and community building, and has been a major influence on politicians both sides of the Atlantic. SCID will use various methods to ensure our research reaches the relevant audiences. We will issue press releases as significant results emerge. ISC in particular has established good links with journalists working in the national media (e.g. the Guardian newspaper), and have a good track record in generating media interest. For example, a recent press release generated several national newspaper stories and a BBC radio 4 Today programme interview (see www.ageofobamabook.com). We will distribute an end of programme executive report to policymakers, which will have added impact because of the involvement of advisors from highly influential bodies such as the Equality and Human Rights Commission in SCID. Interim and final project reports will be hosted on project websites hosted by the collaborating universities. We will host an end of programme open meeting to present our findings to interested parties from the general public, local and national government, policy bodies and elsewhere. Presentations will be made non-technical and intelligible to an informed lay audience.

Publications

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Biancalani T (2015) The statistics of fixation times for systems with recruitment in Journal of Statistical Mechanics: Theory and Experiment

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Biancalani T (2012) Noise-induced metastability in biochemical networks. in Physical review. E, Statistical, nonlinear, and soft matter physics

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Caccioli F (2013) Voter models with conserved dynamics. in Physical review. E, Statistical, nonlinear, and soft matter physics

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Chattoe-Brown, E (2013) Simulating Social Complexity

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Constable G (2013) Stochastic dynamics on slow manifolds in Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical

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Deffuant G (2012) Data and models for exploring sustainability of human well-being in global environmental change in The European Physical Journal Special Topics

 
Description Modellers of complex biological or social systems are often faced with an invidious choice: to use simple models with few mechanisms that can be fully analysed, or to construct complicated models that include all the features which are thought relevant. The former ensures rigour, the latter relevance. We apply a method that combines these two approaches, beginning with a complex model and then modelling the complicated model with simpler models. The resulting chain" of models ensures some rigour and relevance. We illustrate this process on a complex model of voting intentions, constructing a reduced model which agrees well with the predictions of the full model. Experiments with variations of the simpler model yield additional insights which are hidden by the complexity of the full model. This approach facilitated collaboration between social scientists and physicists and the simpler model constrained to agree (in core aspects) with the complicated model. We believe that this approach can be applied to the analysis of other complex phenomena that cannot be adequately represented using a single simple model. The approach provides a structure to facilitate interdisciplinary collaborations between data-driven modelling, requiring a high level of detail, and an analytical approach, requiring simpler models that are more amenable to systematic analysis. In this way, insights obtained in the simpler models can be seen to be relevant to the more complicated models, and the systems they describe.

The more complex data integration models also provide an important tool for social science research and have delivered some key findings in a number of research domains. The voter turnout model is built on a theoretical model of turnout developed during the project. The model emphasises the social aspects of the turnout decision that stem from social norms, rational incentives including expressive benefits , habit and inter-personal mobilisation. The resultant agent based model has been used to test various aspects of voter turnout that are difficult to explore using conventional statistical approaches. For example, we explore the spill over or cascade effects of electoral mobilisation via secondary interpersonal mobilisation. We find that under a complex scenario cascade effects are smaller than previously thought. However, mobilisation effects can create secondary effects through habitual voting and increases in political interest and party affiliation, which reverberate over time, creating long-term spill over effects.
Examining the impact of immigration on turnout we find that the civic duty of immigrants has a significant short-term effect on levels of turnout in host country electorates, but this impact quickly dissipates as the turnout patterns of immigrant groups (and their descendants) converges with the local norm. In an investigation of habit effects we demonstrate how an incremental model of habit performs better than on based on simple threshold effects (e.g. a three election rule of thumb as used in the literature), and that based on such an incremental model of habit formation, low salience elections can reduce turnout in subsequent high salience elections.
With the inter-marriage model, we investigated the processes of partnering in diverse communities, focusing on individual preferences, opportunities for contact, and group size to uncover how these may lead to differing rates of inter-ethnic marriage. Results indicate that, in line with existing evidence, diversity (especially in areas with low ethnic homogeneity) fosters higher rates of inter-ethnic marriage. However, this is strongly mediated by group size, network types, and the extent of search ranges. Work on the impact of changing preferences for ethnicity and education showed that different types of preferences in mate choice appear to have an impact on inter-ethnic partnerships and partnerships in general, much in line with theoretical expectations. It also suggests that different types of areas (in terms of diversity) may foster different types of preference in partner choice.
The aim of the immigration model was to construct a simulation model of migratory decisions that embeds specific ideas within the migration literature, selectivity (skills levels of people moving) and barriers to entry (restrictions to movement), and test the impact of these acknowledged important drivers of migratory decisions for agents of specific national. We focussed on a migratory decision process based on the theory planned behaviour, where agents develop an interest in migration, but are also presented with opportunities to migrate and then decide to move. We make interests, opportunities, and decisions vary by level of skills and implement barriers to entry for Polish and Romanian migrants. The results from the model (which seems to replicate main trends for all real world countries) show that strong selectivity based on skills is important when considering migratory decisions, especially in countries that are further away from the UK. The results also showed the need to considering processes such as chain and return migration into account.
The housing model looked at the dynamics of rents within Manchester and London and how this impacted upon the development or demise of areas with particular cultural characteristics. This identified some of the impacts of the process of gentrification and the conditions under which it occurs. This model and its results have generated some interest within Manchester City Council and has influence work we are currently doing with their "Complex Dependency Unit" analysing their data on "troubled families".

The employment model investigated the impact of social networks and employer discrimination on the development of ethnic segmentation in low-skilled labour markets driven by referral hiring. This model was based on Roger Waldinger and Michael Lichter's seminal study How the Other Half Works using the qualitative and quantitative data contained in that book, and related social science research, to build an approximation of the low-skilled ethnic labour market in Los Angeles between 1950 and 1990. This research provide two main findings: i) Ethnically homogenous social networks significantly increase ethnic segmentation in the labour market. Furthermore, this outweighs the effect of 'conservative' discrimination procedures (i.e. discriminatory processes which aim to retain the existing ethnic make-up of an organisation); ii) Such homophilic networks also enhance the ability of immigrant groups to gain a foothold in the labour market, particularly under conditions of discrimination.
Exploitation Route The ability to build or start form a highly complex agent based model and having the tools to reduce the level of complexity without changing the fundamental nature of the underlying processes could be highly valuable. We anticipate that this new approach will be useful for a broad range of complex phenomena - especially with social or biological systems. Indeed we are already applying this kind of approach within a subsequent EU project on makerspaces and the maker movement, called Digitial DIY.
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Construction,Creative Economy,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Education,Electronics,Environment,Financial Services, and Management Consultancy,Government, Democracy and Justice

URL http://cfpm.org/scid/
 
Title A Complex Model of Voter Turnout 
Description A consistent, detailed and dynamic description, in the form of an agent-based simulation, of the available evidence concerning the question of why people bother to vote. CoMSES Computational Model Library 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact Furthering SCID project findings and analysis 
URL https://www.openabm.org/model/4368/version/1/view
 
Title DITCH - A Model of Inter-Ethnic Partnership Formation 
Description A complex model of emergent processes of differentiation and change in the marriage patterns and social cohesion of migrant communities. 
Type Of Material Data analysis technique 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact The DITCH ("Diversity and Inter-­ethnic marriage: Trust, Culture and Homophily") model has been designed to explore inter-ethnic marriage, but also to move towards adding layers of sophistication to the way such processes have previously been modelled. 
URL https://www.openabm.org/model/4411/version/2
 
Title Immigration model 
Description Simulation model of migratory decisions. The model is implemented as a demographic microsimulation. We designed the stylized populations of the top five sending countries to the UK - Ireland, India, Pakistan, Germany and Poland - plus that of Romania, accurate with regards to the age class and education attainment level of all the inhabitants, scaled at a 1:10,000 ratio, and initialized at year 1980. The only agent attributes are age and educational achievement. The latter is a binary attribute representing whether the agent has completed tertiary education. The initial population is generated via an iterative process where every generated agent is assigned to one of the five countries and 12 age classes. The model runs from year 1980 to year 2020 with one simulation step representing one year. A population of existing immigrants in the UK and their education level is also generated upon initialisation. The fundamental dynamics that we implemented in the model draw from the theoretical background mentioned in the previous section. In particular we inspired the migration process to the theory of planned behaviour, as suggested in Willekens (2013). In the model every agent has a probability of developing an interest towards migration, starting from age 16. Agents interested in migrating then have to come across an opportunity for migration, before their attitude can turn the attitude into a plan of action. The materialization of an opportunity is also probabilistic in the model. Following Willekens we assume that the interest towards migration develops between 16 and 35 years of age and, if an opportunity doesn't come across before the age 50, the agent gives up on the proposition of migrating. At the same time, the agents can lose interest in migrating along the way. One of the main aims of this study is to test the selectivity argument suggested in the literature, whereby immigrants are being selected disproportionally among the highly skilled population in the sending countries. Therefore we assumed that both the probabilities - that of developing a positive attitude towards migration and that of coming across an occasion - differ for people of different levels of education. The global probabilities for agents of each country and educational level to develop an interest (pI) and come across a chance of migration in the course of the 10 subsequent years (pO), are user-defined and set upon initialization. The agents who developed a positive attitude, lose it with a probability of 0.10 each year. The probabilities are assumed constant throughout the life course. Once the decision is made and the occasion materialises, the agent will decide with equal probability between three possible destination countries, of which the UK is one. The distance of the origin country from the UK is also a major factor in the process, with the probability of carrying away the plan of migrating inversely proportional to the distance from the UK. Summarising, the model behaviour is entirely driven by six sets of probabilities: developing a positive attitude towards migrating (different for low and highly educated); coming across an occasion for migrating (also different for low and highly educated); deciding to go to the UK (0.33, equal for low and highly educated) and proceeding to enact the plan (equal for low and highly educated, inversely proportional to distance of origin country). In the case of Poland the probability of deciding to go to the UK was substantially higher for the first years, since most EU countries had restrictions still in place. 
Type Of Material Computer model/algorithm 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact There are no notable impacts just yet; as the model is still in development. The results from the model were presented at the SCID final event in July 2015. 
 
Title The Social Complexity of Immigration and Diversity: Voter Model Data 
Description Collection of data on voter model for SCID project - UK Data Archive. Fieldhouse, E; Lessard-Phillips, L; Edmonds, B 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact model being used to further SCID analysis 
URL http://reshare.ukdataservice.ac.uk/id/eprint/851507
 
Description Collaboration with MODRN project 
Organisation University of Agder
Country Norway 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Added as expert to the 'integration model'.
Collaborator Contribution Participation in residential workshop, production of paper(s).
Impact Paper under consideration for a SSCR Special Issue on Simulation Models of Ethnocentrism and Diversity. Presentation to Norwegian policy makers and at workshop linked to the Special Issue. Multi-disciplinary collaboration involving scientific study of religion, public policy, and computer modeling.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Beyond Schelling and Axelrod. Manchester Metropolitan University 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact conference presentation Beyond Schelling and Axelrod. Manchester Metropolitan University
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description A Focus on the I: Migration modelling in the SCID Project 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Presentation on "A focus in the I: Migration modelling in the SCID project" at CSRW migration modelling meeting, SOuthampton February 2012 - Edmonds, B; Lessard-Phillips, L; Meyer, R; Vasey, H.

SCID analysis presented to audience.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description A computational model of immigration and diversity 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Presentation at the CrimeEx Kickoff meeting, Rome, January 2012 - "A computational model of immigration and diversity"

Dissemination of SCID project insights
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description BSPS conference (Leeds) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Presentation of results from the inter-marriage model to the BSPS conference in Leeds, 7-9 September 2015, entitled 'Changes and trade-offs in ethnic and educational preferences in inter-ethnic partnership formation: an agent-based approach' (Lessard-Phillips, Meyer, and Vasey). The results presented generated a lively discussion during and after the presentation, with interest in the project being shown by audience members and other presenters.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description CSRW Policy Conference 2014 - H Vasey, L Lessard-Phillips, E FIeldhouse, G di Tosto 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Presentations given at CSRW Policy Conference at Royal Society April 2014
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Cascade of Echo Chamber? A Complex Agent-Based Simulation of Voter Turnout 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Presentation of paper at International Political Science Association conference in Montreal and American Political Science Association conference in Washington DC - Fieldhouse, E; Lessard-Phillips, L; Edmonds. B

Presented findings and insight of SCID project to two international audiences.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Complexity Science for the Real World 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact An invited talk to the ESRC Research Methods Festival, University of Oxford, 2nd September 2012.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
URL http://www.ncrm.ac.uk/RMF2012/programme.php?id=A5
 
Description Ditch: A Model of inter-ethnic partnership formation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Talk at Social Simulation Conference Barcelona, September 2014 by R Meyer, H Vasey and L Lessard-Phillips

Discussion about Ditch model.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Diversity and Inter-Ethnic Marriage - An Agent-Based Approach 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Presentation on Diversity and Inter-Ethnic Marriage - An Agent-Based Approach. Paper presentedat the International Sociological Association World Congress in Yokohama July - Vasey, H

Presentation to International Sociological Association World Congress
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Ethnic diversity, density and their consequences on political participation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Presentation at ECPR general conference, Reykjavik, August 2011 - "Ethnic diversity, density and their consequences on political participation: An agent-based simulation"

Dissemination of SCID project insights and overview
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2011
 
Description Ethnic diversity, density and their consequences on political participation: An agent-based simulation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Presentation at SCPR Conference, Reykjavik August 2011, on "Ethnic diversity, density and their consequences on political participation: An agent-based simulation" - Lessard-Phillips, L; Crossley, N; Edmonds, B; Fieldhouse, E; Li, Y; Meyer, R; and Shryane, N.

Presented SCID analysis
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2011
 
Description Ethnic graduate unemployment in Britain during hard times - Y Li 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Publication in Runnymede Perspectives - Ethnic graduate unemployment in Britain during hard times

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Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Ethnic unemployment in Britain 1972-2012 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Publication in Runnymede - Ethnic unemployment in Britain - Y Li

Publication read
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description How can agent-based modelling be used in the social sciences? 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Presentation on "How can agent-based modelling be used in the social sciences?" for the 'What is...?' methods@Manchester seminar series March 2014 - Laurence Lessard-Phillips

Presentation given with insights / findings from SCID
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Inheriting success? 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Publication in Shamit Saggar, Insight, ISER, Essex University - 'Inheriting success?'

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Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Labour Market KET at NIESR - H Vasey 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Knowledge exchange with policy makers, strategists and researchers.

Engagement and sharing of ideas with policy makers, strategists and researchers
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description MODRN workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Participation in residential workshop of MODRN project (see section on collaboration), where work on the integration model was conducted and presented to workshop's participants.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Modelling trust on social networks 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact An invited talk to the Oxford Internet Institute, Nuffield College, University of Oxford, 18th February 2013.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation at academic conference on SCID Work (RGS-IBG) - H Vasey 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Presentations given at RGS-IBG Annual Conferences 2011 and 2012

Presentations given and audience engaged.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2011,2012
 
Description Projecting Mobility Trends 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Contribution to projecting mobility trends report of the Government Office for Science at the Cabinet Office by A Heath and Y Li.

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Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Racial inequality in employment worsened in recessions - Y Li 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Blog post on racial inequality in employment published, read and shared

Shared by readers
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Review of the relationship between religion and poverty - Y Li and A Heath 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Publication in JRF public briefing Review of the relationship between religion and poverty

Publication read
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Roundtable Discussion at CSRW 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Laurence Lessard Phillips and Bruce Edmonds led a roundtable discussion as CSRW policy event April 2014 - "Examples of best practice and challenges for contact and collaboration between policy actors and academics".

Discussions on the topic which stimulated further exchanges.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description SCID Overview - Complexity in the Real World 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Presentation at Complexity in the Real World meeting, Southampton, June 2011 - SCID Overview

Dissemination of SCID project overview
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2011
 
Description SCID Overview - Presentation at IAS Bristol 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Presentation at Institute for Advances Studies, University of Bristol, April 2011 - "SCID Overview"

Dissemination SCID overview
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2011
 
Description Simulating social systems 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact A talk to pupils visiting from local schools
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Social mobility and ethnicity in Britain 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Presentation at House of Lords and social mobility and ethnicity in Britain - Y Li and A Heath.

Presentation to House of Lords
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Stating Abstraction using Chains of Models and the Problem of Context Dependency 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Presentation at the York Centre for Complex Systems Analysis, York, March 2012 - "Stating Abstraction using Chains of Models and the Problem of Context Dependency"

Dissemination of SCID project insights and overview.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description The Complexity of Turnout: An Agent-Based Simulation of Electoral Participation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Presentation of paper at 2nd annual EPSA general conference, Berlin June 2012. Paper on The Complexity of Turnout: An Agent-Based Simulation of Electoral Participation - Fieldhouse, E; Lessard-Phillips, L; Edmonds B.

Presentation on SCID findings and insight.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description The upward and downward social mobility of men in different ethnic groups in Britain - A Heath and Y Li 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Publication in Society Central, ISER, Essex University - The upward and downward social mobility of men in different ethnic groups in Britain.

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Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description What do we know about socio-economic integration and what are the key emerging issues? Y Lia nd A Heath 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Public briefing 'What do we know about socio-economic integration and what are the key emerging issues?' in COMPAS and DCLG

Public briefing to DCLG and COMPAS
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Workshop on computational models of ethnocentrism and diversity 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact A workshop getting together all researchers and others interested in applying agent-based modelling to understanding issues of ethnocentrism and diversity, held at the Manchester Metropolitan University, 7/8th June 2017. At this plans for a special issue on the subject were made.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://davidhales.name/ethnosim2017