REFIT: Personalised Retrofit Decision Support Tools for UK Homes using Smart Home Technology

Lead Research Organisation: Loughborough University
Department Name: Civil and Building Engineering

Abstract

Thermal efficiency retrofit options, appliance upgrades and on-site renewables represent a significant opportunity to deliver energy demand reductions to UK homes. The potential to reduce thermal heat losses through insulation and airtightness (in particular in pre-1980s housing), upgrade the household appliance stock (using the latest energy saving models) and integrated on-site renewables and microgeneration (developing a 'prosumer' culture and reducing energy bills) still remains largely unrealised. There are a number of challenges in providing advice for retrofit solutions to consumers which will promote behaviour change and influence purchasing decisions. Currently consumer information is based on standardised methodologies for nominal house types and the resulting predictions of energy savings have minimal resemblance to reality where the thermal efficiency of the dwelling, efficiency of heating system and appliances, occupancy, user behaviour and preferences will have a significant impact on the effectiveness and uptake of retrofit measures. One solution is to provide consumers with personalised, accurate and trustworthy predictions of energy saving measures which are calibrated and tailored to their dwelling and living patterns, presented in a format to engage and promote action.

This proposal will facilitate a widespread uptake of retrofit measures in UK homes by implementing a holistic approach to providing consumers with personalised, tailored retrofit advice delivered using methods to maximise consumer engagement. Smart Home technology provides a unique opportunity to use real-time measurements, advanced data analytics, digital signal processing and communications techniques, novel visualisation, semantic web and cloud computing technologies to generate advice at different levels of abstraction for informed and justified decision making. The Smart Home concept is currently gaining significant momentum and new developments in open systems, simple use and installation features (ie plug and play), mobile access (ie Smart Phones) and connectivity have brought the concept to the attention of energy companies, ICT companies and appliance manufacturers. The IBM vision of a Smart(er) Home gives three characteristics: 1) Instrumented (sensors and automation of household activities); 2) Interconnected (communication between devices and wider networks - allowing remote access and control of devices); and 3) Intelligent ('the ability to make decisions based on data, leading to better outcomes'). Smart Homes provide consumers with more control over their homes and energy systems and, importantly, how their energy demand and costs can be reduced through interventions.

This proposal brings together a multi-disciplinary team of building, ICT, energy, design and user experts to develop a personalised decision support platform for building envelope retrofits, heating system and appliance replacement purchases, and on-site renewables integration. This will deliver a step-change in the provision and accuracy of retrofit advice to UK householders leading to a low-energy and low-carbon future housing stock. The outcomes will be of benefit to: energy, ICT, embedded systems and telecommunication companies developing technology and business models for Smart Home services; consumers to lower their energy bills and improve the safety, security and comfort of their homes; building component, boiler and appliance manufacturers developing the next generation of low-energy products; and policy makers for new insights into innovative approaches to meeting the security, affordability and carbon reduction aspirations of the UK energy system.

Planned Impact

The large-scale retrofitting of the UK building stock has the potential to impact on the three aspects of the nation's 'energy trilemma': 1) a reduction in carbon emissions arising from energy supply, as the building stock energy demand is reduced; 2) improved security of supply, as reduced energy demand results in less imports of energy supplies required; 3) improved affordability for consumers, as less energy is needed to fulfil comfort and user requirements. The work and findings of the REFIT project, by advancing the purchase and take-up of retrofit options across the stock, will therefore have substantial benefits for many stakeholders within UK society and the UK economy. Societal benefits occur once retrofit measures have been purchased and installed, through mitigation of climate change effects and improved energy security due to the energy demand reductions. Economic benefits arise at the installation stage through job creation for skilled installers for retrofit measures. The increased purchasing of retrofit materials and technologies will have economic benefits for manufacturers and retailers, with a steep demand anticipated for products including insulation, boilers, heating controls, low-energy appliances and on-site microgeneration. Large-scale retrofitting of the building stock will also provide tangible benefits to householders and consumers. Energy bills will be reduced with potential to decrease the number of households in fuel poverty in the UK. In addition, by improving building fabric and heat loss characteristics, homes will become warmer in winter improving thermal comfort levels, in particular for the more vulnerable households in society.

The initial beneficiaries of the research will be the REFIT project partners. REFIT has engaged the support of ICT companies (IBM, Thales), Smart Technology providers (Sentec, Green Energy Options, RWE Power), equipment manufacturers (National instruments), building research and consultancy organisations (BSRIA, Adapt, the National Refurbishment Centre) and industry network organisations (COMIT, FIATECH). Impacts with external stakeholders will be maximised through the COMIT and FIATECH members (including UK and US construction companies, ICT companies and leading universities) and through REFIT project conferences. In particular a high profile REFIT Colloquium will be held in London in the third year of the project to disseminate the immediate findings and identify new routes to achieving academic, commercial and policy impacts.

The REFIT project will develop and trial a new approach to the generation and provision of retrofit advice to householders, specifically by using Smart Home technology both as the enabler to generate personalised, tailored retrofit information and as the means to disseminate this information to householders. Dissemination will be integrated across the project activities and will actively promote impact across several sectors. The beneficiaries include: academic and research organisations developing and evaluating Smart Homes and Smart Technology applications; energy companies seeking novel energy services and customer retention; appliance manufacturers through new performance diagnostic services to promote appliance upgrades; ICT companies developing novel business opportunities through software and hardware applications for new services; policy makers through the evaluation of Smart Homes as an energy demand reduction mechanism to achieve legislative targets; and consumers through access to better information on which to base purchasing decisions and operational strategies for making substantial saving to energy bills.

Publications

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Badiei A (2014) The role of programmable TRVs for space heating energy demand reduction in UK homes in BSO 2014: 2nd IBPSA-England conference on Building Simulation and Optimization, London, 23 Jun 2014 - 24 Jun 2014

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Cockbill S (2019) The Assessment of Meaningful Outcomes from Co-design: A Case Study from the Energy Sector in She Ji: The Journal of Design, Economics, and Innovation

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Coleman M (2015) Utilizing Smart Home data to support the reduction of energy demand from space heating - insights from a UK field study in EEDAL 2015: 8th International Conference on Energy Efficiency in Domestic Appliances and Lighting, Lucerne-Horw, Switzerland, 26 Aug 2015 - 28 Aug 2015

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De Oliveira L (2015) Pre-installation challenges: classifying barriers to the introduction of smart home technology in Joint Conference on 29th International Conference on Informatics for Environmental Protection / 3rd International Conference on ICT for Sustainability (EnviroInfo and ICT4S), Copenhagen, Denmark, 07 Sep 2015 - 09 Sep 2015

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Dimitriou V (2014) Developing suitable thermal models for domestic buildings with Smart Home equipment in BSO 2014: 2nd IBPSA-England conference on Building Simulation and Optimization, London, 23 Jun 2014 - 24 Jun 2014

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Dimitriou V (2015) Data-driven simple thermal models: The radiator - gas consumption model in Proceedings of Building Simulation 2015: 14th International Conference of the International Building Performance Simulation Association, Hyderabad, India, 07 Dec 2015 - 09 Dec 2015

 
Description The REFIT project was a 3.5-year research project funded by Research Councils UK. It was one of the 22 research projects in the Transforming Energy Demand through Digital Innovation (TEDDI) research programme, funded by a joint initiative of the Research Councils UK Energy Programme and Digital Economy Programme. The project ran from May 2012 to October 2015 and employed five full-time university researchers and eight academic staff. The work was a collaboration between Loughborough University, the University of Strathclyde and the University of East Anglia, together with a number of stakeholder partners. The REFIT project explored the Smart Home concept in the UK context to determine the potential for Smart Home technologies to help with energy saving and energy management for UK homes. We focussed in particular on retrofit technologies and supporting households with new retrofit advice. We installed existing off-the-shelf Smart Home products into 20 homes in this study. This included the Smart Home product range manufactured by RWE and imported from Germany, the VERA product range, the CurrentCost product range and the British Gas HIVE heating system. Our work focussed on a small and detailed study of 20 households. This choice was made so that we could observe how Smart Home technologies would integrate into a real world setting of family lives and existing buildings. The small sample allowed us to carry out very detailed measurements and interviews that provide unique insights into Smart Home technologies. We calculated metrics relating to how heating controls are used on a daily basis, identifying how they change over time and assessing how the changes link to external weather conditions. We found that timer settings changed most days, suggesting that occupants override their timer settings according to their daily routines. Regression analysis showed that some of the variation in heating duration was related to the weather. This work was a significant step forward in understanding how homes are heated during transition periods between summer, when little or no heating is used, and winter, when heating is used every day. Much less variation was observed in room thermostat settings, boiler supply temperature and radiator thermostat settings. Recent advances in smart heating controls provided an opportunity to assess how closely room temperatures follow the temperatures set by occupants. Sensor data was used to identify periods when energy savings were possible, and to develop methods to achieve these energy savings by incorporating this learning into advanced heating controls in the future. This highlighted three ways that improved controls could save energy: i) adjusting for heating system characteristics to minimise times when temperatures do not follow occupant settings (overshooting the set point, or lagging behind heating controls); ii) identifying times of excessive heat loss - such as leaving a window open in a room; and iii) identifying times of unoccupied heating - when the heating is in use but the room is unoccupied. A data-driven lumped parameter model of domestic buildings was developed to explore the potential for energy modelling which matched the real world measured data. Results for a case study building showed that an improved fit to the measured data can be achieved by varying the initial model parameter values of capacitance (up to 78%), resistance (-46%) and effective window area (-59%). This highlighted the importance of having a reference set of parameters based on the known physical characteristics of the building and informs the choice of future building survey design. The installation of the smart home technology in the homes raised a number of issues from the perspective of the homeowner. The initial expectations of the homeowners were that the smart home technologies would increase comfort, convenience and security, and reduce energy costs. In particular, they expected the smart home technologies to enable them to make energy-related cost savings by controlling their heating more accurately and identifying energy cost savings. The reality after they had lived with the smart home kit for about a year was somewhat different. They were initially concerned about the aesthetics, but quickly got used to having the kit in the home. They did manage to control their heating successfully, but stressed how ease of use was really important. There were some installation issues, for example radiator control valves not fitting all of the radiators. The motorised radiator valves themselves were found to be noisy and intrusive. At an overall level it was found that although there were expected and realised benefits, these were in part counteracted by the challenges involved in using the technology and integrating it with lifestyle in the home. The project carried out an iterative design and evaluation process to investigate how smart home data (including smart metering) can be presented to households to help them make energy-related retrofit decisions. There was initially little understanding of consumption, the relative costs of electricity and gas, or the units (KWh) involved. Householders were interested in the individual running costs of appliances, and the baseline electricity load. The patterns of use of energy over time were only meaningful to households when they could be put into context. Additional information was needed such as occupancy and outdoor temperatures. Trends over time were interesting to householders, particularly if they could be related to key changes that had taken place. Comparisons of a households energy use with other similar households were useful, but these had to include both type of house and nature of the household, to ensure they were similar. Despite increased interest and more informed decisions, there was only limited impact on what householders intended to do and actually did, in relation to retrofit. Simply providing more information to householders (even in a highly engaging manner) did not necessarily result in increased energy-related retrofit - there are a range of barriers which limit the options which would be considered. These include: upfront cost and cost/payback times, disruption (eg. underfloor heating and insulation), lack of understanding (eg. with microheat generation and ground source heat pumps), and measures which would be difficult to apply to their particular house. Outlines for ten potential energy related services were developed, that are based on smart home data. These are: 1 Appliance Performance Monitoring - Using disaggregated electricity consumption to identify when individual appliances are failing or becoming less efficient; 2 Safety and Security Alerting - Using various sensors in and around the home to monitor and alert when safety and/or security is being breached; 3 Optimising Design of Heating Systems - Using temperature and energy sensors to analyse heating performance and recommend design changes to heating systems; 4 Optimising Control of Heating Systems - This service would use sensors such as room temperature, occupancy, and activity levels, to identify how well heating system control is set up, and how it can be optimised to balance comfort and cost; 5 Understanding Appliance Consumption - Detailed monitoring of consumption by appliances, and comparing this to similar households, to highlight where consumption is 'normal', and where easy cost savings should be possible; 6 Community-based Services - Sharing information on energy consumption within a local community, in order to help members of the community (eg. vulnerable isolated individuals) to learn from collective experience, and promote bulk energy buying or generation in a community; 7 Utility Cost Comparison - Detailed monitoring of energy usage and direct comparison of actual costs of various energy suppliers, leading to recommendations or automatic and dynamic switching of energy supplier; 8 Training and Awareness Raising - To target three key groups to change attitudes: older households who may have time and motivation to consider energy usage and their lifestyles, younger adults who are just starting to live independently, and school children to instil early messages. Capitalise on windows of opportunity to bring about changes in energy related behaviour; 9 Energy supply and demand management - This would help householders manage their energy supply and demand by taking into account the times of day, or days of the week where energy is cheap or free (eg. through micro-generation) and helping to schedule appliance use accordingly; 10 Green Deal 'Plus' - To build on the advice that was given through the Green Deal, by incorporating an energy audit aspect - with a householder-consultation process - to provide more contextually relevant advice to the householder. The project used a range of co-design methods to help householders understand their personal energy data. It was possible to identify a number of successful methodological factors: (1) Using priming materials to help people think about and convey what their homes mean to them, how they aspire to live and what they would like to improve; (2) Continually and actively involving the households in the design process and keeping them immersed in the complex and intangible problem space so they were regularly thinking about key issues and possible solutions; (3) Viewing the householders as 'experts of their own lived experiences' - experiences that we must tap into if we are to design better retrofit advice and future services; (4) Using a range of creative visual prompts and activities to help people grasp and understand intangible or complex concepts; (5) Bringing different householders with different experiences together with technology specialists, to help us design and develop service concepts.
Exploitation Route The findings are of interest to organisations which promote energy savings in the home and who run energy saving initiatives. The findings are also relevant to companies developing Smart Homes services, including feedback, control algorithms and data analytics.
Sectors Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Energy,Environment

URL http://www.refitsmarthomes.org
 
Description The impact of the REFIT project is continuing to evolve as more project outputs occurs and as the technology and policy of Smart Meters and Smart Homes continues to develop. The relevance of the work will continue to grow as more Smart Meters are installed and as Smart Meter data streams - via the DCC - become available. The number of market-ready Smart Home products and manufacturers has been steadily increasing since the project's inception, with many well-known brands now marketing their own Smart Home brands. As Smart Home market penetration grows, the relevance and potential impact routes of the project increases. Smart Meter datasets tend to deliver long, thin streams of data, with relatively little metadata on the dwelling or household they are associated with. Such datasets are becoming more commonplace through the installation of Smart Meters by the energy providers, and through recent OFGEM and other Smart Meter trials. The REFIT project studied the next step in this trend, by considering multiple data streams from Smart Home sensors (over 60 per home), as well as Smart Meter data, and future highly detailed metadata, including 3D geometry of homes and room-by-room surveying. One of the first impacts of this has been the development of a new data model (expressed as an XML schema), capable of holding survey data of this complexity and allowing to changes over time to be recorded. The data model, along with the data itself, has been made available to several companies, academics, data scientists and presented at Smart Meter workshops. The approach is gradually gaining traction as a new paradigm for mapping and storing Smart Home survey data. A second impact development is the use of the data to answer policy questions. The impact of advanced heating systems on occupant heating practices and energy demand is being explored through on-going publications. The potential of using Smart Meter data to infer building thermal performance characteristics has been investigated in a PhD study and presented at a specially organised BEIS workshop. These, as well as other, applications of the REFIT dataset to develop new methods and techniques for utilising Smart Home data for economic and social benefits will be exploited further over the coming years and new impact routes actively sought. Further impact has been achieved through the opening up of the REFIT datasets and the publication of this data as Open Data. Four datasets are available: i) the REFIT Smart Home Dataset (https://dx.doi.org/10.17028/rd.lboro.2070091); ii) REFIT: Electrical Load Measurements (Cleaned) (http://dx.doi.org/10.15129/9ab14b0e-19ac-4279-938f-27f643078cec); iii) REFIT: Personalised retrofit decision support tools for UK homes using smart home technology. Phase 1: Survey data. (https://dx.doi.org/10.5255/UKDA-SN-852366); and iv) REFIT: Personalised retrofit decision support tools for UK homes using smart home technology. Phase 2: Smart home interviews (https://dx.doi.org/10.5255/UKDA-SN-852367). The datasets have been used in academic studies and industry research around the world to better understand Smart Meters and Smart Home technologies. At the time of writing, the REFIT Smart Home Dataset has 8,516 views and 1,888 downloads.
First Year Of Impact 2016
Sector Energy,Environment
Impact Types Policy & public services

 
Description BuildTEDDI Network Grant
Amount £599,981 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/L013681/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2013 
End 08/2017
 
Description DECC consultancy: Cost Assessment of Energy Monitoring Equipment
Amount £10,000 (GBP)
Organisation Department of Energy and Climate Change 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2015 
End 04/2015
 
Description DECC consultancy: Further Analysis of the Household Electricity Use Survey Lot 1
Amount £37,400 (GBP)
Organisation Department of Energy and Climate Change 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start  
 
Description DECC consultancy: Further Analysis of the Household Electricity Use Survey Lot 2: Lighting study
Amount £7,857 (GBP)
Organisation Department of Energy and Climate Change 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start  
 
Description Design4energy: Building life-cycle evolutionary Design methodology able to create Energy-efficient Buildings flexibly connected with the neighborhood energy system
Amount £5,000,000 (GBP)
Funding ID 609380 
Organisation European Commission 
Sector Public
Country European Union (EU)
Start 10/2013 
End 09/2017
 
Description ETI - consultancy
Amount £27,000 (GBP)
Organisation Energy Technologies Institute (ETI) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2015 
End 03/2016
 
Title Process for homeowner engagement with co-design activities 
Description None of the 'type of research tool or method' categories above is relevant. This is experience gained (theory and practice) in using co-design methods for engaging end users in design activities. 
Type Of Material Model of mechanisms or symptoms - human 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact It has enabled the Design School at Loughborough University to develop greater methodological expertise in relation to participative design methods with end users. This has fed directly into the grant application and award of the following project RC Grant reference: EP/N028287/1 Grant title: Improving customer experience while ensuring data privacy for intelligent mobility 
 
Title REFIT Smart Home dataset 
Description The REFIT project (www.refitsmarthomes.org) carried out a study from 2013 to 2015 in which 20 UK homes were upgraded to Smart Homes through the installation of devices including Smart Meters, programmable thermostats, programmable radiator valves, motion sensors, door sensors and window sensors. Data was collected using building surveys, sensor placements and household interviews. The REFIT Smart Home dataset is one of the datasets made publically available by the project. This dataset includes: - Building survey data for the 20 homes. - Sensor measurements made before the Smart Home equipment was installed. - Sensor measurements made after the Smart Home equipment was installed. - Climate data recorded at a nearby weather station. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2017 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact At the time of writing, the dataset has had 909 views and 125 downloads. 
URL https://doi.org/10.17028/rd.lboro.2070091.v1
 
Description Research Visit 
Organisation Delft University of Technology (TU Delft)
Country Netherlands 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Travel and subsistence provided by 'Roberts Funding Award' for creating a meaningful linkage between Loughborough and international centres of excellence through direct interaction of PhD students. PhD student being supervised by me visited ID Studiolab @ TU Delft and The Co-design Research Cluster at the Danish School of Design (KADK) in April and May of 2013.
Collaborator Contribution Discussion of best practice and barriers, relating to co-design theory and practice
Impact The main outcomes were to enable data collection for an initial study within REFIT - namely the design of the co-design process for homeowner/participant engagement and the research materials. The intention is to discuss the outcomes of the REFIT project with these groups, and investigate opportunities for future collaboration
Start Year 2013
 
Description Research Visit 
Organisation Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts
Department Center for Codesign Research
Country Denmark 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Travel and subsistence provided by 'Roberts Funding Award' for creating a meaningful linkage between Loughborough and international centres of excellence through direct interaction of PhD students. PhD student being supervised by me visited ID Studiolab @ TU Delft and The Co-design Research Cluster at the Danish School of Design (KADK) in April and May of 2013.
Collaborator Contribution Discussion of best practice and barriers, relating to co-design theory and practice
Impact The main outcomes were to enable data collection for an initial study within REFIT - namely the design of the co-design process for homeowner/participant engagement and the research materials. The intention is to discuss the outcomes of the REFIT project with these groups, and investigate opportunities for future collaboration
Start Year 2013
 
Description TEDDINET 
Organisation Teddinet
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Attendance at two TEDDINET workshops
Collaborator Contribution TEDDINET organised the event
Impact Presentations and networking opportunities. The collaboration is multi-disciplinary across researchers working in social science, design, building physics and computer science.
Start Year 2013
 
Description DECC future collaboration meeting 2014 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Took part in a discussion about how DECC can learn from REFIT and other EPSRC funded projects

A number of follow up events and workshops will be arranged by DECC for further consultation and collaboration with REFIT and other projects
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Dissemination of project findings to Sentec 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact One day workshop with Sentec ( manufacturers and designers of smart sensing equipment) to discuss project findings and opportunities for future collaboration
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description IET Future Intelligent Cities 2014 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This was a talk to 100+ delegates about the future uses of Smart Meter datastreams for use in the management of the future cities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Invited talk at The Energy Customer event 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The talk introduced the research to a wider audience of industry experts and key stakeholders and highlighted potential areas for future collaboration

New industry contacts were made
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://marketforce.eu.com/events/energy/the-energy-customer
 
Description Presentation at BEIS workshop 'Domestic smart energy meters, data-driven innovation and the public interest'. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Presentation and discussion of REFIT research into estimating the thermal performance parameters of buildings using Smart Meter data.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Presentation to Smart Energy GB of REFIT project findings 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Presentation of research findings from the REFIT project to the marketing team for Smart Energy GB responsible for the design of behaviour change interventions associated with the roll out of Smart Meters to all UK homes. This led to a further presentation of more detailed findings in order to inform the content of a white paper on behaviour change. Smart Energy GB have asked to reference REFIT findings in their forthcoming white paper on behaviour change.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description REFIT dissemination meeting at DECC - January 2013 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact This meeting was convened at the Department of Energy and Climate Change to introduce DECC contacts to the REFIT project, the aims and objectives of the work, and how collaboration could take place throughout the lifetime of the project.

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Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Smart Meter Forum 2014 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The talk highlighted a number of important opportunities for potential industry and academic collaboration

n/a
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
URL http://marketforce.eu.com/uploads/files/2013/10/smart_metering_2nd_final_3222.pdf
 
Description Speaker at 'Energising smarter homes' event, Unrban Innovation Centre, London 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Convened by Forum for the Future and Behaviour Change with Smart Energy GB, this session covered insights into consumer attitudes and behaviours on energy, including research from Loughborough University on the use of smart tech in homes and future trends in home energy use.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description TEDDINET Annual Meeting 2014 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Type Of Presentation poster presentation
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Poster session increased the exposure of the project to policy makers and industry

n/a
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://teddinet.org/activities/annual-meeting/
 
Description TEDDINET Annual Meeting 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A poster session and distributing the final report to 200 delegates at the 'Reducing Energy Demand with Smart Buildings' event in 2015.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015