Smart Me versus Smart Things: The Development of a Personal Resource Planning (PRP) System through Human Interactions with Data Enabled by the IoT

Lead Research Organisation: University of Warwick
Department Name: WMG

Abstract

Every day we see the development of new "smart" things and come closer and closer to the moment when the perfect "smart" home of the future becomes a reality. A "Smart" home, is one in which each appliance (thing) is not only controllable but is also "intelligent", ie. tailored to our individual needs.

Yet, smart objects and smart homes often consider the individual as a passive entity to be 'served', rather than an empowered individual who can make smart decisions based on information. This is often because of the assumption that human cognition isn't able to take on the massive amount of information that could be generated from such smart objects. Indeed, very little is known about how people interact with data and how much of the data which we generate can actually inform our day-to-day decision making. We also do not know whether data generated within a home can change our consumption habits and behaviour. Finally, we are uncertain about whether and to what extent the data that we produce influences other decision makers in our household. Our project offers a new approach to answering these questions by observing actual household behaviour "in the wild" and developing a personal resource planning system (PRP) to support decisions made by individuals, ie. a smart 'me'.

Our approach is different from existing IoT research in the following ways. First, while traditional research views the customer, who either accepts or rejects the product/service developed by businesses, to be outside the supply system, our approach offers a new perspective in which the customer is also viewed as an inside component of the supply system. This means that the customer, through his/her behaviour, becomes an inherent component of the supply system, and thereby transforms this system into a collaborative exchange system. This collaborative exchange system allows customers to interact with businesses and make decisions about how much customisation they would like to see in each product/service they themselves consume (e.g., Crowcroft et al., 2011; McAuley et al., 2011; Ng. et al., 2013). Second, since our approach has a person (customer) in the centre, the main focus of this project is to understand how "smart" things interact with human behaviour, and possibly how this behaviour can be informed by the new data from "smart" things to catalyse the appearance of a more informed "smart" consumer (e.g., Ng, 2012). Finally, our third contribution to existing research is to create data architecture through the IoT which would allow customers to make more informed "smart" decisions. In a way, the main output of this project will be a proof of concept that customers could be "nudged" into making "smarter" consumption decisions which would optimise business-customer interactions and create more value for each household.

Planned Impact

The proposed research will have multiple beneficiaries including: (1) consumers; (2) policy makers; (3) private sector; (4) cross-disciplinary scientific community.

(1) Consumers: Proposed project will suggest ways to improve mechanisms used by households to incorporate self-generated data into resources for consumer choices through the PRP system. This would allow households to make "better" (more optimal) consumption decisions which would increase their quality of life. We will work with our partner, Birmingham City Council to educate consumers and generate impact "in the wild" within the region of West Midlands. In addition to consumers participating in our research project directly, we will also seek to provide educational feedback to the general public.

(2) Policy-makers: Proposed research will offer new ways in which consumers can use their IoT data and make useful policy recommendations as to how the interactions between consumers and their self-generated data could be regulated and supported by the public sector.

(3) Private sector: Our project will provide a practical tool in the form of a ready-to-use PRP system which would propose ways of anticipating future consumer needs/wants. Product and service providers will be able to use this tool to increase consumer satisfaction. This, in turn, will increase business profitability through offering better value for money.

(4) Scientific community: Proposed research will contribute to all disciplines involved in the project by offering new knowledge such as an understanding of interactions between consumers and data; consumption patterns within households and how these patterns depend on the IoT data.

Our impact strategy includes:

(1) Consumer involvement and education: Our project will directly test the new PRP system "in the wild" with 20 households. We will also conduct surveys and decision-making experiments with consumers. All participants will receive educational feedback after each study. As a result, consumers will be informed about how to make "better" decisions and use self-generated IoT data more effectively. Outreach to general public and wider society will be accomplished through working with the press offices at WMG as well as via the use of social media.

(2) Policy-makers: We will involve policy makers (particularly, Birmingham City Council) in PRP discussions through regular meetings. Online and printed publicity materials will be designed to attract attention to the issues related to the project. Papers produced by the team will suggest policy implications of our results.

(3) Private sector: We will use WMG's existing capacity and connections to design meaningful PRP tests and anticipate demand predictions. We will also leverage on the ongoing RCUK HAT project by involving its stakeholders in our research and providing them with educational feedback.

(4) Scientific community: Our project will generate scientific impact through talks at conferences and workshops. Researchers involved in the project (especially at the postdoctoral level) will gain valuable cross-disciplinary experience in working with a diverse group of researchers. Scientific outreach will also work through an established IoT Special Interest Group (based in Warwick University) by gathering cross-disciplinary scientists and providing a regular forum for discussion; monthly think-tank meetings initiated in WMG and aimed at attracting a diverse group of students and researchers. By working closely with the RCUK HAT project, we will benefit from HAT team networks and extended partnerships with other interdisciplinary groups funded under the current RCUK Digital Economy initiative.
 
Description The HARRIET project has developed and released Rumpel, a ground-breaking hyperdata web browser that makes it simpler for people to access and use online data about themselves. The first of its kind, Rumpel is a dashboard that makes it easy for its users to visualise, understand and organise all kinds of personal data, much of which has been hard to access in the past. Rumpel gives users the ability to browse their very own private and secure 'personal data wardrobe' - the HAT (Hub-of-all-Things) which collates data about them held on the internet and allows them to control, combine and share it in whatever way they wish. The HAT was developed on the RCUK-funded project Home Hub-of-all-Things (HAT) as Platform for Multi-sided Market powered by Internet-of-Things: Opportunities for New Economic & Business Model (EP/K039911/1). Through Rumpel, which is also a personal resource planning tool for individuals, HARRIET will assist individuals to better understand their household consumption behaviour and make 'smarter' decisions to plan and live better lives based on their own data stored on the HAT.

HARRIET has also made an impact in implementing smart solutions in cities, establishing collaborations with the City of Birmingham and engaginged in discussions with policy makers from Coventry, Hamburg, Tolouse, Lappeenranta, and Istanbul. Smart cities are urban regions seeking to utilise innovative information and communication technologies (ICT) in architectural planning and design, creative and cultural industries, and concepts of social and environmental sustainability, in order to address economic, spatial, social and ecological problems facing cities today. On a daily basis, smart cities accumulate large masses of data from a variety of sources such as transportation, network, energy sector, smart homes, tax records, surveys, Light Detection and Ranging sensor data (LiDAR), mobile phones sensors, etc. The data from these various sources is then accumulated, linked, and connected via the Internet of Things (IoT).

With the development of computers and smartphones, citizens' interactions with firms are becoming more connected affecting other firms and public bodies in urban living. As a result, firms change the way they design and configure future products and services. Therefore, new business models, i.e., how firms "do business" through their value propositions, value creation and value capture, will play a key role in shaping smart cities of the future. Yet, very little is known about new business models within smart cities and urban living and how these models can be supported by the urban data.

How can cities use, understand, and most importantly, analyse data generated by citizens, businesses, and municipalities to ensure more optimal fulfilment of citizens' wants and needs, to reach sustainable and green society, and to ensure economic growth? Recent advances in Big Data and Connected Data analytics provide useful insights into how city data can be analysed and then used to generate value for municipalities, companies, and individuals offering a variety of tools which range from relatively simple data mining and clustering algorithms to more sophisticated analytics which takes into account the context in which individuals are making decisions in cities.

One of the major challenges for analysing urban datasets is data volume. Recent estimates show that by the end of 2017, annual global traffic of data will reach 7.7 Zettabytes. Under these conditions, it is not clear how analytics will be able to cope with such a volume. This challenge is of grave importance for many municipalities and organisations thatwhich are often forced to delete large quantities of potentially valuable information. Among other sources, customer loyalty card information, video data from security cameras, etc. - all this data is barely used for analytics and often deleted within weeks if not days after collection. Yet, clustering models for large datasets offer some hope for solving this problem.

The idea behind clustering urban data is to split it into similar (homogeneous) groups in accordance with specific attributes. Clustering large masses of urban data in a compact format allows analysts to present information of the entire dataset (without omissions or deletions) but reorganises the data and makes it manageable.

The HARRIET project recently tested two clustering techniques appropriate for large urban datasets: the K-Means technique and the Fuzzy c-Mean (FCM) technique. K-Means divides the data into clusters by minimising the distance between data points and the "centroid" of the cluster (usually calculated as a mean of all points in the cluster). FCM is similar to K-Means but assumes that it is possible that an object/data point may belong to more than one cluster according to its degree of membership. We used LiDAR sensor data from the area of the University of Warwick in Coventry (UK) to compare the performance of K-Means vs FCM. Clustering was conducted on a rather standard AMD 8320, 4.1 GHz, 8 core processor with 8 GB of RAM and running a 64-bit Windows 8.1 OS. As a result of this test, we found that FCM clustering works faster on larger datasets than K-Means. However, K-Means requires less processing power than FCM.

This means that clustering techniques can be very helpful in dealing with large masses of urban data. In fact, clustering cluster analysis for smart data empowers smart cities to conduct 'smart' analytics (analytics which does not require omitting or deleting valuable information) on data generated by citizens, firms, and cities themselves in order to create an optimal system which would allow citizens' wants and needs to be accurately anticipated as well as help firms and cities to develop and deliver anticipated goods and services to citizens.

The time and further tests will tell which clustering technique is best. Based on some early tests, if you have significant limitations to your processing power, K-Means clustering is a good solution but be prepared to wait for the results. If processing power is not a big issue, FCM will work better for large urban datasets and provide a faster solution.

In recent years, urban areas have seen a rapid growth in the Big Personal Data generation at the individual citizen, community, and city levels. This, in turn, has led to the increase in demand for new pricing mechanisms governing the exchange of Big Personal Data. HARRIET produced a paper entitled Multi-Sided Markets and Pricing for Big Personal Data: Smarter Cities and Citizens (https://www.researchgate.net/publication/281063774_Multi-Sided_Markets_and_Pricing_for_Big_Personal_Data_Smarter_Cities_and_Citizens?channel=doi&linkId=55d3170708ae7fb244f57dff&showFulltext=true) which was framed in the context of how new data platforms, banks, and pricing mechanisms can benefit the stakeholders. In particular, we examine how emerging data platforms (that can enable data-driven business models and evaluate both existing and user-centric pricing mechanisms) can be combined with multi-sided markets. A case study involving commodity sensors, personal data, and consumer behaviour is showcased to illustrate the concepts in action.

These and many other results were discussed with practitioners and policy makers at the Smart Cities Forum (http://hubofallthings.com/Harriet/scf/) and Competitive Advantage in Global Economy summer school 2015 (http://hubofallthings.com/Harriet/2015/06/personal-data-economy-drives-the-agenda-at-the-cade-2015-summer-school/).
Exploitation Route Released to the public in July 2016, Rumpel is compatible with all computer Operating Systems and is made available as an open source programme, which means other developers can contribute to its development and freely use it to create their own versions of the hyperdata browser.

With regards to the research on smart cities, city solutions can be adopted from the relevant research outputs (papers) to be directly implemented in interested cities.
Sectors Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism,Government, Democracy and Justice,Transport

URL http://hatresearch.org/Harriet
 
Description The research project's findings and development of Rumpel is being taken forward by the HAT Foundation, a social enterprise grouping spun off from the HAT project. The HAT Foundation is led by a management team comprising academics and researchers who worked on the HAT project, including HAT & HARRIET Project PI Irene Ng and Paul Tasker, who was independent chair of the HAT Industrial Advisory Board. It consists of the HAT Community Foundation, a charity body and its operational arm HAT Data Exchange Ltd (HATDeX) which has developed the Alpha HAT into its beta version of the HAT. Rumpel together with the HAT was released to 136 beta users in July 2016. Further development of the Rumpel hyperdata browser has included Rumpel Modules such as Notables, which enables users to log private notes, lists, blogs, links and share them on the Internet on their own terms. HATDeX has also developed Rumpel Lite, the mobile extension of web Rumpel that is compatible with iOS phones. Plans are under way to have Rumpel include automated and personalised suggestions, prompts and reminders based on users' needs, habits and lifestyles - for example, prioritising news-feed items based on your interests, or helping to inform decisions about what concert or movie to see taking into account where exactly you are and what you have enjoyed previously.
First Year Of Impact 2016
Sector Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism,Government, Democracy and Justice,Retail,Transport
Impact Types Societal,Economic

 
Description Smart Cities: Citizens' Wellbeing & Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy
Amount £4,000 (GBP)
Organisation University of Warwick 
Department Warwick University Centre for Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 11/2015 
End 10/2016
 
Description Smart City and Smart Citizens: New Business and Economic Models of Urban Living
Amount £10,000 (GBP)
Organisation The British Academy 
Department BA/Leverhulme Small Research Grants
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2014 
End 08/2015
 
Title Individual Common Ratio Preference Reversals Dataset 
Description This dataset was used in research output: Loomes G, Pogrebna G. (2014). Testing for independence while allowing for probabilistic choice. Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, 49 (3), pp. 189-211 Findings from technique used in this paper were later adapted to shape Rumpel app. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact Behaviour under risk should be taking into account when collecting personal data. We propose a broad framework for individual choice under risk which can accommodate many stochastic formulations of various deterministic theories. Using this framework to guide an experimental design, we show that most individuals' departures from the independence axiom cannot be explained by adding a 'random noise' term to a deterministic 'core' theory which incorporates this axiom. We also find behaviour that cannot be explained in terms of the standard assumptions of Cumulative Prospect Theory, often invoked to account for violations of independence. Our results suggest that 'similarity' effects may explain the data better. 
URL http://www.gannapogrebna.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2014-JRU-RAW.xlsx
 
Title Individual Risk Attitudes Dataset 
Description This dataset was used in research output: Loomes G, Pogrebna G. (2014). Measuring Individual Risk Attitudes when Preferences are Imprecise. The Economic Journal, 124 (576), pp. 569-593 Findings from technique used in this paper was later adapted to shape Rumpel app. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact When collecting personal data, it is very important to take into account individual risk attitudes. There is widespread interest in measuring risk attitudes and incorporating such measures into broader econometric analyses. We consider three elicitation procedures currently in use. We find considerable variability within - and even more, between - the results they produce. We suggest that this reflects the way that different instruments interact with imprecise underlying preferences. The short run implication is that such procedures need to be used with caution and are likely to be highly context-specific. The longer run implication is that adding 'white noise' to deterministic models is inadequate: we need to develop models that allow for imprecision and procedural variation. 
URL http://www.gannapogrebna.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/RAW-DATA.xlsx
 
Title HAT Hyperdata Browser 
Description The HAT HyperData Browser is a - 'browser' of how data is linked to other data in other places and a way to view the linkages and clusters of data. It works with the HAT Database schema (currently at alpha stage) which is issued under the Creative Commons AttributionNoDerivatives 4.0 International licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/4.0/).Future schema (beyond beta) will be released under Creative Commons AttributionShareAlike 4.0 International licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/). 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2015 
Open Source License? Yes  
Impact The HAT Hyperdata Browser forms part of the technology behind the Hub-of-all-Things (HAT) that allows individuals to flatten, contextualise, bundle and exchange all types of personal data. All this tech exist within a trust framework of a personal data exchange ecosystem, hence allowing permitted exchange of personal data with other individuals or HAT-enabled organisations. These have been released to the wider public and made freely available, to reflect the nature of the project's public funding. 
URL https://github.com/Hub-of-all-Things
 
Title Rumpel HAT dashboard (hyperdata browser) 
Description Rumpel is a hyperdata web browser, a dashboard that makes it easy for its users to visualise, understand and organise all kinds of personal data, much of which has been hard to access in the past. Rumpel was first developed as a HAT hyperdata browser under the RCUK-funded project Home Hub-of-all-Things (HAT) as Platform for Multi-sided Market powered by Internet-of-Things: Opportunities for New Economic & Business Model (EP/K039911/1). 
Type Of Technology Webtool/Application 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact Rumpel gives users the ability to browse their very own private and secure 'personal data wardrobe' - the HAT (Hub-of-all-Things) which collates data about them held on the internet and allows them to control, combine and share it in whatever way they wish. It was launched to the public in July 2016 via HAT spin-off company HAT Data Exchange (HATDeX). A newer version of Rumpel - Rumpel 2.0 - was launched to the public in Feb 2017. 
URL http://www.hatdex.org/rumpel-platform/
 
Description 2nd Service Systems Forum 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact The HARRIET Project funded the Service Systems Forum, which returned for its second year (SSFV2016) following the successful inaugural event (SSFV2015) that was inspired and part-funded by the HAT project. The theme of SSFV2016 was Smart Service Systems & Business Models in the Digital Era. Held in Venice from June 12-13, 2016, the conference aimed to provide opportunities for service researchers from academia and practitioners from industry to share the latest research and practice on topics related to smart service systems and business models in the digital economy.





It also featured a Practitioners' Forum, a half-day session with key practitioners to discuss integration of knowledge to inform practice. HAT Project Lead Irene Ng presented a Keynote Address on Personal Data as an Amplification of Human Capability on the HAT. The event saw the participation of 20 service researchers and industry practitioners who engaged in interesting discussions about the personal data economy and their role in it. The success of SSF2015 has inspired the organisation of the 2nd Service Systems Forum in June 2016.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/sci/wmg/research/business_transformation/ssg/ssgabout/sswmgactivities/...
 
Description Competitive Advantage in the Digital Economy (CADE) 2015 summer school (Venice, Italy) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact CADE 2015 brought together academics and practitioners to discuss the current and future challenges surrounding the issues of New Business Models in the Digital Economy, Big Data and Personalisation. This year the topic of the School was: "Personal Data Economy and New Business Models". Thought leaders from a variety of sciences including Marketing, Service Systems, Computer Science, Economics, and Business Administration shared their opinions about the impact of technology on the way businesses operate, with particular reference to personal data economy and connected data.

In recent years, urban areas have seen a rapid growth in the Big Personal Data generation at the individual citizen, community, and city levels. This, in turn, has led to the increase in demand for new pricing mechanisms governing the exchange of Big Personal Data.

As a part of CADE 2015, HARRIET also organised a city challenge for early career researchers. This challenge was to deliver a (digital) solution with the relevant business model for a specific city. The city of Venice (Italy) wanted to increase tourist mobility, the city of Murcia (Spain) looked for ways to make use of its newly built but troubled airport, and the town of Catia La Mar (Venezuela) looked for way to establish a new art museum. Three teams competed in this year's challenge with each team working on solutions for Venice, Murcia, and Catia, respectively. Teams presented their solutions which were judged by the professional committee.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://hatresearch.org/Harriet/2015/06/personal-data-economy-drives-the-agenda-at-the-cade-2015-summ...
 
Description Competitive Advantage in the Digital Economy (CADE) 2016: Markets, Currencies and Data (Venice, Italy) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact CADE 2016 expanded its reach from last year's event, with participants coming from a range of European countries and in total, 20+ institutions were represented at the school. This year's theme was split into three main areas; markets, currencies and data. CADE2016 was a very diverse event, from the talks to the participants' projects which ranged from privacy in the digital economy to new business and economic models. Participants were also able to apply their existing knowledge base and everything that they had learnt during the school to the CADE challenge; to use a range of potential data sources (e.g., facebook, calendar, location, health) to come up with the killer app for the HAT (Hub-of-all-Things). This resulted in a variety of app ideas from personal fashion apps to financial assistance apps to health and social life apps.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://digitalmusings.me/2016/05/18/competitive-advantage-in-the-digital-economy-2016/
 
Description Competitive Advantage in the Digital Economy (CADE) 2017 (Venice, Italy) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact The CADE Forum 2017 was an exclusive three-day forum held in Venice, Italy, bringing together academic and practitioner speakers to educate and to discuss the state of the art with PhD students, early career researchers and practitioners working within the digital economy. This year saw CADE enter its fourth year, following three successful years during which CADE grew from a predominately Western European forum to a European conference welcoming participants from Eastern Europe. In 2017, CADE Forum became a global event, with applicants from the USA and Australia, highlighting the increased importance of the digital economy and the Forum's relevance and popularity. This year, CADE also merged with WMG's Service Systems Forum to become a single event, tackling the topic of Smart Service Systems, Digital Innovation, Privacy and Trust.
During CADE 2017, internationally-recognised thought leaders from a variety of subjects including Marketing, Service Management, Operations Management, Supply Chain Management and Computer Science shared their thoughts and latest research about the digital economy. The CADE Forum aims to discuss the current state of the art in the digital economy, with a focus not just on presenting the latest research, but also on opening up avenues for future research with a lengthy discussion session following the presentations. This year was no exception, with thought leaders presenting various cutting-edge research topics whilst simultaneously addressing a number of increasingly important issues that left open the possibility for future research.
As well as the keynotes, for the first time in CADE's history this year saw the inclusion of parallel sessions, which gave participants the opportunity to present and then discuss their own research. With the format of CADE placing emphasis on discussion, participants were given up to 15 minutes each to present their research, followed by a short discussion. With topics ranging from the future of blockchain, to participation styles of young people in virtual worlds, these presentations provided a broad and thought-provoking insight into the type of research being conducted in the digital economy. Awards were also offered for best paper (overall), most relevant to practice and unique methodological approach.
Much discussion also took place during CADE 2017's panel session, which saw the Forum's keynote speakers and scientific committee take open questions from participants. The first question drove a long discussion around the future of digital economy research and teaching. This question asked broadly: what needs to be done to advance digital economy research across disciplines, how can we encourage multidisciplinary work within the digital economy and how do we teach the additional knowledge created within said research. Interestingly, whilst the question's focus was on the first two areas, it was the teaching component that received considerable attention. The keynote speakers suggested different approaches, including interactive lectures, lectures from industry on best practice within the digital economy given that industry is seemingly ahead of academia in the digital economy at present (a gap that the Forum agreed needs closing), and creating a more comprehensive extra-curricular reading list which would subsequently be tested in class to ensure the reading is being completed. However, in view of the exponential amount of new knowledge coming into the world through ground-breaking research that needs to be learned and absorbed by students, imparting this effectively remains a considerable challenge for academia, and it is one that the Forum's panel put forth to the participants to solve, as they will be the ones teaching the research in the years to come.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/sci/wmg/research/business_transformation/ssg/ssgabout/sswmgactivities/cade...
 
Description Competitive Advantage in the Digital Economy (CADE) 2018 (Venice, Italy) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact The 5th Competitive Advantage in the Digital Economy (CADE) Forum was an exclusive three-day event, bringing together academics and practitioners to discuss the challenges of the digital economy and present the latest cutting edge research. This year saw the CADE Forum enter its fifth year, and specifically, it focused on personal data, smart service systems and digital transformation. CADE's core objective is to facilitate interdisciplinary collaborations and to continue building a platform for the development of a common language for digital economy research. The Forum has already built a reputation for creating new synergies between research groups both at Warwick and other institutions, and emphasis will continue to be placed on this as well as developing collaborative opportunities between participants at CADE. At CADE, emphasis was placed on discussion and collaboration, with plenty of time allocated to both your presentation, the subsequent discussion and additional time between parallel sessions and workshops for further in depth discussions with other participants. For the first time in 2018, the CADE Forum ran four workshops related to the personal data economy: Product Design in the Personal Data Economy; Student Experience and Teaching; Data-Driven Business Models; and Behavioural Visibility in Data (BeVID)- Experiencing New Research Methods with Reality Mining.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/sci/wmg/research/business_transformation/ssg/ssgabout/sswmgactivities/cade...
 
Description HARRIET Blog/website 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact he HARRIET blogsite was set up as a channel to communicate with researchers, policymakers and industry practitioners as well as the general public on issues relating to the project, i.e. Smart Cities, Smart Citizens and Smart Things. Over the course of the project, the posts reached more than 3,500 unique users. The most popular post on this topic with over 1,300 hits was post by the project RA, David Reynolds, "Where is the World's Smartest City?" published in April, 2015.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016
URL http://hatresearch.org/Harriet/
 
Description Media Coverage on the HAT & HARRIET projects 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The HAT and HARRIET projects have actively engaged in media activities to create more awareness and interest about the HAT, Rumpel and their proposed eventual rollout to the general public. This has included preparing and putting out media releases at various stages of the project, participating in media interviews with various online and offline media, guest blogging about the HAT, and inviting media to HAT events. A list of 'HAT in the Media' can be found at: http://hubofallthings.com/join-the-hat-revolution/media-center/
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014,2015,2016
URL https://hatresearch.org/media-center/
 
Description Smart Cities Forum 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact This workshop on Smart Cities was held on Feb 16, 2016 in London, and it brought together academic researchers, industrial and city government experts that work in this broad space, with the aim of igniting discussion and foster opportunities for further collaboration in the area of smart cities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://hatresearch.org/Harriet/scf/