ESSfES: Everyday Safety-Security for Everyday Services

Lead Research Organisation: Royal Holloway, University of London
Department Name: Information Security

Abstract

Since the early 2000s public service in the UK has undergone significant re-design and a fundamental part of the vision is to produce services used everyday by people that are safe and secure for all. Acknowledging the importance of safe and secure public services, this fellowship is specifically grounded in that area of service design and focuses on the connections between the ways that people create feelings of safety and security in their everyday lives and the protection of digital everyday services.

In the design of digital services, responses to concerns related to trust, identity, privacy and security have typically been handled as part of the digital interaction between service user and service provider and yet the techniques that people use to protect personal privacy, keep information confidential, build trust and manage identity are also enmeshed in their everyday routines and practices. Whilst human factors considerations are a long-established part of this security design process, the focus is typically more on designing for user interaction and the protection of their data rather than designing more broadly for the safety and security of people in their everyday lives. As everyday services are increasingly digitised and reach into almost every aspect of a person's life, it becomes a priority to link these two aspects of protection so that everyday practices become a part of a service engagement that protects an individual's privacy, trust and identity as well as contributing to their individual security.

Security in the context of everyday life is much wider than protection from technological attack; security is also the freedom to engage with these new forms of public service free from concern about threats to their personal safety, security or privacy. In this context not only must technological attack be considered but so too must service providers such as housing authorities, local councils and health care professionals being regarded as threat actors and malicious acts against individuals by family and friends through the misuse of public services be considered. When traditional service providers and members of a person's kin and friendship networks are regarded as sources of threat, people will deploy a wide range of social as well as technological practices to defend themselves. Successfully designing to support and improve these defences through social practices are as important as the design of technological defences.

Outputs
This fellowship will develop a framework through which researchers can co-research and co-design with communities, develop interventions and create impactful techniques that support and improve social defences. Through the research framework relationships will be built between researchers, service producer and consumer communities and practitioners from the areas of everyday security and technological security design.

The fellowship programme will produce a handbook of real-world security-focused everyday service design research problems to be used as part of education programmes as well as the researcher communities. Additionally on-line engagements will be run periodically throughout the fellowship to promote broader thinking about designing to support trust, identity, privacy and security in everyday services.

This fellowship programme will also produce innovative technologies. Examples of possible prototypes include: sound and tactile maps to convey the lived experience of particular communities of service consumers, mapping techniques to show networks of trust across a geographical area, skills-swap technologies to facilitate knowledge transfer about trust, identity, privacy and security in a digitally mediated society and the development of virtual reality technology to help develop understanding of what identity, trust, security and privacy conflicts mean to different communities.

Planned Impact

The research proposed in this fellowship will benefit those citizens who engage with everyday services, including those services related to housing, health, employment, welfare, food and criminal justice. In 2013 it was estimated that circa 78% of the UK population was on-line and at this time the largest increase in Internet use could be seen in low-income households for whom one aspect of internet use is to gain access to digitally delivered everyday services such as housing, health, welfare, employment, education and transport. Given the density of internet use coupled with the progamme of delivering everyday services through digital means, this fellowship has the potential to have far reaching impact both within the UK and internationally. Everyday services include public services but the term also more widely covers services that are regarded as being designed for access by all.

The research proposed in this fellowship will also benefit those providing as well as consuming everyday services. Traditional service providers such as local authorities, public-private partnerships, commercial organisations and central government departments will benefit. The research in this fellowship will work with everyday services underpinned by a wide range of socially-driven economic models and therefore this research will also benefit the less traditional everyday service providers including: municipals, social enterprises, user-led organisations, community groups and co-operatives.

The benefits of the fellowship programme will be felt in the following ways:
- Citizens engaging with everyday services will be able to do so using methods of information sharing and protection that better fit their everyday lives and will be provided with techniques that enable them to safely leverage their networks of support as a means of safety and security.
- lncrease in service design awareness and knowledge about the importance of methods of the communication of service values. Through the promotion of the fellowship outputs and deliverables, the extent to which the presentation and communication of everyday services can be a contributing factor to both the protection of a person's everyday safety-security and of the everyday service will become clearer. Techniques of co-operative service operationalisation will also be evaluated as a possible method of reducing friction between service users and service providers.
- The publication of the security theories knowledge base, the dissemination of fellowship ouputs and the production of a handbook of real-world trust, identity, privacy and security challenges for everyday design will be used to influence understanding across stakeholder communities, including communities of service regulators.
- A wider range of technologies will also be produced. Possible technologies might include: mapping technologies to promote an understanding of the lived experiences of service users and to enable a visualisation of social threats vulnerablities, interactive maps to plot the networks of trust across a geographical area, skills-swap technologies designed to promote the exchange of protection skills know-how between communities and across generations and virtual reality technologies to promote an understanding of alternative view points on the value and conflicts related to trust, identity, privacy and security in the use of everyday services.
 
Description Cyber-crime costs the UK billions of pounds and threatens national security. However, the effects of cyber insecurities on everyday life are not widely acknowledged. The research has sought to address this gap by conducting research with groups across society and the research has demonstrated that for cyber and technological security to be effective, security professionals must address the security issues that people across society face in their everyday lives. The research has also shown that for technological security to be successful, use of digital technology needs to be understood from the perspective of the individual, the institutions deploying the technology and the state (together with the other main institutions of power) and the research has developed approaches to both research and teach security at the intersections of these perspectives.
Exploitation Route The research has produced a course and a monograph intended for PhD students and researchers in this area so that the knowledge produced from the research can be included as part of a cyber security post graduate curriculum. The research has produced techniques (on-line, in-person and hybrid) for identifying and developing an understanding the security issues that arise at the intersections between the different dimensions that shape technology use. Research findings that can be used by policy makers to develop policy and guidance related to the running of digital societies.
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Government, Democracy and Justice

URL https://pure.royalholloway.ac.uk/portal/en/projects/everyday-safetysecurity-for-everyday-services-essfes(61755584-a9fa-4c1e-bd32-629da5c7f57d).html
 
Description The research has provided an evidence-based approach that has driven a culture change, resulting in marginalised neighbourhoods and other communities putting in place digital security practices appropriate to their situations. The development of a broader position on digital security that places people at the centre of technological security design has been reflected in NCSC guidance: https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/collection/you-shape-security The guidance refers to the broader position on digital security that has been developed as a result of this award. The guidance refers to this booklet set that was produced from this award: https://bookleteer.com/collection.html?id=28 Safer digital inclusion has gained greater political focus during the COVID pandemic and the importance of a digital security for all has come to the fore. The research has also informed DCMS's development of a trust framework for digital identity provision.
First Year Of Impact 2019
Sector Communities and Social Services/Policy,Government, Democracy and Justice
Impact Types Policy & public services

 
Description People and Security Guidance - National Cyber Security Centre
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Gave evidence to a government review
 
Title Security Theory Map 
Description The core activity of this research fellowship to date has been the development of a map of security theories draw from the fields of Politics and IR, Sociology, Economics, Computer Science, Psychology and Geography. The map is currently being trialled with policy makers, technologists and security practitioners to explore how different philosophical positions on security can adjust the policies and the technologies used to deploy cyber security strategies. The map has been created in both analogue and digital form and will be made available for public use during 2019. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact The notable impact is the introduction of security philosophies as a start point for cyber security design. This is changing the parameters of the conversations on cyber security technology design with national policy makers. An article outlining the map can be found here (p.16): https://www.riscs.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/2018-RISCS-Annual-Report.pdf 
URL https://stark-tundra-44385.herokuapp.com/
 
Description Not-Equal: Digital Security for All 
Organisation Newcastle University
Department Open Lab
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The broader theoretical position on digital security developed through the ESSfES award that enables a bridging between digital security and digital inclusion policy has been used as the foundation for the Digital Security For All strand of the Not-Equal Digital Economy Network+ inititiative that is run by Open Lab at Newcastle University. This broader theoretical position has been used as the basis for the first call for projects that has been issued by the Not-Equal network.
Collaborator Contribution Not-Equal provides administrative support for ESSfES related engagements and activities. I have calculated 10 days at £350 per day to reflect this.
Impact The output to date has been a call for project proposals that sit within the broader interpretation of digital security that has been developed through ESSfES. Disciplines involved: Computer Science, Design and Sociology.
Start Year 2018
 
Description British Computer Society Webinar 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A webinar hosted by the British Computer Society to discuss new frontiers in security practice.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.bcs.org/events/2020/september/webinar-re-imagining-corporate-security-and-resilience-lea...
 
Description Canon's parliamentary reception 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Attended Canon's Parliamentary Reception on the 31st of October 2018 as part of a panel session to present on futures of digital security. My contribution presented the broader framework of digital security and the participatory engagement methods developed as part of the ESSfES award,
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.govtechleaders.com/2018/12/11/cyber-security-is-about-much-more-than-technology/
 
Description Creative Engagements for Security Practitioners 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A creative engagement workshop to take the creative outputs from the Fellowship and work with security practitioners to convert them into security practice. The aim of such workshops is to explore what types of security engagement are meaningful to organisations, how to benchmark the successes of such engagements and from there to develop a programme of security engagements that enable security practitioners to support people in their day to day security tasks and practices.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Creative Engagements for Security Practitioners 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A creative engagement workshop to take the creative outputs from the Fellowship and work with security practitioners to convert them into security practice. The aim of such workshops is to explore what types of security engagement are meaningful to organisations, how to benchmark the successes of such engagements and from there to develop a programme of security engagements that enable security practitioners to support people in their day to day security tasks and practices. This workshop took place with Axelos (a security practitioner consultancy).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Digital Reponsibility Talk at Academic Centres of Excellence in Cyber Security Research 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact A 60 minute talk to the annual conference for Academic Centres of Excellence in Cyber Security Research
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Digital Responsibility Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A workshop held in collaboration with the Research Institute for Sociotechnical Cyber Security to examine the relevance of notions of responsibility to cyber security practice.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Digital Security For All - talk 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact A talk was given to research group at Lancaster University students on the work to date of the ESSfES fellowship.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://www.lancaster.ac.uk/security-lancaster/about/seminars-and-events/lizzie-coles-kemp/
 
Description Digital Security for All 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation of key fellowship findings to the Digital Economy 10th Anniversary Showcase.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Digital Security for All 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact This talk was designed to introduce people to ethical and political aspects of digital security design.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://hcidopenday.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/Open-Day-Schedule-2019-Final-to-Print.pdf
 
Description Digital Security for all: Intraservice 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Circa 35 members of IntraService - a digitalisation unit that is part of Gothenburg City Council - attended a talk on the bridging of digital security and digital inclusion and the implications of this for digitalisation policy. The work presented was developed as part of the ESSfES award.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Digital Security for all: a research framework 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Circa 40 postgraduate students that form a research cohort at Oxford Brookes' Movement Lab attended a talk on the inclusive and participatory research methods that have been further developed and refined as part of ESSfES.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Digital Security for all: a research framework 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Circa 20 postrgraduate students and security professionals attended a talk given to Oxford's Cyber Security Doctoral Training Centre. The topic of the talk was the case for a broader digital security research framework and the design principles that are used in such a framework.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Digital Security for all: an inclusive approach to security awareness 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Circa 120 security practitioners attended the panel session titled "Finding a common language to promote awareness across the company" hosted as part of the European Information Security Summity 2017. I gave a position statement outlining the evidence that supports the importance for a broader position on security awareness and the associated implications for the language used.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Digital Security for all: implications for security practice 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Circa 100 participants attended the Australian Security Influence and Trust Group in November 2016 in Melbourne. I gave the opening Key Note and set out the principles for a broader and more inclusive approach to information security practice within organisations.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Digital Security for all: implications for security practice 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Circa 40 postgraduate students at Gothenburg University attended a talk on the implications of a broader digital security conceptualisation for IT and security practice within organisations.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://soundcloud.com/digitalthoughtleaders
 
Description Digital Security for all: implications for security practice 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Circa 20 policy researchers attended a talk at CSIRO, Sydney Australia on the 6th of April 2017. This talk presented an initial position on a broader digital security framework to be used in digital service design.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Digital Skills: Cyber Security Engagement Practice 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Circa 150 policy makers and security practitioners attended the NCSC sponsored Research Institute Conference 2016. A talk was given on cyber security engagement practices that are used by and developed through ESSfES. This was the first talk in a series of ESSfES talks and articles that resulted in NCSC publlishing national guidance on cyber security engagement practice. This guidance references ESSfES work in this area.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Digital Skills: Cyber Security Engagement Practice 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Circa 150 participants (total) attended two security engagement practice workshops run at the CBI conference on cyber securty. I presented at these workshops together with a security practitioner from Axelos. The engagement skills and approach presented is grounded in the work of ESSfES.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.cbi.org.uk/news/cbicyber-breakout-session-review-people-and-behaviours-are-your-strongest...
 
Description Digital Skills: Cyber Security Engagement Practice 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact 20 people attended a roundtable for the launch of ATOS' Digital Vision for Cyber Security briefing. Based on the work of the ESSfES award, I wrote an article on security engagement methods that was included in the Digital Vision Briefing. The Digital Skills Briefing was sent out to 500+ individuals.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://atos.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/digital-vision-cyber-security-opinion-paper-new.pdf
 
Description Digital Skills: Cyber Security Engagement Practice 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Circa 35 security practitioners attended a webinar on cyber security engagement techniques given by myself on behalf of consultancy group AXELOS. The cyber security engagement techniques presented are grounded in the work of ESSfES.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Digital Skills: future of security skills 2035 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Circa 40 head teachers from the Woodard Schools Corporation attended a talk on digital skills 2035. This talk presented the digital skills and necessary curriculum changes needed to address the broader security landscape identified by the work of ESSfES.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Digital security for all: why an inclusive security approach matters 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This was a public lecture based on the core principles of ESSfES given to mark the work that I have undertaken in broadening the concept of digital security so that it links with notions of digital inclusion as part of a civil strategy. Circa 120 people attended from the UK, Denmark, the US and Australia. The audience included former study participants, colleagues from across the academic disciplinary spectrum (ranging from Theatre Studies to Number Theory), policy makers in the areas of digital security and digital inclusion, postgraduate students and third sector organisations. The lecture has provided a platform from which to have further discussion within both UK and Swedish government about how to bring together digital security and digital inclusion policy.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/research-and-teaching/departments-and-schools/information-security/n...
 
Description ESSfES: Fellowship Achievements 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Presentation of the key achievements of the ESSfES fellowship to current cohort of Fellows and UKRI panel. The achievements are:

Theoretical Contribution: Brought technological security into conversation with theories of societal and human security. Examining notion of design-accessible theories. Interactive visualisations to articulate theoretical contribution.

Academic Outputs: Year on year submission and acceptance increase for the 4* ACM venue: CHI, diversification of in-band submission venues, monograph for Foundations and Trends in Web Science.

Practice Outputs: Revision of methods book and supporting artefacts for practitioner community.

Design Process Outputs: Revision of theory hack process and supporting artefacts for use in the ACE and CDT communities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Inclusive Privacy and Security 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Talk given at University of Northumbria symposium for people and security.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Inclusive Security Design - Digital Security for All 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact 60+ students attended the Sec Human Summer School in Bochum. The purpose of the talk was to introduce the students to wider conceptualisations of security grounded in social and political political theories of security.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://sechumansummerschool.blogs.ruhr-uni-bochum.de/program-and-invited-speaker/
 
Description Inclusive Security Design - Digital Security for All 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact A talk that introduced students to ideas of integrating digital design with social and political theories of security.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/research-and-teaching/departments-and-schools/business-and-managemen...
 
Description Inclusive Security Design - Digital Security for All 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact The purpose of this talk was to introduce PHD students to the possibilities of including perspectives from social and political theories of security in digital security design.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Multi-geared digital economy: accessible, sustainable and cohesive. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Presentation for potential future theme of Digital Economy (EPSRC - UKRI) - presenting the idea of a sustainable, caring security.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Panel participation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Took part in panel debate as part of the Academic Centres of Excellence for Cyber Security Research Winter School. Topic of debate: academic-industry engagement strategies.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Principles of Securing Cyber Society - postgraduate course 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact The course adopts social framings of security problems using the theoretical output, tools and frameworks developed on the ESSfES fellowship.

Objectives of the course:

Provide students with a grounding in the broader security theory landscape.

Set out a conceptual toolkit that students can use to identify and analyse social aspects of security problems.

Present an overview of some of the relationships between research design and families of security problems.

Demonstrate how critical research approaches can be used to develop a deeper understanding of problems
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Reframing Digital Security Inquiry: Unknotting Some of the Paradoxes of Digital Technology Use 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact A talk explore the use of digital technology and how it is often described as paradoxical; for example, whilst there might be a desire for privacy, people routinely use digital technology to disclose personal information without privacy protection. This talk presented a creative security approach that is designed to critically examine lived experiences of digital technology and, in so doing, unknot technology practices that might seem paradoxical. The theoretical framing of this approach, together with their use, was explained through a presentation of a case study that examines the use of smart technology in the home.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description SASIG - healthcare presentation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presented at Security Awareness Special Interest Group event on the 22nd of March 2017. The event was attended by circa 60 healthcare and security professionals interested in the protection of the healthcare data of individuals. The talk given promoted a broader interpretation of digital security of healthcare records based on the theoretical framework developed as part of the ESSfES award.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description SASIG - human resources presentation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Gave a talk to circa 60 human resources practitioners on the topic of the ways that human resource practitioners can take part in digital security practice. This talk was given as part of 6th Human Resources Workshop hosted by the Security Awareness Special Interest Group.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Talk on Digital Identity Report produced for DCMS 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Presentation to cross-Whitehall working group on digital identity
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://pure.royalholloway.ac.uk/portal/en/publications/digital-identity(1cbddd33-0abc-4863-9b9a-800...
 
Description Theory Hack Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact A workshop to explore different framings of digitall security using different social and political theories as startpoints. The design of the workshop uses the theory map developed as part of ESSfES and the physical modelling method that forms part of the creative engagement toolkit. The workshop is designed for PhD students who are working on sociotechnical security problems.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Theory Hack Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact A workshop to explore different framings of digitall security using different social and political theories as startpoints. The design of the workshop uses the theory map developed as part of ESSfES and the physical modelling method that forms part of the creative engagement toolkit. The workshop is designed for PhD students who are working on sociotechnical security problems.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Webinar for the Security Awareness Special Interest Group (SASIG) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A webinar where I was a panel member debating the role of culture in security practice.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020