GetAMoveOn:transforming health through enabling mobility

Lead Research Organisation: University College London
Department Name: UCL Interaction Centre

Abstract

When we move more, we become smarter; as we become stronger, chronic pain decreases. Greater movement, especially in social contexts, improves collaboration. As we move, not only do we reduce stress: we improve our capacity to handle stressful situations and to see more options for creative new solutions. Movement enhances both strength and stamina, improves bone mineral density and balance, reducing incidence of falling and associated hip injuries (causes of death in the elderly). Movement complements other functions, from assisting with sleep and therefore memory and cognition, to helping with diet and associated hormones - improving insulin sensitivity and balancing cortisol. There are recent studies showing benefits of movement related to dementia. And yet, physical inactivity is the fourth leading cause of death worldwide; sedentarism has been called the "new smoking". Meanwhile costs to UK GDP from sedentarism and associated disease are increasing - from sick days lost to work, to elders losing mobility and having to move into care homes.

We have designed ourselves into our sedentarism: sitting during our commute, at desks while we work, and at home on the sofa. There is a critical need to design ourselves back into the natural effects of health accrued simply by moving more. We need solutions that will help build both the evidence and the experience that movement can enhance and benefit people's lives.

New technologies are transforming our ability to capture lifestyle data on individuals in real time. Consumer technologies such as step counters and wifi scales are the tip of an iceberg - research programmes worldwide are proposing lifestyle data capture from devices ranging from video cameras to electricity meters to wearables. Meanwhile pervasive connectivity allows that data to be transmitted, processed through powerful machine learning tools and provided back to people in a heartbeat. While we understand the potential technologies, we do not yet know how to leverage the technology effectively to support transformative health.

Current approaches in ehealth generally only reach a small part of the population that is already interested in fitness, personal data capture, or both. Their uptake is, furthermore, of dubious effect as two recent medical reviews have shown. To have a national impact on health and wellbeing, to reduce the crippling burden of long term health conditions and to move healthcare from the clinic to the community, we need to reach everyone, across a range of abilities and aspirations. We need to connect the potential of the technology with the potential of people and realise the benefits of a healthy, brilliant, population.

Realising this potential requires research on novel technical solutions, supported by theories from sports and health sciences on blending appropriate movement strategies for particular performance aspirations to behavioural and cognitive sciences on ways to engage people to make effective and meaningful progress. We need to understand what measures are appropriate not just to evaluate progress, but to guide it and adapt to it. To have meaningful impact across these dimensions we need to combine a range of expertise including sensor networks, data analytics, interactive visualisation, human computer interacton, online citizen engagement, behaviour change, sports, exercise.

In this network we focus on movement as a locus for health: it is our test case as it drives so many other benefits that are of value: economically, socially and culturally. The current call is the ideal opportunity to establish our proposed network to develop an interdisciplinary UK community that will address the EPSRC Grand Challenge of transforming community health and care through the delivery of tested technologies that promote wellbeing by providing timely, individualised feedback that encourages appropriate activities.

Planned Impact

This NetworkPlus will have impact across a wide range of areas. The goal of our network is to help move our nation from being sedentary to active by understanding the role interactive technology can have in supporting this transition, and in delivering future technological solutions that are truly fit for purpose. Our engagement strategies will bring together experts in health and sport science, behavioural psychology, network systems, sensors, and human computer interaction, to create the critical mass of experts required to address this key challenge in UK welfare that will deliver improved health nationwide.

When we move more, research unequivocally shows, we are smarter, healthier, calmer and more creative, simply as side effects of this activity. One example of longer term impact will be the methods and technologies developed by the Network that can be used to motivate people to be more physically active, through the detection and communication of changes in personal physical, emotional, cognitive and social (PECS) factors. The collaborations and projects fostered, with our focus on in-the-wild pilots, will create the foundation of knowledge that can be used for developing larger scale projects and deployments, with increasing beneficial impact.

In addition, increased movement will result in a reduction in the demand for expensive healthcare by enabling individuals to detect minor PECS issues early on and address them through suitable lifestyle interventions before they manifest as larger health problems. Our goal in this network is to help people discover how they can move enough to achieve these side effects for whatever their aspirations, from feeling and performing better at school, to being more productive and participating in the labour market for longer, to staying independent longer in their own homes, thus reducing costs to the economy. We will further expand the network by involving health technology companies who want to build applications in the network, providing them with the opportunity to work with researchers to develop theory-informed solutions that are useful, usable and used.

To secure impact stories such as these we will conduct three workshops that each focus on a particular sector such as education, workplaces and residential care communities. These communities have been chosen because of the different types of impact they have the potential to elicit within each context. The network will also fund feasibility projects that will be required to work directly with community groups. The network will have societal impact through improving the quality of life of these and other individuals through the development of technologies that enhance health and wellbeing through impact on physical, emotional, cognitive and social factors. We will work closely with UKactive and others to ensure the evidence from these projects has an influence on the development of national policies.

With respects to impacting individuals, people from community groups involved in network projects and events will learn about the development of research through co-design processes. We will run two competitions that engage school children, university students and members of the public. We will also support Network members in developing their own outreach and public engagement activities. In addition the Network will support capacity building and skill development of early career and established researchers through hosting two doctoral consortia and running two training events.

Publications

10 25 50
 
Description We have identified the main research challenges within the scope of the GAMO Network. These focus on a) the physical activity behaviour, b) behaviour change techniques, and c) understanding the role of the computing technology. Understanding the physical activity behaviour involves analysing the reasons underlying physical activity behaviour; identifying groups who are priority targets for interventions, based on their current physical activity behaviours. Behaviour Change Techniques involves, enabling the target groups to improve and then - if possible - maintain the 'better' behaviour through appropriate behaviour change techniques; either focusing on individual behaviour directly or on the environment that affects the respective behaviour. Understanding the role of the computing technology involves evaluating what kinds of technologies may be used in a particular intervention, to support behaviour change and achieve GAMO's aim of enabling mobility through the use of digital technology.
Exploitation Route The findings outlined in our report are influencing the design of the a series of research projects currently underway.
Sectors Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism

URL https://getamoveon.ac.uk/
 
Description Active Minds Workshop 
Organisation Northumbria University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Provided funding for the Active Minds workshop and related public engagement event, Mindfulness on the Go, both fully funded by GetAMoveOn; promoted the workshop via our media channels; made a video of the workshop to publicise the workshop and its outcomes, which is on our website, YouTube channel and is also available for the organisers to embed in their own publicity materials.
Collaborator Contribution Organised a two-day event focusing on how issues of mental health, accessibility, and neurodiversity intersect with technology and physical activity. Engaged speakers from diverse areas. Ran workshop session in which they arranged the attendees into small groups and asked them to consider three questions: "If you were to spend three years doing a PhD in this area, what would it be on?", "if you were to spend 6 months do a collaborative project, what would it be on and who would it involve?", "If you were to work on a community initiative, what would it be and why?" They also arranged for posters and demos to be presented, including a local collaboration between University of Glasgow and an NHS team.
Impact The organisers have reported the following outputs and outcomes from the activities we have funded: • Requests about (further) participation or involvement • Plans made for further related activity • Audience reported change in views, opinions or behaviours • Own/colleagues reported change in views or opinions • Requests for further information • We brought together 75 people including academics, industry professionals, health professionals, charity workers and members of the public with lived experience of mental health issues to discuss topics related to the concerns of the EPSRC Get A Move On+ • We organised a publicly accessible event at an NHS Hospital • We have changed the views of people on the relevance of mental health to the area of technology and physical activity and enabled people to see connections and parallels across different areas. • A grant application between several attendees will be made in late 2018 on issues relating to the workshop. Multidisciplinary workshop. Disciplines represented amongst speakers: • Health informatics • Psychiatry • Computer Science • Data Science • Lived Experience (Members of public) • Veterinary Science • Mental Health • Dentistry • Psychology • Public Health Disciplines represented amongst participants: • Computer science • Dentistry • Veterinary science • Public health • Artist • Nursery Teacher • Secretary • Design • Coaching • Health Professions • Health Informatics • Medicine • Cancer care • Activist • Data Science • Health promotion • Project officer • Project management • Technology Industry Professional • Lived Experience (Members of public) The impacts of this work are still emerging, and include: • We brought together 75 people including academics, industry professionals, health professionals, charity workers and members of the public with lived experience of mental health issues to discuss topics related to the concerns of the EPSRC Get A Move On+ • We organised a publicly accessible event at an NHS Hospital • We have changed the views of people on the relevance of mental health to the area of technology and physical activity and enabled people to see connections and parallels across different areas. • A grant application between several attendees will be made in late 2018 on issues relating to the workshop. Other outcomes and impacts: • Requests about (further) participation or involvement • Plans made for further related activity • Audience reported change in views, opinions or behaviours • Own/colleagues reported change in views or opinions • Requests for further information
Start Year 2018
 
Description Active Minds Workshop 
Organisation University of Edinburgh
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Provided funding for the Active Minds workshop and related public engagement event, Mindfulness on the Go, both fully funded by GetAMoveOn; promoted the workshop via our media channels; made a video of the workshop to publicise the workshop and its outcomes, which is on our website, YouTube channel and is also available for the organisers to embed in their own publicity materials.
Collaborator Contribution Organised a two-day event focusing on how issues of mental health, accessibility, and neurodiversity intersect with technology and physical activity. Engaged speakers from diverse areas. Ran workshop session in which they arranged the attendees into small groups and asked them to consider three questions: "If you were to spend three years doing a PhD in this area, what would it be on?", "if you were to spend 6 months do a collaborative project, what would it be on and who would it involve?", "If you were to work on a community initiative, what would it be and why?" They also arranged for posters and demos to be presented, including a local collaboration between University of Glasgow and an NHS team.
Impact The organisers have reported the following outputs and outcomes from the activities we have funded: • Requests about (further) participation or involvement • Plans made for further related activity • Audience reported change in views, opinions or behaviours • Own/colleagues reported change in views or opinions • Requests for further information • We brought together 75 people including academics, industry professionals, health professionals, charity workers and members of the public with lived experience of mental health issues to discuss topics related to the concerns of the EPSRC Get A Move On+ • We organised a publicly accessible event at an NHS Hospital • We have changed the views of people on the relevance of mental health to the area of technology and physical activity and enabled people to see connections and parallels across different areas. • A grant application between several attendees will be made in late 2018 on issues relating to the workshop. Multidisciplinary workshop. Disciplines represented amongst speakers: • Health informatics • Psychiatry • Computer Science • Data Science • Lived Experience (Members of public) • Veterinary Science • Mental Health • Dentistry • Psychology • Public Health Disciplines represented amongst participants: • Computer science • Dentistry • Veterinary science • Public health • Artist • Nursery Teacher • Secretary • Design • Coaching • Health Professions • Health Informatics • Medicine • Cancer care • Activist • Data Science • Health promotion • Project officer • Project management • Technology Industry Professional • Lived Experience (Members of public) The impacts of this work are still emerging, and include: • We brought together 75 people including academics, industry professionals, health professionals, charity workers and members of the public with lived experience of mental health issues to discuss topics related to the concerns of the EPSRC Get A Move On+ • We organised a publicly accessible event at an NHS Hospital • We have changed the views of people on the relevance of mental health to the area of technology and physical activity and enabled people to see connections and parallels across different areas. • A grant application between several attendees will be made in late 2018 on issues relating to the workshop. Other outcomes and impacts: • Requests about (further) participation or involvement • Plans made for further related activity • Audience reported change in views, opinions or behaviours • Own/colleagues reported change in views or opinions • Requests for further information
Start Year 2018
 
Description Active Minds Workshop 
Organisation University of Glasgow
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Provided funding for the Active Minds workshop and related public engagement event, Mindfulness on the Go, both fully funded by GetAMoveOn; promoted the workshop via our media channels; made a video of the workshop to publicise the workshop and its outcomes, which is on our website, YouTube channel and is also available for the organisers to embed in their own publicity materials.
Collaborator Contribution Organised a two-day event focusing on how issues of mental health, accessibility, and neurodiversity intersect with technology and physical activity. Engaged speakers from diverse areas. Ran workshop session in which they arranged the attendees into small groups and asked them to consider three questions: "If you were to spend three years doing a PhD in this area, what would it be on?", "if you were to spend 6 months do a collaborative project, what would it be on and who would it involve?", "If you were to work on a community initiative, what would it be and why?" They also arranged for posters and demos to be presented, including a local collaboration between University of Glasgow and an NHS team.
Impact The organisers have reported the following outputs and outcomes from the activities we have funded: • Requests about (further) participation or involvement • Plans made for further related activity • Audience reported change in views, opinions or behaviours • Own/colleagues reported change in views or opinions • Requests for further information • We brought together 75 people including academics, industry professionals, health professionals, charity workers and members of the public with lived experience of mental health issues to discuss topics related to the concerns of the EPSRC Get A Move On+ • We organised a publicly accessible event at an NHS Hospital • We have changed the views of people on the relevance of mental health to the area of technology and physical activity and enabled people to see connections and parallels across different areas. • A grant application between several attendees will be made in late 2018 on issues relating to the workshop. Multidisciplinary workshop. Disciplines represented amongst speakers: • Health informatics • Psychiatry • Computer Science • Data Science • Lived Experience (Members of public) • Veterinary Science • Mental Health • Dentistry • Psychology • Public Health Disciplines represented amongst participants: • Computer science • Dentistry • Veterinary science • Public health • Artist • Nursery Teacher • Secretary • Design • Coaching • Health Professions • Health Informatics • Medicine • Cancer care • Activist • Data Science • Health promotion • Project officer • Project management • Technology Industry Professional • Lived Experience (Members of public) The impacts of this work are still emerging, and include: • We brought together 75 people including academics, industry professionals, health professionals, charity workers and members of the public with lived experience of mental health issues to discuss topics related to the concerns of the EPSRC Get A Move On+ • We organised a publicly accessible event at an NHS Hospital • We have changed the views of people on the relevance of mental health to the area of technology and physical activity and enabled people to see connections and parallels across different areas. • A grant application between several attendees will be made in late 2018 on issues relating to the workshop. Other outcomes and impacts: • Requests about (further) participation or involvement • Plans made for further related activity • Audience reported change in views, opinions or behaviours • Own/colleagues reported change in views or opinions • Requests for further information
Start Year 2018
 
Description Active Minds Workshop 
Organisation University of Strathclyde
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Provided funding for the Active Minds workshop and related public engagement event, Mindfulness on the Go, both fully funded by GetAMoveOn; promoted the workshop via our media channels; made a video of the workshop to publicise the workshop and its outcomes, which is on our website, YouTube channel and is also available for the organisers to embed in their own publicity materials.
Collaborator Contribution Organised a two-day event focusing on how issues of mental health, accessibility, and neurodiversity intersect with technology and physical activity. Engaged speakers from diverse areas. Ran workshop session in which they arranged the attendees into small groups and asked them to consider three questions: "If you were to spend three years doing a PhD in this area, what would it be on?", "if you were to spend 6 months do a collaborative project, what would it be on and who would it involve?", "If you were to work on a community initiative, what would it be and why?" They also arranged for posters and demos to be presented, including a local collaboration between University of Glasgow and an NHS team.
Impact The organisers have reported the following outputs and outcomes from the activities we have funded: • Requests about (further) participation or involvement • Plans made for further related activity • Audience reported change in views, opinions or behaviours • Own/colleagues reported change in views or opinions • Requests for further information • We brought together 75 people including academics, industry professionals, health professionals, charity workers and members of the public with lived experience of mental health issues to discuss topics related to the concerns of the EPSRC Get A Move On+ • We organised a publicly accessible event at an NHS Hospital • We have changed the views of people on the relevance of mental health to the area of technology and physical activity and enabled people to see connections and parallels across different areas. • A grant application between several attendees will be made in late 2018 on issues relating to the workshop. Multidisciplinary workshop. Disciplines represented amongst speakers: • Health informatics • Psychiatry • Computer Science • Data Science • Lived Experience (Members of public) • Veterinary Science • Mental Health • Dentistry • Psychology • Public Health Disciplines represented amongst participants: • Computer science • Dentistry • Veterinary science • Public health • Artist • Nursery Teacher • Secretary • Design • Coaching • Health Professions • Health Informatics • Medicine • Cancer care • Activist • Data Science • Health promotion • Project officer • Project management • Technology Industry Professional • Lived Experience (Members of public) The impacts of this work are still emerging, and include: • We brought together 75 people including academics, industry professionals, health professionals, charity workers and members of the public with lived experience of mental health issues to discuss topics related to the concerns of the EPSRC Get A Move On+ • We organised a publicly accessible event at an NHS Hospital • We have changed the views of people on the relevance of mental health to the area of technology and physical activity and enabled people to see connections and parallels across different areas. • A grant application between several attendees will be made in late 2018 on issues relating to the workshop. Other outcomes and impacts: • Requests about (further) participation or involvement • Plans made for further related activity • Audience reported change in views, opinions or behaviours • Own/colleagues reported change in views or opinions • Requests for further information
Start Year 2018
 
Description David Ellis workshop: Innovations In Primary Care 
Organisation Lancaster University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Provided funding for the workshop (fully funded); promoted the workshop via our media channels; made a video of the workshop to publicise the workshop and its outcomes, which is on our website, YouTube channel and is also available for the organisers to embed in their own publicity materials.
Collaborator Contribution Individual collaborators were Dr David Ellis (Lancaster University) and Dr Lukasz Piwek (University of Bath) organised a workshop following on from the 'thinkpiece' that they wrote for GetAMoveOn: "As part of our getamoveon funded 'thinkpiece', we considered how future wearable interventions might be improved or re-designed from the ground up in order to maximise their success. This included the idea of trialling a practitioner-based approach when considering how wearable technologies might best serve specific domains in health or occupational settings. In July of this year, we hosted a workshop at Lancaster University that focused on the role that wearable interventions might play as part of a primary care intervention. We first heard from Professor Philip Wilson (Medicine) who spoke candidly of recent interactions with challenging patients, who might benefit from interventions to help them become more active. This provided a unique perspective because while Professor Wilson remains research active, he continues to practice as a GP. Academics in the room asked many questions regarding how new developments in wearable technology might become prescribed by primary care practitioners in the future. Dr Lukasz Piwek (Data Science) then presented an overview of research, which makes many promises regarding how wearable technology can diagnose and help patients become more active. This highlighted large gaps between the promise of basic research and how this might be applied within a primary care domain. Several attendees were quick to point out that modern technology may inadvertently be causing harm (e.g., physical inactivity due to time spent sitting in front of a screen). However, others were quick to point out that this shouldn't diminish new attempts to use technology that encourages mobility. After a short break, Dr John Hardy (Chemistry) provided an overview regarding what new wearable technologies might be around the corner. Specifically, materials science has already pioneered the development of fabrics and devices, which appear in other medical interventions. Finally, Dr David Ellis (Psychology) presented recent findings from his own programme of research, which argues that keeping wearable interventions comparatively simple might provide a more straightforward point of access when transferring lab-based findings into the NHS. Over lunch, discussions continued around the promises and barriers afforded by these new technologies, and delegates spent much of the afternoon designing some new interventions of their own. Highlights included a scheme entitled 'Home Walk', which aimed to gamify the walk home from school in a similar style to Pokemon Go. Another aimed to merge Tango Dancing with wearable trackers, which could monitor performance as part of a series of classes aimed at the elderly. While it became clear that moving new technological developments into the hands of primary care practitioners is less than straightforward, the day nevertheless allowed researchers and service providers to share ideas in a relaxed and constructive space. The overall goal - to encourage more physical activity - is universally accepted as something that should be encouraged, and this helped drive discussions forward both during and after the event. Delegates have continued to meet and discuss some of these ideas at length following this workshop, and we will hope this leads to a related funding application shortly. "
Impact David Ellis and Lukasz Piwek, University of Bath are actively involved in the GetAMoveOn network. They have written a thinkpiece, organised this workshop, and also another public engagement workshop all of which are documented elsewhere in the relevant Researchfish entries. They have reported the following impacts to date from the work with them that they have funded: Requests about (further) participation or involvement Plans made for further related activity Audience reported change in views, opinions or behaviours Own/colleagues reported change in views or opinions Decision made or influenced Requests for further information This is a multidisciplinary collaboration. Disciplines involved: psychology, data anlaytics, behaviour change, research methodology, app/wearable development. Dr Ellis is an academic psychologist. The majority of his work considers on how recent methodological developments in technology and data collection (often referred to as digital traces) can reveal information about individuals and their behaviour. This typically involves the integration of converging evidence from laboratory based behavioural experiments and large scale secondary data analysis. He is particularly interested in how these technologies can be applied within health and security settings. Lucasz Piwek is a psychologist and data scientist. He is interested in using data obtained from mobile devices, smart wearables, apps and social networks in user profiling, behaviour change and developing new research methodology. His projects range from investigating psychological markers of 'digital footprints' of behaviour generated by digital devices, developing novel data visualization techniques, and understanding psycho-behavioural implications of using 'quantified self' solutions in workplace, healthcare and security.
Start Year 2016
 
Description David Ellis workshop: Innovations In Primary Care 
Organisation University of Bath
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Provided funding for the workshop (fully funded); promoted the workshop via our media channels; made a video of the workshop to publicise the workshop and its outcomes, which is on our website, YouTube channel and is also available for the organisers to embed in their own publicity materials.
Collaborator Contribution Individual collaborators were Dr David Ellis (Lancaster University) and Dr Lukasz Piwek (University of Bath) organised a workshop following on from the 'thinkpiece' that they wrote for GetAMoveOn: "As part of our getamoveon funded 'thinkpiece', we considered how future wearable interventions might be improved or re-designed from the ground up in order to maximise their success. This included the idea of trialling a practitioner-based approach when considering how wearable technologies might best serve specific domains in health or occupational settings. In July of this year, we hosted a workshop at Lancaster University that focused on the role that wearable interventions might play as part of a primary care intervention. We first heard from Professor Philip Wilson (Medicine) who spoke candidly of recent interactions with challenging patients, who might benefit from interventions to help them become more active. This provided a unique perspective because while Professor Wilson remains research active, he continues to practice as a GP. Academics in the room asked many questions regarding how new developments in wearable technology might become prescribed by primary care practitioners in the future. Dr Lukasz Piwek (Data Science) then presented an overview of research, which makes many promises regarding how wearable technology can diagnose and help patients become more active. This highlighted large gaps between the promise of basic research and how this might be applied within a primary care domain. Several attendees were quick to point out that modern technology may inadvertently be causing harm (e.g., physical inactivity due to time spent sitting in front of a screen). However, others were quick to point out that this shouldn't diminish new attempts to use technology that encourages mobility. After a short break, Dr John Hardy (Chemistry) provided an overview regarding what new wearable technologies might be around the corner. Specifically, materials science has already pioneered the development of fabrics and devices, which appear in other medical interventions. Finally, Dr David Ellis (Psychology) presented recent findings from his own programme of research, which argues that keeping wearable interventions comparatively simple might provide a more straightforward point of access when transferring lab-based findings into the NHS. Over lunch, discussions continued around the promises and barriers afforded by these new technologies, and delegates spent much of the afternoon designing some new interventions of their own. Highlights included a scheme entitled 'Home Walk', which aimed to gamify the walk home from school in a similar style to Pokemon Go. Another aimed to merge Tango Dancing with wearable trackers, which could monitor performance as part of a series of classes aimed at the elderly. While it became clear that moving new technological developments into the hands of primary care practitioners is less than straightforward, the day nevertheless allowed researchers and service providers to share ideas in a relaxed and constructive space. The overall goal - to encourage more physical activity - is universally accepted as something that should be encouraged, and this helped drive discussions forward both during and after the event. Delegates have continued to meet and discuss some of these ideas at length following this workshop, and we will hope this leads to a related funding application shortly. "
Impact David Ellis and Lukasz Piwek, University of Bath are actively involved in the GetAMoveOn network. They have written a thinkpiece, organised this workshop, and also another public engagement workshop all of which are documented elsewhere in the relevant Researchfish entries. They have reported the following impacts to date from the work with them that they have funded: Requests about (further) participation or involvement Plans made for further related activity Audience reported change in views, opinions or behaviours Own/colleagues reported change in views or opinions Decision made or influenced Requests for further information This is a multidisciplinary collaboration. Disciplines involved: psychology, data anlaytics, behaviour change, research methodology, app/wearable development. Dr Ellis is an academic psychologist. The majority of his work considers on how recent methodological developments in technology and data collection (often referred to as digital traces) can reveal information about individuals and their behaviour. This typically involves the integration of converging evidence from laboratory based behavioural experiments and large scale secondary data analysis. He is particularly interested in how these technologies can be applied within health and security settings. Lucasz Piwek is a psychologist and data scientist. He is interested in using data obtained from mobile devices, smart wearables, apps and social networks in user profiling, behaviour change and developing new research methodology. His projects range from investigating psychological markers of 'digital footprints' of behaviour generated by digital devices, developing novel data visualization techniques, and understanding psycho-behavioural implications of using 'quantified self' solutions in workplace, healthcare and security.
Start Year 2016
 
Description David Ellis workshop: What does health look like? Exploring visual feedback from wearables 
Organisation Lancaster University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Provided funding of £2,360; promoted event via our media channels & GetAMoveOn Network communications channels
Collaborator Contribution Developed and organised an event as follows: In line with the aims of GetAMoveOn, this event allowed members of the public to develop simple wearable movement trackers that generate unique visual outputs. Specifically, activities were designed to challenge current thinking on what might constitute a valuable piece of feedback, which could, in turn, feed into future behaviour change interventions. The event took place in September 2018, and began with an introduction from Laura Pullig who provided an overview of what the day would entail. David Ellis then introduced the underlying aims of the GetAMoveOn network and how participants could find out more about future events. Participants were provided with materials and guidance that allowed them to create two wearable movement trackers from scratch. The first was a pressure sensor, which could be placed in a shoe. A second, stretch sensor, could be attached or stitched into fabric. Once these devices were communicating wirelessly with a computer, movements were converted it into visuals with pre-written computer code, which participants could customise. Different movements altered the final visualization in real-time, and experimenting with the sensors to generate new responses helped participants to see, quite literally, what each sensor was recording. This helped illuminate the relationship between movement and visual representation. A static capture of these unique visuals was then transferred onto a t-shirt or mug. While experimenting with the sensors and displays was fun for participants, we hope that these activities will encourage new ways of thinking when health-related data is utilised as part of a future intervention or public engagement event that aims to get people moving. A second group-led activity with work with local dancers to create e-textile movement responsive displays. These will light up or change appearance in response to different movements. Sensors will be made with materials that can be incorporated into clothing and costumes such as conductive fabrics, threads, metals beads, and pressure sensitive materials. We hope to display devices developed following both events as part of an interactive exhibition at future GetAMoveOn or related events. These may challenge current thinking in terms of what might constitute useful and engaging feedback that helps encourage people to become genuinely interested in their activity levels. In turn, developing interventions that go beyond traditional wearable devices (e.g., wrist-based) and feedback metrics (e.g., step counts) could provide several new research opportunities.
Impact This was a multidisciplinary collaboration. Disciplines represented amongst the researchers/organisers: Art Psychology Disciplines represented amongst speakers: Art Psychology Disciplines represented amongst delegates/audience: Art Data Science Computer Science Public engagement: 30 people attended. They were overwhelmingly positive about the day, with 100% of participants reporting that they were happy and satisfied with the event in writing or in conversation with the organisers. 100% who completed the feedback survey said they would recommend the event to others. No delegate reported feeling unsatisfied about any aspect of the event. Engaging young people and stimulating interest in STEM careers: Many children attended the event with their parents. Some were already learning to code in school, but others had little previous experience with electronics. Regardless, they enjoyed building and programming devices (often requiring less assistance than their parents). Therefore, these activities can help children develop an interest in engineering, science and health more generally. Awareness raising: Many people tweeted during the day with the @DoESLiverpool account being especially active. Capacity building: Influenced development of a creative hub at Lancaster University to help build capacity in tech design skills: Event organisers reported that, "There appears to be a large skills gap when developing and prototyping wearable devices as part of interventions that aim to encourage physical activity. Specifically, those working within digital health don't always have the technical knowledge to build simple, but highly-customised sensors. This has become such an issue that Lancaster University is in the process of investing in a 'maker space', which will provide a creative hub for interested students and researchers who are developing prototype devices. The activities outlined previously have helped guide these recent developments and illuminated how this new space will become more productive. First, it is possible for anyone to quickly understand and practice the basic technical skills associated with sensor development. Second, those working with digital textiles and interactive art exhibits already have many skills that could translate across to health and computational social science. We intend to explore this interdisciplinary avenue further as it appears that research cultures and practices are converging when developing digital health interventions."
Start Year 2018
 
Description Feasibility study: AI intervention to encourage PA in older adults (Sani) 
Organisation Robert Gordon University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Funding: - funded the research (at 80%): £49,704 Profile: - Raised profile of the research project via our twitter feed and website. - Produced video of the research which will go on our website, on YouTube, twitter and will be available for the researchers to use to raise the profile of their research.
Collaborator Contribution Our collaborators will carry out a research project which will further the aims of the GetAMoveOn Network+ as follows: Our vision is to develop a natural, ubiquitous and proactive system that can use conversation to deliver behaviour change interventions for improving physical activity to older adults. For this, we address the following research questions: 1. Can physical activity data from wearable sensors be used to contextualise conversational interaction? 2. Can we recognise barriers to physical activity in follow-on user responses and generate recommendations for overcoming them? 3. Can conversational intervention create positive behaviour change? 4. Can we create the type of experience that ensures full engagement and long-term adherence? Conversation appeals to all age groups, but might prove particularly appropriate for older adults who can have difficulties with new technologies and may be more likely to appreciate the natural interaction offered through conversational dialogue. Hence, delivering behaviour change interventions using digital conversation provides an opportunity for achieving higher levels of adoption and adherence, compared to traditional approaches. Presently, digital behaviour change interventions are delivered as text notifications on mobile phones. Despite the popularity of this approach, there is little evidence to indicate that text notifications are effective at promoting positive behaviour change particularly in the long-term. The main problem is that text notifications offer one-way communication (from the device to the user) and hence, provide no opportunity for interaction. In addition, text notifications are easily ignored; fewer than 30% of received notifications are typically viewed by users with average delays of close to 3 hours, highlighting the need for an alternative approach.
Impact Research ongoing. No outputs or outcomes as yet.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Feasibility study: AI intervention to encourage PA in older adults (Sani) 
Organisation University of Aberdeen
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Funding: - funded the research (at 80%): £49,704 Profile: - Raised profile of the research project via our twitter feed and website. - Produced video of the research which will go on our website, on YouTube, twitter and will be available for the researchers to use to raise the profile of their research.
Collaborator Contribution Our collaborators will carry out a research project which will further the aims of the GetAMoveOn Network+ as follows: Our vision is to develop a natural, ubiquitous and proactive system that can use conversation to deliver behaviour change interventions for improving physical activity to older adults. For this, we address the following research questions: 1. Can physical activity data from wearable sensors be used to contextualise conversational interaction? 2. Can we recognise barriers to physical activity in follow-on user responses and generate recommendations for overcoming them? 3. Can conversational intervention create positive behaviour change? 4. Can we create the type of experience that ensures full engagement and long-term adherence? Conversation appeals to all age groups, but might prove particularly appropriate for older adults who can have difficulties with new technologies and may be more likely to appreciate the natural interaction offered through conversational dialogue. Hence, delivering behaviour change interventions using digital conversation provides an opportunity for achieving higher levels of adoption and adherence, compared to traditional approaches. Presently, digital behaviour change interventions are delivered as text notifications on mobile phones. Despite the popularity of this approach, there is little evidence to indicate that text notifications are effective at promoting positive behaviour change particularly in the long-term. The main problem is that text notifications offer one-way communication (from the device to the user) and hence, provide no opportunity for interaction. In addition, text notifications are easily ignored; fewer than 30% of received notifications are typically viewed by users with average delays of close to 3 hours, highlighting the need for an alternative approach.
Impact Research ongoing. No outputs or outcomes as yet.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Feasibility study: Stand Up App (McNarry) 
Organisation Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute
Country Australia 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Funding: - funded the research (at 80%) £48,296.50 Profile: - Raised profile of the research project via our twitter feed and website. - Produced video of the research which will go on our website, on YouTube, twitter and will be available for the researchers to use to raise the profile of their research.
Collaborator Contribution Our collaborators will carry out a research project which will further the aims of the GetAMoveOn Network+ as follows: Physical inactivity is well-accepted as a major cause of morbidity and mortality, but less is known regarding the influence of sedentary behaviour (sitting) on adverse health outcomes. Sitting is now identified as a novel risk factor for poor cardiometabolic health and premature mortality. For many adults, sitting is inherent to the occupational setting, with office workers spending two thirds of their working hours sedentary. Importantly, even in those who regularly exercise, such activity does not offset all of the deleterious consequences of long sedentary periods. New evidence from our Australian CO-PIs shows significant benefits from by breaking up periods of sustained sitting with intermittent movement. Wearable activity trackers and health apps are one of the most rapidly growing market sectors, highlighting the potential for technology in addressing this global health challenge. However, these apps tend to attract people who are already active; and more attention is needed on those who are highly sedentary, many of whom are unaware that they are, in order to break up their sedentary behaviours sufficiently for health gain. The Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute in Australia has recently developed an app, Rise and Recharge, to address this issue, with preliminary evidence suggesting that self-monitoring and real-time feedback via an activity tracker and mobile app, with set-up support only, can elicit short-term improvements in daily movement, sitting time, and sitting accumulation patterns. This project will ascertain the individual and environmental factors that moderate the feasibility of this app to break up prolonged sitting in office workers.
Impact Research ongoing. No outputs or outcomes as yet.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Feasibility study: Stand Up App (McNarry) 
Organisation Swansea University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Funding: - funded the research (at 80%) £48,296.50 Profile: - Raised profile of the research project via our twitter feed and website. - Produced video of the research which will go on our website, on YouTube, twitter and will be available for the researchers to use to raise the profile of their research.
Collaborator Contribution Our collaborators will carry out a research project which will further the aims of the GetAMoveOn Network+ as follows: Physical inactivity is well-accepted as a major cause of morbidity and mortality, but less is known regarding the influence of sedentary behaviour (sitting) on adverse health outcomes. Sitting is now identified as a novel risk factor for poor cardiometabolic health and premature mortality. For many adults, sitting is inherent to the occupational setting, with office workers spending two thirds of their working hours sedentary. Importantly, even in those who regularly exercise, such activity does not offset all of the deleterious consequences of long sedentary periods. New evidence from our Australian CO-PIs shows significant benefits from by breaking up periods of sustained sitting with intermittent movement. Wearable activity trackers and health apps are one of the most rapidly growing market sectors, highlighting the potential for technology in addressing this global health challenge. However, these apps tend to attract people who are already active; and more attention is needed on those who are highly sedentary, many of whom are unaware that they are, in order to break up their sedentary behaviours sufficiently for health gain. The Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute in Australia has recently developed an app, Rise and Recharge, to address this issue, with preliminary evidence suggesting that self-monitoring and real-time feedback via an activity tracker and mobile app, with set-up support only, can elicit short-term improvements in daily movement, sitting time, and sitting accumulation patterns. This project will ascertain the individual and environmental factors that moderate the feasibility of this app to break up prolonged sitting in office workers.
Impact Research ongoing. No outputs or outcomes as yet.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Feasibility study: family intervention using intelligent personal system (Carlin) 
Organisation Ulster University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Funding: - funded the research (at 80%) £49,150 Profile: - Raised profile of the research project via our twitter feed and website. - Produced video of the research which will go on our website, on YouTube, twitter and will be available for the researchers to use to raise the profile of their research.
Collaborator Contribution Our collaborators will carry out a research project which will further the aims of the GetAMoveOn Network+ as follows: The high incidence of childhood obesity and the associated risk of developing obesity-related co-morbidities earlier in life mean that schoolchildren are a key target population for the promotion of sustainable healthy behaviours. To date, the majority of health interventions within this population have focused on the school setting; however, the influence of parents and other family members on health behaviours at this stage of the lifecycle is well-established. Therefore, interventions should also target the wider family when seeking to promote physical activity and other health-related behaviours such as healthy eating in school children. Recent years have seen a rapid integration of technology into everyday life, particularly within the home environment. Intelligent personal systems such as Amazon Echo and Google Home can now be used to stream audio entertainment, control other smart devices and promote health, for example, online fitness coaching. To date, little is known about the potential role that such devices can play in positively influencing health-related behaviours within the home setting. The proposed project will adopt a cross-sectoral, interdisciplinary approach to explore the role of intelligent personal systems within the home environment for promoting and maintaining physical activity and other health-related behaviours in school children participating in the community-based, family-focused SWEET (Safe Wellbeing Eating & Exercise Together as a family) project. Motivation towards using the devices, and the impact on behaviour once the technology has been removed will also be explored. Additionally, the project will examine engagement with and acceptability of this technology from the participant's perspective.
Impact Research ongoing. No outputs or outcomes as yet.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Feasibility study: improving adult health through gamification system and rewards (Plannger) 
Organisation HiMotiv
PI Contribution Funding: - funded the research (at 80%) £47,887 Profile: - Raised profile of the research project via our twitter feed and website. - Produced video of the research which will go on our website, on YouTube, twitter and will be available for the researchers to use to raise the profile of their research.
Collaborator Contribution Our collaborators will carry out a research project which will further the aims of the GetAMoveOn Network+ as follows: This project aims to improve health by developing a gamification system where adults can earn points for physical activity and redeem them for real rewards. Our pilot study reveals that real rewards act as a motivational catalyst to encourage increased activity and, if sustained, this increased activity can become habit. We need to understand when and why real rewards are the most effective in increasing activity so that health benefits can be maximized. We need to make persuasive nudges that encourage increases in activity in order to improve health. We need to optimise these persuasive nudges in terms of their utility and cost-effectiveness in order to encourage increased activity and improved health. We will develop, make, and optimise real rewards and health messages that compel working adults to increase their activity and improve their health. We will develop real rewards and health messages in consultation with working adults to ensure their salience and relevance. We will make emails that promote real rewards and health messages in order to compel staff to increase their activity and improve health. We will test and optimise the real rewards and health messages through a randomised field experiment over several weeks using a gamification system and we will evaluate their utility and cost-effectiveness. We will develop a future research agenda focused on improving the health of other communities using persuasive nudges built on the outcomes of an industry stakeholder workshop that will reflect on the study's findings.
Impact Research ongoing. No outputs or outcomes as yet.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Feasibility study: improving adult health through gamification system and rewards (Plannger) 
Organisation King's College London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Funding: - funded the research (at 80%) £47,887 Profile: - Raised profile of the research project via our twitter feed and website. - Produced video of the research which will go on our website, on YouTube, twitter and will be available for the researchers to use to raise the profile of their research.
Collaborator Contribution Our collaborators will carry out a research project which will further the aims of the GetAMoveOn Network+ as follows: This project aims to improve health by developing a gamification system where adults can earn points for physical activity and redeem them for real rewards. Our pilot study reveals that real rewards act as a motivational catalyst to encourage increased activity and, if sustained, this increased activity can become habit. We need to understand when and why real rewards are the most effective in increasing activity so that health benefits can be maximized. We need to make persuasive nudges that encourage increases in activity in order to improve health. We need to optimise these persuasive nudges in terms of their utility and cost-effectiveness in order to encourage increased activity and improved health. We will develop, make, and optimise real rewards and health messages that compel working adults to increase their activity and improve their health. We will develop real rewards and health messages in consultation with working adults to ensure their salience and relevance. We will make emails that promote real rewards and health messages in order to compel staff to increase their activity and improve health. We will test and optimise the real rewards and health messages through a randomised field experiment over several weeks using a gamification system and we will evaluate their utility and cost-effectiveness. We will develop a future research agenda focused on improving the health of other communities using persuasive nudges built on the outcomes of an industry stakeholder workshop that will reflect on the study's findings.
Impact Research ongoing. No outputs or outcomes as yet.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Feasibility study: improving adult health through gamification system and rewards (Plannger) 
Organisation University of San Diego
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Funding: - funded the research (at 80%) £47,887 Profile: - Raised profile of the research project via our twitter feed and website. - Produced video of the research which will go on our website, on YouTube, twitter and will be available for the researchers to use to raise the profile of their research.
Collaborator Contribution Our collaborators will carry out a research project which will further the aims of the GetAMoveOn Network+ as follows: This project aims to improve health by developing a gamification system where adults can earn points for physical activity and redeem them for real rewards. Our pilot study reveals that real rewards act as a motivational catalyst to encourage increased activity and, if sustained, this increased activity can become habit. We need to understand when and why real rewards are the most effective in increasing activity so that health benefits can be maximized. We need to make persuasive nudges that encourage increases in activity in order to improve health. We need to optimise these persuasive nudges in terms of their utility and cost-effectiveness in order to encourage increased activity and improved health. We will develop, make, and optimise real rewards and health messages that compel working adults to increase their activity and improve their health. We will develop real rewards and health messages in consultation with working adults to ensure their salience and relevance. We will make emails that promote real rewards and health messages in order to compel staff to increase their activity and improve health. We will test and optimise the real rewards and health messages through a randomised field experiment over several weeks using a gamification system and we will evaluate their utility and cost-effectiveness. We will develop a future research agenda focused on improving the health of other communities using persuasive nudges built on the outcomes of an industry stakeholder workshop that will reflect on the study's findings.
Impact Research ongoing. No outputs or outcomes as yet.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Feasibility study: improving adult health through gamification system and rewards (Plannger) 
Organisation University of Windsor
PI Contribution Funding: - funded the research (at 80%) £47,887 Profile: - Raised profile of the research project via our twitter feed and website. - Produced video of the research which will go on our website, on YouTube, twitter and will be available for the researchers to use to raise the profile of their research.
Collaborator Contribution Our collaborators will carry out a research project which will further the aims of the GetAMoveOn Network+ as follows: This project aims to improve health by developing a gamification system where adults can earn points for physical activity and redeem them for real rewards. Our pilot study reveals that real rewards act as a motivational catalyst to encourage increased activity and, if sustained, this increased activity can become habit. We need to understand when and why real rewards are the most effective in increasing activity so that health benefits can be maximized. We need to make persuasive nudges that encourage increases in activity in order to improve health. We need to optimise these persuasive nudges in terms of their utility and cost-effectiveness in order to encourage increased activity and improved health. We will develop, make, and optimise real rewards and health messages that compel working adults to increase their activity and improve their health. We will develop real rewards and health messages in consultation with working adults to ensure their salience and relevance. We will make emails that promote real rewards and health messages in order to compel staff to increase their activity and improve health. We will test and optimise the real rewards and health messages through a randomised field experiment over several weeks using a gamification system and we will evaluate their utility and cost-effectiveness. We will develop a future research agenda focused on improving the health of other communities using persuasive nudges built on the outcomes of an industry stakeholder workshop that will reflect on the study's findings.
Impact Research ongoing. No outputs or outcomes as yet.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Feasibility study: mobile app for football fans (Rooksby) 
Organisation European Healthy Stadia Network
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Funding: - funded the research (at 80%) £47,080.37. Profile: - Raised profile of the research project via our twitter feed and website. - Produced video of the research which will go on our website, on YouTube, twitter and will be available for the researchers to use to raise the profile of their research.
Collaborator Contribution Our collaborators will carry out a research project which will further the aims of the GetAMoveOn Network+ as follows: Men are often underrepresented in behavioural lifestyle interventions and are considered a hard-to-reach and underserved group [1]. One way to successfully engage men is via football clubs that they identify with [2]. Current work on engaging men in this way has used mobile technology for self-monitoring and social support within the context of a complex intervention [3], but we believe that the potential for designing mobile applications that support football fans to adopt healthier behaviours and practices requires significant further development. We also believe that there is much broader potential for creatively incorporating a variety of social and behavioural change techniques into mobile applications. The focus of this project will be on creating mobile technology to encourage middle-aged men to engage in light and moderate physical activity, and to encourage active travel to sporting events. We will take a co-design approach to the development of a mobile application that creatively combines self-monitoring, social support and other behavioural change techniques. We envisage an application that enables football fans to (i) make associations between their team identity, their levels of physical activity, and active travel to football matches; (ii) become role models for other fans; (iii) engage with other fans in action planning and problem solving; and, (iv) review discrepancies between goals and actual behaviour. The novelty of this research will be in designing a mobile-based intervention for football fans, creatively incorporating behavioural change techniques into a community specific design, and in designing technology for masculinity in positive lifestyle change. References [1] Robertson C, Avenell A, Stewart F, Archibald D, Douglas F, Hoddinott P, van Teijlingen E, Boyers D. Clinical Effectiveness of Weight Loss and Weight Maintenance Interventions for Men: A Systematic Review of Men-Only Randomized Controlled Trials (The ROMEO Project). Am J Mens Health 2017;11(4):1096-1123.
Impact Research ongoing. No outputs or outcomes as yet.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Feasibility study: mobile app for football fans (Rooksby) 
Organisation Northumbria University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Funding: - funded the research (at 80%) £47,080.37. Profile: - Raised profile of the research project via our twitter feed and website. - Produced video of the research which will go on our website, on YouTube, twitter and will be available for the researchers to use to raise the profile of their research.
Collaborator Contribution Our collaborators will carry out a research project which will further the aims of the GetAMoveOn Network+ as follows: Men are often underrepresented in behavioural lifestyle interventions and are considered a hard-to-reach and underserved group [1]. One way to successfully engage men is via football clubs that they identify with [2]. Current work on engaging men in this way has used mobile technology for self-monitoring and social support within the context of a complex intervention [3], but we believe that the potential for designing mobile applications that support football fans to adopt healthier behaviours and practices requires significant further development. We also believe that there is much broader potential for creatively incorporating a variety of social and behavioural change techniques into mobile applications. The focus of this project will be on creating mobile technology to encourage middle-aged men to engage in light and moderate physical activity, and to encourage active travel to sporting events. We will take a co-design approach to the development of a mobile application that creatively combines self-monitoring, social support and other behavioural change techniques. We envisage an application that enables football fans to (i) make associations between their team identity, their levels of physical activity, and active travel to football matches; (ii) become role models for other fans; (iii) engage with other fans in action planning and problem solving; and, (iv) review discrepancies between goals and actual behaviour. The novelty of this research will be in designing a mobile-based intervention for football fans, creatively incorporating behavioural change techniques into a community specific design, and in designing technology for masculinity in positive lifestyle change. References [1] Robertson C, Avenell A, Stewart F, Archibald D, Douglas F, Hoddinott P, van Teijlingen E, Boyers D. Clinical Effectiveness of Weight Loss and Weight Maintenance Interventions for Men: A Systematic Review of Men-Only Randomized Controlled Trials (The ROMEO Project). Am J Mens Health 2017;11(4):1096-1123.
Impact Research ongoing. No outputs or outcomes as yet.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Feasibility study: mobile app for football fans (Rooksby) 
Organisation University of Glasgow
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Funding: - funded the research (at 80%) £47,080.37. Profile: - Raised profile of the research project via our twitter feed and website. - Produced video of the research which will go on our website, on YouTube, twitter and will be available for the researchers to use to raise the profile of their research.
Collaborator Contribution Our collaborators will carry out a research project which will further the aims of the GetAMoveOn Network+ as follows: Men are often underrepresented in behavioural lifestyle interventions and are considered a hard-to-reach and underserved group [1]. One way to successfully engage men is via football clubs that they identify with [2]. Current work on engaging men in this way has used mobile technology for self-monitoring and social support within the context of a complex intervention [3], but we believe that the potential for designing mobile applications that support football fans to adopt healthier behaviours and practices requires significant further development. We also believe that there is much broader potential for creatively incorporating a variety of social and behavioural change techniques into mobile applications. The focus of this project will be on creating mobile technology to encourage middle-aged men to engage in light and moderate physical activity, and to encourage active travel to sporting events. We will take a co-design approach to the development of a mobile application that creatively combines self-monitoring, social support and other behavioural change techniques. We envisage an application that enables football fans to (i) make associations between their team identity, their levels of physical activity, and active travel to football matches; (ii) become role models for other fans; (iii) engage with other fans in action planning and problem solving; and, (iv) review discrepancies between goals and actual behaviour. The novelty of this research will be in designing a mobile-based intervention for football fans, creatively incorporating behavioural change techniques into a community specific design, and in designing technology for masculinity in positive lifestyle change. References [1] Robertson C, Avenell A, Stewart F, Archibald D, Douglas F, Hoddinott P, van Teijlingen E, Boyers D. Clinical Effectiveness of Weight Loss and Weight Maintenance Interventions for Men: A Systematic Review of Men-Only Randomized Controlled Trials (The ROMEO Project). Am J Mens Health 2017;11(4):1096-1123.
Impact Research ongoing. No outputs or outcomes as yet.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Feasibility study: online assessment and feedback tool for PA in older adults 
Organisation University of Bath
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Funding: - funded the research (at 80%) £49,935.24 Profile: - Raised profile of the research project via our twitter feed and website. - Produced video of the research which will go on our website, on YouTube, twitter and will be available for the researchers to use to raise the profile of their research.
Collaborator Contribution Our collaborators will carry out a research project which will further the aims of the GetAMoveOn Network+ as follows: This project aims to improve older adults' health outcomes by developing a novel digital physical activity assessment and feedback tool using the Person-Based Approach pioneered by our research team [1]. Existing physical activity measures in older adults are unreliable, and accurate measurement (e.g. accelerometers) is expensive and often unfeasible. A brief digital tool that combines self-report and digital data will help improve measurement and provide an effective intervention to increase activity and reduce sedentary behaviour. In order to develop a successful digital tool we need to: 1. better understand exactly what a digital tool needs to include in order to accurately measure and increase physical activity in older adults. 2. collect evidence about the tool's reliability and validity as a measure of, and intervention for, older adults' physical activity. 3. optimise the digital tool by evaluating the acceptability and utility of its features and understanding the experiences of older adults who have used it. The project will employ qualitative and quantitative methods to develop, build and evaluate our new tool. Firstly, we will consult older adults, field experts from academia and industry and existing literature to fully understand what a digital tool needs to include in order to accurately measure and increase physical activity in older adults. Secondly, older adults will use the digital tool alongside existing self-report measures and gold-standard movement sensors, comparing these to assess the tool's reliability and validity as a measure and as a brief intervention. Finally, older adults will take part in qualitative interviews in order to evaluate the acceptability and utility of the tool's features, and modify it to maximise effective measurement, engagement and behaviour change. The project will produce a novel digital physical activity assessment and feedback tool that will enable older adults to move more and researchers to more accurately measure physical activity.
Impact Research ongoing. No outputs or outcomes as yet.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Feasibility study: online assessment and feedback tool for PA in older adults 
Organisation University of Edinburgh
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Funding: - funded the research (at 80%) £49,935.24 Profile: - Raised profile of the research project via our twitter feed and website. - Produced video of the research which will go on our website, on YouTube, twitter and will be available for the researchers to use to raise the profile of their research.
Collaborator Contribution Our collaborators will carry out a research project which will further the aims of the GetAMoveOn Network+ as follows: This project aims to improve older adults' health outcomes by developing a novel digital physical activity assessment and feedback tool using the Person-Based Approach pioneered by our research team [1]. Existing physical activity measures in older adults are unreliable, and accurate measurement (e.g. accelerometers) is expensive and often unfeasible. A brief digital tool that combines self-report and digital data will help improve measurement and provide an effective intervention to increase activity and reduce sedentary behaviour. In order to develop a successful digital tool we need to: 1. better understand exactly what a digital tool needs to include in order to accurately measure and increase physical activity in older adults. 2. collect evidence about the tool's reliability and validity as a measure of, and intervention for, older adults' physical activity. 3. optimise the digital tool by evaluating the acceptability and utility of its features and understanding the experiences of older adults who have used it. The project will employ qualitative and quantitative methods to develop, build and evaluate our new tool. Firstly, we will consult older adults, field experts from academia and industry and existing literature to fully understand what a digital tool needs to include in order to accurately measure and increase physical activity in older adults. Secondly, older adults will use the digital tool alongside existing self-report measures and gold-standard movement sensors, comparing these to assess the tool's reliability and validity as a measure and as a brief intervention. Finally, older adults will take part in qualitative interviews in order to evaluate the acceptability and utility of the tool's features, and modify it to maximise effective measurement, engagement and behaviour change. The project will produce a novel digital physical activity assessment and feedback tool that will enable older adults to move more and researchers to more accurately measure physical activity.
Impact Research ongoing. No outputs or outcomes as yet.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Feasibility study: online assessment and feedback tool for PA in older adults 
Organisation University of Southampton
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Funding: - funded the research (at 80%) £49,935.24 Profile: - Raised profile of the research project via our twitter feed and website. - Produced video of the research which will go on our website, on YouTube, twitter and will be available for the researchers to use to raise the profile of their research.
Collaborator Contribution Our collaborators will carry out a research project which will further the aims of the GetAMoveOn Network+ as follows: This project aims to improve older adults' health outcomes by developing a novel digital physical activity assessment and feedback tool using the Person-Based Approach pioneered by our research team [1]. Existing physical activity measures in older adults are unreliable, and accurate measurement (e.g. accelerometers) is expensive and often unfeasible. A brief digital tool that combines self-report and digital data will help improve measurement and provide an effective intervention to increase activity and reduce sedentary behaviour. In order to develop a successful digital tool we need to: 1. better understand exactly what a digital tool needs to include in order to accurately measure and increase physical activity in older adults. 2. collect evidence about the tool's reliability and validity as a measure of, and intervention for, older adults' physical activity. 3. optimise the digital tool by evaluating the acceptability and utility of its features and understanding the experiences of older adults who have used it. The project will employ qualitative and quantitative methods to develop, build and evaluate our new tool. Firstly, we will consult older adults, field experts from academia and industry and existing literature to fully understand what a digital tool needs to include in order to accurately measure and increase physical activity in older adults. Secondly, older adults will use the digital tool alongside existing self-report measures and gold-standard movement sensors, comparing these to assess the tool's reliability and validity as a measure and as a brief intervention. Finally, older adults will take part in qualitative interviews in order to evaluate the acceptability and utility of the tool's features, and modify it to maximise effective measurement, engagement and behaviour change. The project will produce a novel digital physical activity assessment and feedback tool that will enable older adults to move more and researchers to more accurately measure physical activity.
Impact Research ongoing. No outputs or outcomes as yet.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Feasibility study: phone messages to encourage PA in urban Bangladesh (Jenkins) 
Organisation Diabetic Association of Bangladesh
PI Contribution Funding: - funded the research (at 80%): £49,991 Profile: - Raised profile of the research project via our twitter feed and website. - Produced video of the research which will go on our website, on YouTube, twitter and will be available for the researchers to use to raise the profile of their research.
Collaborator Contribution Our collaborators will carry out a research project which will further the aims of the GetAMoveOn Network+ as follows: Chronic diseases have evolved into a critical issue in Bangladesh. Even relatively small increases in physical activity can reduce the risk of chronic disease such as diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases and atheroscleritic diseases, as well as improve overall wellbeing. However, urban older adults in Bangladesh typically engage in very little physical activity, with little awareness, opportunity or motivation to be physically active. Over 90% of households in urban areas own a mobile phone, presenting an opportunity to reach people through mHealth interventions. We propose conducting formative research and a pilot study to adapt and establish the feasibility of an mHealth intervention to promote physical activity among older adults in urban Bangladesh. This builds on our experiences of developing, implementing and evaluating an mHealth intervention (voice messages, dramas and songs) to promote physical activity in rural areas (Trials2016: 17:600). Preliminary results from our on-going project indicate that the messages are well received and improve levels of physical activity among rural adults. Urban Bangladesh differs markedly from rural areas. Through interviews and focus group discussions we will identify barriers and enablers to physical activity in Faridpur town and will identify ways in which our intervention needs to be adapted to this urban context and the needs of older adults (55+) in particular. The process of message development, delivery and receipt will be piloted among a sample of older adults. Findings from this study will feed into the application for a Trial Development Grant under the 2018 MRC/Wellcome Joint Global Health Trials scheme.
Impact Research ongoing. No outputs or outcomes as yet.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Feasibility study: phone messages to encourage PA in urban Bangladesh (Jenkins) 
Organisation University College London
Department Institute For Global Health
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Funding: - funded the research (at 80%): £49,991 Profile: - Raised profile of the research project via our twitter feed and website. - Produced video of the research which will go on our website, on YouTube, twitter and will be available for the researchers to use to raise the profile of their research.
Collaborator Contribution Our collaborators will carry out a research project which will further the aims of the GetAMoveOn Network+ as follows: Chronic diseases have evolved into a critical issue in Bangladesh. Even relatively small increases in physical activity can reduce the risk of chronic disease such as diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases and atheroscleritic diseases, as well as improve overall wellbeing. However, urban older adults in Bangladesh typically engage in very little physical activity, with little awareness, opportunity or motivation to be physically active. Over 90% of households in urban areas own a mobile phone, presenting an opportunity to reach people through mHealth interventions. We propose conducting formative research and a pilot study to adapt and establish the feasibility of an mHealth intervention to promote physical activity among older adults in urban Bangladesh. This builds on our experiences of developing, implementing and evaluating an mHealth intervention (voice messages, dramas and songs) to promote physical activity in rural areas (Trials2016: 17:600). Preliminary results from our on-going project indicate that the messages are well received and improve levels of physical activity among rural adults. Urban Bangladesh differs markedly from rural areas. Through interviews and focus group discussions we will identify barriers and enablers to physical activity in Faridpur town and will identify ways in which our intervention needs to be adapted to this urban context and the needs of older adults (55+) in particular. The process of message development, delivery and receipt will be piloted among a sample of older adults. Findings from this study will feed into the application for a Trial Development Grant under the 2018 MRC/Wellcome Joint Global Health Trials scheme.
Impact Research ongoing. No outputs or outcomes as yet.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Feasibility study: wheelchair tracker (Farkhatdinov) 
Organisation Queen Mary University of London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Funding: - funded the research (at 80%): £49,906 Profile: - Raised profile of the research project via our twitter feed and website. - Produced video of the research which will go on our website, on YouTube, twitter and will be available for the researchers to use to raise the profile of their research.
Collaborator Contribution Our collaborators will carry out a research project which will further the aims of the GetAMoveOn Network+ as follows: There are around 1.2 million wheelchair users in the UK and many of them have limited access to social and healthcare due to limited mobility and increasing pressure on the NHS. A possible motivation for the wheelchairs users to keep fit is to introduce suitable mobility tracking technologies. Compare to walking trackers there are almost no feasible solutions for wheelchair users. We propose to develop a mobility tracker for wheelchair users. Such system will be user-centred, inexpensive and adaptable to passive and active wheelchairs. The tracker will be based on combining smartphone navigation data and wheelchairs kinematics. It will give an estimate of the user mobility during wheelchair propulsion (differences of the wheelchair and user movements) and overall navigation path and user efforts (total movement). The wheelchair movement will be tracked with the help of rotary sensor and a microcontroller wirelessly connected to the user's smartphone. Optional auditory and visual feedback will be used to inform the user about the tracking. Collected data will be automatically analysed and an estimate of the user's efforts will be available for the user and relevant social/healthcare professionals. With the help of our system, we shall investigate how different wheelchair propulsion patterns affect the fitness of their users. The outcomes of the project will have a direct impact on the wheelchair users (including elderly population) fitness and their motivation to increase their activities.
Impact Research ongoing. No outputs or outcomes as yet.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Marion Lean - Stretch Orchestra Workshop with 'Haringey Rhinos' and 'Footfalls and Heartbeats' 
Organisation Footfalls and Heartbeats Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Provided funding for the workshop (fully funded); promoted the workshop via our media channels; made a video of the workshop to publicise the workshop and its outcomes, which is on our website, YouTube channel and is also available for the organisers to embed in their own publicity materials.
Collaborator Contribution Ran a research workshop which took place at the White Hart Lane stadium clubhouse in Tottenham after a training session (rugby). The organiser (design researcher) introduced the purpose and the agenda as well as introducing a representative from an intelligent textiles company who demo-ed some products and invited workshop participants to interact with them. Players from the Haringey Rhinos RFC tried out textile sensor systems including connected smart socks and considered alternative non-screen-based, sensory data feedback systems for use on the field. The aim was to consider ways to develop methods that would allow exploration of the sensory and affective dimensions of digital health products. Workshop participants took on tasks using materials and discussed experiences and ideas about digital health products and their data. The discussion led to issues around affective impact of data presence using digital technologies to track data and ideation around speculative sensory feedback systems.
Impact Output and outcomes reported from this event include: Requests about (further) participation or involvement Plans made for further related activity Audience reported change in views, opinions or behaviours- discussion around technologies and data use Own/colleagues reported change in views or opinions Decision made or influenced Requests for further information Involvement of research participants in 'methods' exercises and engagement in ideation workshop with discussion of issues around the themes of technology and exercise and use of new technologies in sports. Development of multidisciplinary research methodology involving designers, textiles researchers and technolgists to test ideas in the wider community. See also http://marionlean.co.uk/Methods-Testing-ideas-in-the-wider-community. Requests about (further) participation or involvement Plans made for further related activity Audience reported change in views, opinions or behaviours- discussion around technologies and data use Own/colleagues reported change in views or opinions Decision made or influenced Requests for further information Other impacts not listed above - please list/summarise these:
Start Year 2018
 
Description Marion Lean - Stretch Orchestra Workshop with 'Haringey Rhinos' and 'Footfalls and Heartbeats' 
Organisation Haringey Rhinos RFC
PI Contribution Provided funding for the workshop (fully funded); promoted the workshop via our media channels; made a video of the workshop to publicise the workshop and its outcomes, which is on our website, YouTube channel and is also available for the organisers to embed in their own publicity materials.
Collaborator Contribution Ran a research workshop which took place at the White Hart Lane stadium clubhouse in Tottenham after a training session (rugby). The organiser (design researcher) introduced the purpose and the agenda as well as introducing a representative from an intelligent textiles company who demo-ed some products and invited workshop participants to interact with them. Players from the Haringey Rhinos RFC tried out textile sensor systems including connected smart socks and considered alternative non-screen-based, sensory data feedback systems for use on the field. The aim was to consider ways to develop methods that would allow exploration of the sensory and affective dimensions of digital health products. Workshop participants took on tasks using materials and discussed experiences and ideas about digital health products and their data. The discussion led to issues around affective impact of data presence using digital technologies to track data and ideation around speculative sensory feedback systems.
Impact Output and outcomes reported from this event include: Requests about (further) participation or involvement Plans made for further related activity Audience reported change in views, opinions or behaviours- discussion around technologies and data use Own/colleagues reported change in views or opinions Decision made or influenced Requests for further information Involvement of research participants in 'methods' exercises and engagement in ideation workshop with discussion of issues around the themes of technology and exercise and use of new technologies in sports. Development of multidisciplinary research methodology involving designers, textiles researchers and technolgists to test ideas in the wider community. See also http://marionlean.co.uk/Methods-Testing-ideas-in-the-wider-community. Requests about (further) participation or involvement Plans made for further related activity Audience reported change in views, opinions or behaviours- discussion around technologies and data use Own/colleagues reported change in views or opinions Decision made or influenced Requests for further information Other impacts not listed above - please list/summarise these:
Start Year 2018
 
Description Marion Lean - Stretch Orchestra Workshop with 'Haringey Rhinos' and 'Footfalls and Heartbeats' 
Organisation Royal College of Art
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Provided funding for the workshop (fully funded); promoted the workshop via our media channels; made a video of the workshop to publicise the workshop and its outcomes, which is on our website, YouTube channel and is also available for the organisers to embed in their own publicity materials.
Collaborator Contribution Ran a research workshop which took place at the White Hart Lane stadium clubhouse in Tottenham after a training session (rugby). The organiser (design researcher) introduced the purpose and the agenda as well as introducing a representative from an intelligent textiles company who demo-ed some products and invited workshop participants to interact with them. Players from the Haringey Rhinos RFC tried out textile sensor systems including connected smart socks and considered alternative non-screen-based, sensory data feedback systems for use on the field. The aim was to consider ways to develop methods that would allow exploration of the sensory and affective dimensions of digital health products. Workshop participants took on tasks using materials and discussed experiences and ideas about digital health products and their data. The discussion led to issues around affective impact of data presence using digital technologies to track data and ideation around speculative sensory feedback systems.
Impact Output and outcomes reported from this event include: Requests about (further) participation or involvement Plans made for further related activity Audience reported change in views, opinions or behaviours- discussion around technologies and data use Own/colleagues reported change in views or opinions Decision made or influenced Requests for further information Involvement of research participants in 'methods' exercises and engagement in ideation workshop with discussion of issues around the themes of technology and exercise and use of new technologies in sports. Development of multidisciplinary research methodology involving designers, textiles researchers and technolgists to test ideas in the wider community. See also http://marionlean.co.uk/Methods-Testing-ideas-in-the-wider-community. Requests about (further) participation or involvement Plans made for further related activity Audience reported change in views, opinions or behaviours- discussion around technologies and data use Own/colleagues reported change in views or opinions Decision made or influenced Requests for further information Other impacts not listed above - please list/summarise these:
Start Year 2018
 
Description Marion Lean - What does Health Feel Like? (Stretch Orchestra Exhibition) London Design Festival 2018 
Organisation Royal College of Art
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Provided funding for the workshop; promoted the workshop via our media channels; made a video of the workshop to publicise the workshop and its outcomes, which is on our website, YouTube channel and is also available for the organisers to embed in their own publicity materials.
Collaborator Contribution Marion Lean, a PhD textiles researcher, organised and hosted the exhibition at the London Design Festival. It was a public, interactive exhibition where visitors could learn about current collaborative research between GAMO and RCA and participate by considering alternative sensory ways to experience health data collected from wearable technologies. The purpose was to create a public engagement opportunity which would allow an open narrative around research of systems and technologies aimed to support behaviour change around physical activity. In collaboration with intelligent textiles innovators, Footfalls and Heartbeats an interactive installation as part of the London Design Festival proposed a felt experience of data generated by technology products designed to support wellbeing. The installation was open for 4 days with the designer present throughout to take visitors through a demonstration and collect feedback. A connected exercise pad made with textile sensors responded to your interaction by inviting you to experience physical activity data in a playful way; a giant marble run, designed to elicit a childlike feeling of wonder and satisfaction. The work was public facing therefore attracted visitors from many backgrounds, as well as children to try out a textile sensor system which recorded data and then feedback the data in a novel format to encourage consideration of alternative data feedback systems for bodily data collected from digital health products. A film showing previous workshops on the topic was also on show so that visitors could learn about the research methods and the context. The event took place during the London Design Festival (Sept 2018) which attracts thousands of international visitors from within the design industry as well public (930,773 visits in 2017). The installation was also recorded and shared via social media platforms to engage an extended network. The aim was to enable the public and wider design community group to reconsider the ways that risks of sedentary lifestyle is being tackled from perspective of materials and design. Visitors explored the ways that we could interpret health data from digital tracking devices using alternative sensory output as generated by the initial workshops and iterative design sessions. The intention was to generate feedback from visitors as to how they might like to feel, hear, interact, play and use their physical activity data in ways that would be more meaningful.
Impact The collaboration was multidisciplinary involving: Design, Textiles, Data Science,Human Computer Interaction. Outputs and outcomes: Requests about (further) participation or involvement Plans made for further related activity Requests for further information Public engagement: the event took place during the London Design Festival (Sept 2018) which attracts thousands of international visitors from within the design industry as well public (930,773 visits in 2017). The installation was also recorded and shared via social media platforms to engage an extended network. As a public engagement opportunity, it was well situated to draw in an audience from a non-typical demographic considering the 'health' angle. Feedback from within the design community was positive in relation to the consideration of varied and artistic responses to communicating health topics. Visitors reported that they enjoyed trying out the installation and were surprised that they had been 'tricked' into engaging in physical activity given the context of a 'design festival'. Conversations took place around personal experiences of health and bodily data tracking (digital and non digital). The impact was seen in visitors' responses to the interactive experience, both whilst using the system and in the discussion. The documentation of the event (films and imagery) has been used as a tool for discussion around the design of digital health and data experiences in subsequent events as well as online discussion. A significant outcome was an invitation to take part in future activities in relation to the alternative interface agenda for digital technologies. The installation also served as a catalyst for an educational program on the theme. Other outcomes and impacts: A film of the Stretch Orchestra Workshop and Marble Run installation Were exhibited in the section 'Collaboration and Cross disciplinary working' at Futurescan 4, Fashion Textiles Courses Conference exhibition 2019 at University of Bolton. A paper presentation titled 'How does health feel? Exploring Affective and Sensory Dimensions of Data' in the track 'Integrating and Connecting Digital Technologies' was presented at Futurescan 4. Programme: http://www.ftc-online.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/F4_Programme.pdf Abstract: http://www.ftc-online.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/F4_AbstractsBiographies_UPDATED.pdf The full paper was also published in 2019 by the conference. Learnings from both the workshop and installation were used in development of the 'Material Led Feedback System' cross programme short course at the Royal College of Art, November 2018 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=92lkpWalWIY Marion Lean has been awarded a UKRI grant to undertake a placement in central government where learnings from the workshop about how people engage with data will inform focus group sessions with members of the public and SMEs nationwide to gather qualitative data on the benefits of gigabit capable connections. The Stretch Orchestra Installation is now part of the 'Data Physicalisation' database dataphys.org contributing to an emerging field of research and practice. It is hosted in the section ' List of Physical Visualisations' http://dataphys.org/list/stretch-orchestra-marble-run/ Marion Lean was invited to exhibit and generate content for Graphic Hunters' S-H-O-W conference 2019 on the theme 'Emotions in data visualisations and Information Design'. https://graphichuntersshow.nl/ These projects will contribute to Marion Lean's submission for a practice based PhD in Design Research at the Royal College of Art supported by AHRC London Doctoral Consortium due to be completed by December 2019.
Start Year 2018
 
Description ThinkPiece: A scoping review of Exertion Game Research in 2017 
Organisation University College Cork
Department Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre
Country Ireland 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Provision of £4000 (=80%) funding to Nottingham as a result of the first Call for Papers by the EPSRC-funded GetAMoveOn Network+
Collaborator Contribution Delivery of a paper as follows: Title A scoping review of Exergame Research in 2017 Summary This study will provide a clear view of the scope of previous game-based interventions for movement and exercise, review the quality of evidence, and provide indications for where these interventions are likely to succeed. Collaborators Joe Marshall, University of Nottingham, Mixed Reality Lab, School of Computer Science, Lead investigator Conor Linehan, University College, Cork, Schoool of Applied Psychology, Co-investigator
Impact Paper was delivered 18th May 2017. Paper was presented at the first GetAMoveOn Symposium on 25th May 2017. Multidisciplinary: Computer Science Applied Psychology
Start Year 2017
 
Description ThinkPiece: A scoping review of Exertion Game Research in 2017 
Organisation University of Nottingham
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Provision of £4000 (=80%) funding to Nottingham as a result of the first Call for Papers by the EPSRC-funded GetAMoveOn Network+
Collaborator Contribution Delivery of a paper as follows: Title A scoping review of Exergame Research in 2017 Summary This study will provide a clear view of the scope of previous game-based interventions for movement and exercise, review the quality of evidence, and provide indications for where these interventions are likely to succeed. Collaborators Joe Marshall, University of Nottingham, Mixed Reality Lab, School of Computer Science, Lead investigator Conor Linehan, University College, Cork, Schoool of Applied Psychology, Co-investigator
Impact Paper was delivered 18th May 2017. Paper was presented at the first GetAMoveOn Symposium on 25th May 2017. Multidisciplinary: Computer Science Applied Psychology
Start Year 2017
 
Description ThinkPiece: Designing for Agency and Compassion: Critical Reflections on Technology to Support Physical Activity in Late Life 
Organisation University of Copenhagen
Department Psychiatric Center Copenhagen
Country Denmark 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Provision of £3926.22 (=80%) funding to Lincoln as a result of the first Call for Papers by the EPSRC-funded GetAMoveOn Network+
Collaborator Contribution Delivery of a research paper as follows: Title Designing for Agency and Compassion: Critical Reflections on Technology to Support Physical Activity in Late Life Summary This paper will outline challenges that need to be addressed in order to create technology that is compassionate, offers room for the lived experiences of older adults, and empowers them to re-gain ownership of their embodied experiences of PA. Collaborators Dr Kathrin Gerling, University of Lincoln, School of Computer Science, College of Science, Lead investigator Prof. Mo Ray, University of Lincoln, School of Health and Social Care, College of Social Sicence, Co-investigator     Prof. Dr. Adam Evans, University of Copenhagen Denmark, Sport Individual and Society, Department of Nutrtion, Exercise and Sports, Co-investigator
Impact Research paper was delivered by 18th May 2017. Paper was presented at the first GetAMoveOn Symposium on 25th May 2017. Multidisciplinary: Computer Science Health and Social Care  Nutrition, Exercise and Sports Science
Start Year 2017
 
Description ThinkPiece: Designing for Agency and Compassion: Critical Reflections on Technology to Support Physical Activity in Late Life 
Organisation University of Lincoln
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Provision of £3926.22 (=80%) funding to Lincoln as a result of the first Call for Papers by the EPSRC-funded GetAMoveOn Network+
Collaborator Contribution Delivery of a research paper as follows: Title Designing for Agency and Compassion: Critical Reflections on Technology to Support Physical Activity in Late Life Summary This paper will outline challenges that need to be addressed in order to create technology that is compassionate, offers room for the lived experiences of older adults, and empowers them to re-gain ownership of their embodied experiences of PA. Collaborators Dr Kathrin Gerling, University of Lincoln, School of Computer Science, College of Science, Lead investigator Prof. Mo Ray, University of Lincoln, School of Health and Social Care, College of Social Sicence, Co-investigator     Prof. Dr. Adam Evans, University of Copenhagen Denmark, Sport Individual and Society, Department of Nutrtion, Exercise and Sports, Co-investigator
Impact Research paper was delivered by 18th May 2017. Paper was presented at the first GetAMoveOn Symposium on 25th May 2017. Multidisciplinary: Computer Science Health and Social Care  Nutrition, Exercise and Sports Science
Start Year 2017
 
Description ThinkPiece: Exploring the Relevance of Social Practice Theory to Informing the Design of Technologies for Encouraging More Physical Activity in Everyday Life 
Organisation Lancaster University
Department Lancaster Environment Centre
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Provision of £3768.78 (=80%) funding to UCL as a result of the first Call for Papers by the EPSRC-funded GetAMoveOn Network+
Collaborator Contribution Delivery of a research paper as follows: Title Exploring the Relevance of Social Practice Theory to Design for encouraging more Physical Activity in Everyday Life Summary The purpose of the proposed paper is to provide a review on the application of Social Practice theory (SPT) to the challenge of designing technology to encourage more physical activity (PA) in everyday life. Hadiza Ismaila, University College London, Interaction Centre, Lead investigator Professor Ann Blandford, University College London, Institute of Digital Health, Co-investigator     Dr Edward Fottrell, University College London, Institute for Global Health, Co-investigator     Prof. Elizabeth Shove, Lancaster University, Department of Sociology, Co-investigator     Dr Stanley Blue, Lancaster University, Department of Sociology, Co-investigator  
Impact Paper to be delivered May 2018 Multidisciplinary: HCI Digital Health Sociology Epidemiology/population surveillance
Start Year 2017
 
Description ThinkPiece: Exploring the Relevance of Social Practice Theory to Informing the Design of Technologies for Encouraging More Physical Activity in Everyday Life 
Organisation University College London
Department UCL Interaction Centre
PI Contribution Provision of £3768.78 (=80%) funding to UCL as a result of the first Call for Papers by the EPSRC-funded GetAMoveOn Network+
Collaborator Contribution Delivery of a research paper as follows: Title Exploring the Relevance of Social Practice Theory to Design for encouraging more Physical Activity in Everyday Life Summary The purpose of the proposed paper is to provide a review on the application of Social Practice theory (SPT) to the challenge of designing technology to encourage more physical activity (PA) in everyday life. Hadiza Ismaila, University College London, Interaction Centre, Lead investigator Professor Ann Blandford, University College London, Institute of Digital Health, Co-investigator     Dr Edward Fottrell, University College London, Institute for Global Health, Co-investigator     Prof. Elizabeth Shove, Lancaster University, Department of Sociology, Co-investigator     Dr Stanley Blue, Lancaster University, Department of Sociology, Co-investigator  
Impact Paper to be delivered May 2018 Multidisciplinary: HCI Digital Health Sociology Epidemiology/population surveillance
Start Year 2017
 
Description ThinkPiece: Going beyond motivation! A framework for the design of technolog y for supporting physical activity where mobility is restricted. 
Organisation University College London
Department UCL Interaction Centre
PI Contribution Provision of £2672 (=80%) funding as a result of the first Call for Papers by the EPSRC-funded GetAMoveOn Network+
Collaborator Contribution Delivery of research paper as follows: Title Of course, I want to be active! Going beyond motivation in technological approaches to physical activity. Summary Psychological and emotional barriers to activity are underexplored in behaviour change models and theories. We aim to stimulate discussion on theories, design of studies, methods and challenges in designing body-aware technologies that provide real time feedback to update people's self-perception of their body and its ability to move. Collaborators Aneesha Singh, University College London, Interaction Centre, Lead investigator Prof. Nadia Berthouze, University College London, Interaction Centre, Co-investigator     Amanda Williams, University College London, Co-investigator     Ana Tajadura-Jiménez, Universidad Loyola Andalucía & Honorary Research Associate at UCLIC, Co-investigator
Impact Paper to be delivered 18th May 2017 Multidisciplinary: Psychoacoustics, neuroscience and computer sciences HCI Health psychology
Start Year 2017
 
Description ThinkPiece: Physical activity interventions in older adults using digital technologies with special emphasis on Just-in-time adaptive interventions (JITAIs) 
Organisation University of Southampton
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Provision of £4000 (=80%) funding to Southampton University as a result of the first Call for Papers by the EPSRC-funded GetAMoveOn Network+
Collaborator Contribution Delivery of a research paper as follows: Title Physical activity interventions in older adults using digital technologies with special emphasis on Just-in-time adaptive interventions (JITAIs) Summary We want to answer two questions: 1) What needs to be considered when making decisions about the six intervention components of a JITAI to promote improve physical activity in older adults? 2) What is the evidence base for JITAIs targeting physical activity in older adults (e.g., acceptability, feasibility, efficacy)? Collaborators Dr Andre Matthias Müller, University of Southampton, Centre for Applications of Clinical and Community Applications of Health Psychology, Department of Psychology, Lead investigator Professor Ian Craddock, University of Bristol, Faculty of Engineering, Co-investigator     Professor Ann Blandford, University College London, Institute of Digital Health, Co-investigator     Dr Leanne Morrison, University of Southampton, Centre for Applications of Clinical and Community Applications of Health Psychology, Department of Psychology, Co-investigator     Prof. Lucy Yardley, University of Southampton, Centre for Applications of Clinical and Community Applications of Health Psychology, Department of Psychology, Co-investigator
Impact Paper to be delivered by 18th May 2017 Health Psychology Engineering/Data Science/sensor networks  Digital Health/HCI 
Start Year 2017
 
Description ThinkPiece: The current state of self-tracking technologies and interventions for encouraging increased activity and how to assess them: a critical review 
Organisation University College London
Department UCL Interaction Centre
PI Contribution Provision of £1556.82 (=80%) funding to UCLas a result of the first Call for Papers by the EPSRC-funded GetAMoveOn Network+
Collaborator Contribution Delivery of a research paper as follows: Title The current state of self-tracking technologies and interventions for encouraging increased activity and how to assess them: a critical review Summary The paper will present an overview of current PI technologies for measuring physical activity; research into engagement and use of these technologies and how this has impacted individuals, groups and society; considerations for using these devices in interventions; and finally, a critique of both the methods for studying PI systems, and the interventions using them, to provide new directions for future work. Collaborators Daniel Harrison, University College London, Interaction Centre, Lead investigator Prof. Nadia Berthouze, University College London, Interaction Centre, Co-investigator     Paul Marshall, University College London, Interaction Centre, Co-investigator
Impact Research paper delivered 18 May 2017. The paper was presented at the first GetAMoveOn Symposium on 25th May 2017.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Thinkpiece: When wearable devices fail: Improving future digital health interventions 
Organisation Lancaster University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Provision of £2843.20 (=80%) funding to Lancaster as a result of the first Call for Papers by the EPSRC-funded GetAMoveOn Network+
Collaborator Contribution Delivery of a research paper as follows: Title When wearable devices fail: Improving future digital health interventions Summary The paper will identify patterns and document the key reasons why wearables and other mobile technologies can fail to change behaviour. It will also consider how study designs and outcome measures may need to be adapted in the future. Collaborators: Dr David A. Ellis, Lancaster University, Lead investigator Dr Lukasz Piwek, University of Bath School of Management, Co-investigator
Impact Paper to was delivered by 18th May 2017. Paper was presented at the first GetAMoveOn Symposium on 25th May 2017. Multi-disciplinary: psychology, data science. The work done for this paper directly informed the development of the workshop, also funded by GetAMoveOn Network+ "Innovations in Primary Care' which is reported elsewhere in this section. This thinkpiece gave rise to a published paper (also in Publications section) Ellis, D. A. and Piwek, L. (2018). Failing to encourage physical activity with wearable technology: what next? Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, 111, (9), 310-313 Associated Altimetric score is here https://sage.altmetric.com/details/45418872. Both authors are involved with the CERST project (https://crestresearch.ac.uk/). The use of digital technologies for tracking/behaviour change is an area interest for the behavioural analytics strand of CERST which has been informed by the work done for this thinkpiece. (This core programme isn't on the website, but it did commence in October 2018.) The work done for this paper also informed a British Psychology Society Social Section symposium hosted with colleagues and attended by around 100 people in 2018: Levine M., Stuart, A., Koschate-Reis, M., Cooper, J., Wilkins, D., Philpot, R., Ellis, D. A., Piwek, L. and Joinson, A. (2018). Social Psychology, New Technologies and the Crisis of Relevance. Symposium presented at the British Psychology Society - Social Section Annual Conference - Addressing the Crisis, August 28-30, Keele, UK It also helped inform a public lecture given by one of the authors, David Ellis, attended by over 100 people. Ellis, D. A. (2018). Is Modern Technology Ruining Your Life? Public lecture presented as part of the Lancaster University Public Lecture Series, June 13, Lancaster, UK Additional funding proposals that have arisen from or are informed by the work done for this thinkpiece include: 1) Currently (early 2019) developing a Knowledge Transfer Partnership with industry to explore measurement of health outcomes from difficult to reach populations. 2) Working with Lancashire country council (early 2019) as part of a related Sport England Bid that aims to encourage physical activity.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Thinkpiece: When wearable devices fail: Improving future digital health interventions 
Organisation University of Bath
Department School of Health Bath
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Provision of £2843.20 (=80%) funding to Lancaster as a result of the first Call for Papers by the EPSRC-funded GetAMoveOn Network+
Collaborator Contribution Delivery of a research paper as follows: Title When wearable devices fail: Improving future digital health interventions Summary The paper will identify patterns and document the key reasons why wearables and other mobile technologies can fail to change behaviour. It will also consider how study designs and outcome measures may need to be adapted in the future. Collaborators: Dr David A. Ellis, Lancaster University, Lead investigator Dr Lukasz Piwek, University of Bath School of Management, Co-investigator
Impact Paper to was delivered by 18th May 2017. Paper was presented at the first GetAMoveOn Symposium on 25th May 2017. Multi-disciplinary: psychology, data science. The work done for this paper directly informed the development of the workshop, also funded by GetAMoveOn Network+ "Innovations in Primary Care' which is reported elsewhere in this section. This thinkpiece gave rise to a published paper (also in Publications section) Ellis, D. A. and Piwek, L. (2018). Failing to encourage physical activity with wearable technology: what next? Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, 111, (9), 310-313 Associated Altimetric score is here https://sage.altmetric.com/details/45418872. Both authors are involved with the CERST project (https://crestresearch.ac.uk/). The use of digital technologies for tracking/behaviour change is an area interest for the behavioural analytics strand of CERST which has been informed by the work done for this thinkpiece. (This core programme isn't on the website, but it did commence in October 2018.) The work done for this paper also informed a British Psychology Society Social Section symposium hosted with colleagues and attended by around 100 people in 2018: Levine M., Stuart, A., Koschate-Reis, M., Cooper, J., Wilkins, D., Philpot, R., Ellis, D. A., Piwek, L. and Joinson, A. (2018). Social Psychology, New Technologies and the Crisis of Relevance. Symposium presented at the British Psychology Society - Social Section Annual Conference - Addressing the Crisis, August 28-30, Keele, UK It also helped inform a public lecture given by one of the authors, David Ellis, attended by over 100 people. Ellis, D. A. (2018). Is Modern Technology Ruining Your Life? Public lecture presented as part of the Lancaster University Public Lecture Series, June 13, Lancaster, UK Additional funding proposals that have arisen from or are informed by the work done for this thinkpiece include: 1) Currently (early 2019) developing a Knowledge Transfer Partnership with industry to explore measurement of health outcomes from difficult to reach populations. 2) Working with Lancashire country council (early 2019) as part of a related Sport England Bid that aims to encourage physical activity.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Storify - Older Adults workshop June 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Storify brings together twitter activity into a story to encapsulate the proceedings of an event. Twitter activity:
Workshop on using technology to enable older adults to be physically active
June 27th 2017

The purpose of tweeting from the workshop was to:

- Create a sense of anticipation and excitement
- Raise awareness of the GAMO Network+
- Enable people to see the kind of work we and our members are engaged in
- Increase engagement with our followers
- Increase our following

The following statistics show the outputs and outcomes of activity on the day and demonstrate meaningful engagement for what was a small and relatively low-key event.

Of particular note:

- We reached over 7611 people on twitter
- 17 more people viewed our profile and we increased our following by 11
- The engagement rate for the day was more than double the average achieved by major brands.

Twitter output and outcome (engagement) stats for workshop 27th June

Outputs
99 tweets from @GAMONetwork account

Outcomes
7611 impressions
54 retweets
31 likes
1.6 engagement (average is 0.7% for major brands)
10 link clicks/expansions
4 replies
17 views of our profile
11 new follows

A compilation of tweets from the day was 'Storified' and published on the website to give people who couldn't attend a flavour of what went on.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://getamoveon.ac.uk/events/workshop-1/workshop2017-storify
 
Description 1st Symposium (2017) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact The aim of the symposium was to bring together experts in sensor networks, data analytics, interactive visualisation, human computer interaction, online citizen engagement, behaviour change, sports and exercise with the aim of transforming health through enabling mobility.
The event was planned to provide:
• a forum for dissemination of ongoing research, including research directly funded by the Network+
• an opportunity to explore challenges in the area
• an opportunity to contribute to the shaping of future initiatives and funding calls offered by the Network
Content of the symposium
24th May:
Registration, early evening drinks reception and symposium dinner.
25th May:
We propose a mix of activities: some invited talks, panels, poster sessions, and presentations from both GetAMoveOn Network+ members and others working on related topics.
Keynote speaker Dr Rafael A Calvo, University of Sydney
Further information about he aims and content of the symposium: https://getamoveon.ac.uk/events/symposium-2017
The agenda and abstracts can be downloaded here: https://getamoveon.ac.uk/content/5-events/1-symposium-2017/gamo-symposium-booklet.pdf
1st GetAMoveOn Symposium Delegate Analysis
• Over-subscribed - 40 delegates compared to 30 originally planned of which 13 were PhD students/post-doc researchers
• International event: most people attending from UK, but Europe, Scandinavia, Aus/NZ also represented.
• 21 different institutions represented, with people attending from more than one department within some institutions
• Wide range of disciplines and research interests represented including HCI, behaviour change, computer science & AI, data analytics, m-health/e-health/health tech, research design, exergames
• We also had delegates with research interests relating to each of our key target groups: young people, older people, people at work, and also researchers specialising in PA for people with particular health conditions - cancer and mental ill health
• 3 (out of 5) members of our Advisory Group attended.

Social media engagement - Twitter stats for symposium 25th May:
• 86 scheduled tweets from @GAMONetwork account
• 13,733 impressions
• 89 retweets
• 73 likes
• 2.5% engagement (average is 0.7% for major brands)
• 13 link clicks (through to info about our workshop on 27th June - see separate entry)
• 6 replies
• 25 new followers

Verbal feedback from the event was very positive, with participants finding particularly valuable:
- The interdisciplinary nature of the event
- Resulting insights into perspectives of researchers in other fields
- Being challenged to think differently about their own research
- The opportunity to network and make connections that could lead to new collaborations

The following papers (detailed in Publications section) have arisen from research presented at the symposium:

https://www.jmir.org/2019/2/e11253/
http://www.research.lancs.ac.uk/portal/en/publications/failing-to-encourage-physical-activity-with-wearable-technology(29f54a21-b283-49c4-a2ae-0a5db61d5c58).html
http://mhealth.amegroups.com/article/view/16492/16598
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://getamoveon.ac.uk/events/symposium-2017
 
Description 1st Symposium proceedings publication 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Publication of symposium proceedings
The proceedings booklet from our first symposium 2017 was published on the GetAMoveOn website. The main outcome from this is to raise awareness of:

- The symposium itself
- The range of research being done in the field
- The key research challenges that people are engaging with
- The kinds of areas of research we are interested in funding

Also to:

- Disseminate research findings for others to respond to and build on through their own research
- Provide benefits to Network members and increase engagement with them by helping to raise their personal profiles as researchers
- Enable other researchers to contact network members via the delegate list

Unfortunately we were unable initially to track the number of downloads as at the time google analytics was not set up to track PDF downloads.

Tracking since July 2017 indicates 28 downloads of the Proceedings to date (mid February 2018).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017,2018
 
Description Active Minds Workshop 18th and 19th July 2018 Queen Elizabeth University Hospital Glasgow 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Active Minds was a two-day event focusing on how issues of mental health, accessibility, and neurodiversity intersect with technology and physical activity. The event had speakers from diverse areas. The keynotes were:

• Dr. Gavin Doherty (Trinity College Dublin) Talk title: Designing better e-Health interventions.
• Dr. Tadaaki Furuhashi (Nagoya University, Japan) Talk title: Hikikomori and "human movement consultation"
• Dr Anja Thieme (Microsoft Research). Talk title: Design for Health and Wellbeing: How Technology can Meaningfully Assist People and why we should Extend their Unique Abilities
• Dr William Simm (Lancaster University): Talk title: Co-creating empowering technologies for health self-management.

The keynotes discussed relevant work from different perspectives, including Computer Science, Psychiatry, Health Informatics and industry research. Each keynote talk was followed by a question and answer session.

We also had ten short talks about diverse issues. Topics and disciplines covered ranged from dentistry and its occupational mental health risk, technology design for depression, HCI and AI, lived and caring experience of psychosis and digital design for and with young people. Each speaker was also invited to sit on a panel for a discussion session with the audience.

In addition to the talks and discussions, we had a discussion session in which we arranged the attendees into small groups and asked them to consider three questions: "If you were to spend three years doing a PhD in this area, what would it be on?", "if you were to spend 6 months do a collaborative project, what would it be on and who would it involve?", "If you were to work on a community initiative, what would it be and why?" This sparked interesting discussions with groups, and between groups at the end with diverse ideas being proposed.

We also arranged for posters and demos to be presented, including a local collaboration between University of Glasgow and an NHS team.

To conclude the event we organised a public lecture by Rohan Gunatillake (funded separately also by GetAMoveOn Network) to talk about his experience and insight into developing technologies for mindfulness that are used by hundreds of thousands of people around the world. Drawing on examples from professional athletes to ordinary everyday life, his lecture made a very fitting ending to our event that technology, mental wellbeing and a range of human movements each had a unique role to influence each other and to contribute to our overall wellbeing and quality of life.

To support networking and discussion we organised several coffee breaks, and an evening meal in the West End of Glasgow.

The impacts of this work are still emerging, and include:


• We brought together 75 people including academics, industry professionals, health professionals, charity workers and members of the public with lived experience of mental health issues to discuss topics related to the concerns of the EPSRC Get A Move On+

• We organised a publicly accessible event at an NHS Hospital

• We have changed the views of people on the relevance of mental health to the area of technology and physical activity and enabled people to see connections and parallels across different areas.

• A grant application between several attendees will be made in late 2018 on issues relating to the workshop.


Feedback from participants included:

• "Really interesting"
• "Made some good contacts"
• "Interesting intersections were explored"
• "Challenged to hear lived experiences of mental health challenges and how to embrace their perspectives in future research and workshops such as this event."

Comments on Twitter:

• "Thought-provoking and wide ranging discussions at this morning's #activeminds seminar on digital health, physical activity and mental wellbeing - seeing tech as enabling and enhancing, rather than replacing human support... and a focus on need to promote inclusion" @SyneDrum
• "Looks like veterinarians suffer from very similar issues & challenges as #juniordoctors. Lots of similarities in Paul Andrew Eynon w/ what we found in @BurnoutDocs project around lack of support. Lots of practical suggestions on what could help. But who is responsible?" @martacecchinato
• "Thanks Maki Rooksby & @johnrooksby for a very interesting @GAMONetwork workshop! Great way to meet new people and to spark ideas around supporting different forms wellbeing through technology #ActiveMinds" @jolacovides

Event organisers were:
Dr Maki Rooksby (University of Glasgow)
Dr John Rooksby (Northumbria University)
Prof Matthew Chalmers (University of Glasgow)
Prof Helen Minnis (University of Glasgow)
Dr Jonathan Delafield-Butt (University of Strathclyde)
Dr Dave Murray-Rust (University of Edinburgh)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://Activeminds.xyz
 
Description Behaviour Change Workshop Report 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Publication of report on workshop: Behaviour Change Interventions to Address Sedentarism in Different Communities - published 16 April 2018.

This report is based on keynote talks and discussions at the GetAMoveOn Network+ (GAMO) workshop, Behaviour Change Interventions to Address Sedentarism in Different Communities, that took place in February 2018. The workshop brought together experts to highlight the challenges and opportunities of using digital technology interventions to reduce sedentary behaviour in different communities.

Impacts: Agenda setting: increased awareness among researchers in the field of research priorities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://getamoveon.ac.uk/publications/behaviour-change-sedentarism
 
Description CHI 2018 workshop - The Body as Starting Point: Exploring Inside and Around Body Boundaries for Body-Centric Computing Design 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact A practical 2-day design-research workshop held at CHI 2018 to (1) explore through knowledge overviews and design exercises how understanding internal systems (from gut to hormones) can affect design of interactive systems for the body -from play to rehab and from this, (2) to explore an in-body-centric HCI research agenda.
More of us are designing tools for what is becoming known as "body-centric computing" aimed at a range of goods from innovations in play to disease prevention. That said, even in this body-oriented work, the body itself is still mainly treated as a black box, where few of us in HCI know much about what goes on under our body's hoods. Knowing more about this wonderfully complex system ourselves, rather than relying on the kindness of interdisciplinary colleagues to tell us how it works, we hypothesize,will enables us to innovate in more powerful and effective ways, as we are able to consider research and design opportunities based on this body science but informed by our methods. https://bodyasstartingpoint.tumblr.com/
Organizers:
m.c. schraefel, wellthLab, University of Southampton, UK / GetAMoveOn Network+ collaborator
Elise van den Hoven, School of Software, FEIT UTS, Australia
Josh Andres, IBM Research Australia and Exertion Games Lab, RMIT University, Australia

Outcomes:
- 22 attendees: 10 PhD, 10 research staff/post docs; 2 from industry
- Workshop content provides participants with new perspectives to inspire and enable new innovations
- Interdisciplinary nature of the workshop afforded opportunities for participants to make new connections and collaborations
- Organisers report subsequent requests for collaborations
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://chi2018.acm.org/accepted-workshops/
 
Description Course on Imbodied Interaction 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Inbodied Interaction Course: Programme leader: m.c. schraefel

The workshop was attended by 14 delegates at CHI2017, 66 at the RCA, and 45 at the Data Science department at Southampton University.

Overview
The programme covers the three basics every HCI researcher needs to know about how bodies work to improve ANY design.
From Ergonomics to Embodied Interaction, the body is a fundamental locus of interaction in HCI research and design.  The body and all its awesome complexity, however, is largely treated as a black box where we focus on designing around the constraints of its input and output.
If we crack open the lid of the box, however, to understand, for instance:
• How sleep affects ability to see errors, or
• How stress suppresses creativity or affects recall, or
• How social interaction with movement enhances insight,
we can immediately begin to explore new kinds of design challenges to help us perform better from general to specific contexts:
Imagine the typical scenario of finishing the write up of a CHI paper. If we know something of goings on IN the body, how would we design a tool that identifies sleep and stress patterns to prompt counterintuitive but beneficial increase of social engagement prior to a critical deadline, for instance?
That's a new kind of question, isn't it? for potentially new kinds of interactive designs/systems.
The body is highly complex. No kidding. But in this course we explore how, by cracking the lid of the body black box via three accessible heuristics, we can begin to address these new kinds of questions to enable us to innovate better designs for human performance and enhanced quality of life for all.
About the Course
The premise of this course is that by learning more about how our bodies work - or more particularly how the 11 complex systems (shown in sidebars) that make up our bodies from bones to hormones - we will have the knowledge we need to take the leap forward necessary in the efficacy of our designs to make real and measurable differences in the world for human wellbeing and quality of life.
Our goal is to explore how understanding more about our inbodied complexity can help inform design of systems to support our embodied complexity. This focus for HCI researchers to become more self-reliant about the body, to enable us to begin to look inside the body ourselves to see how that informs what we do in terms of designing for interactions with the body is a New Thing.
Some people may say that we do not need to gain this expertise: we can continue to collaborate with doctors or physiologists or whomever who have this expertise. Yes, we can of course, but HCI is an interdisciplinary field, where computer scientists learn about visual perception and cognition, where psychologists learn to code, and sociologists how to design. At the very least, with the approach this course offers, participants will be able to ask better questions and have more informed conversations with those domain experts.
Approach and Outcomes
To come to grips with all the awesome complexity from physiology to endocrinology with some microbiota in between, takes years of study to gain expert knowledge. We have 160 mins. The focus of this course is to give participants a sufficient introduction to the complexity of the body's interconnected systems that it is both accessible and of immediate and practical use. To this end, the course will present and practice a set of three concepts through which to start to develop better knowledge of the relationship of our inner processes on our outer practices.
These concepts are:
• Inbodied interaction
• The in5 map of inbodied interactions
• The binary body: the fundamental inbodied interaction
Read more here: http://inbodiedinteraction.tumblr.com/
Course Organization
The approach of the course will be a mix of instruction and practicum across each of the two 80 minute sessions.
Session One will cover Inbodied Interaction and an introduction to the in5 model.
Session Two Will go into more detail of in5 in terms of connecting these processes to internal systems. We will also cover the Binary Body evaluation model and practice this assessment.
After instruction in each component, we will have small group practice sessions to develop a new interaction approach demonstrating an application of the concepts just learned.
By the end of the two sessions participants will have practical experience with these three approaches, and potentially both a novel interaction to explore with new collaborators.
Course Instructor
The course is developed and delivered by m.c. schraefel. m.c. is a professor of computer science and human performance at the University of Southampton http://users.ecs.soton.ac.uk/mc/ where she runs the WellthLab (mission: make better normal). m.c. is also a certified, practicing strength and conditioning coach, nutritionist and functional neurology practitioner and coach.
m.c.'s research and publications in HCI are related to information systems design and health interaction; on the physiological side her research is around active mechanisms to alleviate workplace pain https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=schraefel More information can be found on m.c.'s websites http://users.ecs.soton.ac.uk/mc/ http://www.begin2dig.com/ and youtube.com/begin2dig
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://inbodiedinteraction.tumblr.com/
 
Description David Ellis Workshop: Innovations in Primary Care 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact As part of our getamoveon funded 'thinkpiece', we considered how future wearable interventions might be improved or re-designed from the ground up in order to maximise their success. This included the idea of trialling a practitioner-based approach when considering how wearable technologies might best serve specific domains in health or occupational settings. In July of this year, we hosted a workshop at Lancaster University that focused on the role that wearable interventions might play as part of a primary care intervention.

We first heard from Professor Philip Wilson (Medicine) who spoke candidly of recent interactions with challenging patients, who might benefit from interventions to help them become more active. This provided a unique perspective because while Professor Wilson remains research active, he continues to practice as a GP. Academics in the room asked many questions regarding how new developments in wearable technology might become prescribed by primary care practitioners in the future.

Dr Lukasz Piwek (Data Science) then presented an overview of research, which makes many promises regarding how wearable technology can diagnose and help patients become more active. This highlighted large gaps between the promise of basic research and how this might be applied within a primary care domain. Several attendees were quick to point out that modern technology may inadvertently be causing harm (e.g., physical inactivity due to time spent sitting in front of a screen). However, others were quick to point out that this shouldn't diminish new attempts to use technology that encourages mobility.

After a short break, Dr John Hardy (Chemistry) provided an overview regarding what new wearable technologies might be around the corner. Specifically, materials science has already pioneered the development of fabrics and devices, which appear in other medical interventions.

Finally, Dr David Ellis (Psychology) presented recent findings from his own programme of research, which argues that keeping wearable interventions comparatively simple might provide a more straightforward point of access when transferring lab-based findings into the NHS.

Over lunch, discussions continued around the promises and barriers afforded by these new technologies, and delegates spent much of the afternoon designing some new interventions of their own. Highlights included a scheme entitled 'Home Walk', which aimed to gamify the walk home from school in a similar style to Pokemon Go. Another aimed to merge Tango Dancing with wearable trackers, which could monitor performance as part of a series of classes aimed at the elderly.

While it became clear that moving new technological developments into the hands of primary care practitioners is less than straightforward, the day nevertheless allowed researchers and service providers to share ideas in a relaxed and constructive space. The overall goal - to encourage more physical activity - is universally accepted as something that should be encouraged, and this helped drive discussions forward both during and after the event. Delegates have continued to meet and discuss some of these ideas at length following this workshop, and we will hope this leads to a related funding application shortly.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://drive.google.com/open?id=17lr5e5EmaZT39BJur1zEPCjAZgU41oC2
 
Description David Ellis workshop: What does health look like? Exploring visual feedback from wearables 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact In line with the aims of GetAMoveOn, this event allowed members of the public to develop simple wearable movement trackers that generate unique visual outputs. Specifically, activities were designed to challenge current thinking on what might constitute a valuable piece of feedback, which could, in turn, feed into future behaviour change interventions.

The event took place in September of this year, and began with an introduction from Laura Pullig who provided an overview of what the day would entail. David Ellis then introduced the underlying aims of the GetAMoveOn network and how participants could find out more about future events.

Participants were provided with materials and guidance that allowed them to create two wearable movement trackers from scratch. The first was a pressure sensor, which could be placed in a shoe. A second, stretch sensor, could be attached or stitched into fabric. Once these devices were communicating wirelessly with a computer, movements were converted it into visuals with pre-written computer code, which participants could customise. Different movements altered the final visualization in real-time, and experimenting with the sensors to generate new responses helped participants to see, quite literally, what each sensor was recording. This helped illuminate the relationship between movement and visual representation. A static capture of these unique visuals was then transferred onto a t-shirt or mug.

While experimenting with the sensors and displays was fun for participants, we hope that these activities will encourage new ways of thinking when health-related data is utilised as part of a future intervention or public engagement event that aims to get people moving. A second group-led activity with work with local dancers to create e-textile movement responsive displays. These will light up or change appearance in response to different movements. Sensors will be made with materials that can be incorporated into clothing and costumes such as conductive fabrics, threads, metals beads, and pressure sensitive materials.

We hope to display devices developed following both events as part of an interactive exhibition at future GetAMoveOn or related events. These may challenge current thinking in terms of what might constitute useful and engaging feedback that helps encourage people to become genuinely interested in their activity levels. In turn, developing interventions that go beyond traditional wearable devices (e.g., wrist-based) and feedback metrics (e.g., step counts) could provide several new research opportunities.


Outputs and outcomes:

Public engagement:
30 people attended. They were overwhelmingly positive about the day, with 100% of participants reporting that they were happy and satisfied with the event in writing or in conversation with the organisers. 100% who completed the feedback survey said they would recommend the event to others. No delegate reported feeling unsatisfied about any aspect of the event.

Engaging young people and stimulating interest in STEM careers:
Many children attended the event with their parents. Some were already learning to code in school, but others had little previous experience with electronics. Regardless, they enjoyed building and programming devices (often requiring less assistance than their parents). Therefore, these activities can help children develop an interest in engineering, science and health more generally.

Awareness raising:
Many people tweeted during the day with the @DoESLiverpool account being especially active.

Capacity building:
Influenced development of a creative hub at Lancaster University to help build capacity in tech design skills:
Event organisers reported that, "There appears to be a large skills gap when developing and prototyping wearable devices as part of interventions that aim to encourage physical activity. Specifically, those working within digital health don't always have the technical knowledge to build simple, but highly-customised sensors. This has become such an issue that Lancaster University is in the process of investing in a 'maker space', which will provide a creative hub for interested students and researchers who are developing prototype devices.


The activities outlined previously have helped guide these recent developments and illuminated how this new space will become more productive. First, it is possible for anyone to quickly understand and practice the basic technical skills associated with sensor development. Second, those working with digital textiles and interactive art exhibits already have many skills that could translate across to health and computational social science. We intend to explore this interdisciplinary avenue further as it appears that research cultures and practices are converging when developing digital health interventions."
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hudWfDCEZEQ&t=185s
 
Description GAMO newsletter - Year 2 - February 14th 2018 workshop reminder + announcement of other events 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Regular newsletters are sent out. The purpose is to keep the network informed of activities by members, announce events, announce funding calls etc. Members are encouraged to forward the newsletter to anyone they think may be interested in it, to help grow the network.

This newsletter sent on February 14th 2018 announced our second Small Events call inviting proposals for small events and activities which support the 'the aim of transforming health through enabling mobility' which support the network's aims of collaboration and impact, and offering grants of up to £2,500.

There was also a reminder about the deadline for submitting an Intention to Submit for our
first Feasibility Call with grants up to £50k to provide short term support to allow initial investigation of new ideas which are strongly aligned to the GetAMoveOn Network+ aims and research challenges.


Total recipients for February 14th 2018 newsletter: 204 (143 additions to list since GAMO launch)
% recipients who opened: 36.8% (industry average 15.4%)
% recipients who clicked: 5.9% (industry average 1.5%)

The number of additions to our mailing list (recipients) indicates continuing growth in the Network during Year 2, reflecting increasing awareness of the network and engagement with our agenda. Above-average open rates and click rates indicate well-targeted, relevant content and an engaged membership who are responsive to the content that we send to them.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://getamoveon.ac.uk/funding-calls/small-events-2
 
Description GAMO newsletter - Year 2 - January 24th 2018 workshop reminders 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Regular newsletters are sent out. The purpose is to keep the network informed of activities by members, announce events, announce funding calls etc. Members are encouraged to forward the newsletter to anyone they think may be interested in it, to help grow the network.

This newsletter sent on January 24th 2018 included reminders about the deadlines for our Summer/Winter School call for proposals and our two forthcoming workshops:
Firstly, our Workshop on Behaviour Change to Address Sedentarism in different communities to be held on Tuesday 20th February 2018 at UCL with GAMO PI Anna Cox and GAMO Co-I Ann Blandford facilitating. The workshop was being held in association with the 4th Annual Digital Behaviour Change Conference - Behaviour Change for Health: Digital & Beyond; secondly, a workshop being hosted at CHI 2018 by GAMO Co-I m.c. schraefel, Elise van den Hoven  University of Technology Sydney, Australia and Josh Andres  IBM Research Australia & Exertion Games Lab RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia, to explore how increased understanding of the human body by HCI researchers might be applied in to innovation in design and research.
The newsletter also trailed the announcement of our first Feasibility Call going live on 31st January.
Total recipients for January 24th 2018 newsletter: 191 (130 additions to list since GAMO launch)
% recipients who opened: 37.2% (industry average 15.3%)
% recipients who clicked: 9.4% (industry average 1.5%)

The number of additions to our mailing list (recipients) indicates continuing growth in the Network during Year 2, reflecting increasing awareness of the network and engagement with our agenda. Above-average open rates and click rates indicate well-targeted, relevant content and an engaged membership who are responsive to the content that we send to them.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description GAMO newsletter - Year 2 - January 31st 2018 - Feasibility Call 1 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Regular newsletters are sent out. The purpose is to keep the network informed of activities by members, announce events, announce funding calls etc. Members are encouraged to forward the newsletter to anyone they think may be interested in it, to help grow the network.

This newsletter sent on January 31st 2018 announced our first Feasibility Call with grants up to £50k to provide short term support to allow initial investigation of new ideas which are strongly aligned to the GetAMoveOn Network+ aims and research challenges.

We also announced the two workshops that will be going ahead as a result of our first Small Events call:3"Active minds: physical activity, mental health and digital technology" and "An innovation workshop to aid the development of wearable interventions within primary care" both scheduled for June/July 2018 (dates t.b.c.).

There was also a reminder for our Behaviour Change workshop on 20th February and our workshop at CHI 2018 in April.

Total recipients for January 31st 2018 newsletter: 191 (132 additions to list since GAMO launch)
% recipients who opened: 36.1% (industry average 15.4%)
% recipients who clicked: 17.6% (industry average 1.5%)

The number of additions to our mailing list (recipients) indicates continuing growth in the Network during Year 2, reflecting increasing awareness of the network and engagement with our agenda. Above-average open rates and click rates indicate well-targeted, relevant content and an engaged membership who are responsive to the content that we send to them. The particularly high click-through rate indicated significant positive interest in the feasibility funding call.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://getamoveon.ac.uk/funding-calls/feasibility-funding-call-1
 
Description GAMO newsletter - Year 2 - June 20th 2017 workshop reminder + announcement of other events 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Regular newsletters are sent out. The purpose is to keep the network informed of activities by members, announce events, announce funding calls etc. Members are encouraged to forward the newsletter to anyone they think may be interested in it, to help grow the network.

This newsletter sent out on June 20th included a last call for workshop registrations, a report on the 1st Symposium which took place the previous month with links to the proceedings booklet and the Storify compilation of tweets on the GAMO website, plus announcements of two events - not run by the Network but likely to be of interest and relevance to our membership:

Firstly, a seminar on Co-Design in Digital Health as part of the TechSharing Seminar Series, organised by our early-career researcher colleagues from UCL Interaction Centre, the eHealth Unit, the Department of Clinical, Educational and Health Psychology, and the Department of Behavioural Science and Health.

Secondly, the Disability Innovation Summit, organised by the Global Disability Innovation Hub, which place alongside London's 2017 Para Athletics to explore the latest global technologies and research, ideas, products and innovations from across the technology, sports, art, corporate, development and design fields. Dr Anna Cox, the Principal Investigator for the GetAMoveOn Network+ was one of the speakers.

Total recipients for June 20th newsletter: 171 (110 additions to list since GAMO launch)
% recipients who opened: 32.9% (industry average 15.6%)
% recipients who clicked: 4.1% (industry average 1.6%)
The number of additions to our mailing list (recipients) indicates continuing growth in the Network during Year 2, reflecting increasing awareness of the network and engagement with our agenda. Above-average open rates and click rates indicate well-targeted, relevant content and an engaged membership who are responsive to the content that we send to them.

Four abstracts were submitted for the workshop, all of which were accepted and presented at the workshop. There were 31 registrations for the workshop which was on target (30), including 22 academic researchers, 5 students/PhD students/Post-doc researchers, 2 industry private sector (1 consultant advising NHS; 1 consultant working in public health & third sector), 1 from older people's charity, 1 funder)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description GAMO newsletter - Year 2 - March 16th 2017 announcing first workshop (older adults and PA) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Regular newsletters are sent out. The purpose is to keep the network informed of activities by members, announce events, announce funding calls etc. Members are encouraged to forward the newsletter to anyone they think may be interested in it, to help grow the network.

This newsletter, sent on March 16th 2018, announced our first workshop on using technology to help older adults be physically active, taking place in June 2017, and the associated call for abstracts to be presented at the workshop.

Total recipients for March 16th newsletter: 148 (87 additions to list since GAMO launch)
% recipients who opened: 45.9% (industry average 15.6%)
% recipients who clicked: 7.4% (industry average 1.6%)

The number of additions to our mailing list (recipients) indicates rapid growth in the Network in the early part of Year 2, attributed to activities starting to get underway.
Above-average open rates and click rates indicate well-targeted, relevant content and an engaged membership who are responsive to the content that we send to them.

As a result of this email announcement four abstracts were submitted, all of which were accepted and presented at the workshop. There were 31 registrations for the workshop which was on target (30), including 22 academic researchers, 5 students/PhD students/Post-doc researchers, 2 industry private sector (1 consultant advising NHS; 1 consultant working in public health & third sector), 1 from older people's charity, 1 funder)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://getamoveon.ac.uk/events/workshop-1
 
Description GAMO newsletter - Year 2 - November 30th 2017 announcement of summer schools 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Regular newsletters are sent out. The purpose is to keep the network informed of activities by members, announce events, announce funding calls etc. Members are encouraged to forward the newsletter to anyone they think may be interested in it, to help grow the network.

This newsletter sent on 30th November 2017 announced our intention to sponsor a series of Winter and Summer Schools to be held in 2018 and 2019, for the benefit of both early career and established researchers. The Schools would provide a program of lectures, classes, tutorials, hands on technology sessions, exercises or group work organised by Network+ members for the benefit of early and established researchers. Applications were encouraged on topics aligned with the GetAMoveOn Network+ agenda and our aim of 'transforming health through enabling mobility with the help of digital technologies'. Applications to run programs on sensor networks, data analytics, interactive visualisation, human computer interaction, online citizen engagement, behaviour change, sports and exercise, were particularly encouraged but any relevant applications were welcomed.

A call was issued in November 2017 and closed at the end of Jan 2018. We didn't receive any applications, which we believe may reflect that fact that there are no obvious rewards for academics to run this kind of activity (non profit-making, and run for the benefit of delegates). We had been contacted by one potential applicant but it took several weeks before EPSRC were able to clarify whether or not his proposal might be eligible, by which time it was too late for him to apply. However, he may still be interested, and we have also subsequently been contacted by someone else who missed the deadline, so are exploring the possibilities for him to run an event for PhD students and early career researchers.

Total recipients for November 30th newsletter: 187 (126 additions to list since GAMO launch)
% recipients who opened: 29.7% (industry average 15.6%)
% recipients who clicked: 8.1% (industry average 1.5%)

The number of additions to our mailing list (recipients) indicates continuing growth in the Network during Year 2, reflecting increasing awareness of the network and engagement with our agenda. Above-average open rates and click rates indicate well-targeted, relevant content and an engaged membership who are responsive to the content that we send to them.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description GAMO newsletter - Year 2 - August 23rd 2017 small events call 1 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Regular newsletters are sent out. The purpose is to keep the network informed of activities by members, announce events, announce funding calls etc. Members are encouraged to forward the newsletter to anyone they think may be interested in it, to help grow the network.

This newsletter sent on 23rd August 2017 announced our next funding call, inviting applications for funding to run small events. It also announced the publication of more of our thinkpieces, and a seminare, not run by the Network but likely to be of interest and relevance to our membership:
The final TechSharing Seminar of 2017: Is it worth it? Getting your digital product into the NHS (or choosing not to), organised by early-career researchers from UCL Interaction Centre, the eHealth Unit, the Department of Clinical, Educational and Health Psychology, and the Department of Behavioural Science and Health.

The seminar explored the pros, cons and requirements of developing digital products for the NHS with speakers and panelists including Yinka Makinde (Digital Health. London), Professor Elizabeth Murray (UCL eHealth Unit), Dr Anne Bruinvels (NHS Innovation Fellow/OWise), Dr Indra Joshi (NHS England/One HealthTech) and Felix Greaves (Public Health England).

Total recipients for August 23rd newsletter: 185 (124 additions to list since GAMO launch)
% recipients who opened: 45.7% (industry average 15.6%)
% recipients who clicked: 9.2% (industry average 1.6%)

The number of additions to our mailing list (recipients) indicates continuing growth in the Network during Year 2, reflecting increasing awareness of the network and engagement with our agenda. Above-average open rates and click rates indicate well-targeted, relevant content and an engaged membership who are responsive to the content that we send to them.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description GAMO newsletters - Year 2 - March 3rd 2017 - Symposium call for abstracts 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Regular newsletters are sent out. The purpose is to keep the network informed of activities by members, announce events, announce funding calls etc.
Members are encouraged to forward the newsletter to anyone they think may be interested in it, to help grow the network.
This newsletter, sent on 3rd March 2017, announced the call for abstracts and posters to be presented at our Symposium in May 2017.
Linked to this were three subsequent reminders about the call.

Total recipients for March 3rd newsletter: 147 (86 additions to list since GAMO launch)
% recipients who opened: 42.10% (industry average 15.6%)
% recipients who clicked: 8.30% (industry average 1.6%)

The number of additions to our mailing list (recipients) indicates rapid growth in the Network in the early part of Year 2, attributed to activities starting to get underway.
Above-average open rates and click rates indicate well-targeted, relevant content and an engaged membership who are responsive to the content that we send to them.

As a result of this email campaign, 20 abstracts were submitted, all of which were accepted and presented at the symposium.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://getamoveon.ac.uk/content/4-events/6-symposium-2017/gamo-symposium-booklet.pdf
 
Description Marion Lean - Stretch Orchestra Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The event took place at the White Hart Lane stadium clubhouse in Tottenham after a training session (rugby). The organiser (design researcher) introduced the purpose and the agenda as well as introducing a representative from an intelligent textiles company who demo-ed some products and invited workshop participants to interact with them.
Players from the Haringey Rhinos RFC tried out textile sensor systems including connected smart socks and considered alternative non-screen-based, sensory data feedback systems for use on the field. The aim is to consider ways to develop methods that would allow exploration of the sensory and affective dimensions of digital health products. A workshop took place where participants took on tasks using materials and discussed experiences and ideas about digital health products and their data. The discussion led to issues around affective impact of data presence using digital technologies to track data and ideation around speculative sensory feedback systems.

The context of the community sports group was intended to set the scene for uses of new textile tracking technology in physical activity. The group were very engaged and interested to chat about their experiences. It was beneficial to have a representative from the textiles company present to answer questions but the textile sensor systems themselves and about the applications and current projects. The group were able to take part in the 'methods' exercises and then apply the experience of interacting with sensors and material exploration exercises into the discussion and ideation workshop.

Feedback from the participants was that the session was 'something different' and they enjoyed interacting with materials, some questioned if they had been doing the 'right thing' which is a great results as research through design practice can take varied approaches and it is appropriate that sports people who had been playing in the field just before the workshop could take forward the notion of play into the workshop setting as a tool to explore issues and encourage discussion around the set themes of technology and exercise. Trialling the textile technologies was a new experience and created opportunities for further questions and discussion around the use of new technologies in sports.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://www.marionlean.co.uk/Methods-Testing-ideas-in-the-wider-community
 
Description Marion Lean - What Does Health Feel Like (Stretch Orchestra exhibiiton) London Design Festival 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A public, interactive exhibition where visitors could learn about current collaborative research between GAMO and RCA and participate by considering alternative sensory ways to experience health data collected from wearable technologies.

The purpose was to create a public engagement opportunity which would allow an open narrative around research of systems and technologies aimed to support behaviour change around physical activity. In collaboration with intelligent textiles innovators, Footfalls and Heartbeats an interactive installation as part of the London Design Festival proposed a felt experience of data generated by technology products designed to support wellbeing. The installation was open for 4 days with the designer present throughout to take visitors through a demonstration and collect feedback.

A connected exercise pad made with textile sensors responded to your interaction by inviting you to experience physical activity data in a playful way; a giant marble run, designed to elicit a childlike feeling of wonder and satisfaction. The work was public facing therefore attracted visitors from many backgrounds, as well as children to try out a textile sensor system which recorded data and then feedback the data in a novel format to encourage consideration of alternative data feedback systems for bodily data collected from digital health products. A film showing previous workshops on the topic was also on show so that visitors could learn about the research methods and the context.

The event took place during the London Design Festival (Sept 2018) which attracts thousands of international visitors from within the design industry as well public (930,773 visits in 2017). The installation was also recorded and shared via social media platforms to engage an extended network.

The aim was to enable the public and wider design community group to reconsider the ways that risks of sedentary lifestyle is being tackled from perspective of materials and design. Visitors explored the ways that we could interpret health data from digital tracking devices using alternative sensory output as generated by the initial workshops and iterative design sessions.

The intention was to generate feedback from visitors as to how they might like to feel, hear, interact, play and use their physical activity data in ways that would be more meaningful.

As a public engagement opportunity, it was well situated to draw in an audience from a non-typical demographic considering the 'health' angle. Feedback from within the design community was positive in relation to the consideration of varied and artistic responses to communicating health topics.

Visitors reported that they enjoyed trying out the installation and were surprised that they had been 'tricked' into engaging in physical activity given the context of a 'design festival'. Conversations took place around personal experiences of health and bodily data tracking (digital and non digital).

The impact was seen in visitors' responses to the interactive experience, both whilst using the system and in the discussion. The documentation of the event (films and imagery) has been used as a tool for discussion around the design of digital health and data experiences in subsequent events as well as online discussion.

A significant impact was an invitation to take part in future activities in relation to the alternative interface agenda for digital technologies. The installation also served as a catalyst for an educational program on the theme.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://www.marionlean.co.uk/Methods-Collaboration-Interactive-installation
 
Description Mindfulness on the go (Public Lecture) 19th July 2018 Queen Elizabeth Hospital Glasgow 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact This event took place in conjunction with the Active Minds workshop, organised by the same team:

Dr Maki Rooksby (University of Glasgow)
Dr John Rooksby (Northumbria University)
Prof Matthew Chalmers (University of Glasgow)
Prof Helen Minnis (University of Glasgow)
Dr Jonathan Delafield-Butt (University of Strathclyde)
Dr Dave Murray-Rust (University of Edinburgh)

Disciplines represented amongst the researchers/organisers:

• Computer Science
• Psychology
• Health and Wellbeing (Psychiatry)

It was funded the by GetAMoveOn Network as a separate public lecture.

The public lecture was placed on the final day of Active Minds, a two-day event focusing on how issues of mental health, accessibility, and neurodiversity intersect with technology and physical activity. The public lecture was to summarise and to conclude the event. The speaker was Rohan Gunatillake, the founder of Mindfulness Everywhere to talk about his experience and insight into developing technologies for mindfulness that are used by hundreds of thousands of people around the world. Drawing on examples from professional athletes to ordinary everyday life, his lecture made a very fitting ending to our event that technology, mental wellbeing and a range of human movements each had a unique role to influence each other and to contribute to our overall wellbeing and quality of life.

To support networking and discussion we organised coffee breaks before and after the lecture, with some poster presentations outside the lecture theatre at the end.

Disciplines represented amongst the researchers/organisers:

• Computer Science
• Psychology
• Health and Wellbeing (Psychiatry)

Disciplines represented amongst speakers:

• Mindfulness
• Digital health
• Mobile health

Disciplines represented amongst audience:

• Computer science
• Dentistry
• Veterinary science
• Public health
• Artist
• Nursery Teacher
• Secretary
• Design
• Coaching
• Health Professions
• Health Informatics
• Medicine
• Cancer care
• Activist
• Data Science
• Health promotion
• Project officer
• Project management
• Technology Industry Professional
• Lived Experience (Members of public)


The impacts of this work are still emerging, and include:


• We brought together 75 people including academics, industry professionals, health professionals, charity workers and members of the public with lived experience of mental health issues to discuss topics related to the concerns of the EPSRC Get A Move On+

• We organised a publicly accessible event at an NHS Hospital

• We have changed the views of people on the relevance of mental health to the area of technology and physical activity and enabled people to see connections and parallels across different areas.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://Activeminds.xyz
 
Description Newsletter Year 3 - CBC abstracts submission date notice - November 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Regular newsletters are sent out. The purpose is to keep the network informed of activities by members, announce events, announce funding calls etc. Members are encouraged to forward the newsletter to anyone they think may be interested in it, to help grow the network.

This newsletter sent on 12th November 2018 announced the Call for Abstracts for the UCL Centre for Behaviour Change - 5th Annual Conference, and call for entries for the #CBCCONF19 awards.

Total recipients for the newsletter: 309 (248 additions to list since GAMO launch)

% recipients who opened: 36.4% (industry average 15.9%)
% recipients who clicked: 2.9% (industry average 1.5%)

The cumulative growth in our Network mailing list (recipients) reflects continuing growth in the Network during Year 3, and increasing awareness of the network and engagement with our agenda. Above-average open rates and click rates indicate well-targeted, relevant content and an engaged membership who are responsive to the content that we send to them.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Newsletter Year 3 - funding announcements & launch of new videos - November 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Regular newsletters are sent out. The purpose is to keep the network informed of activities by members, announce events, announce funding calls etc. Members are encouraged to forward the newsletter to anyone they think may be interested in it, to help grow the network.

This newsletter sent on 22nd November 2018 included a round-up of the summer's activities, announcement of the projects funding as a result of our second round of feasibility funding and gave advance notice of a planned summer school.

Total recipients for the newsletter: 310 (249 additions to list since GAMO launch)

% recipients who opened: 33.4% (industry average 15.9%)
% recipients who clicked: 12.3% (industry average 1.5%)

The cumulative growth in our Network mailing list (recipients) reflects continuing growth in the Network during Year 3, and increasing awareness of the network and engagement with our agenda. Above-average open rates and click rates indicate well-targeted, relevant content and an engaged membership who are responsive to the content that we send to them. The particularly high click-through rate for this newsletter indicates a high level of engagement with our agenda, with recipients primarily interested in the outcome of the feasibility funding.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Newsletter - Year 3 - June 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Regular newsletters are sent out. The purpose is to keep the network informed of activities by members, announce events, announce funding calls etc. Members are encouraged to forward the newsletter to anyone they think may be interested in it, to help grow the network.

This newsletter sent on 30th June 2018 announced our series of summer events resulting from our Small Events calls inviting proposals for small events and activities which support the 'the aim of transforming health through enabling mobility' which support the network's aims of collaboration and impact, and offering grants of up to £2,500.

Total recipients for the newsletter: 296 (235 additions to list since GAMO launch)

% recipients who opened: 30.4% (industry average 15.8%)
% recipients who clicked: 3.4% (industry average 1.5%)

The cumulative growth in our Network mailing list (recipients) reflects continuing growth in the Network during Year 2, and increasing awareness of the network and engagement with our agenda. Above-average open rates and click rates indicate well-targeted, relevant content and an engaged membership who are responsive to the content that we send to them.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://getamoveon.ac.uk/events/time:past
 
Description Newsletter 1 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact First newsletter issued. Aim was to launch the Network+ and announce the first Call for Papers; issued to mailing list of 61 contacts already known to the investigators.
• Issued 22nd December 2017
• Aim: to generate applications for an initial series of up to ten thinkpieces or short whitepapers, to help scope and define approaches, and stimulate debate about the role of current and future technologies in enhancing levels of activity and movement in one of our three target groups: schools, workplaces, communities of older adults.

Applications:
- 11 applications received from 7 separate lead institutions.
- 8 of the applications were from collaborators in more than one institution.
- Co-investigators involved in collaborations were from a total of 11 institutions across 4 different countries (including England).

Grants made:
- 7 papers were funded, representing 5 separate lead institutions.
- 5 of the applications funded were from collaborators in more than one institution.
- Co-investigators came from a total of 6 institutions across 3 countries (including England).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://getamoveon.ac.uk/funding-calls/think-pieces-and-white-papers-2016
 
Description Newsletter 2 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Purpose was to follow up on initial newsletter and encourage applications for first call for papers. See under Newsletter 1 for details.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Newsletter 3 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Newsletter to announce the 1st GetAMoveOn Network+ Annual Sympoisum, issued to a wider membership list of 146 - grown since the launch of the Network (see Network Growth).
Aim: to create awareness of the symposium and generate submission of abstracts for papers to be presented at the symposium.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://getamoveon.ac.uk/events/symposium-2017
 
Description Newsletter 4 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Newsletter to remind people about the submission deadline for abstracts for papers to be presented at the 1st GetAMoveOn Network+ Annual Symposium and generate submissions.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Newsletter Year 3 - Grants workshop announcement - July 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Regular newsletters are sent out. The purpose is to keep the network informed of activities by members, announce events, announce funding calls etc. Members are encouraged to forward the newsletter to anyone they think may be interested in it, to help grow the network.

This newsletter sent on 30th July 2018 announced our planned grant writing workshop: Secrets of Successful Grant Applications - a one-day, intensive course on how to write great research grant applications and maximise your chances of success when applying for a grant; aimed at academics at all levels, from PhD students and ECRs to PIs and professors; led by Andrew Derrington.

Total recipients for the newsletter: 299 (238 additions to list since GAMO launch)

% recipients who opened: 33.9% (industry average 15.9%)
% recipients who clicked: 11.5% (industry average 1.5%)

The cumulative growth in our Network mailing list (recipients) reflects continuing growth in the Network during Year 3, and increasing awareness of the network and engagement with our agenda. Above-average open rates and click rates indicate well-targeted, relevant content and an engaged membership who are responsive to the content that we send to them. This newsletter had particularly high click-through rates indicating a well-targeted workshop with a high degree of relevance for our Network.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Research Challenges Video 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact In May 2017 the 1st GAMO Symposium took place with the aim to bring together a range of experts to help to scope and define approaches, and stimulate debate, about the role of current and future technologies in enhancing levels of activity and movement in one of our three target groups: schools, workplaces, and communities of older adults.
The symposium closed with a workshop in which delegates were asked to write down individually what they considered to be the main research challenges and goals for GAMO, and then took part in a group activity to brainstorm research questions related to the challenges and the target groups. They also worked in groups to brainstorm ideas for solutions to engage people in more physical activity.
This workshop outputs were written up as a report which was published on the GetAMoveOn website (see separate entry). We also produced a short video giving an overview of the research challenges identified, which was uploaded to YouTube and also embedded in the website. The purpose of the video is to provide a quick overview for researchers and funding applicants of some of the areas we are interested in funding, and to make the GetAMoveOn Network+ remit more accessible to non-research practitioners and other professionals with an interest in the field.

We promoted the report and video in tweets and our newsletter.

Tweets & direct retweets mean the announcement went to a minimum of 24,897 people.

The YouTube video has viewed there 18 times.

There have been over 100 visits to the page where the video is embedded on our website.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Secrets of Successful Grant Applications workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact An intensive one-day public event intended to help participants write great research grant applications and maximise their chances of success, plus a day of 1:1 coaching sessions for applicants whose feasibility projects had been shortlisted but not funded. Those applicants had been invited to attend the course, rewrite their applications and then resubmit them for consideration by a second panel.

The public course was on 13th September 2018 and the day of coaching sessions was on 14th September 2018. Both sessions were free to participants.

There were 48 delegates who actually attended on the day, so that was the direct reach for the event, but live tweets on the day achieved 6262 impressions, so total reach likely to be at least 500.

Registered delegates were as follows:

ECRs 23
Established researchers 15
PhD students 15
Other 3

Reach covered a broad range of academics with research interests relevant to different aspects of GAMO's work. Research interests represented amongst registered delegates included:


HCI & research methods
HCI
User studies
User centred design
Interaction design
Qualitative research
Design research
Research in the wild


Conditions / communities of interest
Mental Health
Chronic pain/rehab
Adolescent wellbeing
Older adults
Health and wellbeing
Sleep quality


Technology
Digital Games
Persuasive tech
Personal wellbeing tech
Ubiquitous technologies
Wearables
Digital Health
Diagnostic screening
Computer science
Natural language processing
Machine learning
Data science
AI
Language learning / processing
Interactive systems
Knowledge representation
Signal processing
Robotics
IoT
Cross-device interaction
Gaming
Physical computing
Electronic textiles / flexible electronics
Cloud mobile
Big data
Data science
Cyber-security
Multi-sensory computing
Information systems
Digital preservation
Educational technology
Applied maths
Mobile tech
Smart toys
Educational tech
Affective computing
Ubicomp
Physical computing
State-of-the-art tech in relation to behaviour change
Personal informatics
Consumer health tech
Auditory data display
E-health
Digital health for self-management of health


Psychology, behaviour, behaviour change
Behaviour change
Behaviour change motivation
Physical activity behaviour
Activity interventions
Digital interventions
Physical activity
Exercise
Eating behaviour
Health psychology
Social psychology
Neuroscience

The course was led by Andrew Derrington who won his first grant in 1978 and succeeded in funding a 30-year research career through fellowships, project grants and programme funding. He has served on research grant committees for several UK research councils and the Wellcome Trust. The approach that he teaches is based on his extensive experience and analysis of how grant committees make funding decisions.

The course was aimed at academics at all levels, from PhD students and ECRs to PIs and professors.

Learning objectives for the course were:

- How the grant application process works and what this means for you.
- What you absolutely must do before you even start writing.
- Why you need a good introduction and how to write it.
- The four essential propositions you must include to convince the panel to fund your project.
- What to avoid: the traps and bad habits that can stymie your proposal.
- How to write your applications quickly and efficiently so you can meet deadlines without burning the midnight oil.
-How to set yourself up to respond quickly to calls and develop a sustainable approach to grant funding.

The feedback survey (completed by 33 out of 48 delegates) was very positive:

96.7% were academics

69% were ECRs and the rest established

88% said they increased their knowledge of the topic

79% said they increased their grant-writing skills

20% made new contacts / met potential collaborators

Overall satisfaction was 4.5 out of 5 (4 = satisfied and 5 = very satisfied).

79% were very satisfied with the overall content and another 15% were satisfied with the overall content, meaning:

94% were satisfied or very satisfied with the overall content.

48 % were very satisfied with the interactive sessions and another 39% were satisfied, meaning:

87% were satisfied or very satisfied with the interactive sessions.

100% would recommend the workshop to others.


COMMENTS (these are all the comments, unedited):


The presenter, Andrew, was like Michael Jordan in that he was arrogant, but brilliant enough to feel like the arrogance was well deserved. I liked him a lot and felt the whole thing was excellent.


The agenda was good, the day moved at a good pace with timely intervals. The content was very engaging and incitelful, held my attention throughout the day and provided me with a lot of usable skills. It was also well-pitched at the multidisciplinary audience in attendance and allowed opportunities for discussion. The only thing that may have improved it, although this isn't a criticism as the course objectives were very well met, would have been an opportunity to speak to and get to know some of the other delegates (I.e. over a networking lunch).


Overall, it felt like the material could have been covered in half a day as there was some repetition and the concept was fairly simple. It would have been better to spend more time on attempting to work with examples or write our own examples as this bit felt rushed at the end.

It would have been great to also have more time to get to know the other participants and maybe find potential collaborators.


The sessions were very interactive which helped to consolidate the learning.

Really excellent day, I feel I have learned so much and will be more confident with my next grant applications. Thank you.

Agenda was up to my expectations. Content was excellent, I was really pleased I attended this event, and I think I have learnt a lot, much more than in any other similar event I attended. Not that much in terms of developing my skills but in terms of understanding what is really going on in the project evaluation process. However, I do hope that by applying the rules/strategies and accepting the advice we were given, I 'll also be able to develop my skills in writing up good or better proposals.

This course was absolutely fantastic, and I think will have the biggest impact upon my professional practice moving forward of any that I have attended. I thought the material was great and Andrew was a very engaging presenter. My only gripe was that in the workshop type exercises, his responses to questioning was sometimes a little sharp/condescending towards the person offering up their work for critique.

I thought Andrew was great and I'm looking forward to putting his suggestions into practice. Highly recommended him.

It would have been nice to have had more than one exercise but it would have required a much longer event and that may not necessarily be a good idea.

Really excellent.

Excellent day, worth the making the trip for.

This was a fantastic experience that will be of use in all my grant writing going forward.

Excellent thanks so much.

For ECR's looking for assistance on proposal writing, I think this seminar was spot on. Many thanks.

Maybe have a session on possible projects that could be pitched to the network or a project development session.

Regarding the 1-1 sessions on day 2, this could have probably been done remotely, or even just a group session at the end of day one emphasising what to put in section (I felt what I was told in the 1-1 was fairly generalised so would apply to any applicant).

The session was hosted in an ideal location from Euston train station. It would have been good to have a round-robin of who was in the room, and expertise/interests that were there as you didn't know who to specifically go to talk to as you didn't know who people were. One idea would be to ask delegates consent if you can circulate list of those attending, so individuals can research those attending to seek more targeted discussions in order to build new collaborations.

Great speaker and very relevant event. Thanks GAMONetwork, Anna Cox and Clare Casson.

As I said, this was an excellent workshop, I think particularly due to the knowledge, expoerience and the personality of the speaker who was able to share the wealth of his knowledge on grant writing and evaluation, as well as his own experiences, in a very interesting and fun manner.

As this was a London based event, a 10:30-11 start would be great, as trains in to London for a 10 start for an event are extremely expensive as this requires peak time travel.


I saw the live tweeting - you did a great job. Thanks :-) AC

Well done!

It was really great, thanks so much for putting this on. I learned a huge amount, which will be really useful!

Copies of slides on the day so we could annotate them

Thanks excellent event :)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://getamoveon.ac.uk/events/grant-writing
 
Description Storify - Symposium 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Storify brings together twitter activity into a story to encapsulate the proceedings of an event. The purpose of tweeting from the symposium on May 25th was to:

- Create a sense of anticipation and excitement
- Raise awareness of the GAMO Network+
- Enable people to see the kind of work we and our members are engaged in
- Increase engagement with our followers
- Increase our following

The following statistics show the outputs and outcomes of activity on the day and demonstrate meaningful engagement.

Of particular note:

- We reached over 13,000 people on twitter
- Increased our following by 25.
- The engagement rate for the day was almost 4 times the average achieved by major brands.

Twitter output and outcome (engagement) stats for symposium 25th May

Outputs
158 tweets from @GAMONetwork account of which 86 scheduled

Outcomes
13,733 impressions
89 retweets
73 likes
2.5% engagement (average is 0.7% for major brands)
13 link clicks (through to info about Lucy's workshop on 27th)
6 replies
25 new followers

Tweets from the day were 'Storified' and posted on the website to give people who missed the event a flavour of what went on (see link below).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://getamoveon.ac.uk/events/symposium-2017/symposium-storify
 
Description ThinkPiece publications 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact A number of 'thinkpieces' were funded as part of the start-up phase of the GetAMoveOn Network+ to help scope and define approaches and stimulate debate about the role of current and future technologies in enhancing levels of activity and movement in one of our three target groups: schools, workplaces, communities of older adults.

It was our intention that these papers would address theoretical, methodological, policy, business or other practical aspects, or identify topics and research agendas that could subsequently be developed into pilot projects or larger research collaborations.

The resulting papers were presented at our 1st Symposium in May 2017, and have been published through the second half of 2017 as the review process has been completed.

The main outcome from this has been that the thinkpieces have served as a guide for grant applicants to GAMO's remit and the kinds of areas of research we are interested in funding.

There have been 250 visits to the ThinkPieces page on the website and 113 downloads of our thinkpieces from July 2017 to mid February 2018
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017,2018
URL https://getamoveon.ac.uk/publications/thinkpieces
 
Description Twitter Activity - Year 3 - March 2018 to Feb 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Daily tweets have been going out from the GAMONetwork account.
Follower numbers have increased from 23 in Nov 2016 to 640 at end of Feb 2019.
We are achieving around 32,000 tweet impressions/month.
The engagement rate averages 1.67% which is higher than the estimated average of 0.7% for major brands (range 0.5% to 1%)

The purpose of our twitter activity is to:

- Raise general awareness of the GAMO Network+
- To raise awareness of specific events and activities e.g. workshops, calls for papers etc.
- To publicise closing dates and help 'reel in' abstract submissions, funding applications etc.
- Create a sense of anticipation and excitement around events
- Enable people to see the kind of work we and our members are engaged in
- Raise awareness of the broad subject of physical activity, how to get people moving more, research going on in this area, interesting initiatives etc.
- Increase engagement with our followers
- Increase our following

Output metrics - monthly average for last quarter

Number of tweets: 54

Outcomes - engagement metrics - monthly average for last quarter

Engagements
Impressions: 32,000 (peal 46,000)
Retweets: 53 - these act as multipliers to significantly increase our reach
Number of engagements: 350
Quarterly average engagement rate is 1.67% (average for major brands is 0.7%).
Profile visit: 168

- Figures demonstrate significant reach, engagement and influence month by month
- It is clear that tweeting in the lead up to events and during events gives a significant up-lift in engagement.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018,2019
URL https://twitter.com/gamonetwork
 
Description Twitter activity - March 2017 to Feb 2018 (Year 2) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Twitter 2017/2018

Daily tweets have been going out from the GAMONetwork account.
Follower numbers have increased from 23 in Nov 2016 to 358 in Feb 2018.
We are now achieving around 45,000 tweet impressions/month.
The engagement rate averages 1.2% which is higher than the estimated average of 0.7% for major brands (range 0.5% to 1%)

The purpose of our twitter activity is to:

- Raise general awareness of the GAMO Network+
- To raise awareness of specific events and activities e.g. workshops, calls for papers etc.
- To publicise closing dates and help 'reel in' abstract submissions, funding applications etc.
- Create a sense of anticipation and excitement around events
- Enable people to see the kind of work we and our members are engaged in
- Raise awareness of the broad subject of physical activity, how to get people moving more, research going on in this area, interesting initiatives etc.
- Increase engagement with our followers
- Increase our following

Additional output metrics

Number of tweets: peak was in Feb 2018 (118) due to promotion of 1st Feasibility Call.

Outcomes - engagement metrics

Engagements
Tweet impressions; average 20,142/month (March 2017 to Feb 2018) peaking at 45,600 due to promotion of the 1st Feasibility Call
Retweets act as multipliers to significantly increase our reach, so, for example, retweets of a single tweet promoting our 1st Symposium Workshop Report potentially extended our reach to an additional 25,383 people
Number of engagements: 4867 total averaging 405/month and peaking in February with 950 due to promotion of the 1st Feasibility call
Quarterly average engagement rate is 1.4% (average for major brands is 0.7%). This is slightly lower than last year (1.5%) but as the number of followers and impressions grows, it is harder to maintain engagement rates as to do so, the absolute numbers of people engaged have to increase in line with impressions.
There have been 3090 visits to the GAMO twitter profile over the last 12 months. This is significant as it raises awareness of the GAMONetwork and our agenda.

- Figures demonstrate increasing reach, engagement and influence
- It is clear that tweeting in the lead up to events and during events gives a significant up-lift in engagement.

https://twitter.com/GAMOnetwork
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017,2018
URL https://twitter.com/GAMOnetwork
 
Description Twitter activity - Nov 2016 to Feb 2017 (Year 1) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Social media
Daily tweets have been going out from the GAMONetwork account.
Follower numbers have increased from 23 in November 2016 to 81 in March 2017. We are now achieving around 20,000 tweet impressions/month. The engagement rate averages 1.1% which is higher than the estimated average of 0.7% (range 0.5% to 1%) for major brands.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Website - Year 1 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact A website has been created at www.getamoveon.ac.uk with information on the aims of the GetAMoveOn Network+, news about funding calls and network events. This provides a repository of information to link to from social media, newsletters etc. so plays a pivotal role in other engagement activities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012,2017
URL http://www.getamoveon.ac.uk
 
Description Website - Year 2 March 2017 to Feb 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact The purpose of the website is to provide information about the aims of the GetAMoveOn Network+, news about funding calls and network events. It provides a repository of information to link to from social media, newsletters etc. so plays a pivotal role in other engagement activities.

Key website stats

Average of 600 page views per month

1.41 average dwell time

Average view 2.5 pages per session

Most popular content is that which we most want people to engage with: events, funding calls, thinkpieces, other publications.

Most visitors are from the UK but we also have international visitors, the top 20 countries being as follows (excluding those with 100% bounce rate indicating they had come to the wrong place):
United States, India, Australia, Germany, France, Ireland, Denmark, Belgium, Cyprus, Mexico, Spain, Latvia, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Canada, Croatia, Italy, Morocco, Pakistan


Main updates to the website for the year March 2017 to Feb 2018 are:

CALLS FOR PAPERS

Call for abstracts - March 2017
A Call for Abstracts to be presented at our first symposium (May 2017) was published on the website in March 2017, with early career researchers particularly encouraged to apply.

The call was promoted to our mailing list and twitter.

Outcome: 20 abstracts received. Target was 10.

Impacts:
Wide range of disciplines represented in presentations and posters, promoting interdisciplinary understanding and ideas for new collaborations amongst delegates.
9 PhD students and other early career researchers got the opportunity to present their research in poster form providing important learning opportunities from discussion of research with other delegates and feedback received
11 other researchers, mostly early career researchers likewise benefited from feedback and discussion of the research they presented, which will help to shape and influence positively their future research in this area.


CALLS FOR PROPOSALS (FUNDING CALLS)

The following funding calls have been published on the website from March 2017 to end February 2018:

Small Events funding call (1) - August 2017
This invited applications for funding up to £2500 to run workshops or other activities to further GAMO aims.
Outcomes:
We received 2 applications both of which were funded (see Other Outputs & Knowledge/Steps).

Summer School funding call - November 2017
This invited applications to run summer schools aimed at PhD students and early career researchers focusing on GAMO themes and audiences.

Outcomes:
We didn't receive any applications by the deadline but are in conversation with two academics who are interested in running a school but were not able to make the deadline.

Feasibility Funding Call - 31st January 2018
Details of our first call for Feasibility Projects went live on January 31st. The purpose of this Feasibility Funding is to provide short term support to allow initial investigation of new ideas which are strongly aligned to the GetAMoveOn Network+ aims and research challenges.

Outcomes:
In the first two weeks after publication (to date) there were:

- Applicant information: 78 downloads
- Intention to Submit form: 56 downloads
- Full application/proposal form: 28 downloads

At the time of writing the call is still open so it is not possible yet to report on outcomes in terms of proposals received.


Small Events funding call (2) - 14th February 2018
Our second call inviting applications for funding up to £2500 to run workshops or other activities to further GAMO aims.

At the time of writing, the call has only just been launched (today). There have been 6 downloads of applicant information/application forms.

The call will not close until the end of March so it is not possible yet to report on outcomes in terms of proposals received.


ONLINE PUBLICATIONS

Symposium proceedings
- See separate entry for details
Symposium Workshop Report June 2017
- See separate entry
Research Challenges video
- See separate entry
Thinkpieces
- See separate entry for details
Workshop presentations - Older Adults and Physical Activity - June 2017
- See separate entry for details

INFORMATION ABOUT OUR EVENTS

Publication of information about our workshops:
- Older adults and physical activity (held June 2017)
- Inbodied Interaction @CHI2017 (held May 2017)
- Behaviour Change to address sedentarism (held February 2018)
- Exploring Inside & Around Body Boundaries for Body-Centric Computing Design CHI 2018 (to be held April 2018)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017,2018
URL https://getamoveon.ac.uk
 
Description Website - Year 3 March 2018 to Feb 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact The purpose of the website is to provide information about the aims of the GetAMoveOn Network+, news about funding calls and network events. It provides a repository of information to link to from social media, newsletters etc. so plays a pivotal role in other engagement activities.

Key website stats from launch to 6/3/19
Visitor sessions: 7271
Users: 4658
Page views: 16880

Most popular content is that which we most want people to engage with: events, funding calls, thinkpieces, other publications

Most visitors are from the UK but we also have international visitors, including from the major European countries, USA, Canada, Australia

Main updates to the website for the year March 2018 to Feb 2019 were:

ONLINE PUBLICATIONS
Behaviour Change Interventions to Address Sedentarism in Different Communities - published 16 April 2018: see separate entry for details. Impacts: Agenda setting: increased awareness amongst researchers in the field of research priorities.
Thinkpiece - publication of our final thinkpiece: see separate entry for details.
Blog posts - to help promote our events, we published a series of blog posts: Mindfulness on the Go; Technology, Mental Health and Physical Activity; What's In Store for Wearables;
We also published a progress report on Year 1 and Year 2: this was designed to be accessible and to give an at-a-glance view of our major activities and progress to date, using key stats and graphics.

UPDATES ON ACTIVITIES
Feasibility Funding Call
Details of our first call for Feasibility Projects went live in the previous reporting period - on January 31st 2018. At the end of the last reporting period the call was still open so it was not possible. to report on outcomes in terms of proposals received. Those outcomes were as follows:
Intention to submit forms received: 34
Full submissions received: 30

Projects funded - announcement of projects funded was published July 2018 (first round of funding) and October 2018 (second round).

EVENTS
Publication of information about a series of academic workshops and public engagement events held over summer 2018 (see individual entries for details):

Academic / practitioner workshop 13th July 2018: Innovation workshop - wearables in primary care + 29th September - Linked public engagement event:
What does health look like? Exploring visual feedback from wearables

Academic / practitioner workshop 18th & 19th July 2018: Active minds: physical activity, mental health & digital technology + 19th July - Linked public engagement event:
Mindfulness on-the-go with Rohan Gunatillake

Research workshop 16th August 2018: What does health feel like? Stretch Orchestra +
19th - 23rd September 2018 - Linked public event: What does health feel like? Exploring sensory feedback from wearables.

Workshop 13th September: Secrets of Successful Grant Applications

NEW SECTIONS
Section to showcase our YouTube videos of events and funded projects. These are detailed in separate entries.
Section to promote GAMO Fellowship
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018,2019
URL https://getamoveon.ac.uk/
 
Description Workshop Feb 2018 - Behaviour change - publication of presentations 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact The presentations made at our workshop on 20th February 2018, 'Behaviour Change to Address Sedentarism', were published on the GetAMoveOn website. The purpose was to:

Raise awareness of:

- The workshop itself
- The range of research being done in the field
- The key research challenges that people are engaging with

Also to:

- Disseminate research findings for others to respond to and build on through their own research
- Provide benefits to Network members and increase engagement with them by helping to raise their personal profiles as researchers
- Enable other researchers to contact network members via their contact details in presentations

The publication of the presentations was tweeted. This achieved 3359 impressions. Retweets achieved potentially 13,814 additional impressions.

At the time of writing, 5 days after publication of the presentations, there have been 25 visits to the download page.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://getamoveon.ac.uk/events/behaviour-change
 
Description Workshop June 2017 - publication of presentations - older adults 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Publication of workshop presentations June 2017
The presentations made at our workshop on June 27th 2017, 'Using Technology to Help Older Adults by Physically Active', were published on the GetAMoveOn website. The purpose was to:

Raise awareness of:

- The workshop itself
- The range of research being done in the field
- The key research challenges that people are engaging with

Also to:

- Disseminate research findings for others to respond to and build on through their own research
- Provide benefits to Network members and increase engagement with them by helping to raise their personal profiles as researchers
- Enable other researchers to contact network members via their contact details in presentations

Unfortunately we were unable initially to track the number of downloads as at the time google analytics was not set up to track PDF downloads.

Since July 2017 to date (mid-February 2018) there have been 258 visits to the workshop page and 31 downloads of presentations.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017,2018
 
Description Workshop June 2017: Using technology to help older adults be physically active 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Get A Move On Network + One Day Workshop:
Using technology to help older adults be physically active
June 27th 2017, University College London, 10.00-16.00

On June 27th 2017 we held a workshop on using technology to help older adults to be physically active. We heard findings from some of the most recent research on the topic, focusing on different technologies, different user groups, and different types of physical activity; we learned about on-going research that hasn't reported yet; had some lively, stimulating and challenging discussions, and forged new relationships with researchers from a whole range of disciplines, from HCI, to computer science, to health psychology. Details as follows:

Keynote speaker
Professor Nanette Mutrie, University of Edinburgh

Organiser and Chair
Professor Lucy Yardley, University of Oxford and University of Southampton

About the workshop

The purpose of the workshop was to bring together researchers across the UK and beyond with an interest in using technology to support physical activity in older people. The topic is intended to include a wide range of types and uses of technology, diverse populations and varied kinds of physical activity.

The workshop was designed to stimulate discussion and collaboration on this topic through a mixture of short presentations of recent and ongoing research, and small group networking. Participants were involved in sharing ideas and experiences, building collaborations and developing plans for funding proposals.

Agenda

10.00 Coffee/Tea

10.15 Welcome and introductions

10.30 Nanette Mutrie: Helping older adults sit less and walk more: pedometers; SitFITs and other devices

11.30 General Discussion

12.00 Lunch

12.45 Cindy Gray: STARFISH: a team-based smartphone app to increase physical activity in older adults and stroke survivors

1.10 Paul Curzon: Supporting physical activity as part of intelligent digital management of chronic conditions

1.35 m.c. schraefel: Elder everyday athletes: building resilience

2.00 Coffee/Tea

2.30 Kathrin Gerling: Designing for older users: understanding the relationship between playful technology, physical activity and vulnerability

2.55 Kirsten Smith: Iterative development and modification of a digital physical activity and a diet intervention for older cancer survivors

3.20 Eiman Kanjo: Persuasive technologies for older adults to increase physical activities

3.45 General discussion: future directions

4.00 CLOSE

Help with travel expenses
A limited fund was made available to reimburse costs incurred for travel to and from the workshop.

Event report

Overview

• 31 registrations which was on target (30), including 22 academic researchers, 5 students/PhD students/Post-doc researchers, 2 industry private sector (1 consultant advising NHS; 1 consultant working in public health & third sector), 1 from older people's charity, 1 funder

• Registered delegates were almost exclusively from UK, which is perhaps to be expected for a 1 day workshop.

• 21 different institutions represented, with people attending from more than one department within some institutions

• Wide range of disciplines and research interests represented including HCI, health psychology, physical therapy, behaviour change, computer science & AI, data analytics, m-health/e-health/health tech

• By definition, workshop delegates were interested in 1 of our target groups - older adults - though some had a particular interest in health challenges that are prevalent in this group such as cancer, dementia, general health and wellbeing.

Details

Attendees

• Registered: 31 (22 + 7 speakers)

• Attended: 14 + 7 speakers = 21

• No-shows: 10, of which 4 cancelled in advance or sent apologies

One of the disadvantages of making a workshop free is that there is no disincentive to delegates to prioritise something else if there are other calls on their time.

Attendees supported by travel grants

All delegates were invited to apply for support for travel costs, provided they could demonstrate that they would make a significant contribution to the workshop e.g. as a speaker, by sharing particular expertise etc. Five awards were made ranging from £50 to £250.

Countries represented

Registered delegates were almost exclusively from UK, which is perhaps to be expected for a 1 day workshop.

3 countries represented:

• UK (Including England, Scotland, Wales)

• Finland

• Italy


Institutions

21 organisations were represented, with delegates from more than one department within some organisations:

1. Centre for Ageing Better
2. Coventry University
3. EPSRC
4. G&G Projects
5. King's College London
6. Loughborough University
7. Newcastle University
8. Nottingham Trent University
9. Queen Mary University of London
10. Swansea University
11. Univeristy of Milano Bicocca
12. University College London
13. University of Birmingham
14. University of Cambridge
15. University of Edinburgh
16. University of Glasgow
17. University of Helsinki
18. University of Lincoln
19. University of Oxford
20. University of Southampton
21. University of Surrey


Departments

Delegates were from a range of different departments and research groups - many of which are themselves inter-disciplinary e.g.

• Social Research
• Public Health
• Communications
• Assistive Technology
• Computing Science
• Sport and Exercise Sciences
• Behavioural Science & Health
• Health Psychology
• Primary Care and Population Health
• Nutritional Sciences

The following research centres and institutes were represented:

Physical Activity for Health Research Centre
University of Edinburgh
Institute of Health and Wellbeing
University of Glasgow
UCL Interaction Centre
University College London
Institute of Public Health
University of Cambridge
Centre for Technology Enabled Health Research
Coventry University
Centre for Ageing Better



Disciplines and research interests

A wide range of disciplines and research interests was represented. The most frequently mentioned areas of interest were:

• Older adults' health
• Interestingly, only about half of registrants stated a specific interest in older people, though possibly some thought that was implied by attending a specialist workshop. Some had a particular interest in health challenges that are prevalent in this group such as cancer, dementia, general health and wellbeing.
• eHealth, mHealth
• HCI
• Physical activity for health
• Behaviour change
• Health psychology

More 'techie' interests were less often mentioned but were represented:

• AI, data science, sensors
• Assistive technologies
• Affective computing
• Biomedical engineering
• Playful tech
• Biomedical / biomechanical engineering
• App development

There were also representatives from EPSRC (funder) and someone working in physical rehabilitation


Key learnings from workshop feedback to consider for future workshops

• The opportunity to discuss research findings and issues raised is very important to most delegates. It was suggested that there should be more participative/interactive sessions and fewer formal presentations.
• It was also suggested that there should be more time allowed for Q&A and discussion after presentations (10 minutes was allocated after 20 minute presentations), and also more formal, structured, active chairing of discussions to help bring out key themes and research issues
• The networking opportunities were important to delegates but time is necessarily limited. One suggestion was to provide more structured networking opportunities e.g. speed networking
• The opportunity to make new cross-disciplinary contacts and discuss potential collaborations was also highly valued. One suggestion was to programme in more structured discussion about collaborating on future funding applications and/or providing some kind of 'matching' service to help potential collaborators from different disciplines to meet
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://getamoveon.ac.uk/events/workshop-1
 
Description Workshop Report from 1st Symposium (2017) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact In May 2017 the 1st GAMO Symposium took place with the aim to bring together a range of experts to help to scope and define approaches, and stimulate debate, about the role of current and future technologies in enhancing levels of activity and movement in one of our three target groups: schools, workplaces, and communities of older adults.

The symposium closed with a workshop in which delegates were asked to write down individually what they considered to be the main research challenges and goals for GAMO, and then took part in a group activity to brainstorm research questions related to the challenges and the target groups. They also worked in groups to brainstorm ideas for solutions to engage people in more physical activity.

This report is based on a thematic analysis of the handwritten notes of the discussions which took place, and the flip-chart posters produced during the group activities. The structure of the text is based on the key themes that have been identified (which are reflected in the 'topic cloud' on the first page; the font size represents their occurrence frequency). The report aims to incorporate and represent the different perspectives from the researchers involved as well as the different domains.

The report is set out as follows:

Section 1 - Research Components: Areas and Levels of Research
In this section, we present a model which conceptualises the research challenges identified in the workshop discussions, organising them into a number of 'areas' of research and 'levels' of intervention, defining the scope of each, and how they relate to each other in terms of an overall 'research lifecycle'.

Section 2 - Summary of Research Challenges and Goals Identified
In this section, we summarise the discussions which took place in the workshop. They are grouped thematically, according to the research challenges and goals identified by participants, at each level of intervention, and in relation to the overall 'research lifecycle'.

Section 3 - Outputs of group work: Research Questions Identified, and Ideas for Solutions to Engage People in More Physical Activity
In this section, we present the specific research questions identified during the group activities, the outline concepts which arose from the brainstorming activities to develop ideas for solutions to engage people in physical activity, and some specific research questions that would need to be addressed to develop those concepts further.

The report was published on the GetAMoveOn website. We also produced a short video (see separate entry) giving an overview of the research challenges identified, which was uploaded to YouTube and also embedded in the website.

We promoted these in tweets and our newsletter.

Tweets & direct retweets mean the announcement had a reach of at least 25,383 people, potentially many more if retweets were retweeted.

Our own tweet achieved an engagement rate of 4.7%

The main outcomes from the report are that it as a guide in its own right for grant applicants to some of GAMO's funding priorities, and it also served as the main input into workshop activities at our Workshop on Behaviour Change to Address Sedentarism in Different Communities held on 20th February 2018. The report findings were further developed to form the foundations of a roadmap summarising current knowledge, research challenges and future opportunities for reducing sedentary behaviour across communities and populations. This is currently being developed and is scheduled for delivery in Q2 2018.

The intended outcome from this will be clearer guidance for the research community on priority areas for investigation, to enable more efficient deployment of research effort and resources such as funding, including more focused guidance for applicants for GAMO funding, and identification of opportunities for collaboration and inter-disciplinary working.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://getamoveon.ac.uk/publications
 
Description Workshop on Behaviour Change to Address Sedentarism in Different Communities 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Workshop on Behaviour Change to Address Sedentarism in different communities
Held on Tuesday 20th February 2018 from 10am-4pm at UCL
Facilitators: Profs Ann Blandford & Anna Cox

Overview
The workshop was held in association with the 4th Annual Digital Behaviour Change Conference - Behaviour Change for Health: Digital & Beyond
It included talks and working group activities focusing on the role of behaviour change and other theories that support reasoning about the social and community contexts within which behaviour takes place. The focus was on reducing sedentarism across communities (e.g., schools, work places, care homes) where it is possible to introduce digitally enabled interventions to shape individual and group practices.
Participants learned about various theoretical and empirical approaches to behaviour change as applied to the challenge of reducing sedentarism within communities.
Another key workshop activity was to build on the report of the workshop we held at our 1st Symposium, which identified a significant number of research challenges in the field, as the basis for creating our Research Roadmap. This is currently being developed and will be finalised in Q2 of 2018.
Speakers
KEYNOTE Professor Shailey Minocha, Open University, Centre for Research in Computing: "Role of activity monitors in adopting an active and healthy lifestyle".
Dr Stanley Blue, Lancaster University: "Theories of practice and public health: from the obesogenic environment to healthy everyday life".
Dr Jacqueline Mair, Napier University, Sports, Exercise and Health Science Research Group: "Using technology to reduce sedentary behaviour in the workplace".
Dr Max Western, Southampton University: "Developing online resources to support reduction of sedentary behaviour in older people in the community".
Workshop content
Working groups (5-6 people per group) worked in parallel on particular communities (schools, workplaces, post-retirement communities), focusing on different stages of change:
• Pre-contemplation / contemplation / preparation: what makes people consider changing lifestyle?
• Action: theories and techniques to help people transition in to action
• Maintenance: theories and techniques to support maintenance of behaviour (habits, engagement)
The working groups addressed the following questions: what theories and techniques have been shown to be effective, or show promise? What are future possibilities at 3 years, 10 years, 25 years?

There was also an open-mic session at which delegates talked about their own work including:
• Testing a physical activity promotion program in three versions and comparing effects of telephone coaching and SMS prompting.
• Introduction to 'Living Streets' and their mission to get people walking more
• Research looking at how we can apply smartphone technology to encourage behaviour change in relation to air pollution, including encouraging a shift to walking and cycling from private car use
• An intervention involving a mobile phone game to increase walking.
Workshop outputs & outcomes
The main output - a report and roadmap that summarises current knowledge, research challenges and future opportunities for reducing sedentary behaviour across communities and populations, is being developed and is scheduled for delivery in Q2 2018.
The intended outcome from this will be clearer guidance for the research community on priority areas for investigation, to enable more efficient deployment of research effort and resources such as funding, including more focused guidance for applicants for GAMO funding, and identification of opportunities for collaboration and inter-disciplinary working.
Benefits and outcomes for delegates of attending included:
• Expanded and deepened their knowledge of the latest theoretical and empirical approaches to behaviour change interventions and related approaches to address sedentarism
• An opportunity to shape the GetAMoveOn research agenda & find out about future funding opportunities
• Make new contacts with a view to collaborating on future proposals for funding from the GAMO Network+ 
• Open mic session during which delegates were able to disseminate their own research

DELEGATES

NUMBERS

Registered: 31 registered + 4 speakers = 35


SENIORITY / CAREER STAGE

Analysis of job titles indicates a wide range of delegates from different career stages. Registered job titles included:

• Academic GP
• Assistant Professor
• Behavior Change Design Director
• Director of Clinical Development
• Director of Research
• Human Factors Consultant
• Learning and Impact Manager
• Lecturer
• PhD Researcher
• PhD student
• Post-doctoral researcher
• Professional Lead - Physical Activity
• Research Associate
• Research Fellow
• Senior Manager
• Senior Research Fellow
• Senior Strategic Consultant
• Waste prevention officer


INTERNATIONAL REACH

Registered delegates were mostly from UK, which is perhaps to be expected for a 1 day workshop but did include some European delegates:

Austria - 1
Finland - 1
Germany - 1
Swizerland - 1
UK - all others


Organisations , Disciplines & Research interests represented

Organisations

Sectors represented included health insurance, NHS, university, voluntary/third sector, local authority and the private sector, as follows. At least 20 different organisations were represented. This is not a full list as details of on 23 delegates were captured during the registration process.


1. Bradford NHS Teaching Hospitals
2. Bupa
3. Everyone Health
4. Imperial College London
5. University of Jyväskylä
6. King's College London
7. Living Streets
8. Mad*Pow
9. Mersyside Recycling and Waste Authority
10. Mott MacDonald
11. Surrey University
12. The Behavioural Architects
13. The University of Warwick
14. University of Basel, DSBG
15. University of Birmingham
16. University of Bristol
17. University of Cambridge
18. University of Graz
19. University of Kent
20. University of Mannheim


Research interests / discipline

Research & professional interests included the following. This is not a full list as details of on 23 delegates were captured during the registration process.

• Digital health for behaviour change at a community level
• Digital coaching, sport technology, sport and exercise psychology
• Active travel
• Incentives based behaviour change
• Physical activity promotion, reduction of sedentary behaviour, remote communication, coaching based on BCTs, Apps and Web-pages implementing essential BCTs to promote an active lifestyle
• personal informatics, activity tracking, reflection, older adults, sedentary behaviour
• Sedentary behaviour
• Which components in mHealth interventions lead to increased physical activity and how we can build components based on Social Psychological theories and principles.
• Physical activity,
• Physical activity, nutrition, weight loss
• Preventing household waste

FEEDBACK

The overall feedback, both anecdotal and from the feedback survey, was very good.

Notable highlights

Respondents were 'satisfied' or 'very satisfied' with all aspects of the workshop content (length and content of presentations, workshop discussions, interactive sessions etc.). Each aspect scored over 4 out of 5.

Respondents achieved a wide range of objectives, with highest scores going to two of the key objectives for the GAMO Network, which were outcomes for 71% of participants: making contacts and exchanging ideas with delegates in other disciplines or sectors, and meeting potential new collaborators in other disciplines or sectors.

57% increased their knowledge of research and other work going on in this field and learned about other's work in their own and other disciplines/sectors (though as a high proportion were researchers in the field it is likely they already had a good overview of work in the field)
57% exchanged ideas and made new contacts/met potential collaborators in their own disciplines/sector
71% did so with people in other disciplines/sectors
28% were inspired with new ideas for research projects and/or funding applications
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description YouTube channel - Year 3 - March 2018 to Feb 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact We have produced 5-minute videos of all the events we have funded and for each of our feasibility projects. Videos published on our YouTube channel in Year 3 include:

- Get A Move On Network Research Challenges
- How do we get people to move more? Behaviour Change Workshop report
- ActiveMinds
- Mindfulness on the Go
- Wearables in primary care: Innovations workshop
- What does health look like? Visualising health stats from wearables
- What does health feel like? Part 1 - exploring our health data with smart materials
- What does health feel like? Part 2 - exploring sensory feedback from wearables
- Rise and Recharge

These are videos published on a dedicated section of our website and on the individual event/project page, as well as on our own dedicated GetAMoveOn Network YouTube channel.

Outcomes and impacts:

- Increased awareness among researchers of GAMO agenda, research challenges & related activities (e.g. by tweeting the videos, as well as simply their presence on line).
- Wider public audience reached via YouTube
- Resources for our collaborators/funded researchers to raise the profile of their projects: multiplies our reach & awareness impacts

YouTube stats (as at 6/3/19)

Total views: 675
Total watch time: 1628 mins = 27 hours
Average view time: 2.24
Likes: 15
Shares: 59
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018,2019
URL https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCl5kP4g3Q9oifBzbQYIk_8g/featured