The Bristol Urban Area Diagnostics Pilot

Lead Research Organisation: University of Bristol
Department Name: Civil Engineering

Abstract

As European Green Capital 2015 and one of the Rockefeller 100 Resilient Cities, Bristol has challenged itself to transform by 2065 into a place where citizens 'flourish' by working together to create wellbeing, and achieve this equitably and sustainably. The Bristol Urban Area can legitimately claim to be in the vanguard of such urban transformation, and yet its development pathway remains characterised by paradox, and the need to deal with some stark realities and to challenge a 'business-as-usual' mind-set if progress towards aspirational goals is to be sustained. This proposal addresses a fundamental issue: what is stopping Bristol from bridging the gap between its current situation and the desired future as encapsulated in the City's various visions and aspirations?

We have forged a partnership focused on the contiguous City of Bristol and South Gloucestershire urban area. We have secured the full backing of the two local authorities, Bristol Green Capital Partnership and Bristol Health Partners, the LEP, the local business community, citizen groups, and academics from across both Universities, with tangible commitments of support. Dissolving siloes through partnership, and a genuine interdisciplinary and cross-sectoral collaboration, is core to our approach, and hence both Universities have committed to share equally the financial resources with external partners in a three-way split.

It is a key strength of this project that we are able to leverage extensively on internationally leading research assets, including: 'Bristol is Open', the FP7-funded Systems Thinking for Efficient Energy Planning (STEEP), the Horizon 2020 REPLICATE project, ongoing work at the £3.5m EPSRC/ESRC International Centre for Infrastructure Futures (ICIF) and co-produced and co-designed research such as the AHRC/ESRC Connected Communities and Digital Economy funded projects including REACT Hub, Tangible Memories and Productive Margins. We also have access to a wealth of highly valuabe data sources including the 2015 State of Bristol Report, Bristol's Quality of Life Survey, and the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents & Children that has followed the health of 14,500 local families since the 1990s.

We intend to build on the ICIF cognitive modelling approach which identifies the importance of challenging established mental models since these entrench a 'business-as-usual' mind-set. At the heart is co-creation and co-production, and an acknowledgement that citizen behaviour and action are essential to the delivery of desired societal outcomes such as wellbeing, equality, health, learning, and carbon neutrality.

The work programme synthesises existing domain-specific diagnostic methodologies and tools to create a novel Integrated Diagnostics Framework. We believe strongly that unless an integrating framework is developed to bring together multiple viewpoints, the diagnosis of urban challenges will remain fragmented and understandings will potentially conflict. We will apply this framework in this pilot project to diagnosis complex problems across four 'Challenge Themes': Mobility & Accessibility, Health & Happiness, Equality & Inclusion and the 'Carbon Neutral' city. We have appointed 'Theme Leaders' who are all 'end users' of the diagnostics, ensuring that the process of investigation is cross-sectoral, interdisciplinary, participatory and grounded in real-world context and application.

The legacy of the project will be threefold: firstly innovation in the diagnostic framework and methods needed to address urban challenges; secondly its application to the Bristol urban area and the resulting diagnostics synthesise across the four Challenge Themes; and finally the formation of an embryonic cadre of cross-sector city leaders with the capability to apply integrated diagnostics and challenge the prevailing 'business as usual' approaches.

Planned Impact

Focussing on significant challenges. The Bristol Urban Area (BUA) can legitimately claim to be in the vanguard of urban transformation, owing to numerous accolades in liveability, sustainability, and urban innovation. However, its development is characterised by paradox and there are stark realities to face. Significant progress is needed in interconnected challenges of 'health and happiness', 'mobility and accessibility', 'equality and inclusion' and 'carbon-neutral city'. Evidence on the urgency of these challenges is presented in the Case for Support. Our long-term ambition, through effective diagnoses, is to make a significant impact in these areas.

Co-production with end users - partnerships for impact. The Pilot will take us part of the way towards the above goal, yet it is critical to design for impact and ensure the diagnostic framework will meet the needs of future end-users. Thus, this proposal has been co-developed with a wealth of end-users with significant influence (Bristol City Council, South Gloucestershire Council, Bristol Green Capital Partnership and Bristol Health Partners). This approach has established a dedicated set of partners, committed to the outcomes and to long-term legacy. End-users have agreed to lead 'challenge theme' investigations, creating an intimate involvement in the project and ensuring they can benefit immediately from the new knowledge.

Supporting the improvement of collaborative practices for health, mobility, carbon-neutral city, equality and beyond. To resolve interconnected challenges in the context of budget constraints, effective collaborations across organisational and disciplinary boundaries are essential. An Integrated Diagnostic Framework focussed on collaborative practices will offer new ways to robustly assess and learn in real time, generating short-term, but potentially large-scale impacts on BUA's mobility and accessibility, health and happiness, inclusion and inequality and Carbon-neutral agendas. However, the framework will also be applicable to other challenges leading to an exponential potential for impact. The diagnostic framework will be publicly accessible on a prominent webpage and shared via partners (engaging at least 450 people) alongside supporting method documents, formal project reports, blogs, and simple guides to help change-makers from a variety of backgrounds replicate the diagnosis in new challenge areas. A joint training session will attract 100+ people and support leadership development. Podcasts and training materials from the session will be made available online for a wider audience. Inclusion in the October 2017 'Festival of the Future City' will secure widespread awareness and uptake amongst the public, international policy makers, academics and businesses. Exceptional support from the Local Economic Partnership, Arup and Buro Happold offers routes to impact amongst business. UoB's Cabot Institute - a coordinator for Future Cities research - will act as an ongoing conduit for the project, coordinating future funding applications, monitoring impact and organising events to ensure continuity of the partnership during any future funding gaps. Regular connection to national and international networks (e.g. UWE's WHO Collaborating Centre on Healthy Urban Environments, Core Cities network, ICLEI, the Rockefeller Resilient City Network) offers routes to impact far beyond Bristol.

The legacy of this project will be threefold: first, innovation in the diagnostic framework and methods needed to address the challenges of urban living holistically; second, the application of this diagnostic approach to the BUA in order to identify the obstacles that have prevented further progress in delivering outcomes; and finally, a legacy through the formation of an embryonic cadre of cross-sectoral city leaders with the capability to use this learning to challenge the 'business as usual' approaches we experience in urban systems in BUA and the UK as a whole.

Organisations

Publications

10 25 50
 
Description Urban ID research is ongoing and at the final synthesis stage, with the findings reaching maturity. The following are the main outcomes to emerge:
1. We have established a synthesis of co-production, learning journeys, resilience and systems thinking research within an integrated diagnostics framework, and we have been able to apply this to explore the diagnosis of urban challenges. The framework has been applied successfully through a number of case studies.
2. The challenge we set ourselves at the outset of this project was to understand and diagnose "What is stopping Bristol from bridging the gap between our current situation and the desired future as encapsulated by the City's various visions and aspirations?". This has required a significant co-production programme in its own right to bring together leaders and decision-makers from local partnerships, the two local authorities and NGOs - comprising a practitioner community - and create a space for them to work alongside researchers from a range of academic disciplines. The reflection and feedback of the practitioner community is that this has been a novel process that has added rigour and creativity to strategic planning and development activities in the Bristol urban area.
3. A further finding of the Urban ID project is the learning arising from having set up this cross-sector, transdisciplinary programme.
4. Development of the diagnostic framework is being achieved by applying it to five geographically-located case studies, each of which presents a rich set of interconnected urban challenges. This 'real-world' application is providing a stimulus for researchers to develop the tools and methods needed to successfully engage citizens and practitioners in co-production of the problem diagnoses and co-creation of potential solutions. 5. We have identified the crucial need for cities and communities to keep up to date their knowledge about themselves and how they work; such knowledge is the foundation of effective policy and action. Failure to keep it up to date in rapidly changing times will inevitably lead to sub-optimal policy and action.
Exploitation Route The urban living diagnostics framework is intended for general use. Once tested and validated, we expect it to be of use to anyone wishing to diagnose urban living issues in any contextual setting. We have already had a request to apply it to a diagnosis of the challenges of holisitc infrastructure provision in the SW of England.

We aim to develop a long term route map that will provide a research and development pathway towards the desired long term goals. The route map will enable integration of thinking and practice and will identify the sequences of actions that should be followed.
Sectors Agriculture, Food and Drink,Communities and Social Services/Policy,Construction,Creative Economy,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Education,Electronics,Energy,Environment,Financial Services, and Management Consultancy,Healthcare,Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism,Government, Democracy and Justice,Manufacturing, including Industrial Biotechology,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections,Retail,Security and Diplomacy,Transport

URL http://www.bristol.ac.uk/cabot/research/urban-id
 
Description The project is at the final synthesis stage, with the final documents and publications being formulated. The main impacts to date have been through ongoing workshops and meetings with city stakeholders (policy makers, professionals, industry, third sector, and citizens) around the emerging One City Plan of Bristol City Council. It is possible only to make the qualitative assessments of research impact as follows: 1. Urban ID project has formed a cadre of city planners and thinkers equipped to tackle city-wide challenges with the perspectives arising out of systems and co-production mindsets, and with the engagement and enthusiasm to sustain and embed this new approach. These planners and thinkers are now themselves proposing new projects and areas to which to apply the co-production, systems thinking, and learning journey approaches, including application to significant institutional developments and city-wide strategic planning. 2. Urban ID project members are able to provide in terms of resources and knowledge to a citizen-led housing case study in South Bristol. This activity has great significance in Bristol due to the presence of many low density developments in Bristol's suburban areas and associated with these the relatively poor mobility choices for residents; the lack of employment opportunities in such disadvantaged areas, and the issue of affordability of housing in Bristol. The research on this case study is ongoing. 3. SW Institution of Civil Engineers has requested that we apply the UrbanID diagnostics framework to the SW Infrastructure challenge. Funding is being sought for this. 4. Further engagement has continued with local and regional stakeholders to communicate ideas and findings of UrbanID and to stimulate further application studies.
First Year Of Impact 2017
Sector Communities and Social Services/Policy,Construction,Creative Economy,Education,Environment,Financial Services, and Management Consultancy,Healthcare,Transport,Other
Impact Types Societal,Policy & public services

 
Description Application of the Urban-ID Systems and Co-production Approach to the Bristol 'One City Plan'
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact OVERALL PROJECT AIM: To take research findings from the Bristol Urban Area Diagnostics Pilot project (now branded Urban Integrated Diagnostics, or Urban ID), and apply the systems thinking and co-production methods and practices developed on the project in support of Bristol City Council as it formulates its 'One City Plan'. The key impact is through the alignment of the policies, planning and practices of public and private organisations in a city or other urban area, we can reduce adverse impacts from conflict and enhance the beneficial interactions from a more joined up approach. PROBLEM ADDRESSED: At the Festival of the Future City 2017 Bristol's Mayor, Marvin Rees, launched the Bristol 'One City Plan' noting: "The ambition of 'The One City Plan' will enable a truly collaborative and integrated approach to deliver for the city. The plan will look forward and provide an overarching vision for Bristol, aligning partners across the city on the key challenges and opportunities." Working with Bristol City Council, Urban ID team has identified a set of activities in the 'One City Plan' process where the Mayor's Office charged with delivering the One City Plan, can benefit form the systems thinking and co-production methods and tools developed on the Urban-ID project. This work is funded under an impact acceleration award, and has: 1. Delivered a systems thinking workshop for the stakeholders and One City Plan challenge theme leads (Work Stream leads) helping them to develop the skills and apply systems and co-production tools to understand the complexity of urban challenges and diagnose and map the root causes; 2. Has provided, and continues to provide, a critique of and support to the One City Planning process, policy goals and activities. This includes review of the metrics set, the prioritization of challenges being addressed. This has been founded on the integrated systems perspective and coproduction principles and practices developed on Urban ID; 3. Contributions are planned for the design of a governance workshop to build a better understanding of how each plan theme connects to, and impacts on, the wider city system; This whole activity is ongoing and we have identified other opportunities to apply the structured Urban ID approach to help improve the quality of diagnosis of key city challenges. This includes designing and leading some place-based "living labs" that will bring stakeholders together to develop a localised, citizen-led understanding of the city challenges.
 
Description EPSRC Impact Acceleration Award
Amount £14,112 (GBP)
Organisation University of Sheffield 
Department EPSRC KTA Knowledge Transfer Account
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 11/2017 
End 04/2018
 
Description Inspiring Science
Amount £2,500,000 (GBP)
Organisation Wellcome Trust 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 11/2017 
End 11/2019
 
Description Arup UrbanID 
Organisation Arup Group
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Leading the UrbanID diagnostics project. Developing the diagnostics framework. Planning and supporting the diagnostics activities, and synthesising the results.
Collaborator Contribution Participation in networking events, planning of diagnostics activities and participation in those activities.
Impact The UrbanID project is in its early stages. No public outputs have been created as yet.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Bristol Green Capital Partnership Collaboration on 'The future role of city sustainability communities' 
Organisation Bristol Green Capital Partnership
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution University of Bristol and University of West of England led the academic work on the Urban ID project. The University of Bristol formed a collaboration with Bristol Green Capital Partnership, and as one of the Urban ID case study projects, academics from both Universities worked with BGCP to understand "The future role of city sustainability communities". This included qualitative data collection and analysis through interviewing and facilitating workshops with BGCP membership.
Collaborator Contribution Bristol Green Capital Partnership is the city's independent environmental sustainability network. It has 850 member organisations from across the private, public, voluntary and third sectors. Its members are based across the city, the Bristol urban area and the wider region as well as beyond. It therefore has considerable convening power through the trust its membership place in the partnership. They were therefore able to a) contribute directly to the case study research design and 2) facilitate access to its membership through the meetings, workshops and other events it convened.
Impact The outcomes from the partnership are firstly to have been able to develop and trial the Urban ID approach to diagnosing city challenges in a co-produced research case study with the membership of the Bristol Green Capital Partnership. Secondly there has been sharing of knowledge between the BGCP and University researchers, including the transfer of knowledge of systems and coproduction methods and tools.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Bristol Urban ID 
Organisation Arup Group
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution We are leading this Urban Living Partnership Pilot project. We are overseeing the development of a new integrated urban diagnostics tool and its implementation through a programme of engagement activities with diverse stakeholder groups across the Bristol city-region. The project is still in its formative stages. The prototype diagnostics framework is now being tested and evaluated. It will be updated and applied more widely later in 2017. We shall oversee the abstraction and synthesis of the learning from all these activities.
Collaborator Contribution All the partners have been involved as participants in the co-production approach being followed in the development, application, evaluation and synthesis of the integrated urban diagnostics tool. Each participant is involved in the design and implementation of one or more case study applications of the tool.
Impact This project is still in its formative stages. There are no formal outputs or outcomes attributable to it at present. At this point the Urban ID research is ongoing and findings are preliminary. However the following are the main outcomes to emerge: 1. We have established a synthesis of co-production, learning journeys, resilience and systems thinking research within an integrated diagnostics framework, and we have been able to apply this to explore the diagnosis of urban challenges. At this stage the framework represents a preliminary product of the research. 2. The challenge we set ourselves at the outset of this project was to understand and diagnose "What is stopping Bristol from bridging the gap between our current situation and the desired future as encapsulated by the City's various visions and aspirations?". This has required a significant co-production programme in its own right to bring together leaders and decision-makers from local partnerships, the two local authorities and NGOs - comprising a practitioner community - and create a space for them to work alongside researchers from a range of academic disciplines. The reflection and feedback of the practitioner community is that this has been a novel process that has added rigour and creativity to strategic planning and development activities in the Bristol urban area. 3. A further finding of the Urban ID project is the learning arising from having set up this cross-sector, transdisciplinary programme. 4. Development of the diagnostic framework is being achieved by applying it to five geographically-located case studies, each of which presents a rich set of interconnected urban challenges. This 'real-world' application is providing a stimulus for researchers to develop the tools and methods needed to successfully engage citizens and practitioners in co-production of the problem diagnoses and co-creation of potential solutions. Emerging Impacts: Again at this stage in the project impacts are embryonic and it is possible only to make the qualitative assessments of research impact as follows: 1. A first impact is that the Urban ID project has begun to form a cadre of city planners and thinkers equipped to tackle city-wide challenges with the perspectives arising out of systems and co-production mindsets, and with the engagement and enthusiasm to sustain and embed this new approach. These planners and thinkers are now themselves proposing new projects and areas to which to apply the co-production, systems thinking, and learning journey approaches, including application to significant institutional developments and city-wide strategic planning. 2. A second impact area is the support that the Urban ID project is able to provide in terms of resources and knowledge to a citizen-led housing case study in South Bristol. This activity has great significance in Bristol due to the presence of many low density developments in Bristol's suburban areas and associated with these the relatively poor mobility choices for residents; the lack of employment opportunities in such disadvantaged areas, and the issue of affordability of housing in Bristol. The research on this case study is ongoing. The project is multidisciplinary, involving engineering, transport, environmental sciences, social sciences, health, policy, and creative arts and design.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Bristol Urban ID 
Organisation Bristol City Council
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution We are leading this Urban Living Partnership Pilot project. We are overseeing the development of a new integrated urban diagnostics tool and its implementation through a programme of engagement activities with diverse stakeholder groups across the Bristol city-region. The project is still in its formative stages. The prototype diagnostics framework is now being tested and evaluated. It will be updated and applied more widely later in 2017. We shall oversee the abstraction and synthesis of the learning from all these activities.
Collaborator Contribution All the partners have been involved as participants in the co-production approach being followed in the development, application, evaluation and synthesis of the integrated urban diagnostics tool. Each participant is involved in the design and implementation of one or more case study applications of the tool.
Impact This project is still in its formative stages. There are no formal outputs or outcomes attributable to it at present. At this point the Urban ID research is ongoing and findings are preliminary. However the following are the main outcomes to emerge: 1. We have established a synthesis of co-production, learning journeys, resilience and systems thinking research within an integrated diagnostics framework, and we have been able to apply this to explore the diagnosis of urban challenges. At this stage the framework represents a preliminary product of the research. 2. The challenge we set ourselves at the outset of this project was to understand and diagnose "What is stopping Bristol from bridging the gap between our current situation and the desired future as encapsulated by the City's various visions and aspirations?". This has required a significant co-production programme in its own right to bring together leaders and decision-makers from local partnerships, the two local authorities and NGOs - comprising a practitioner community - and create a space for them to work alongside researchers from a range of academic disciplines. The reflection and feedback of the practitioner community is that this has been a novel process that has added rigour and creativity to strategic planning and development activities in the Bristol urban area. 3. A further finding of the Urban ID project is the learning arising from having set up this cross-sector, transdisciplinary programme. 4. Development of the diagnostic framework is being achieved by applying it to five geographically-located case studies, each of which presents a rich set of interconnected urban challenges. This 'real-world' application is providing a stimulus for researchers to develop the tools and methods needed to successfully engage citizens and practitioners in co-production of the problem diagnoses and co-creation of potential solutions. Emerging Impacts: Again at this stage in the project impacts are embryonic and it is possible only to make the qualitative assessments of research impact as follows: 1. A first impact is that the Urban ID project has begun to form a cadre of city planners and thinkers equipped to tackle city-wide challenges with the perspectives arising out of systems and co-production mindsets, and with the engagement and enthusiasm to sustain and embed this new approach. These planners and thinkers are now themselves proposing new projects and areas to which to apply the co-production, systems thinking, and learning journey approaches, including application to significant institutional developments and city-wide strategic planning. 2. A second impact area is the support that the Urban ID project is able to provide in terms of resources and knowledge to a citizen-led housing case study in South Bristol. This activity has great significance in Bristol due to the presence of many low density developments in Bristol's suburban areas and associated with these the relatively poor mobility choices for residents; the lack of employment opportunities in such disadvantaged areas, and the issue of affordability of housing in Bristol. The research on this case study is ongoing. The project is multidisciplinary, involving engineering, transport, environmental sciences, social sciences, health, policy, and creative arts and design.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Bristol Urban ID 
Organisation Bristol Cultural Development Partnership
Department Bristol Festival of Ideas
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution We are leading this Urban Living Partnership Pilot project. We are overseeing the development of a new integrated urban diagnostics tool and its implementation through a programme of engagement activities with diverse stakeholder groups across the Bristol city-region. The project is still in its formative stages. The prototype diagnostics framework is now being tested and evaluated. It will be updated and applied more widely later in 2017. We shall oversee the abstraction and synthesis of the learning from all these activities.
Collaborator Contribution All the partners have been involved as participants in the co-production approach being followed in the development, application, evaluation and synthesis of the integrated urban diagnostics tool. Each participant is involved in the design and implementation of one or more case study applications of the tool.
Impact This project is still in its formative stages. There are no formal outputs or outcomes attributable to it at present. At this point the Urban ID research is ongoing and findings are preliminary. However the following are the main outcomes to emerge: 1. We have established a synthesis of co-production, learning journeys, resilience and systems thinking research within an integrated diagnostics framework, and we have been able to apply this to explore the diagnosis of urban challenges. At this stage the framework represents a preliminary product of the research. 2. The challenge we set ourselves at the outset of this project was to understand and diagnose "What is stopping Bristol from bridging the gap between our current situation and the desired future as encapsulated by the City's various visions and aspirations?". This has required a significant co-production programme in its own right to bring together leaders and decision-makers from local partnerships, the two local authorities and NGOs - comprising a practitioner community - and create a space for them to work alongside researchers from a range of academic disciplines. The reflection and feedback of the practitioner community is that this has been a novel process that has added rigour and creativity to strategic planning and development activities in the Bristol urban area. 3. A further finding of the Urban ID project is the learning arising from having set up this cross-sector, transdisciplinary programme. 4. Development of the diagnostic framework is being achieved by applying it to five geographically-located case studies, each of which presents a rich set of interconnected urban challenges. This 'real-world' application is providing a stimulus for researchers to develop the tools and methods needed to successfully engage citizens and practitioners in co-production of the problem diagnoses and co-creation of potential solutions. Emerging Impacts: Again at this stage in the project impacts are embryonic and it is possible only to make the qualitative assessments of research impact as follows: 1. A first impact is that the Urban ID project has begun to form a cadre of city planners and thinkers equipped to tackle city-wide challenges with the perspectives arising out of systems and co-production mindsets, and with the engagement and enthusiasm to sustain and embed this new approach. These planners and thinkers are now themselves proposing new projects and areas to which to apply the co-production, systems thinking, and learning journey approaches, including application to significant institutional developments and city-wide strategic planning. 2. A second impact area is the support that the Urban ID project is able to provide in terms of resources and knowledge to a citizen-led housing case study in South Bristol. This activity has great significance in Bristol due to the presence of many low density developments in Bristol's suburban areas and associated with these the relatively poor mobility choices for residents; the lack of employment opportunities in such disadvantaged areas, and the issue of affordability of housing in Bristol. The research on this case study is ongoing. The project is multidisciplinary, involving engineering, transport, environmental sciences, social sciences, health, policy, and creative arts and design.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Bristol Urban ID 
Organisation Bristol Green Capital Partnership
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution We are leading this Urban Living Partnership Pilot project. We are overseeing the development of a new integrated urban diagnostics tool and its implementation through a programme of engagement activities with diverse stakeholder groups across the Bristol city-region. The project is still in its formative stages. The prototype diagnostics framework is now being tested and evaluated. It will be updated and applied more widely later in 2017. We shall oversee the abstraction and synthesis of the learning from all these activities.
Collaborator Contribution All the partners have been involved as participants in the co-production approach being followed in the development, application, evaluation and synthesis of the integrated urban diagnostics tool. Each participant is involved in the design and implementation of one or more case study applications of the tool.
Impact This project is still in its formative stages. There are no formal outputs or outcomes attributable to it at present. At this point the Urban ID research is ongoing and findings are preliminary. However the following are the main outcomes to emerge: 1. We have established a synthesis of co-production, learning journeys, resilience and systems thinking research within an integrated diagnostics framework, and we have been able to apply this to explore the diagnosis of urban challenges. At this stage the framework represents a preliminary product of the research. 2. The challenge we set ourselves at the outset of this project was to understand and diagnose "What is stopping Bristol from bridging the gap between our current situation and the desired future as encapsulated by the City's various visions and aspirations?". This has required a significant co-production programme in its own right to bring together leaders and decision-makers from local partnerships, the two local authorities and NGOs - comprising a practitioner community - and create a space for them to work alongside researchers from a range of academic disciplines. The reflection and feedback of the practitioner community is that this has been a novel process that has added rigour and creativity to strategic planning and development activities in the Bristol urban area. 3. A further finding of the Urban ID project is the learning arising from having set up this cross-sector, transdisciplinary programme. 4. Development of the diagnostic framework is being achieved by applying it to five geographically-located case studies, each of which presents a rich set of interconnected urban challenges. This 'real-world' application is providing a stimulus for researchers to develop the tools and methods needed to successfully engage citizens and practitioners in co-production of the problem diagnoses and co-creation of potential solutions. Emerging Impacts: Again at this stage in the project impacts are embryonic and it is possible only to make the qualitative assessments of research impact as follows: 1. A first impact is that the Urban ID project has begun to form a cadre of city planners and thinkers equipped to tackle city-wide challenges with the perspectives arising out of systems and co-production mindsets, and with the engagement and enthusiasm to sustain and embed this new approach. These planners and thinkers are now themselves proposing new projects and areas to which to apply the co-production, systems thinking, and learning journey approaches, including application to significant institutional developments and city-wide strategic planning. 2. A second impact area is the support that the Urban ID project is able to provide in terms of resources and knowledge to a citizen-led housing case study in South Bristol. This activity has great significance in Bristol due to the presence of many low density developments in Bristol's suburban areas and associated with these the relatively poor mobility choices for residents; the lack of employment opportunities in such disadvantaged areas, and the issue of affordability of housing in Bristol. The research on this case study is ongoing. The project is multidisciplinary, involving engineering, transport, environmental sciences, social sciences, health, policy, and creative arts and design.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Bristol Urban ID 
Organisation Bristol Health Partners
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution We are leading this Urban Living Partnership Pilot project. We are overseeing the development of a new integrated urban diagnostics tool and its implementation through a programme of engagement activities with diverse stakeholder groups across the Bristol city-region. The project is still in its formative stages. The prototype diagnostics framework is now being tested and evaluated. It will be updated and applied more widely later in 2017. We shall oversee the abstraction and synthesis of the learning from all these activities.
Collaborator Contribution All the partners have been involved as participants in the co-production approach being followed in the development, application, evaluation and synthesis of the integrated urban diagnostics tool. Each participant is involved in the design and implementation of one or more case study applications of the tool.
Impact This project is still in its formative stages. There are no formal outputs or outcomes attributable to it at present. At this point the Urban ID research is ongoing and findings are preliminary. However the following are the main outcomes to emerge: 1. We have established a synthesis of co-production, learning journeys, resilience and systems thinking research within an integrated diagnostics framework, and we have been able to apply this to explore the diagnosis of urban challenges. At this stage the framework represents a preliminary product of the research. 2. The challenge we set ourselves at the outset of this project was to understand and diagnose "What is stopping Bristol from bridging the gap between our current situation and the desired future as encapsulated by the City's various visions and aspirations?". This has required a significant co-production programme in its own right to bring together leaders and decision-makers from local partnerships, the two local authorities and NGOs - comprising a practitioner community - and create a space for them to work alongside researchers from a range of academic disciplines. The reflection and feedback of the practitioner community is that this has been a novel process that has added rigour and creativity to strategic planning and development activities in the Bristol urban area. 3. A further finding of the Urban ID project is the learning arising from having set up this cross-sector, transdisciplinary programme. 4. Development of the diagnostic framework is being achieved by applying it to five geographically-located case studies, each of which presents a rich set of interconnected urban challenges. This 'real-world' application is providing a stimulus for researchers to develop the tools and methods needed to successfully engage citizens and practitioners in co-production of the problem diagnoses and co-creation of potential solutions. Emerging Impacts: Again at this stage in the project impacts are embryonic and it is possible only to make the qualitative assessments of research impact as follows: 1. A first impact is that the Urban ID project has begun to form a cadre of city planners and thinkers equipped to tackle city-wide challenges with the perspectives arising out of systems and co-production mindsets, and with the engagement and enthusiasm to sustain and embed this new approach. These planners and thinkers are now themselves proposing new projects and areas to which to apply the co-production, systems thinking, and learning journey approaches, including application to significant institutional developments and city-wide strategic planning. 2. A second impact area is the support that the Urban ID project is able to provide in terms of resources and knowledge to a citizen-led housing case study in South Bristol. This activity has great significance in Bristol due to the presence of many low density developments in Bristol's suburban areas and associated with these the relatively poor mobility choices for residents; the lack of employment opportunities in such disadvantaged areas, and the issue of affordability of housing in Bristol. The research on this case study is ongoing. The project is multidisciplinary, involving engineering, transport, environmental sciences, social sciences, health, policy, and creative arts and design.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Bristol Urban ID 
Organisation BuroHappold Engineering
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution We are leading this Urban Living Partnership Pilot project. We are overseeing the development of a new integrated urban diagnostics tool and its implementation through a programme of engagement activities with diverse stakeholder groups across the Bristol city-region. The project is still in its formative stages. The prototype diagnostics framework is now being tested and evaluated. It will be updated and applied more widely later in 2017. We shall oversee the abstraction and synthesis of the learning from all these activities.
Collaborator Contribution All the partners have been involved as participants in the co-production approach being followed in the development, application, evaluation and synthesis of the integrated urban diagnostics tool. Each participant is involved in the design and implementation of one or more case study applications of the tool.
Impact This project is still in its formative stages. There are no formal outputs or outcomes attributable to it at present. At this point the Urban ID research is ongoing and findings are preliminary. However the following are the main outcomes to emerge: 1. We have established a synthesis of co-production, learning journeys, resilience and systems thinking research within an integrated diagnostics framework, and we have been able to apply this to explore the diagnosis of urban challenges. At this stage the framework represents a preliminary product of the research. 2. The challenge we set ourselves at the outset of this project was to understand and diagnose "What is stopping Bristol from bridging the gap between our current situation and the desired future as encapsulated by the City's various visions and aspirations?". This has required a significant co-production programme in its own right to bring together leaders and decision-makers from local partnerships, the two local authorities and NGOs - comprising a practitioner community - and create a space for them to work alongside researchers from a range of academic disciplines. The reflection and feedback of the practitioner community is that this has been a novel process that has added rigour and creativity to strategic planning and development activities in the Bristol urban area. 3. A further finding of the Urban ID project is the learning arising from having set up this cross-sector, transdisciplinary programme. 4. Development of the diagnostic framework is being achieved by applying it to five geographically-located case studies, each of which presents a rich set of interconnected urban challenges. This 'real-world' application is providing a stimulus for researchers to develop the tools and methods needed to successfully engage citizens and practitioners in co-production of the problem diagnoses and co-creation of potential solutions. Emerging Impacts: Again at this stage in the project impacts are embryonic and it is possible only to make the qualitative assessments of research impact as follows: 1. A first impact is that the Urban ID project has begun to form a cadre of city planners and thinkers equipped to tackle city-wide challenges with the perspectives arising out of systems and co-production mindsets, and with the engagement and enthusiasm to sustain and embed this new approach. These planners and thinkers are now themselves proposing new projects and areas to which to apply the co-production, systems thinking, and learning journey approaches, including application to significant institutional developments and city-wide strategic planning. 2. A second impact area is the support that the Urban ID project is able to provide in terms of resources and knowledge to a citizen-led housing case study in South Bristol. This activity has great significance in Bristol due to the presence of many low density developments in Bristol's suburban areas and associated with these the relatively poor mobility choices for residents; the lack of employment opportunities in such disadvantaged areas, and the issue of affordability of housing in Bristol. The research on this case study is ongoing. The project is multidisciplinary, involving engineering, transport, environmental sciences, social sciences, health, policy, and creative arts and design.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Bristol Urban ID 
Organisation Business West
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution We are leading this Urban Living Partnership Pilot project. We are overseeing the development of a new integrated urban diagnostics tool and its implementation through a programme of engagement activities with diverse stakeholder groups across the Bristol city-region. The project is still in its formative stages. The prototype diagnostics framework is now being tested and evaluated. It will be updated and applied more widely later in 2017. We shall oversee the abstraction and synthesis of the learning from all these activities.
Collaborator Contribution All the partners have been involved as participants in the co-production approach being followed in the development, application, evaluation and synthesis of the integrated urban diagnostics tool. Each participant is involved in the design and implementation of one or more case study applications of the tool.
Impact This project is still in its formative stages. There are no formal outputs or outcomes attributable to it at present. At this point the Urban ID research is ongoing and findings are preliminary. However the following are the main outcomes to emerge: 1. We have established a synthesis of co-production, learning journeys, resilience and systems thinking research within an integrated diagnostics framework, and we have been able to apply this to explore the diagnosis of urban challenges. At this stage the framework represents a preliminary product of the research. 2. The challenge we set ourselves at the outset of this project was to understand and diagnose "What is stopping Bristol from bridging the gap between our current situation and the desired future as encapsulated by the City's various visions and aspirations?". This has required a significant co-production programme in its own right to bring together leaders and decision-makers from local partnerships, the two local authorities and NGOs - comprising a practitioner community - and create a space for them to work alongside researchers from a range of academic disciplines. The reflection and feedback of the practitioner community is that this has been a novel process that has added rigour and creativity to strategic planning and development activities in the Bristol urban area. 3. A further finding of the Urban ID project is the learning arising from having set up this cross-sector, transdisciplinary programme. 4. Development of the diagnostic framework is being achieved by applying it to five geographically-located case studies, each of which presents a rich set of interconnected urban challenges. This 'real-world' application is providing a stimulus for researchers to develop the tools and methods needed to successfully engage citizens and practitioners in co-production of the problem diagnoses and co-creation of potential solutions. Emerging Impacts: Again at this stage in the project impacts are embryonic and it is possible only to make the qualitative assessments of research impact as follows: 1. A first impact is that the Urban ID project has begun to form a cadre of city planners and thinkers equipped to tackle city-wide challenges with the perspectives arising out of systems and co-production mindsets, and with the engagement and enthusiasm to sustain and embed this new approach. These planners and thinkers are now themselves proposing new projects and areas to which to apply the co-production, systems thinking, and learning journey approaches, including application to significant institutional developments and city-wide strategic planning. 2. A second impact area is the support that the Urban ID project is able to provide in terms of resources and knowledge to a citizen-led housing case study in South Bristol. This activity has great significance in Bristol due to the presence of many low density developments in Bristol's suburban areas and associated with these the relatively poor mobility choices for residents; the lack of employment opportunities in such disadvantaged areas, and the issue of affordability of housing in Bristol. The research on this case study is ongoing. The project is multidisciplinary, involving engineering, transport, environmental sciences, social sciences, health, policy, and creative arts and design.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Bristol Urban ID 
Organisation Future Cities Catapult Limited
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution We are leading this Urban Living Partnership Pilot project. We are overseeing the development of a new integrated urban diagnostics tool and its implementation through a programme of engagement activities with diverse stakeholder groups across the Bristol city-region. The project is still in its formative stages. The prototype diagnostics framework is now being tested and evaluated. It will be updated and applied more widely later in 2017. We shall oversee the abstraction and synthesis of the learning from all these activities.
Collaborator Contribution All the partners have been involved as participants in the co-production approach being followed in the development, application, evaluation and synthesis of the integrated urban diagnostics tool. Each participant is involved in the design and implementation of one or more case study applications of the tool.
Impact This project is still in its formative stages. There are no formal outputs or outcomes attributable to it at present. At this point the Urban ID research is ongoing and findings are preliminary. However the following are the main outcomes to emerge: 1. We have established a synthesis of co-production, learning journeys, resilience and systems thinking research within an integrated diagnostics framework, and we have been able to apply this to explore the diagnosis of urban challenges. At this stage the framework represents a preliminary product of the research. 2. The challenge we set ourselves at the outset of this project was to understand and diagnose "What is stopping Bristol from bridging the gap between our current situation and the desired future as encapsulated by the City's various visions and aspirations?". This has required a significant co-production programme in its own right to bring together leaders and decision-makers from local partnerships, the two local authorities and NGOs - comprising a practitioner community - and create a space for them to work alongside researchers from a range of academic disciplines. The reflection and feedback of the practitioner community is that this has been a novel process that has added rigour and creativity to strategic planning and development activities in the Bristol urban area. 3. A further finding of the Urban ID project is the learning arising from having set up this cross-sector, transdisciplinary programme. 4. Development of the diagnostic framework is being achieved by applying it to five geographically-located case studies, each of which presents a rich set of interconnected urban challenges. This 'real-world' application is providing a stimulus for researchers to develop the tools and methods needed to successfully engage citizens and practitioners in co-production of the problem diagnoses and co-creation of potential solutions. Emerging Impacts: Again at this stage in the project impacts are embryonic and it is possible only to make the qualitative assessments of research impact as follows: 1. A first impact is that the Urban ID project has begun to form a cadre of city planners and thinkers equipped to tackle city-wide challenges with the perspectives arising out of systems and co-production mindsets, and with the engagement and enthusiasm to sustain and embed this new approach. These planners and thinkers are now themselves proposing new projects and areas to which to apply the co-production, systems thinking, and learning journey approaches, including application to significant institutional developments and city-wide strategic planning. 2. A second impact area is the support that the Urban ID project is able to provide in terms of resources and knowledge to a citizen-led housing case study in South Bristol. This activity has great significance in Bristol due to the presence of many low density developments in Bristol's suburban areas and associated with these the relatively poor mobility choices for residents; the lack of employment opportunities in such disadvantaged areas, and the issue of affordability of housing in Bristol. The research on this case study is ongoing. The project is multidisciplinary, involving engineering, transport, environmental sciences, social sciences, health, policy, and creative arts and design.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Bristol Urban ID 
Organisation Knowle West Media Centre
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution We are leading this Urban Living Partnership Pilot project. We are overseeing the development of a new integrated urban diagnostics tool and its implementation through a programme of engagement activities with diverse stakeholder groups across the Bristol city-region. The project is still in its formative stages. The prototype diagnostics framework is now being tested and evaluated. It will be updated and applied more widely later in 2017. We shall oversee the abstraction and synthesis of the learning from all these activities.
Collaborator Contribution All the partners have been involved as participants in the co-production approach being followed in the development, application, evaluation and synthesis of the integrated urban diagnostics tool. Each participant is involved in the design and implementation of one or more case study applications of the tool.
Impact This project is still in its formative stages. There are no formal outputs or outcomes attributable to it at present. At this point the Urban ID research is ongoing and findings are preliminary. However the following are the main outcomes to emerge: 1. We have established a synthesis of co-production, learning journeys, resilience and systems thinking research within an integrated diagnostics framework, and we have been able to apply this to explore the diagnosis of urban challenges. At this stage the framework represents a preliminary product of the research. 2. The challenge we set ourselves at the outset of this project was to understand and diagnose "What is stopping Bristol from bridging the gap between our current situation and the desired future as encapsulated by the City's various visions and aspirations?". This has required a significant co-production programme in its own right to bring together leaders and decision-makers from local partnerships, the two local authorities and NGOs - comprising a practitioner community - and create a space for them to work alongside researchers from a range of academic disciplines. The reflection and feedback of the practitioner community is that this has been a novel process that has added rigour and creativity to strategic planning and development activities in the Bristol urban area. 3. A further finding of the Urban ID project is the learning arising from having set up this cross-sector, transdisciplinary programme. 4. Development of the diagnostic framework is being achieved by applying it to five geographically-located case studies, each of which presents a rich set of interconnected urban challenges. This 'real-world' application is providing a stimulus for researchers to develop the tools and methods needed to successfully engage citizens and practitioners in co-production of the problem diagnoses and co-creation of potential solutions. Emerging Impacts: Again at this stage in the project impacts are embryonic and it is possible only to make the qualitative assessments of research impact as follows: 1. A first impact is that the Urban ID project has begun to form a cadre of city planners and thinkers equipped to tackle city-wide challenges with the perspectives arising out of systems and co-production mindsets, and with the engagement and enthusiasm to sustain and embed this new approach. These planners and thinkers are now themselves proposing new projects and areas to which to apply the co-production, systems thinking, and learning journey approaches, including application to significant institutional developments and city-wide strategic planning. 2. A second impact area is the support that the Urban ID project is able to provide in terms of resources and knowledge to a citizen-led housing case study in South Bristol. This activity has great significance in Bristol due to the presence of many low density developments in Bristol's suburban areas and associated with these the relatively poor mobility choices for residents; the lack of employment opportunities in such disadvantaged areas, and the issue of affordability of housing in Bristol. The research on this case study is ongoing. The project is multidisciplinary, involving engineering, transport, environmental sciences, social sciences, health, policy, and creative arts and design.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Bristol Urban ID 
Organisation Local Enterprise Partnerships
Department West of England Local Enterprise Partnership
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution We are leading this Urban Living Partnership Pilot project. We are overseeing the development of a new integrated urban diagnostics tool and its implementation through a programme of engagement activities with diverse stakeholder groups across the Bristol city-region. The project is still in its formative stages. The prototype diagnostics framework is now being tested and evaluated. It will be updated and applied more widely later in 2017. We shall oversee the abstraction and synthesis of the learning from all these activities.
Collaborator Contribution All the partners have been involved as participants in the co-production approach being followed in the development, application, evaluation and synthesis of the integrated urban diagnostics tool. Each participant is involved in the design and implementation of one or more case study applications of the tool.
Impact This project is still in its formative stages. There are no formal outputs or outcomes attributable to it at present. At this point the Urban ID research is ongoing and findings are preliminary. However the following are the main outcomes to emerge: 1. We have established a synthesis of co-production, learning journeys, resilience and systems thinking research within an integrated diagnostics framework, and we have been able to apply this to explore the diagnosis of urban challenges. At this stage the framework represents a preliminary product of the research. 2. The challenge we set ourselves at the outset of this project was to understand and diagnose "What is stopping Bristol from bridging the gap between our current situation and the desired future as encapsulated by the City's various visions and aspirations?". This has required a significant co-production programme in its own right to bring together leaders and decision-makers from local partnerships, the two local authorities and NGOs - comprising a practitioner community - and create a space for them to work alongside researchers from a range of academic disciplines. The reflection and feedback of the practitioner community is that this has been a novel process that has added rigour and creativity to strategic planning and development activities in the Bristol urban area. 3. A further finding of the Urban ID project is the learning arising from having set up this cross-sector, transdisciplinary programme. 4. Development of the diagnostic framework is being achieved by applying it to five geographically-located case studies, each of which presents a rich set of interconnected urban challenges. This 'real-world' application is providing a stimulus for researchers to develop the tools and methods needed to successfully engage citizens and practitioners in co-production of the problem diagnoses and co-creation of potential solutions. Emerging Impacts: Again at this stage in the project impacts are embryonic and it is possible only to make the qualitative assessments of research impact as follows: 1. A first impact is that the Urban ID project has begun to form a cadre of city planners and thinkers equipped to tackle city-wide challenges with the perspectives arising out of systems and co-production mindsets, and with the engagement and enthusiasm to sustain and embed this new approach. These planners and thinkers are now themselves proposing new projects and areas to which to apply the co-production, systems thinking, and learning journey approaches, including application to significant institutional developments and city-wide strategic planning. 2. A second impact area is the support that the Urban ID project is able to provide in terms of resources and knowledge to a citizen-led housing case study in South Bristol. This activity has great significance in Bristol due to the presence of many low density developments in Bristol's suburban areas and associated with these the relatively poor mobility choices for residents; the lack of employment opportunities in such disadvantaged areas, and the issue of affordability of housing in Bristol. The research on this case study is ongoing. The project is multidisciplinary, involving engineering, transport, environmental sciences, social sciences, health, policy, and creative arts and design.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Bristol Urban ID 
Organisation PWC (UK) Limited
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution We are leading this Urban Living Partnership Pilot project. We are overseeing the development of a new integrated urban diagnostics tool and its implementation through a programme of engagement activities with diverse stakeholder groups across the Bristol city-region. The project is still in its formative stages. The prototype diagnostics framework is now being tested and evaluated. It will be updated and applied more widely later in 2017. We shall oversee the abstraction and synthesis of the learning from all these activities.
Collaborator Contribution All the partners have been involved as participants in the co-production approach being followed in the development, application, evaluation and synthesis of the integrated urban diagnostics tool. Each participant is involved in the design and implementation of one or more case study applications of the tool.
Impact This project is still in its formative stages. There are no formal outputs or outcomes attributable to it at present. At this point the Urban ID research is ongoing and findings are preliminary. However the following are the main outcomes to emerge: 1. We have established a synthesis of co-production, learning journeys, resilience and systems thinking research within an integrated diagnostics framework, and we have been able to apply this to explore the diagnosis of urban challenges. At this stage the framework represents a preliminary product of the research. 2. The challenge we set ourselves at the outset of this project was to understand and diagnose "What is stopping Bristol from bridging the gap between our current situation and the desired future as encapsulated by the City's various visions and aspirations?". This has required a significant co-production programme in its own right to bring together leaders and decision-makers from local partnerships, the two local authorities and NGOs - comprising a practitioner community - and create a space for them to work alongside researchers from a range of academic disciplines. The reflection and feedback of the practitioner community is that this has been a novel process that has added rigour and creativity to strategic planning and development activities in the Bristol urban area. 3. A further finding of the Urban ID project is the learning arising from having set up this cross-sector, transdisciplinary programme. 4. Development of the diagnostic framework is being achieved by applying it to five geographically-located case studies, each of which presents a rich set of interconnected urban challenges. This 'real-world' application is providing a stimulus for researchers to develop the tools and methods needed to successfully engage citizens and practitioners in co-production of the problem diagnoses and co-creation of potential solutions. Emerging Impacts: Again at this stage in the project impacts are embryonic and it is possible only to make the qualitative assessments of research impact as follows: 1. A first impact is that the Urban ID project has begun to form a cadre of city planners and thinkers equipped to tackle city-wide challenges with the perspectives arising out of systems and co-production mindsets, and with the engagement and enthusiasm to sustain and embed this new approach. These planners and thinkers are now themselves proposing new projects and areas to which to apply the co-production, systems thinking, and learning journey approaches, including application to significant institutional developments and city-wide strategic planning. 2. A second impact area is the support that the Urban ID project is able to provide in terms of resources and knowledge to a citizen-led housing case study in South Bristol. This activity has great significance in Bristol due to the presence of many low density developments in Bristol's suburban areas and associated with these the relatively poor mobility choices for residents; the lack of employment opportunities in such disadvantaged areas, and the issue of affordability of housing in Bristol. The research on this case study is ongoing. The project is multidisciplinary, involving engineering, transport, environmental sciences, social sciences, health, policy, and creative arts and design.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Bristol Urban ID 
Organisation South Gloucestershire Council
Department Department for Children, Adults and Health
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution We are leading this Urban Living Partnership Pilot project. We are overseeing the development of a new integrated urban diagnostics tool and its implementation through a programme of engagement activities with diverse stakeholder groups across the Bristol city-region. The project is still in its formative stages. The prototype diagnostics framework is now being tested and evaluated. It will be updated and applied more widely later in 2017. We shall oversee the abstraction and synthesis of the learning from all these activities.
Collaborator Contribution All the partners have been involved as participants in the co-production approach being followed in the development, application, evaluation and synthesis of the integrated urban diagnostics tool. Each participant is involved in the design and implementation of one or more case study applications of the tool.
Impact This project is still in its formative stages. There are no formal outputs or outcomes attributable to it at present. At this point the Urban ID research is ongoing and findings are preliminary. However the following are the main outcomes to emerge: 1. We have established a synthesis of co-production, learning journeys, resilience and systems thinking research within an integrated diagnostics framework, and we have been able to apply this to explore the diagnosis of urban challenges. At this stage the framework represents a preliminary product of the research. 2. The challenge we set ourselves at the outset of this project was to understand and diagnose "What is stopping Bristol from bridging the gap between our current situation and the desired future as encapsulated by the City's various visions and aspirations?". This has required a significant co-production programme in its own right to bring together leaders and decision-makers from local partnerships, the two local authorities and NGOs - comprising a practitioner community - and create a space for them to work alongside researchers from a range of academic disciplines. The reflection and feedback of the practitioner community is that this has been a novel process that has added rigour and creativity to strategic planning and development activities in the Bristol urban area. 3. A further finding of the Urban ID project is the learning arising from having set up this cross-sector, transdisciplinary programme. 4. Development of the diagnostic framework is being achieved by applying it to five geographically-located case studies, each of which presents a rich set of interconnected urban challenges. This 'real-world' application is providing a stimulus for researchers to develop the tools and methods needed to successfully engage citizens and practitioners in co-production of the problem diagnoses and co-creation of potential solutions. Emerging Impacts: Again at this stage in the project impacts are embryonic and it is possible only to make the qualitative assessments of research impact as follows: 1. A first impact is that the Urban ID project has begun to form a cadre of city planners and thinkers equipped to tackle city-wide challenges with the perspectives arising out of systems and co-production mindsets, and with the engagement and enthusiasm to sustain and embed this new approach. These planners and thinkers are now themselves proposing new projects and areas to which to apply the co-production, systems thinking, and learning journey approaches, including application to significant institutional developments and city-wide strategic planning. 2. A second impact area is the support that the Urban ID project is able to provide in terms of resources and knowledge to a citizen-led housing case study in South Bristol. This activity has great significance in Bristol due to the presence of many low density developments in Bristol's suburban areas and associated with these the relatively poor mobility choices for residents; the lack of employment opportunities in such disadvantaged areas, and the issue of affordability of housing in Bristol. The research on this case study is ongoing. The project is multidisciplinary, involving engineering, transport, environmental sciences, social sciences, health, policy, and creative arts and design.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Bristol Urban ID 
Organisation University of the West of England
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We are leading this Urban Living Partnership Pilot project. We are overseeing the development of a new integrated urban diagnostics tool and its implementation through a programme of engagement activities with diverse stakeholder groups across the Bristol city-region. The project is still in its formative stages. The prototype diagnostics framework is now being tested and evaluated. It will be updated and applied more widely later in 2017. We shall oversee the abstraction and synthesis of the learning from all these activities.
Collaborator Contribution All the partners have been involved as participants in the co-production approach being followed in the development, application, evaluation and synthesis of the integrated urban diagnostics tool. Each participant is involved in the design and implementation of one or more case study applications of the tool.
Impact This project is still in its formative stages. There are no formal outputs or outcomes attributable to it at present. At this point the Urban ID research is ongoing and findings are preliminary. However the following are the main outcomes to emerge: 1. We have established a synthesis of co-production, learning journeys, resilience and systems thinking research within an integrated diagnostics framework, and we have been able to apply this to explore the diagnosis of urban challenges. At this stage the framework represents a preliminary product of the research. 2. The challenge we set ourselves at the outset of this project was to understand and diagnose "What is stopping Bristol from bridging the gap between our current situation and the desired future as encapsulated by the City's various visions and aspirations?". This has required a significant co-production programme in its own right to bring together leaders and decision-makers from local partnerships, the two local authorities and NGOs - comprising a practitioner community - and create a space for them to work alongside researchers from a range of academic disciplines. The reflection and feedback of the practitioner community is that this has been a novel process that has added rigour and creativity to strategic planning and development activities in the Bristol urban area. 3. A further finding of the Urban ID project is the learning arising from having set up this cross-sector, transdisciplinary programme. 4. Development of the diagnostic framework is being achieved by applying it to five geographically-located case studies, each of which presents a rich set of interconnected urban challenges. This 'real-world' application is providing a stimulus for researchers to develop the tools and methods needed to successfully engage citizens and practitioners in co-production of the problem diagnoses and co-creation of potential solutions. Emerging Impacts: Again at this stage in the project impacts are embryonic and it is possible only to make the qualitative assessments of research impact as follows: 1. A first impact is that the Urban ID project has begun to form a cadre of city planners and thinkers equipped to tackle city-wide challenges with the perspectives arising out of systems and co-production mindsets, and with the engagement and enthusiasm to sustain and embed this new approach. These planners and thinkers are now themselves proposing new projects and areas to which to apply the co-production, systems thinking, and learning journey approaches, including application to significant institutional developments and city-wide strategic planning. 2. A second impact area is the support that the Urban ID project is able to provide in terms of resources and knowledge to a citizen-led housing case study in South Bristol. This activity has great significance in Bristol due to the presence of many low density developments in Bristol's suburban areas and associated with these the relatively poor mobility choices for residents; the lack of employment opportunities in such disadvantaged areas, and the issue of affordability of housing in Bristol. The research on this case study is ongoing. The project is multidisciplinary, involving engineering, transport, environmental sciences, social sciences, health, policy, and creative arts and design.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Bristol Urban ID 
Organisation Watershed Media Centre
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution We are leading this Urban Living Partnership Pilot project. We are overseeing the development of a new integrated urban diagnostics tool and its implementation through a programme of engagement activities with diverse stakeholder groups across the Bristol city-region. The project is still in its formative stages. The prototype diagnostics framework is now being tested and evaluated. It will be updated and applied more widely later in 2017. We shall oversee the abstraction and synthesis of the learning from all these activities.
Collaborator Contribution All the partners have been involved as participants in the co-production approach being followed in the development, application, evaluation and synthesis of the integrated urban diagnostics tool. Each participant is involved in the design and implementation of one or more case study applications of the tool.
Impact This project is still in its formative stages. There are no formal outputs or outcomes attributable to it at present. At this point the Urban ID research is ongoing and findings are preliminary. However the following are the main outcomes to emerge: 1. We have established a synthesis of co-production, learning journeys, resilience and systems thinking research within an integrated diagnostics framework, and we have been able to apply this to explore the diagnosis of urban challenges. At this stage the framework represents a preliminary product of the research. 2. The challenge we set ourselves at the outset of this project was to understand and diagnose "What is stopping Bristol from bridging the gap between our current situation and the desired future as encapsulated by the City's various visions and aspirations?". This has required a significant co-production programme in its own right to bring together leaders and decision-makers from local partnerships, the two local authorities and NGOs - comprising a practitioner community - and create a space for them to work alongside researchers from a range of academic disciplines. The reflection and feedback of the practitioner community is that this has been a novel process that has added rigour and creativity to strategic planning and development activities in the Bristol urban area. 3. A further finding of the Urban ID project is the learning arising from having set up this cross-sector, transdisciplinary programme. 4. Development of the diagnostic framework is being achieved by applying it to five geographically-located case studies, each of which presents a rich set of interconnected urban challenges. This 'real-world' application is providing a stimulus for researchers to develop the tools and methods needed to successfully engage citizens and practitioners in co-production of the problem diagnoses and co-creation of potential solutions. Emerging Impacts: Again at this stage in the project impacts are embryonic and it is possible only to make the qualitative assessments of research impact as follows: 1. A first impact is that the Urban ID project has begun to form a cadre of city planners and thinkers equipped to tackle city-wide challenges with the perspectives arising out of systems and co-production mindsets, and with the engagement and enthusiasm to sustain and embed this new approach. These planners and thinkers are now themselves proposing new projects and areas to which to apply the co-production, systems thinking, and learning journey approaches, including application to significant institutional developments and city-wide strategic planning. 2. A second impact area is the support that the Urban ID project is able to provide in terms of resources and knowledge to a citizen-led housing case study in South Bristol. This activity has great significance in Bristol due to the presence of many low density developments in Bristol's suburban areas and associated with these the relatively poor mobility choices for residents; the lack of employment opportunities in such disadvantaged areas, and the issue of affordability of housing in Bristol. The research on this case study is ongoing. The project is multidisciplinary, involving engineering, transport, environmental sciences, social sciences, health, policy, and creative arts and design.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Staple Hill Partnerships 
Organisation Bristol Health Partners
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Partnered with them in designing and facilitating the research
Collaborator Contribution Partnered with us in designing and facilitating the research
Impact The research itself, and ongoing relationships
Start Year 2018
 
Description Staple Hill Partnerships 
Organisation South Gloucestershire Council
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Partnered with them in designing and facilitating the research
Collaborator Contribution Partnered with us in designing and facilitating the research
Impact The research itself, and ongoing relationships
Start Year 2018
 
Description The Bristol Forum 
Organisation Bristol City Council
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution I have worked alongside Bristol City Office and the mayor, and with Ges Rosenberg and colleagues from University of the WEst of England, to design an event. The Bristol Forum is an initiative inspired by the One City Approach. The aim of the Bristol Forum is to bring together researchers with organisations across the city to address the challenges we face. In March 2019 the University of Bristol, University of the West of England and the City Office will host the first in a series of events to ask how we work together to tackle inequalities in Bristol. The One City approach aims to use the collective power of Bristol's key organisations to make a bigger impact by supporting partners, organisations and citizens to help solve key challenges. The broad aims of the forum are to: • Share intelligence, knowledge and insights relating to the challenges facing the city/city region • Create new opportunities for students, researchers, community organisations, businesses, trade unions and others to share their work, build collaborations and develop new action/research projects • Feed research findings and suggestions into the ongoing development of the Bristol One City Plan which is designed to put forward a vision and strategy for the future of Bristol going through to 2050
Collaborator Contribution They have worked alongside us to plan the event, and have provided CITY HALL for our use
Impact Multi-disciplinary collaboration Outputs will be an event to take place on MArch 29th 2019 Funding for future collaborations has been provided by the University of Bristol IAA awards.
Start Year 2018
 
Description DIscussion at ICE President's visit to the SW Region, 5 July 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The UrbanID ideas and findings were discussed at a lunch with the ICE President (Prof Lord Robert Mair), also attended by senior industry and regional representatives. The President praised the activity and expressed his support for the diagnostics methodology being applied to SW Infrastructure via the SW Infrastructure Panel.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Discussion at Institution of Civil Engineers, South West Infrastructure Panel 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Application of the UrbanID methodology to the diagnosis of SW infrastructure challenges was discussed. The SW Infrastructure Panel agreed to support a bid for Impact Acceleration Account funding at a future date.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Discussion at Institution of Civil Engineers, State of the Nation workshop 25 June 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Ideas and findings from UrbanID were raised at this workshop, the purpose of which was to gather regional evidence for the ICE's national State of the Nation reports. These are used to raise policy issues at government level.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Discussion with Resilience First regarding systems aspects of infrastructure and urban resilience, 27 June 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact Ideas and findings from UrbanID were discussed at this workshop, which was scoping out the potential for a project focused on the resilience of airports as quasi urban communities. Representatives of several major UK airports were present, along with a number of consulting engineers. This eventually led to a small advisory role in a pilot project that commenced in February 2019.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Emily Prestwood (UWE) presentation entitled A Partnership Approach to Carbon Neutral Bristol 2050 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Emily Prestwood (UWE) presented 'A Partnership Approach to Carbon Neutral Bristol 2050' with co-authors with Ges Rosenberg (UoB), Ian Townsend (BGCP) and James Longhurst (UWE) to the IPCC 'Cities and Climate Change Science Conference: Fostering new scientific knowledge for cities based on science, practice and policy' in Edmonton, Canada, March 5-7, 2018.

The conference themes were:1) Cities & climate change (Imperatives for action); 2 Urban emissions, impacts and vulnerabilities (Science and practice of cities); 3 Solutions for the transition to low carbon and climate resilient cities (Science and practice for cities); and 4) Enabling transformative climate action in cities (advancing science and advancing cities).

The contribution was made to a themed session, entitled: 'Governing Climate Change in Complex Urban Settings: Resilience Through Social Innovation' and the work presented by Prestwood was developed from the Urban ID case study work undertaken in collaboration with Bristol Green Capital Partnership. A key finding is the need to localise SDGs such as SDG17 to account for the importance of partnerships such as BGCP. This accrues due to the convening power and trust a partnership has with its members and the long-term engagement with sustainability a partnership is able to sustain beyond any single political term of office.

Abstract to Presentation:
"Sustainable cities are widely accepted as a "desirable policy goal". However what this means for individual cities and how it can be achieved is complex to define and any sustainable response requires mobilisation of a wide range of stakeholders with differing worldviews and multiple objectives. This is especially true when it comes to addressing the challenges of climate change and urban transformation. Emission inventories, boundaries and targets are traditionally seen as imposed in a top-down, technocratic process, flowing down from national government to local government and organisations. Yet engagement with city plans, such as the Bristol Resilience Strategy and the forthcoming Bristol 'One City Plan', represents a genuine desire by local government to engage with society and co-produce solutions to these sustainability challenges.
Funded by the UK Research Council and Innovate, the Bristol 'Urban ID' project created a novel 'Integrated Diagnostics Framework' founded on systems methods, resilience thinking and social science co-production. This framework and toolset was used to investigate and diagnose the root causes for urban challenges and their interdependencies for five community case studies in the Bristol urban area, including how Bristol can meet its goal of becoming a carbon neutral city by 2050.
The project itself was co-produced with leading institutions and communities from across Bristol, including partnership organisations and local authorities. It defined for itself the specific challenge of exploring the barriers preventing transition from 'business as usual' policies, plans and practices. The analysis identifies the motivations of stakeholders across a range of spatial, temporal and sectoral boundaries. Findings show that civic engagement with citizens and businesses frequently occurs over issues of neighbourhood quality, clean energy, thermal comfort in homes and access to nature, and importantly, that these proxy issues have the potential to serve as engagement mechanisms for the delivery of carbon neutrality itself. The paper discusses the important role civic society organisations such as Bristol Green Capital Partnership can play in creating political space, mobilising communities, facilitating longer term conversations and developing a shared language around carbon neutrality, and consequently the value of partnership roles in enabling transformative climate action in cities."
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://citiesipcc.org/
 
Description Integrated diagnostics workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The workshop included the following:
1. Diagnostic Assets Mapping of participants' diagnostic assets (knowledge, expertise, networks, to include data, methodologies, tools, capabilities and experiences) and relating these to the Urban ID project. What/who is missing from the conversation?
2. Overview and Cataloguing of Challenges in the Themes: 1) Health & Happiness;2) Mobility & Accessibility;3) Carbon Neutral City;4) Inclusion & Equality.
3. A First Rapid Diagnostic to develop a diagnostic approach or toolset that could be used to: 1) explore and improve our understanding of the challenge; 2) understand how solutions could be developed and appraised, and 3) identify possible transition pathways to the improved outcomes. From this, can we develop a better shared sense of what is a diagnostic? Where in this do we draw the line (if we do) between diagnosing an undesirable outcome, diagnosing its underlying causes, and exploring the acceptability of possible solutions?
4. Next Steps & Recommendations: Who should we network with for diagnostic framework? How do the research assets relate to the project work packages? What support would we recommend to the Challenge Theme leads to use in their diagnostics? What are the next steps in development of the Integrated Diagnostics Framework?
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Meeting with local urban and environmental design consultancy 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A practitioner, new to Bristol, was briefed on the UrbanID methodology and findings. This led to his support for follow-on discussions with the Bristol One City Plan initiative.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Merling quality of life feedback 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact To feed our project findings into a local project aimed at improving quality of life in Staple Hill. We fed our findings into project group meetings. Our findings were welcomed as giving insight into the neighbourhood residents' happiness
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Participation in ICE SW workshop on ICE national response to Grenfell Tower disaster (06/10/2017) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Injection of UKCRIC and UrbanID project ideas into formative discussions around SW ICE input to ICE national response to Grenfell Tower disaster.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Participation in South West Infrastructure Panel of SW ICE (07/02/2018) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Membership of newly formed SW Infrastructure Panel of the Institution of Civil Engineers. Opportunity to feed in ideas and techniques from UrbanID, ReDReSC and UKCRIC into policy coordination for infrastructure across the SW of England.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Participation in meeting with Mayor of Bristol and local business regarding One City Plan (12/10/2017) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Injection of policy and practice ideas from UKCRIC, ReDReSC and UrbanID projects into formative discussions about the One City plan, chaired by the Mayor of Bristol (Marvin Rees) and local business leaders.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Partnership building workshop with Bristol City Council City Control Room Leaders 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Small workshop meeting with Bristol City Council City Control Room Leaders to explore industry needs for the UKCRIC facilties, UrbanID and ReDReSC projects. Contributed to raising awareness of the proposed facility, eliciting performance requirements, prioritisation of use cases, and input to research route mapping.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Presentation at a special workshop session during the ICE Global Engineering Conference, London, 25 October 2018, 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation as part of an hour long session discussing the role of co-production in future engineering practice. The findings of UrbanID were used as an illustration of the opportunities and issues.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Railway path engagement workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A workshop run in the area of the city we were working exploring the future stewardship of the railway path, using the methodologies and diagnostics developed on the project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Staple Hill Happiness workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Older residents and people engaged with this group were asked to label places in their neighbourhood that affected their happiness and to construct definitions of happiness and 'older people' Connections were made with local residents and researchers more 'grounded' in the local neighbourhood
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description UK Science and Innovation Network Delegate to Metrolab Annual Summit, Atlanta December 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact The purpose of this visit was to meet the Board of the US Metrolab Network (https://metrolabnetwork.org/) and share with them UK experience and capabilities in city and urban-based research, technology and social innovation, and in Civic University/City collaborations. Delegates from the Universities of Bristol, Strathclyde and Glasgow attended, along with representatives from SIN and Innovate UK, and Bristol and Glasgow City authorities. The meeting explored opportunities for US-UK collaboration in city and urban research and as a consequence, delegates from the Metrolab Network made a return visit to the UK in early March 2018, visiting London, Bristol and Glasgow. Dr Ges Rosenberg from the Urban ID project attended both these events, and as well as contributing to the building of this UK cities - US Metrolab Network relationship, has also developed a number of contacts for future research collaborations. At this stage the full impacts of this activity is not realised, but the potential is for a collaborative US-UK research programme in smart (social and technological) city innovation.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://cabot-institute.blogspot.co.uk/2018/02/metrolabs-visit-sharing-experiences-of.html
 
Description UKCRIC Urban Observatories/National Infrastructure Commission workshop, held as part of Festival of the Future Cities week (17/10/2017) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact A day long workshop focused on the UKCRIC Urban Observatories developments and links to the National Infrastructure Commission's policy development around digital twins.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Urban ID Tools and Methods Workshops 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact These two workshops were for Urban ID partners. The outputs from the workshops were:

o Know how to use learning power profiles in their case study
o Know how to use creative methods to create a space for imagination, narrative and thinking differently in their case study sites
o Know how to go about collaboratively mapping the interdependent systems which impact on their case study
o Have mapped out a project case study, with time lines and deliverables ready to go, with ongoing support.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Urban ID Website and Blog 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Nine blog posts were made on the website in 2017 detailing public engagement and coproduction opportunities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.urban-id.co.uk/
 
Description Urban ID launch event 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This event was part of Bristol's Healthy City Week 2016 and formally launched the Bristol Urban ID (Integrated Diagnostics) project. It brought together stakeholders from the Bristol urban area to address dilemmas and issues in urban living. With leading keynote speakers, there was an opportunity for people to join the debate and help shape the research project. Discussion themes around Diagnosing Urban Challenges included:
How do we enhance citizen health and happiness?
How can we create a Carbon Neutral City by 2050?
How can we improve transport and access to services?
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Urban ID network event 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This was a social networking event for researchers, business, local authorities and third sector partners involved with, or interested in, urban living, liveable cities, and future cities.
The aim was for people to get to know each other and talk informally about the opportunities of pilot urban living project and the potential for future partnering under the RCUK Urban Living Theme.

Through this pre-launch networking event in July (attended by circa 60 stakeholders), and the launch event in October 2016 (attended by circa 100 stakeholders) we have developed our stakeholder community to 150+ key people and organisations.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Urban ID twitter feed 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Urban ID twitter feed (https://twitter.com/@BristolUrbanID) and website (http://www.bristol.ac.uk/cabot/research/urban-id/) and blog http://urban-id.org/about-urban-id/

Our Communication Strategy is aimed at: a) sustaining a dialogue and interest with our stakeholder community, place makers, community organisers and lead agencies in city change making; and b) capturing the development of the project through publishing stories from the team and from guest writers. Our blog site is currently being updated so the project can start to publish stories and posts about the research that is being carried at the moment.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://twitter.com/@BristolUrbanID
 
Description Urban Living Partnership Showcase event, in Leeds (20/02/2018) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Participation and presentations of findings of UrbanID project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Urban Living Partnership workshop session at Festival of the Future City, Bristol (19/10/2017) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact An afternoon workshop session featuring presentations from all 5 Urban Living Partnership Pilot projects. Progress update on Bristol UrbanID project, with further reference to UKCRIC and ReDReSC.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017