Novel Hybrid Heat Pipe for space and ground applications

Lead Research Organisation: University of Brighton
Department Name: Sch of Computing, Engineering & Maths

Abstract

Industry demand for high heat transfer capability, efficient thermal control, flexibility and low cost has motivated researchers to develop a new generation of passive systems mainly based on fluid phase-change. This project proposes the modelling and the experimental characterisation of a novel wickless heat transfer device applicable both on the ground and in space. The name Hybrid Heat Pipe (HyHP) comes from the fact that the well-established loop thermosyphon (TS) is here transformed to a plain serpentine device with one evaporator for each turn, as a pulsating heat pipe (PHP).
Why do we need a new wickless heat device? Two-phase heat transfer devices play an important role in a variety of engineering fields; TSs, for example, are already successfully implemented in nuclear and solar plants, while heat pipe applications range from electronics cooling to the automotive sector. But the actual systems have two major problems: 1) dissipation of high thermal powers maintaining high heat fluxes has significant limits connected to the upscale of the internal wick and the system dimensions, 2) the deployability or the flexibility of the passive two-phase systems is quite reduced.
How does HyHP work? The vertical operation in gravity, as well as the distinctive location of the heating and the cooling sections, causes the fluid to circulate regularly in a preferential direction guaranteeing stable operation and homogeneous temperature distribution of the system. The combination between channel dimension and working fluid is chosen in such a way that the device will operate in thermosyphon mode on the ground and, in the case of weightless conditions, in capillary mode, i.e the liquid completely fills the tube section and therefore vapour expansion and contraction cause an oscillation of the liquid/vapour patterns.
Why do we need a new project on HyHP? Because, although in 2014 a first HyHP prototype was built and the first ground and microgravity experiments were successfully carried out, we are far from understanding all the physical phenomena inside a HyHP and our ability to simulate the processes involved is still quite limited, i.e. we are not able to design a HyHP to manage heat within given boundary conditions.
Numerical analyses are fundamental to understanding the possible advantages and drawbacks of the HyHP and to predict its performance. The development and the use of innovative numerical tools and theoretical approaches will provide an insight into the physical phenomena and the governing mechanisms of a HyHP, opening the route to more efficient and customised design.
These numerical studies will be supported by parallel extensive experimental campaigns. A prototype with an Infrared (IR) and Visible Spectrum (VIS) window will be designed, built, equipped with several sensors and tested both on the ground and in micro-gravity conditions. ESA has already offered us partial funding and access to the parabolic flight campaigns.
It is expected that the primary beneficiary of this research will be the space industry; however advantages are not confined to this specific field, as the support of two ground-based companies indicates. Since the novel design of HyHPs combines technological aspects from both TSs and PHPs, the numerical tools we develop will be relevant to all industries concerned with thermal management. The investigation will benefit the scientific and industrial sectors by providing an open-source CFD tool for the simulation of general phase-change heat transfer phenomena.
Finally the project is contributing to the growing of the new Advanced Engineering Centre of the University of Brighton, which starts with a initial investment of £14M with the aim of delivering world leading research in the sectors of Internal Combustion Engines, Thermal Efficiency and System Efficiency, and Thermal Management for Ground and Space Applications.

Planned Impact

Our HyHP project focuses on two-phase passive thermal devices, such as Thermosyphons, a known technology already used in nuclear and geothermal plants, solar concentration power plants and computer cooling, and Pulsating Heat Pipes, which are an emerging and promising technology, due to manufacturing simplicity, low cost and the capability to be used in flexible systems.
The main project beneficiaries are the UK manufacturing sector working in the field of Heat Exchangers, Heat Pipes and Thermal Management; the UK Space Sector, since advanced design and simulation skills will be available for the thermal systems of satellites and space missions; the UK scientific communities working in the fields of Engineering and Physics; and the University of Brighton, since this will be its first project in this particular field, which will finally transfer longstanding, high-level, multidisciplinary and internationally recognised research from Italy to the UK.
Worldwide the Heat Exchanger Market will be worth £16B by 2019. Within this, Europe has always been a major producer (30% globally) of heat exchangers, since it includes most of the global leaders in heat exchanger manufacturing. The Heat Pipe Market is only a niche, nevertheless it already had a value of more than £0.6B in 2009, demonstrating faster growth with respect to other thermal control devices. This growth is driven by the needs to manage higher heat fluxes, dissipated in new ultra-high density electronic components and in high-power LEDs. The Space Sector is presently booming with many new private actors sharing a market opportunity of 5B£ in 2020, which has been estimated to grow to £40B and 100,000 new jobs by 2030 by the Editor of Works Management and Engineering Careers, Max Gosney. The challenge for the private industry is to build sophisticated small satellites (micro- and nano- satellites) at low costs using innovative solutions. In addition business is growing around so-called "space tourism" and suborbital flights. The thermal management of satellites represents about 15% of manufacturers' business. It is therefore expected that the new technologies of two-phase thermal systems for space applications and high power thermal control on the ground may have a value of more than £1B by 2020.
The UK has a major role in the commercialisation and development of heat pipe technology, since three of the 10 major companies in Europe producing heat pipes, loop heat pipes, vapour chambers and thermosyphons are UK-based. The project will also convince such companies that the University of Brighton may be a key partner for heat pipe technology.
The capability to design these systems is of enormous importance for their technological advancements. Since the design of our HyHP combines technological aspects of both TS and PHP, there are many aspects to consider in order to evaluate the great impact of HyHP on the beneficiaries: (1) the proposed advanced numerical tools will be very important for all the Industries related to fluid systems using two-phase flows, (2) specifically the numerical tools will contribute to the design of pulsating heat pipes and bring the technology closer to market implementation, (3) better understanding of the effect of gravity on such systems will also open their use for terrestrial application, such as in the automotive sector, (4) the participation of UK scientists in the ESA Physical Science Unit will generate new skills and network opportunities, (5) HyHP is building basic competencies which lead to innovation of thermal components in the public and private sector for the space industry.
Finally, HyHP results from a specific scientific context, and has produced excellent research for the last 7 years, with journal papers and worldwide recognition. There is a real possibility of implementing a Hybrid Heat Pipe on the International Space Station, which will provide an imaginative means for wider dissemination of science to the greater public.

Organisations

Publications

10 25 50
 
Description The main Key Findings are:
- The novel concept of the Hybrid Pulsating Heat Pipe is working in microgravity conditions, opening the route for this high power PHPs in Space (noteworthy the European Space Agency has very recently proposed a bid on PHP integrated in a Carbon Fiber Board for a satellite radiator).
- The project went also in the direction of Flexible Pulsating Heat Pipes, which could be a great way to control the temperature of flexible electronics. A new proposal, led by Prof. Marco Marengo, has been awarded by the European Space Agency (ESA MAP TOPDESS), which aims to find a new technology for deployable radiators and moving systems in nano- and micro-satellites.
- The influence of temperature of contact angle has been studied, showing that the wall temperature has a negligible influence on the values of the equilibrium contact angle, especially in case of hydrophobic surface.
- A novel VOF tool developed in OPENFOAM is able to simulate slug/plug flows with phase change and a conjugate heat transfer approach at the wall. This is supporting the lumped parameter network model of a Pulsating Heat Pipe, developed by the University of Brighton.
- The standard mapping of the two-phase flow regimes is not feasible for thermally driven flows: HyHP ha defined the first two-phase mapping considering the vapour plug acceleration instead of the usual gravitational force.
Exploitation Route We have developed a novel thermal system to manage heat in space components, and we have found new routes to design this system, using a new mapping of the flow regimes and advanced computational capabilities. Our findings are opening the route for the use of Pulsating Heat Pipes not only for space applications, but also for terrestrial applications such as cooling of flexible electronics. Moreover, HyHP findings has opened the route for three other new research streams: 1) Cooling of flexible electronics (n preparation for EPSRC standard grant), 2) Smart polymeric electric heaters for battery thermal control (in preparation for INNOVATE UK), 3) Mesoscale simulation of nucleate boiling using stochastic fluid dynamics (BOIL-MODE-ON, awarded by the Individual Fellowship EU Marie Curie Grant to Dr. Francesco Magaletti).
Sectors Aerospace, Defence and Marine,Energy,Environment,Pharmaceuticals and Medical Biotechnology,Transport

URL http://blogs.brighton.ac.uk/hyhp/
 
Description The outputs of the research project have been fed into the finalisation of the experimental set-up of the Space Pulsating Heat Pipe (PHP) that will fly on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2021. The research team of HyHP has met with the Engineering Team of the ISS to detail the technical concept of Heat Transfer Host 1 and its inserts one of which will be the proposed Space PHP. The output of the proposal led to a new research stream linked to the cooling of flexible electronics, and Prof. Marco Marengo has been invited by HUAWEI Co. to the 11th International Electronics Cooling Technology Workshop (CTW2019), held from November 28th to 29th 2019 at Songshan Lake, Dongguan, China, and co-organized by Division of Technological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences & Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd, to speak about the new technology of Pulsating Heat Pipe developed during HyHP. Furthermore, the use of Pulsating Heat Pipe technology has been explored also for battery thermal control, and in 2018 the company RICARDO Co. has offered to support 66% of a PhD student grant on the use of two-phase systems for Li_Ion battery control. The student started in January 2019 and the first battery mock-up will be ready in our labs at the end of March 2020. The VOF model and its overall developments have been also used as the starting point for a new PHD Thesis which started in April 2019 with the aim to build advanced CFD approaches for phase-change heat transfer.
First Year Of Impact 2017
Sector Aerospace, Defence and Marine,Education,Electronics,Energy,Transport
Impact Types Societal,Economic,Policy & public services

 
Description BOIL-MODE-ON, IF Marie Sklodowska-Curie grant
Amount € 213,000 (EUR)
Funding ID Marie Sklodowska-Curie grant agreement N. 836693 
Organisation European Commission H2020 
Sector Public
Country Belgium
Start 05/2019 
End 05/2021
 
Description ESA CORA MAP- Wound Healing In Space: Key challenges towards Intelligent and Enabling Sensing platforms (WHISKIES)
Amount € 500,000 (EUR)
Organisation ESA - ESTEC 
Sector Public
Country Netherlands
Start 01/2020 
End 01/2023
 
Description ESA MAP ENCOM-4
Amount € 500,000 (EUR)
Organisation ESA - ESTEC 
Sector Public
Country Netherlands
Start 10/2019 
End 09/2022
 
Description ESA MAP TOPDESS
Amount € 500,000 (EUR)
Organisation European Space Agency 
Sector Public
Country France
Start 10/2019 
End 09/2022
 
Description KTP Project with European Thermodynamics
Amount £189,354 (GBP)
Organisation European Thermodynamics 
Sector Private
Country United Kingdom
Start 02/2019 
End 01/2021
 
Description Multi-scale numerical modelling of phase- change heat transfer for the design andoptimisation of energy efficient thermal management systems in datacentres
Amount € 100,000 (EUR)
Organisation European Commission 
Sector Public
Country European Union (EU)
Start 04/2019 
End 03/2022
 
Description Rising Stars Award 2019, University of Brighton. Title: Application of CFD methods for the investigation of wound exudate absorption in wound dressings. PI: Dr. Manolia Andredaki
Amount £5,000 (GBP)
Organisation University of Brighton 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 08/2019 
End 03/2020
 
Description Rising Stars Award 2019, University of Brighton. Title: Development, optimisation and application of advanced simulation tools for boiling heat transfer in micro-passages. PI: Dr. Anastasios Georgoulas
Amount £5,000 (GBP)
Organisation University of Brighton 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 08/2019 
End 08/2020
 
Description Thermal management of electric and hybrid vehicle components (PhD Studentship)
Amount £65,312 (GBP)
Organisation Ricardo UK Ltd 
Sector Private
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2019 
End 01/2023
 
Title Advanced numerical technique to deal with diabetic interfaces in two-phase flows 
Description HyHP has develop a world-leading tool in an open source code (OPENFOAM) to deal with very high accuracy interfaces with mass and heat transfer. Presently, our group is one of the recognised centres for this technique, which is providing extreme control of spurious currents at the interfaces and is dealing in a very good, innovative way the transfer of energy through the interfaces. 
Type Of Material Computer model/algorithm 
Year Produced 2017 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The investigation adds significantly to the existing knowledge on bubble growth and detachment, in cases of saturated pool boiling of refrigerants, since a comprehensive examination of the effect of fundamental controlling parameters on the bubble detachment characteristics is conducted (more than 100, high resolution, transient, numerical simulations were conducted for the purposes of the present investigation), identifying their exact quantitative influence on the bubble detachment diameter and time as well as their relative importance. Finally, it can be said that the use of the improved VOF-based interface capturing approach that is proposed, presented, validated and applied in the present investigation, constitutes a quite promising and novel tool for the simulation of bubble growth and detachment processes, providing great insight regarding the complex underlined physics, hydrodynamics and thermodynamics, of such two-phase flow phenomena of significant interest to real technological applications. 
 
Description ESA CORA MAP Research Project: Wound Healing In Space- Key challenges towards Intelligent and Enabling Sensing platforms (WHISKIES) 
Organisation FlexEnable Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution UoB has been performing numerical simulations for the optimization of the bandage characteristics (topology, porosity, wettability) with respect to the physical properties of the exudate and gravity conditions. From a fluid-dynamics point of view, the rate of exudate absorption into wound dressings is governed by the interaction of two immiscible fluids, with a clearly defined interface between them; Ambient air that pre-exists in the pore structure of the wound dressing at the moment of application and the liquid exudate that leaks out from the affected wound. Hence, the actual resulting absorption rate is interplay of the following fluid dynamics related mechanisms: • Two-phase flow Interface dynamics between gaseous and liquid fluid phases • Capillary action within micro-passages • Wettability For this purpose, an enhanced Volume Of Fluid (VOF) based model that accounts for spurious currents reduction, which has been previously implemented in OpenFOAM CFD Toolbox (an open source CFD software), and it was validated and applied by part of the investigators' team for the case of two-phase flow interfacial dynamics, in similar spatial and temporal scales, is going to be utilised. The idea is to create a simplified numerical analogue of the phenomenon, in order to see the adsorption rate of a droplet, as well as a group of droplets and a thin liquid film against different viscosities in order to investigate quantitatively the effect of the viscosity and the absorption rate at the phenomenon. This numerical investigation aims in the development of an optimum, open-source numerical simulation tool that will be able to quantify in detail the absorption rate of exudate for particular values of viscosity and wound dressing type (i.e. different values of porosity).
Collaborator Contribution Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB) - Microgravity Research Centre and Laboratoire de Médecine Expérimentale: Scientific Coordinator, Financial Administration of the project and Spherization of red blood cells The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge (UCAM-CGC): Graphene-based materials for electrodes in sensing- RFID sensing The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge (UCAM-DoC): Tensile sensitive fibers and Big data and Machine learning for biomedical Institute for microsystems and microelectronics - CNR (CNR-IMM): Optical Sensing for wound monitoring and cells cultures Technological University Dublin (TUDUBLIN): photo-sensitive materials for optical sensing Institute of microelectronics - IMB-CNM-CSIC (CSIC-IMB): Micro/nanofabrication for electronic sensors and tissue engineering platforms- Advanced characterization of functional surfaces and (nano)materials mechanics- Radiation hard and biocompatible integrated autonomous/flexible systems. Fraunhofer Institute (IBMT): Biomaterials for scaffolding Queen Mary University (QMU): Modelling and simulations of sensing-related processes University of Bremen (UNIBREM): Data communication and machine learning IRP (Institute for Pediatric Research) -University of Padova (UNIPD): Flow cytometry-single mass cytometry University of Brighton (UoB): Numerical modelling of biodevices and biomaterials NON-ACADEMIC PARTNERS Optosmart srl: Optical fibres sensors Optrace LTD: Holographic sensing Flexenable LTD: Flexible electronic Mjr Pharmjet GMBH: Functionalized particles Regemat3D SL: 4D-bioprinting GSNET SRL*: AR for wound IR detection CRIL LTD: Micro Raman for biomedical Footfalls and heartbeats LTD: Patches for wound healing ASSOCIATED ACADEMIC PARTNERS Nagoya Institute of Technology: Acoustic sensing and CFD Harvard University: Hyper-resolution Microscopy Laboratory for Interdisciplinary Physics - Grenoble: Microfluidic devices seeded with endothelial cells ASAcampus JL, ASA Res Div-DSBSC, University of Florence: Scientific Coordinator Life and Medical Science
Impact The Project commenced in January 2020. No outputs yet.
Start Year 2020
 
Description ESA CORA MAP Research Project: Wound Healing In Space- Key challenges towards Intelligent and Enabling Sensing platforms (WHISKIES) 
Organisation Footfalls and Heartbeats Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution UoB has been performing numerical simulations for the optimization of the bandage characteristics (topology, porosity, wettability) with respect to the physical properties of the exudate and gravity conditions. From a fluid-dynamics point of view, the rate of exudate absorption into wound dressings is governed by the interaction of two immiscible fluids, with a clearly defined interface between them; Ambient air that pre-exists in the pore structure of the wound dressing at the moment of application and the liquid exudate that leaks out from the affected wound. Hence, the actual resulting absorption rate is interplay of the following fluid dynamics related mechanisms: • Two-phase flow Interface dynamics between gaseous and liquid fluid phases • Capillary action within micro-passages • Wettability For this purpose, an enhanced Volume Of Fluid (VOF) based model that accounts for spurious currents reduction, which has been previously implemented in OpenFOAM CFD Toolbox (an open source CFD software), and it was validated and applied by part of the investigators' team for the case of two-phase flow interfacial dynamics, in similar spatial and temporal scales, is going to be utilised. The idea is to create a simplified numerical analogue of the phenomenon, in order to see the adsorption rate of a droplet, as well as a group of droplets and a thin liquid film against different viscosities in order to investigate quantitatively the effect of the viscosity and the absorption rate at the phenomenon. This numerical investigation aims in the development of an optimum, open-source numerical simulation tool that will be able to quantify in detail the absorption rate of exudate for particular values of viscosity and wound dressing type (i.e. different values of porosity).
Collaborator Contribution Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB) - Microgravity Research Centre and Laboratoire de Médecine Expérimentale: Scientific Coordinator, Financial Administration of the project and Spherization of red blood cells The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge (UCAM-CGC): Graphene-based materials for electrodes in sensing- RFID sensing The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge (UCAM-DoC): Tensile sensitive fibers and Big data and Machine learning for biomedical Institute for microsystems and microelectronics - CNR (CNR-IMM): Optical Sensing for wound monitoring and cells cultures Technological University Dublin (TUDUBLIN): photo-sensitive materials for optical sensing Institute of microelectronics - IMB-CNM-CSIC (CSIC-IMB): Micro/nanofabrication for electronic sensors and tissue engineering platforms- Advanced characterization of functional surfaces and (nano)materials mechanics- Radiation hard and biocompatible integrated autonomous/flexible systems. Fraunhofer Institute (IBMT): Biomaterials for scaffolding Queen Mary University (QMU): Modelling and simulations of sensing-related processes University of Bremen (UNIBREM): Data communication and machine learning IRP (Institute for Pediatric Research) -University of Padova (UNIPD): Flow cytometry-single mass cytometry University of Brighton (UoB): Numerical modelling of biodevices and biomaterials NON-ACADEMIC PARTNERS Optosmart srl: Optical fibres sensors Optrace LTD: Holographic sensing Flexenable LTD: Flexible electronic Mjr Pharmjet GMBH: Functionalized particles Regemat3D SL: 4D-bioprinting GSNET SRL*: AR for wound IR detection CRIL LTD: Micro Raman for biomedical Footfalls and heartbeats LTD: Patches for wound healing ASSOCIATED ACADEMIC PARTNERS Nagoya Institute of Technology: Acoustic sensing and CFD Harvard University: Hyper-resolution Microscopy Laboratory for Interdisciplinary Physics - Grenoble: Microfluidic devices seeded with endothelial cells ASAcampus JL, ASA Res Div-DSBSC, University of Florence: Scientific Coordinator Life and Medical Science
Impact The Project commenced in January 2020. No outputs yet.
Start Year 2020
 
Description ESA CORA MAP Research Project: Wound Healing In Space- Key challenges towards Intelligent and Enabling Sensing platforms (WHISKIES) 
Organisation Fraunhofer Society
Department The Fraunhofer Institute for Biomedical Engineering (IBMT)
Country Germany 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution UoB has been performing numerical simulations for the optimization of the bandage characteristics (topology, porosity, wettability) with respect to the physical properties of the exudate and gravity conditions. From a fluid-dynamics point of view, the rate of exudate absorption into wound dressings is governed by the interaction of two immiscible fluids, with a clearly defined interface between them; Ambient air that pre-exists in the pore structure of the wound dressing at the moment of application and the liquid exudate that leaks out from the affected wound. Hence, the actual resulting absorption rate is interplay of the following fluid dynamics related mechanisms: • Two-phase flow Interface dynamics between gaseous and liquid fluid phases • Capillary action within micro-passages • Wettability For this purpose, an enhanced Volume Of Fluid (VOF) based model that accounts for spurious currents reduction, which has been previously implemented in OpenFOAM CFD Toolbox (an open source CFD software), and it was validated and applied by part of the investigators' team for the case of two-phase flow interfacial dynamics, in similar spatial and temporal scales, is going to be utilised. The idea is to create a simplified numerical analogue of the phenomenon, in order to see the adsorption rate of a droplet, as well as a group of droplets and a thin liquid film against different viscosities in order to investigate quantitatively the effect of the viscosity and the absorption rate at the phenomenon. This numerical investigation aims in the development of an optimum, open-source numerical simulation tool that will be able to quantify in detail the absorption rate of exudate for particular values of viscosity and wound dressing type (i.e. different values of porosity).
Collaborator Contribution Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB) - Microgravity Research Centre and Laboratoire de Médecine Expérimentale: Scientific Coordinator, Financial Administration of the project and Spherization of red blood cells The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge (UCAM-CGC): Graphene-based materials for electrodes in sensing- RFID sensing The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge (UCAM-DoC): Tensile sensitive fibers and Big data and Machine learning for biomedical Institute for microsystems and microelectronics - CNR (CNR-IMM): Optical Sensing for wound monitoring and cells cultures Technological University Dublin (TUDUBLIN): photo-sensitive materials for optical sensing Institute of microelectronics - IMB-CNM-CSIC (CSIC-IMB): Micro/nanofabrication for electronic sensors and tissue engineering platforms- Advanced characterization of functional surfaces and (nano)materials mechanics- Radiation hard and biocompatible integrated autonomous/flexible systems. Fraunhofer Institute (IBMT): Biomaterials for scaffolding Queen Mary University (QMU): Modelling and simulations of sensing-related processes University of Bremen (UNIBREM): Data communication and machine learning IRP (Institute for Pediatric Research) -University of Padova (UNIPD): Flow cytometry-single mass cytometry University of Brighton (UoB): Numerical modelling of biodevices and biomaterials NON-ACADEMIC PARTNERS Optosmart srl: Optical fibres sensors Optrace LTD: Holographic sensing Flexenable LTD: Flexible electronic Mjr Pharmjet GMBH: Functionalized particles Regemat3D SL: 4D-bioprinting GSNET SRL*: AR for wound IR detection CRIL LTD: Micro Raman for biomedical Footfalls and heartbeats LTD: Patches for wound healing ASSOCIATED ACADEMIC PARTNERS Nagoya Institute of Technology: Acoustic sensing and CFD Harvard University: Hyper-resolution Microscopy Laboratory for Interdisciplinary Physics - Grenoble: Microfluidic devices seeded with endothelial cells ASAcampus JL, ASA Res Div-DSBSC, University of Florence: Scientific Coordinator Life and Medical Science
Impact The Project commenced in January 2020. No outputs yet.
Start Year 2020
 
Description ESA CORA MAP Research Project: Wound Healing In Space- Key challenges towards Intelligent and Enabling Sensing platforms (WHISKIES) 
Organisation GSNET Italia
Country Italy 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution UoB has been performing numerical simulations for the optimization of the bandage characteristics (topology, porosity, wettability) with respect to the physical properties of the exudate and gravity conditions. From a fluid-dynamics point of view, the rate of exudate absorption into wound dressings is governed by the interaction of two immiscible fluids, with a clearly defined interface between them; Ambient air that pre-exists in the pore structure of the wound dressing at the moment of application and the liquid exudate that leaks out from the affected wound. Hence, the actual resulting absorption rate is interplay of the following fluid dynamics related mechanisms: • Two-phase flow Interface dynamics between gaseous and liquid fluid phases • Capillary action within micro-passages • Wettability For this purpose, an enhanced Volume Of Fluid (VOF) based model that accounts for spurious currents reduction, which has been previously implemented in OpenFOAM CFD Toolbox (an open source CFD software), and it was validated and applied by part of the investigators' team for the case of two-phase flow interfacial dynamics, in similar spatial and temporal scales, is going to be utilised. The idea is to create a simplified numerical analogue of the phenomenon, in order to see the adsorption rate of a droplet, as well as a group of droplets and a thin liquid film against different viscosities in order to investigate quantitatively the effect of the viscosity and the absorption rate at the phenomenon. This numerical investigation aims in the development of an optimum, open-source numerical simulation tool that will be able to quantify in detail the absorption rate of exudate for particular values of viscosity and wound dressing type (i.e. different values of porosity).
Collaborator Contribution Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB) - Microgravity Research Centre and Laboratoire de Médecine Expérimentale: Scientific Coordinator, Financial Administration of the project and Spherization of red blood cells The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge (UCAM-CGC): Graphene-based materials for electrodes in sensing- RFID sensing The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge (UCAM-DoC): Tensile sensitive fibers and Big data and Machine learning for biomedical Institute for microsystems and microelectronics - CNR (CNR-IMM): Optical Sensing for wound monitoring and cells cultures Technological University Dublin (TUDUBLIN): photo-sensitive materials for optical sensing Institute of microelectronics - IMB-CNM-CSIC (CSIC-IMB): Micro/nanofabrication for electronic sensors and tissue engineering platforms- Advanced characterization of functional surfaces and (nano)materials mechanics- Radiation hard and biocompatible integrated autonomous/flexible systems. Fraunhofer Institute (IBMT): Biomaterials for scaffolding Queen Mary University (QMU): Modelling and simulations of sensing-related processes University of Bremen (UNIBREM): Data communication and machine learning IRP (Institute for Pediatric Research) -University of Padova (UNIPD): Flow cytometry-single mass cytometry University of Brighton (UoB): Numerical modelling of biodevices and biomaterials NON-ACADEMIC PARTNERS Optosmart srl: Optical fibres sensors Optrace LTD: Holographic sensing Flexenable LTD: Flexible electronic Mjr Pharmjet GMBH: Functionalized particles Regemat3D SL: 4D-bioprinting GSNET SRL*: AR for wound IR detection CRIL LTD: Micro Raman for biomedical Footfalls and heartbeats LTD: Patches for wound healing ASSOCIATED ACADEMIC PARTNERS Nagoya Institute of Technology: Acoustic sensing and CFD Harvard University: Hyper-resolution Microscopy Laboratory for Interdisciplinary Physics - Grenoble: Microfluidic devices seeded with endothelial cells ASAcampus JL, ASA Res Div-DSBSC, University of Florence: Scientific Coordinator Life and Medical Science
Impact The Project commenced in January 2020. No outputs yet.
Start Year 2020
 
Description ESA CORA MAP Research Project: Wound Healing In Space- Key challenges towards Intelligent and Enabling Sensing platforms (WHISKIES) 
Organisation Harvard University
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution UoB has been performing numerical simulations for the optimization of the bandage characteristics (topology, porosity, wettability) with respect to the physical properties of the exudate and gravity conditions. From a fluid-dynamics point of view, the rate of exudate absorption into wound dressings is governed by the interaction of two immiscible fluids, with a clearly defined interface between them; Ambient air that pre-exists in the pore structure of the wound dressing at the moment of application and the liquid exudate that leaks out from the affected wound. Hence, the actual resulting absorption rate is interplay of the following fluid dynamics related mechanisms: • Two-phase flow Interface dynamics between gaseous and liquid fluid phases • Capillary action within micro-passages • Wettability For this purpose, an enhanced Volume Of Fluid (VOF) based model that accounts for spurious currents reduction, which has been previously implemented in OpenFOAM CFD Toolbox (an open source CFD software), and it was validated and applied by part of the investigators' team for the case of two-phase flow interfacial dynamics, in similar spatial and temporal scales, is going to be utilised. The idea is to create a simplified numerical analogue of the phenomenon, in order to see the adsorption rate of a droplet, as well as a group of droplets and a thin liquid film against different viscosities in order to investigate quantitatively the effect of the viscosity and the absorption rate at the phenomenon. This numerical investigation aims in the development of an optimum, open-source numerical simulation tool that will be able to quantify in detail the absorption rate of exudate for particular values of viscosity and wound dressing type (i.e. different values of porosity).
Collaborator Contribution Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB) - Microgravity Research Centre and Laboratoire de Médecine Expérimentale: Scientific Coordinator, Financial Administration of the project and Spherization of red blood cells The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge (UCAM-CGC): Graphene-based materials for electrodes in sensing- RFID sensing The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge (UCAM-DoC): Tensile sensitive fibers and Big data and Machine learning for biomedical Institute for microsystems and microelectronics - CNR (CNR-IMM): Optical Sensing for wound monitoring and cells cultures Technological University Dublin (TUDUBLIN): photo-sensitive materials for optical sensing Institute of microelectronics - IMB-CNM-CSIC (CSIC-IMB): Micro/nanofabrication for electronic sensors and tissue engineering platforms- Advanced characterization of functional surfaces and (nano)materials mechanics- Radiation hard and biocompatible integrated autonomous/flexible systems. Fraunhofer Institute (IBMT): Biomaterials for scaffolding Queen Mary University (QMU): Modelling and simulations of sensing-related processes University of Bremen (UNIBREM): Data communication and machine learning IRP (Institute for Pediatric Research) -University of Padova (UNIPD): Flow cytometry-single mass cytometry University of Brighton (UoB): Numerical modelling of biodevices and biomaterials NON-ACADEMIC PARTNERS Optosmart srl: Optical fibres sensors Optrace LTD: Holographic sensing Flexenable LTD: Flexible electronic Mjr Pharmjet GMBH: Functionalized particles Regemat3D SL: 4D-bioprinting GSNET SRL*: AR for wound IR detection CRIL LTD: Micro Raman for biomedical Footfalls and heartbeats LTD: Patches for wound healing ASSOCIATED ACADEMIC PARTNERS Nagoya Institute of Technology: Acoustic sensing and CFD Harvard University: Hyper-resolution Microscopy Laboratory for Interdisciplinary Physics - Grenoble: Microfluidic devices seeded with endothelial cells ASAcampus JL, ASA Res Div-DSBSC, University of Florence: Scientific Coordinator Life and Medical Science
Impact The Project commenced in January 2020. No outputs yet.
Start Year 2020
 
Description ESA CORA MAP Research Project: Wound Healing In Space- Key challenges towards Intelligent and Enabling Sensing platforms (WHISKIES) 
Organisation MyBiotech
Country Germany 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution UoB has been performing numerical simulations for the optimization of the bandage characteristics (topology, porosity, wettability) with respect to the physical properties of the exudate and gravity conditions. From a fluid-dynamics point of view, the rate of exudate absorption into wound dressings is governed by the interaction of two immiscible fluids, with a clearly defined interface between them; Ambient air that pre-exists in the pore structure of the wound dressing at the moment of application and the liquid exudate that leaks out from the affected wound. Hence, the actual resulting absorption rate is interplay of the following fluid dynamics related mechanisms: • Two-phase flow Interface dynamics between gaseous and liquid fluid phases • Capillary action within micro-passages • Wettability For this purpose, an enhanced Volume Of Fluid (VOF) based model that accounts for spurious currents reduction, which has been previously implemented in OpenFOAM CFD Toolbox (an open source CFD software), and it was validated and applied by part of the investigators' team for the case of two-phase flow interfacial dynamics, in similar spatial and temporal scales, is going to be utilised. The idea is to create a simplified numerical analogue of the phenomenon, in order to see the adsorption rate of a droplet, as well as a group of droplets and a thin liquid film against different viscosities in order to investigate quantitatively the effect of the viscosity and the absorption rate at the phenomenon. This numerical investigation aims in the development of an optimum, open-source numerical simulation tool that will be able to quantify in detail the absorption rate of exudate for particular values of viscosity and wound dressing type (i.e. different values of porosity).
Collaborator Contribution Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB) - Microgravity Research Centre and Laboratoire de Médecine Expérimentale: Scientific Coordinator, Financial Administration of the project and Spherization of red blood cells The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge (UCAM-CGC): Graphene-based materials for electrodes in sensing- RFID sensing The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge (UCAM-DoC): Tensile sensitive fibers and Big data and Machine learning for biomedical Institute for microsystems and microelectronics - CNR (CNR-IMM): Optical Sensing for wound monitoring and cells cultures Technological University Dublin (TUDUBLIN): photo-sensitive materials for optical sensing Institute of microelectronics - IMB-CNM-CSIC (CSIC-IMB): Micro/nanofabrication for electronic sensors and tissue engineering platforms- Advanced characterization of functional surfaces and (nano)materials mechanics- Radiation hard and biocompatible integrated autonomous/flexible systems. Fraunhofer Institute (IBMT): Biomaterials for scaffolding Queen Mary University (QMU): Modelling and simulations of sensing-related processes University of Bremen (UNIBREM): Data communication and machine learning IRP (Institute for Pediatric Research) -University of Padova (UNIPD): Flow cytometry-single mass cytometry University of Brighton (UoB): Numerical modelling of biodevices and biomaterials NON-ACADEMIC PARTNERS Optosmart srl: Optical fibres sensors Optrace LTD: Holographic sensing Flexenable LTD: Flexible electronic Mjr Pharmjet GMBH: Functionalized particles Regemat3D SL: 4D-bioprinting GSNET SRL*: AR for wound IR detection CRIL LTD: Micro Raman for biomedical Footfalls and heartbeats LTD: Patches for wound healing ASSOCIATED ACADEMIC PARTNERS Nagoya Institute of Technology: Acoustic sensing and CFD Harvard University: Hyper-resolution Microscopy Laboratory for Interdisciplinary Physics - Grenoble: Microfluidic devices seeded with endothelial cells ASAcampus JL, ASA Res Div-DSBSC, University of Florence: Scientific Coordinator Life and Medical Science
Impact The Project commenced in January 2020. No outputs yet.
Start Year 2020
 
Description ESA CORA MAP Research Project: Wound Healing In Space- Key challenges towards Intelligent and Enabling Sensing platforms (WHISKIES) 
Organisation Nagoya Institute of Technology
Country Japan 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution UoB has been performing numerical simulations for the optimization of the bandage characteristics (topology, porosity, wettability) with respect to the physical properties of the exudate and gravity conditions. From a fluid-dynamics point of view, the rate of exudate absorption into wound dressings is governed by the interaction of two immiscible fluids, with a clearly defined interface between them; Ambient air that pre-exists in the pore structure of the wound dressing at the moment of application and the liquid exudate that leaks out from the affected wound. Hence, the actual resulting absorption rate is interplay of the following fluid dynamics related mechanisms: • Two-phase flow Interface dynamics between gaseous and liquid fluid phases • Capillary action within micro-passages • Wettability For this purpose, an enhanced Volume Of Fluid (VOF) based model that accounts for spurious currents reduction, which has been previously implemented in OpenFOAM CFD Toolbox (an open source CFD software), and it was validated and applied by part of the investigators' team for the case of two-phase flow interfacial dynamics, in similar spatial and temporal scales, is going to be utilised. The idea is to create a simplified numerical analogue of the phenomenon, in order to see the adsorption rate of a droplet, as well as a group of droplets and a thin liquid film against different viscosities in order to investigate quantitatively the effect of the viscosity and the absorption rate at the phenomenon. This numerical investigation aims in the development of an optimum, open-source numerical simulation tool that will be able to quantify in detail the absorption rate of exudate for particular values of viscosity and wound dressing type (i.e. different values of porosity).
Collaborator Contribution Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB) - Microgravity Research Centre and Laboratoire de Médecine Expérimentale: Scientific Coordinator, Financial Administration of the project and Spherization of red blood cells The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge (UCAM-CGC): Graphene-based materials for electrodes in sensing- RFID sensing The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge (UCAM-DoC): Tensile sensitive fibers and Big data and Machine learning for biomedical Institute for microsystems and microelectronics - CNR (CNR-IMM): Optical Sensing for wound monitoring and cells cultures Technological University Dublin (TUDUBLIN): photo-sensitive materials for optical sensing Institute of microelectronics - IMB-CNM-CSIC (CSIC-IMB): Micro/nanofabrication for electronic sensors and tissue engineering platforms- Advanced characterization of functional surfaces and (nano)materials mechanics- Radiation hard and biocompatible integrated autonomous/flexible systems. Fraunhofer Institute (IBMT): Biomaterials for scaffolding Queen Mary University (QMU): Modelling and simulations of sensing-related processes University of Bremen (UNIBREM): Data communication and machine learning IRP (Institute for Pediatric Research) -University of Padova (UNIPD): Flow cytometry-single mass cytometry University of Brighton (UoB): Numerical modelling of biodevices and biomaterials NON-ACADEMIC PARTNERS Optosmart srl: Optical fibres sensors Optrace LTD: Holographic sensing Flexenable LTD: Flexible electronic Mjr Pharmjet GMBH: Functionalized particles Regemat3D SL: 4D-bioprinting GSNET SRL*: AR for wound IR detection CRIL LTD: Micro Raman for biomedical Footfalls and heartbeats LTD: Patches for wound healing ASSOCIATED ACADEMIC PARTNERS Nagoya Institute of Technology: Acoustic sensing and CFD Harvard University: Hyper-resolution Microscopy Laboratory for Interdisciplinary Physics - Grenoble: Microfluidic devices seeded with endothelial cells ASAcampus JL, ASA Res Div-DSBSC, University of Florence: Scientific Coordinator Life and Medical Science
Impact The Project commenced in January 2020. No outputs yet.
Start Year 2020
 
Description ESA CORA MAP Research Project: Wound Healing In Space- Key challenges towards Intelligent and Enabling Sensing platforms (WHISKIES) 
Organisation Optosmart Srl
Country Italy 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution UoB has been performing numerical simulations for the optimization of the bandage characteristics (topology, porosity, wettability) with respect to the physical properties of the exudate and gravity conditions. From a fluid-dynamics point of view, the rate of exudate absorption into wound dressings is governed by the interaction of two immiscible fluids, with a clearly defined interface between them; Ambient air that pre-exists in the pore structure of the wound dressing at the moment of application and the liquid exudate that leaks out from the affected wound. Hence, the actual resulting absorption rate is interplay of the following fluid dynamics related mechanisms: • Two-phase flow Interface dynamics between gaseous and liquid fluid phases • Capillary action within micro-passages • Wettability For this purpose, an enhanced Volume Of Fluid (VOF) based model that accounts for spurious currents reduction, which has been previously implemented in OpenFOAM CFD Toolbox (an open source CFD software), and it was validated and applied by part of the investigators' team for the case of two-phase flow interfacial dynamics, in similar spatial and temporal scales, is going to be utilised. The idea is to create a simplified numerical analogue of the phenomenon, in order to see the adsorption rate of a droplet, as well as a group of droplets and a thin liquid film against different viscosities in order to investigate quantitatively the effect of the viscosity and the absorption rate at the phenomenon. This numerical investigation aims in the development of an optimum, open-source numerical simulation tool that will be able to quantify in detail the absorption rate of exudate for particular values of viscosity and wound dressing type (i.e. different values of porosity).
Collaborator Contribution Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB) - Microgravity Research Centre and Laboratoire de Médecine Expérimentale: Scientific Coordinator, Financial Administration of the project and Spherization of red blood cells The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge (UCAM-CGC): Graphene-based materials for electrodes in sensing- RFID sensing The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge (UCAM-DoC): Tensile sensitive fibers and Big data and Machine learning for biomedical Institute for microsystems and microelectronics - CNR (CNR-IMM): Optical Sensing for wound monitoring and cells cultures Technological University Dublin (TUDUBLIN): photo-sensitive materials for optical sensing Institute of microelectronics - IMB-CNM-CSIC (CSIC-IMB): Micro/nanofabrication for electronic sensors and tissue engineering platforms- Advanced characterization of functional surfaces and (nano)materials mechanics- Radiation hard and biocompatible integrated autonomous/flexible systems. Fraunhofer Institute (IBMT): Biomaterials for scaffolding Queen Mary University (QMU): Modelling and simulations of sensing-related processes University of Bremen (UNIBREM): Data communication and machine learning IRP (Institute for Pediatric Research) -University of Padova (UNIPD): Flow cytometry-single mass cytometry University of Brighton (UoB): Numerical modelling of biodevices and biomaterials NON-ACADEMIC PARTNERS Optosmart srl: Optical fibres sensors Optrace LTD: Holographic sensing Flexenable LTD: Flexible electronic Mjr Pharmjet GMBH: Functionalized particles Regemat3D SL: 4D-bioprinting GSNET SRL*: AR for wound IR detection CRIL LTD: Micro Raman for biomedical Footfalls and heartbeats LTD: Patches for wound healing ASSOCIATED ACADEMIC PARTNERS Nagoya Institute of Technology: Acoustic sensing and CFD Harvard University: Hyper-resolution Microscopy Laboratory for Interdisciplinary Physics - Grenoble: Microfluidic devices seeded with endothelial cells ASAcampus JL, ASA Res Div-DSBSC, University of Florence: Scientific Coordinator Life and Medical Science
Impact The Project commenced in January 2020. No outputs yet.
Start Year 2020
 
Description ESA CORA MAP Research Project: Wound Healing In Space- Key challenges towards Intelligent and Enabling Sensing platforms (WHISKIES) 
Organisation Optrace
Sector Private 
PI Contribution UoB has been performing numerical simulations for the optimization of the bandage characteristics (topology, porosity, wettability) with respect to the physical properties of the exudate and gravity conditions. From a fluid-dynamics point of view, the rate of exudate absorption into wound dressings is governed by the interaction of two immiscible fluids, with a clearly defined interface between them; Ambient air that pre-exists in the pore structure of the wound dressing at the moment of application and the liquid exudate that leaks out from the affected wound. Hence, the actual resulting absorption rate is interplay of the following fluid dynamics related mechanisms: • Two-phase flow Interface dynamics between gaseous and liquid fluid phases • Capillary action within micro-passages • Wettability For this purpose, an enhanced Volume Of Fluid (VOF) based model that accounts for spurious currents reduction, which has been previously implemented in OpenFOAM CFD Toolbox (an open source CFD software), and it was validated and applied by part of the investigators' team for the case of two-phase flow interfacial dynamics, in similar spatial and temporal scales, is going to be utilised. The idea is to create a simplified numerical analogue of the phenomenon, in order to see the adsorption rate of a droplet, as well as a group of droplets and a thin liquid film against different viscosities in order to investigate quantitatively the effect of the viscosity and the absorption rate at the phenomenon. This numerical investigation aims in the development of an optimum, open-source numerical simulation tool that will be able to quantify in detail the absorption rate of exudate for particular values of viscosity and wound dressing type (i.e. different values of porosity).
Collaborator Contribution Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB) - Microgravity Research Centre and Laboratoire de Médecine Expérimentale: Scientific Coordinator, Financial Administration of the project and Spherization of red blood cells The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge (UCAM-CGC): Graphene-based materials for electrodes in sensing- RFID sensing The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge (UCAM-DoC): Tensile sensitive fibers and Big data and Machine learning for biomedical Institute for microsystems and microelectronics - CNR (CNR-IMM): Optical Sensing for wound monitoring and cells cultures Technological University Dublin (TUDUBLIN): photo-sensitive materials for optical sensing Institute of microelectronics - IMB-CNM-CSIC (CSIC-IMB): Micro/nanofabrication for electronic sensors and tissue engineering platforms- Advanced characterization of functional surfaces and (nano)materials mechanics- Radiation hard and biocompatible integrated autonomous/flexible systems. Fraunhofer Institute (IBMT): Biomaterials for scaffolding Queen Mary University (QMU): Modelling and simulations of sensing-related processes University of Bremen (UNIBREM): Data communication and machine learning IRP (Institute for Pediatric Research) -University of Padova (UNIPD): Flow cytometry-single mass cytometry University of Brighton (UoB): Numerical modelling of biodevices and biomaterials NON-ACADEMIC PARTNERS Optosmart srl: Optical fibres sensors Optrace LTD: Holographic sensing Flexenable LTD: Flexible electronic Mjr Pharmjet GMBH: Functionalized particles Regemat3D SL: 4D-bioprinting GSNET SRL*: AR for wound IR detection CRIL LTD: Micro Raman for biomedical Footfalls and heartbeats LTD: Patches for wound healing ASSOCIATED ACADEMIC PARTNERS Nagoya Institute of Technology: Acoustic sensing and CFD Harvard University: Hyper-resolution Microscopy Laboratory for Interdisciplinary Physics - Grenoble: Microfluidic devices seeded with endothelial cells ASAcampus JL, ASA Res Div-DSBSC, University of Florence: Scientific Coordinator Life and Medical Science
Impact The Project commenced in January 2020. No outputs yet.
Start Year 2020
 
Description ESA CORA MAP Research Project: Wound Healing In Space- Key challenges towards Intelligent and Enabling Sensing platforms (WHISKIES) 
Organisation Queen Mary University of London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution UoB has been performing numerical simulations for the optimization of the bandage characteristics (topology, porosity, wettability) with respect to the physical properties of the exudate and gravity conditions. From a fluid-dynamics point of view, the rate of exudate absorption into wound dressings is governed by the interaction of two immiscible fluids, with a clearly defined interface between them; Ambient air that pre-exists in the pore structure of the wound dressing at the moment of application and the liquid exudate that leaks out from the affected wound. Hence, the actual resulting absorption rate is interplay of the following fluid dynamics related mechanisms: • Two-phase flow Interface dynamics between gaseous and liquid fluid phases • Capillary action within micro-passages • Wettability For this purpose, an enhanced Volume Of Fluid (VOF) based model that accounts for spurious currents reduction, which has been previously implemented in OpenFOAM CFD Toolbox (an open source CFD software), and it was validated and applied by part of the investigators' team for the case of two-phase flow interfacial dynamics, in similar spatial and temporal scales, is going to be utilised. The idea is to create a simplified numerical analogue of the phenomenon, in order to see the adsorption rate of a droplet, as well as a group of droplets and a thin liquid film against different viscosities in order to investigate quantitatively the effect of the viscosity and the absorption rate at the phenomenon. This numerical investigation aims in the development of an optimum, open-source numerical simulation tool that will be able to quantify in detail the absorption rate of exudate for particular values of viscosity and wound dressing type (i.e. different values of porosity).
Collaborator Contribution Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB) - Microgravity Research Centre and Laboratoire de Médecine Expérimentale: Scientific Coordinator, Financial Administration of the project and Spherization of red blood cells The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge (UCAM-CGC): Graphene-based materials for electrodes in sensing- RFID sensing The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge (UCAM-DoC): Tensile sensitive fibers and Big data and Machine learning for biomedical Institute for microsystems and microelectronics - CNR (CNR-IMM): Optical Sensing for wound monitoring and cells cultures Technological University Dublin (TUDUBLIN): photo-sensitive materials for optical sensing Institute of microelectronics - IMB-CNM-CSIC (CSIC-IMB): Micro/nanofabrication for electronic sensors and tissue engineering platforms- Advanced characterization of functional surfaces and (nano)materials mechanics- Radiation hard and biocompatible integrated autonomous/flexible systems. Fraunhofer Institute (IBMT): Biomaterials for scaffolding Queen Mary University (QMU): Modelling and simulations of sensing-related processes University of Bremen (UNIBREM): Data communication and machine learning IRP (Institute for Pediatric Research) -University of Padova (UNIPD): Flow cytometry-single mass cytometry University of Brighton (UoB): Numerical modelling of biodevices and biomaterials NON-ACADEMIC PARTNERS Optosmart srl: Optical fibres sensors Optrace LTD: Holographic sensing Flexenable LTD: Flexible electronic Mjr Pharmjet GMBH: Functionalized particles Regemat3D SL: 4D-bioprinting GSNET SRL*: AR for wound IR detection CRIL LTD: Micro Raman for biomedical Footfalls and heartbeats LTD: Patches for wound healing ASSOCIATED ACADEMIC PARTNERS Nagoya Institute of Technology: Acoustic sensing and CFD Harvard University: Hyper-resolution Microscopy Laboratory for Interdisciplinary Physics - Grenoble: Microfluidic devices seeded with endothelial cells ASAcampus JL, ASA Res Div-DSBSC, University of Florence: Scientific Coordinator Life and Medical Science
Impact The Project commenced in January 2020. No outputs yet.
Start Year 2020
 
Description ESA CORA MAP Research Project: Wound Healing In Space- Key challenges towards Intelligent and Enabling Sensing platforms (WHISKIES) 
Organisation REGEMAT 3D
Country Spain 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution UoB has been performing numerical simulations for the optimization of the bandage characteristics (topology, porosity, wettability) with respect to the physical properties of the exudate and gravity conditions. From a fluid-dynamics point of view, the rate of exudate absorption into wound dressings is governed by the interaction of two immiscible fluids, with a clearly defined interface between them; Ambient air that pre-exists in the pore structure of the wound dressing at the moment of application and the liquid exudate that leaks out from the affected wound. Hence, the actual resulting absorption rate is interplay of the following fluid dynamics related mechanisms: • Two-phase flow Interface dynamics between gaseous and liquid fluid phases • Capillary action within micro-passages • Wettability For this purpose, an enhanced Volume Of Fluid (VOF) based model that accounts for spurious currents reduction, which has been previously implemented in OpenFOAM CFD Toolbox (an open source CFD software), and it was validated and applied by part of the investigators' team for the case of two-phase flow interfacial dynamics, in similar spatial and temporal scales, is going to be utilised. The idea is to create a simplified numerical analogue of the phenomenon, in order to see the adsorption rate of a droplet, as well as a group of droplets and a thin liquid film against different viscosities in order to investigate quantitatively the effect of the viscosity and the absorption rate at the phenomenon. This numerical investigation aims in the development of an optimum, open-source numerical simulation tool that will be able to quantify in detail the absorption rate of exudate for particular values of viscosity and wound dressing type (i.e. different values of porosity).
Collaborator Contribution Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB) - Microgravity Research Centre and Laboratoire de Médecine Expérimentale: Scientific Coordinator, Financial Administration of the project and Spherization of red blood cells The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge (UCAM-CGC): Graphene-based materials for electrodes in sensing- RFID sensing The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge (UCAM-DoC): Tensile sensitive fibers and Big data and Machine learning for biomedical Institute for microsystems and microelectronics - CNR (CNR-IMM): Optical Sensing for wound monitoring and cells cultures Technological University Dublin (TUDUBLIN): photo-sensitive materials for optical sensing Institute of microelectronics - IMB-CNM-CSIC (CSIC-IMB): Micro/nanofabrication for electronic sensors and tissue engineering platforms- Advanced characterization of functional surfaces and (nano)materials mechanics- Radiation hard and biocompatible integrated autonomous/flexible systems. Fraunhofer Institute (IBMT): Biomaterials for scaffolding Queen Mary University (QMU): Modelling and simulations of sensing-related processes University of Bremen (UNIBREM): Data communication and machine learning IRP (Institute for Pediatric Research) -University of Padova (UNIPD): Flow cytometry-single mass cytometry University of Brighton (UoB): Numerical modelling of biodevices and biomaterials NON-ACADEMIC PARTNERS Optosmart srl: Optical fibres sensors Optrace LTD: Holographic sensing Flexenable LTD: Flexible electronic Mjr Pharmjet GMBH: Functionalized particles Regemat3D SL: 4D-bioprinting GSNET SRL*: AR for wound IR detection CRIL LTD: Micro Raman for biomedical Footfalls and heartbeats LTD: Patches for wound healing ASSOCIATED ACADEMIC PARTNERS Nagoya Institute of Technology: Acoustic sensing and CFD Harvard University: Hyper-resolution Microscopy Laboratory for Interdisciplinary Physics - Grenoble: Microfluidic devices seeded with endothelial cells ASAcampus JL, ASA Res Div-DSBSC, University of Florence: Scientific Coordinator Life and Medical Science
Impact The Project commenced in January 2020. No outputs yet.
Start Year 2020
 
Description ESA CORA MAP Research Project: Wound Healing In Space- Key challenges towards Intelligent and Enabling Sensing platforms (WHISKIES) 
Organisation Spanish National Research Council (CSIC)
Department Barcelona Institute of Microelectronics
Country Spain 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution UoB has been performing numerical simulations for the optimization of the bandage characteristics (topology, porosity, wettability) with respect to the physical properties of the exudate and gravity conditions. From a fluid-dynamics point of view, the rate of exudate absorption into wound dressings is governed by the interaction of two immiscible fluids, with a clearly defined interface between them; Ambient air that pre-exists in the pore structure of the wound dressing at the moment of application and the liquid exudate that leaks out from the affected wound. Hence, the actual resulting absorption rate is interplay of the following fluid dynamics related mechanisms: • Two-phase flow Interface dynamics between gaseous and liquid fluid phases • Capillary action within micro-passages • Wettability For this purpose, an enhanced Volume Of Fluid (VOF) based model that accounts for spurious currents reduction, which has been previously implemented in OpenFOAM CFD Toolbox (an open source CFD software), and it was validated and applied by part of the investigators' team for the case of two-phase flow interfacial dynamics, in similar spatial and temporal scales, is going to be utilised. The idea is to create a simplified numerical analogue of the phenomenon, in order to see the adsorption rate of a droplet, as well as a group of droplets and a thin liquid film against different viscosities in order to investigate quantitatively the effect of the viscosity and the absorption rate at the phenomenon. This numerical investigation aims in the development of an optimum, open-source numerical simulation tool that will be able to quantify in detail the absorption rate of exudate for particular values of viscosity and wound dressing type (i.e. different values of porosity).
Collaborator Contribution Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB) - Microgravity Research Centre and Laboratoire de Médecine Expérimentale: Scientific Coordinator, Financial Administration of the project and Spherization of red blood cells The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge (UCAM-CGC): Graphene-based materials for electrodes in sensing- RFID sensing The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge (UCAM-DoC): Tensile sensitive fibers and Big data and Machine learning for biomedical Institute for microsystems and microelectronics - CNR (CNR-IMM): Optical Sensing for wound monitoring and cells cultures Technological University Dublin (TUDUBLIN): photo-sensitive materials for optical sensing Institute of microelectronics - IMB-CNM-CSIC (CSIC-IMB): Micro/nanofabrication for electronic sensors and tissue engineering platforms- Advanced characterization of functional surfaces and (nano)materials mechanics- Radiation hard and biocompatible integrated autonomous/flexible systems. Fraunhofer Institute (IBMT): Biomaterials for scaffolding Queen Mary University (QMU): Modelling and simulations of sensing-related processes University of Bremen (UNIBREM): Data communication and machine learning IRP (Institute for Pediatric Research) -University of Padova (UNIPD): Flow cytometry-single mass cytometry University of Brighton (UoB): Numerical modelling of biodevices and biomaterials NON-ACADEMIC PARTNERS Optosmart srl: Optical fibres sensors Optrace LTD: Holographic sensing Flexenable LTD: Flexible electronic Mjr Pharmjet GMBH: Functionalized particles Regemat3D SL: 4D-bioprinting GSNET SRL*: AR for wound IR detection CRIL LTD: Micro Raman for biomedical Footfalls and heartbeats LTD: Patches for wound healing ASSOCIATED ACADEMIC PARTNERS Nagoya Institute of Technology: Acoustic sensing and CFD Harvard University: Hyper-resolution Microscopy Laboratory for Interdisciplinary Physics - Grenoble: Microfluidic devices seeded with endothelial cells ASAcampus JL, ASA Res Div-DSBSC, University of Florence: Scientific Coordinator Life and Medical Science
Impact The Project commenced in January 2020. No outputs yet.
Start Year 2020
 
Description ESA CORA MAP Research Project: Wound Healing In Space- Key challenges towards Intelligent and Enabling Sensing platforms (WHISKIES) 
Organisation Technological University Dublin
Country Ireland 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution UoB has been performing numerical simulations for the optimization of the bandage characteristics (topology, porosity, wettability) with respect to the physical properties of the exudate and gravity conditions. From a fluid-dynamics point of view, the rate of exudate absorption into wound dressings is governed by the interaction of two immiscible fluids, with a clearly defined interface between them; Ambient air that pre-exists in the pore structure of the wound dressing at the moment of application and the liquid exudate that leaks out from the affected wound. Hence, the actual resulting absorption rate is interplay of the following fluid dynamics related mechanisms: • Two-phase flow Interface dynamics between gaseous and liquid fluid phases • Capillary action within micro-passages • Wettability For this purpose, an enhanced Volume Of Fluid (VOF) based model that accounts for spurious currents reduction, which has been previously implemented in OpenFOAM CFD Toolbox (an open source CFD software), and it was validated and applied by part of the investigators' team for the case of two-phase flow interfacial dynamics, in similar spatial and temporal scales, is going to be utilised. The idea is to create a simplified numerical analogue of the phenomenon, in order to see the adsorption rate of a droplet, as well as a group of droplets and a thin liquid film against different viscosities in order to investigate quantitatively the effect of the viscosity and the absorption rate at the phenomenon. This numerical investigation aims in the development of an optimum, open-source numerical simulation tool that will be able to quantify in detail the absorption rate of exudate for particular values of viscosity and wound dressing type (i.e. different values of porosity).
Collaborator Contribution Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB) - Microgravity Research Centre and Laboratoire de Médecine Expérimentale: Scientific Coordinator, Financial Administration of the project and Spherization of red blood cells The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge (UCAM-CGC): Graphene-based materials for electrodes in sensing- RFID sensing The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge (UCAM-DoC): Tensile sensitive fibers and Big data and Machine learning for biomedical Institute for microsystems and microelectronics - CNR (CNR-IMM): Optical Sensing for wound monitoring and cells cultures Technological University Dublin (TUDUBLIN): photo-sensitive materials for optical sensing Institute of microelectronics - IMB-CNM-CSIC (CSIC-IMB): Micro/nanofabrication for electronic sensors and tissue engineering platforms- Advanced characterization of functional surfaces and (nano)materials mechanics- Radiation hard and biocompatible integrated autonomous/flexible systems. Fraunhofer Institute (IBMT): Biomaterials for scaffolding Queen Mary University (QMU): Modelling and simulations of sensing-related processes University of Bremen (UNIBREM): Data communication and machine learning IRP (Institute for Pediatric Research) -University of Padova (UNIPD): Flow cytometry-single mass cytometry University of Brighton (UoB): Numerical modelling of biodevices and biomaterials NON-ACADEMIC PARTNERS Optosmart srl: Optical fibres sensors Optrace LTD: Holographic sensing Flexenable LTD: Flexible electronic Mjr Pharmjet GMBH: Functionalized particles Regemat3D SL: 4D-bioprinting GSNET SRL*: AR for wound IR detection CRIL LTD: Micro Raman for biomedical Footfalls and heartbeats LTD: Patches for wound healing ASSOCIATED ACADEMIC PARTNERS Nagoya Institute of Technology: Acoustic sensing and CFD Harvard University: Hyper-resolution Microscopy Laboratory for Interdisciplinary Physics - Grenoble: Microfluidic devices seeded with endothelial cells ASAcampus JL, ASA Res Div-DSBSC, University of Florence: Scientific Coordinator Life and Medical Science
Impact The Project commenced in January 2020. No outputs yet.
Start Year 2020
 
Description ESA CORA MAP Research Project: Wound Healing In Space- Key challenges towards Intelligent and Enabling Sensing platforms (WHISKIES) 
Organisation University Libre Bruxelles (Université Libre de Bruxelles ULB)
Country Belgium 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution UoB has been performing numerical simulations for the optimization of the bandage characteristics (topology, porosity, wettability) with respect to the physical properties of the exudate and gravity conditions. From a fluid-dynamics point of view, the rate of exudate absorption into wound dressings is governed by the interaction of two immiscible fluids, with a clearly defined interface between them; Ambient air that pre-exists in the pore structure of the wound dressing at the moment of application and the liquid exudate that leaks out from the affected wound. Hence, the actual resulting absorption rate is interplay of the following fluid dynamics related mechanisms: • Two-phase flow Interface dynamics between gaseous and liquid fluid phases • Capillary action within micro-passages • Wettability For this purpose, an enhanced Volume Of Fluid (VOF) based model that accounts for spurious currents reduction, which has been previously implemented in OpenFOAM CFD Toolbox (an open source CFD software), and it was validated and applied by part of the investigators' team for the case of two-phase flow interfacial dynamics, in similar spatial and temporal scales, is going to be utilised. The idea is to create a simplified numerical analogue of the phenomenon, in order to see the adsorption rate of a droplet, as well as a group of droplets and a thin liquid film against different viscosities in order to investigate quantitatively the effect of the viscosity and the absorption rate at the phenomenon. This numerical investigation aims in the development of an optimum, open-source numerical simulation tool that will be able to quantify in detail the absorption rate of exudate for particular values of viscosity and wound dressing type (i.e. different values of porosity).
Collaborator Contribution Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB) - Microgravity Research Centre and Laboratoire de Médecine Expérimentale: Scientific Coordinator, Financial Administration of the project and Spherization of red blood cells The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge (UCAM-CGC): Graphene-based materials for electrodes in sensing- RFID sensing The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge (UCAM-DoC): Tensile sensitive fibers and Big data and Machine learning for biomedical Institute for microsystems and microelectronics - CNR (CNR-IMM): Optical Sensing for wound monitoring and cells cultures Technological University Dublin (TUDUBLIN): photo-sensitive materials for optical sensing Institute of microelectronics - IMB-CNM-CSIC (CSIC-IMB): Micro/nanofabrication for electronic sensors and tissue engineering platforms- Advanced characterization of functional surfaces and (nano)materials mechanics- Radiation hard and biocompatible integrated autonomous/flexible systems. Fraunhofer Institute (IBMT): Biomaterials for scaffolding Queen Mary University (QMU): Modelling and simulations of sensing-related processes University of Bremen (UNIBREM): Data communication and machine learning IRP (Institute for Pediatric Research) -University of Padova (UNIPD): Flow cytometry-single mass cytometry University of Brighton (UoB): Numerical modelling of biodevices and biomaterials NON-ACADEMIC PARTNERS Optosmart srl: Optical fibres sensors Optrace LTD: Holographic sensing Flexenable LTD: Flexible electronic Mjr Pharmjet GMBH: Functionalized particles Regemat3D SL: 4D-bioprinting GSNET SRL*: AR for wound IR detection CRIL LTD: Micro Raman for biomedical Footfalls and heartbeats LTD: Patches for wound healing ASSOCIATED ACADEMIC PARTNERS Nagoya Institute of Technology: Acoustic sensing and CFD Harvard University: Hyper-resolution Microscopy Laboratory for Interdisciplinary Physics - Grenoble: Microfluidic devices seeded with endothelial cells ASAcampus JL, ASA Res Div-DSBSC, University of Florence: Scientific Coordinator Life and Medical Science
Impact The Project commenced in January 2020. No outputs yet.
Start Year 2020
 
Description ESA CORA MAP Research Project: Wound Healing In Space- Key challenges towards Intelligent and Enabling Sensing platforms (WHISKIES) 
Organisation University of Bremen
Country Germany 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution UoB has been performing numerical simulations for the optimization of the bandage characteristics (topology, porosity, wettability) with respect to the physical properties of the exudate and gravity conditions. From a fluid-dynamics point of view, the rate of exudate absorption into wound dressings is governed by the interaction of two immiscible fluids, with a clearly defined interface between them; Ambient air that pre-exists in the pore structure of the wound dressing at the moment of application and the liquid exudate that leaks out from the affected wound. Hence, the actual resulting absorption rate is interplay of the following fluid dynamics related mechanisms: • Two-phase flow Interface dynamics between gaseous and liquid fluid phases • Capillary action within micro-passages • Wettability For this purpose, an enhanced Volume Of Fluid (VOF) based model that accounts for spurious currents reduction, which has been previously implemented in OpenFOAM CFD Toolbox (an open source CFD software), and it was validated and applied by part of the investigators' team for the case of two-phase flow interfacial dynamics, in similar spatial and temporal scales, is going to be utilised. The idea is to create a simplified numerical analogue of the phenomenon, in order to see the adsorption rate of a droplet, as well as a group of droplets and a thin liquid film against different viscosities in order to investigate quantitatively the effect of the viscosity and the absorption rate at the phenomenon. This numerical investigation aims in the development of an optimum, open-source numerical simulation tool that will be able to quantify in detail the absorption rate of exudate for particular values of viscosity and wound dressing type (i.e. different values of porosity).
Collaborator Contribution Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB) - Microgravity Research Centre and Laboratoire de Médecine Expérimentale: Scientific Coordinator, Financial Administration of the project and Spherization of red blood cells The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge (UCAM-CGC): Graphene-based materials for electrodes in sensing- RFID sensing The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge (UCAM-DoC): Tensile sensitive fibers and Big data and Machine learning for biomedical Institute for microsystems and microelectronics - CNR (CNR-IMM): Optical Sensing for wound monitoring and cells cultures Technological University Dublin (TUDUBLIN): photo-sensitive materials for optical sensing Institute of microelectronics - IMB-CNM-CSIC (CSIC-IMB): Micro/nanofabrication for electronic sensors and tissue engineering platforms- Advanced characterization of functional surfaces and (nano)materials mechanics- Radiation hard and biocompatible integrated autonomous/flexible systems. Fraunhofer Institute (IBMT): Biomaterials for scaffolding Queen Mary University (QMU): Modelling and simulations of sensing-related processes University of Bremen (UNIBREM): Data communication and machine learning IRP (Institute for Pediatric Research) -University of Padova (UNIPD): Flow cytometry-single mass cytometry University of Brighton (UoB): Numerical modelling of biodevices and biomaterials NON-ACADEMIC PARTNERS Optosmart srl: Optical fibres sensors Optrace LTD: Holographic sensing Flexenable LTD: Flexible electronic Mjr Pharmjet GMBH: Functionalized particles Regemat3D SL: 4D-bioprinting GSNET SRL*: AR for wound IR detection CRIL LTD: Micro Raman for biomedical Footfalls and heartbeats LTD: Patches for wound healing ASSOCIATED ACADEMIC PARTNERS Nagoya Institute of Technology: Acoustic sensing and CFD Harvard University: Hyper-resolution Microscopy Laboratory for Interdisciplinary Physics - Grenoble: Microfluidic devices seeded with endothelial cells ASAcampus JL, ASA Res Div-DSBSC, University of Florence: Scientific Coordinator Life and Medical Science
Impact The Project commenced in January 2020. No outputs yet.
Start Year 2020
 
Description ESA CORA MAP Research Project: Wound Healing In Space- Key challenges towards Intelligent and Enabling Sensing platforms (WHISKIES) 
Organisation University of Cambridge
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution UoB has been performing numerical simulations for the optimization of the bandage characteristics (topology, porosity, wettability) with respect to the physical properties of the exudate and gravity conditions. From a fluid-dynamics point of view, the rate of exudate absorption into wound dressings is governed by the interaction of two immiscible fluids, with a clearly defined interface between them; Ambient air that pre-exists in the pore structure of the wound dressing at the moment of application and the liquid exudate that leaks out from the affected wound. Hence, the actual resulting absorption rate is interplay of the following fluid dynamics related mechanisms: • Two-phase flow Interface dynamics between gaseous and liquid fluid phases • Capillary action within micro-passages • Wettability For this purpose, an enhanced Volume Of Fluid (VOF) based model that accounts for spurious currents reduction, which has been previously implemented in OpenFOAM CFD Toolbox (an open source CFD software), and it was validated and applied by part of the investigators' team for the case of two-phase flow interfacial dynamics, in similar spatial and temporal scales, is going to be utilised. The idea is to create a simplified numerical analogue of the phenomenon, in order to see the adsorption rate of a droplet, as well as a group of droplets and a thin liquid film against different viscosities in order to investigate quantitatively the effect of the viscosity and the absorption rate at the phenomenon. This numerical investigation aims in the development of an optimum, open-source numerical simulation tool that will be able to quantify in detail the absorption rate of exudate for particular values of viscosity and wound dressing type (i.e. different values of porosity).
Collaborator Contribution Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB) - Microgravity Research Centre and Laboratoire de Médecine Expérimentale: Scientific Coordinator, Financial Administration of the project and Spherization of red blood cells The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge (UCAM-CGC): Graphene-based materials for electrodes in sensing- RFID sensing The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge (UCAM-DoC): Tensile sensitive fibers and Big data and Machine learning for biomedical Institute for microsystems and microelectronics - CNR (CNR-IMM): Optical Sensing for wound monitoring and cells cultures Technological University Dublin (TUDUBLIN): photo-sensitive materials for optical sensing Institute of microelectronics - IMB-CNM-CSIC (CSIC-IMB): Micro/nanofabrication for electronic sensors and tissue engineering platforms- Advanced characterization of functional surfaces and (nano)materials mechanics- Radiation hard and biocompatible integrated autonomous/flexible systems. Fraunhofer Institute (IBMT): Biomaterials for scaffolding Queen Mary University (QMU): Modelling and simulations of sensing-related processes University of Bremen (UNIBREM): Data communication and machine learning IRP (Institute for Pediatric Research) -University of Padova (UNIPD): Flow cytometry-single mass cytometry University of Brighton (UoB): Numerical modelling of biodevices and biomaterials NON-ACADEMIC PARTNERS Optosmart srl: Optical fibres sensors Optrace LTD: Holographic sensing Flexenable LTD: Flexible electronic Mjr Pharmjet GMBH: Functionalized particles Regemat3D SL: 4D-bioprinting GSNET SRL*: AR for wound IR detection CRIL LTD: Micro Raman for biomedical Footfalls and heartbeats LTD: Patches for wound healing ASSOCIATED ACADEMIC PARTNERS Nagoya Institute of Technology: Acoustic sensing and CFD Harvard University: Hyper-resolution Microscopy Laboratory for Interdisciplinary Physics - Grenoble: Microfluidic devices seeded with endothelial cells ASAcampus JL, ASA Res Div-DSBSC, University of Florence: Scientific Coordinator Life and Medical Science
Impact The Project commenced in January 2020. No outputs yet.
Start Year 2020
 
Description ESA CORA MAP Research Project: Wound Healing In Space- Key challenges towards Intelligent and Enabling Sensing platforms (WHISKIES) 
Organisation University of Florence
Country Italy 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution UoB has been performing numerical simulations for the optimization of the bandage characteristics (topology, porosity, wettability) with respect to the physical properties of the exudate and gravity conditions. From a fluid-dynamics point of view, the rate of exudate absorption into wound dressings is governed by the interaction of two immiscible fluids, with a clearly defined interface between them; Ambient air that pre-exists in the pore structure of the wound dressing at the moment of application and the liquid exudate that leaks out from the affected wound. Hence, the actual resulting absorption rate is interplay of the following fluid dynamics related mechanisms: • Two-phase flow Interface dynamics between gaseous and liquid fluid phases • Capillary action within micro-passages • Wettability For this purpose, an enhanced Volume Of Fluid (VOF) based model that accounts for spurious currents reduction, which has been previously implemented in OpenFOAM CFD Toolbox (an open source CFD software), and it was validated and applied by part of the investigators' team for the case of two-phase flow interfacial dynamics, in similar spatial and temporal scales, is going to be utilised. The idea is to create a simplified numerical analogue of the phenomenon, in order to see the adsorption rate of a droplet, as well as a group of droplets and a thin liquid film against different viscosities in order to investigate quantitatively the effect of the viscosity and the absorption rate at the phenomenon. This numerical investigation aims in the development of an optimum, open-source numerical simulation tool that will be able to quantify in detail the absorption rate of exudate for particular values of viscosity and wound dressing type (i.e. different values of porosity).
Collaborator Contribution Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB) - Microgravity Research Centre and Laboratoire de Médecine Expérimentale: Scientific Coordinator, Financial Administration of the project and Spherization of red blood cells The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge (UCAM-CGC): Graphene-based materials for electrodes in sensing- RFID sensing The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge (UCAM-DoC): Tensile sensitive fibers and Big data and Machine learning for biomedical Institute for microsystems and microelectronics - CNR (CNR-IMM): Optical Sensing for wound monitoring and cells cultures Technological University Dublin (TUDUBLIN): photo-sensitive materials for optical sensing Institute of microelectronics - IMB-CNM-CSIC (CSIC-IMB): Micro/nanofabrication for electronic sensors and tissue engineering platforms- Advanced characterization of functional surfaces and (nano)materials mechanics- Radiation hard and biocompatible integrated autonomous/flexible systems. Fraunhofer Institute (IBMT): Biomaterials for scaffolding Queen Mary University (QMU): Modelling and simulations of sensing-related processes University of Bremen (UNIBREM): Data communication and machine learning IRP (Institute for Pediatric Research) -University of Padova (UNIPD): Flow cytometry-single mass cytometry University of Brighton (UoB): Numerical modelling of biodevices and biomaterials NON-ACADEMIC PARTNERS Optosmart srl: Optical fibres sensors Optrace LTD: Holographic sensing Flexenable LTD: Flexible electronic Mjr Pharmjet GMBH: Functionalized particles Regemat3D SL: 4D-bioprinting GSNET SRL*: AR for wound IR detection CRIL LTD: Micro Raman for biomedical Footfalls and heartbeats LTD: Patches for wound healing ASSOCIATED ACADEMIC PARTNERS Nagoya Institute of Technology: Acoustic sensing and CFD Harvard University: Hyper-resolution Microscopy Laboratory for Interdisciplinary Physics - Grenoble: Microfluidic devices seeded with endothelial cells ASAcampus JL, ASA Res Div-DSBSC, University of Florence: Scientific Coordinator Life and Medical Science
Impact The Project commenced in January 2020. No outputs yet.
Start Year 2020
 
Description ESA CORA MAP Research Project: Wound Healing In Space- Key challenges towards Intelligent and Enabling Sensing platforms (WHISKIES) 
Organisation University of Grenoble
Department Laboratory for Interdisciplinary Physics
Country France 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution UoB has been performing numerical simulations for the optimization of the bandage characteristics (topology, porosity, wettability) with respect to the physical properties of the exudate and gravity conditions. From a fluid-dynamics point of view, the rate of exudate absorption into wound dressings is governed by the interaction of two immiscible fluids, with a clearly defined interface between them; Ambient air that pre-exists in the pore structure of the wound dressing at the moment of application and the liquid exudate that leaks out from the affected wound. Hence, the actual resulting absorption rate is interplay of the following fluid dynamics related mechanisms: • Two-phase flow Interface dynamics between gaseous and liquid fluid phases • Capillary action within micro-passages • Wettability For this purpose, an enhanced Volume Of Fluid (VOF) based model that accounts for spurious currents reduction, which has been previously implemented in OpenFOAM CFD Toolbox (an open source CFD software), and it was validated and applied by part of the investigators' team for the case of two-phase flow interfacial dynamics, in similar spatial and temporal scales, is going to be utilised. The idea is to create a simplified numerical analogue of the phenomenon, in order to see the adsorption rate of a droplet, as well as a group of droplets and a thin liquid film against different viscosities in order to investigate quantitatively the effect of the viscosity and the absorption rate at the phenomenon. This numerical investigation aims in the development of an optimum, open-source numerical simulation tool that will be able to quantify in detail the absorption rate of exudate for particular values of viscosity and wound dressing type (i.e. different values of porosity).
Collaborator Contribution Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB) - Microgravity Research Centre and Laboratoire de Médecine Expérimentale: Scientific Coordinator, Financial Administration of the project and Spherization of red blood cells The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge (UCAM-CGC): Graphene-based materials for electrodes in sensing- RFID sensing The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge (UCAM-DoC): Tensile sensitive fibers and Big data and Machine learning for biomedical Institute for microsystems and microelectronics - CNR (CNR-IMM): Optical Sensing for wound monitoring and cells cultures Technological University Dublin (TUDUBLIN): photo-sensitive materials for optical sensing Institute of microelectronics - IMB-CNM-CSIC (CSIC-IMB): Micro/nanofabrication for electronic sensors and tissue engineering platforms- Advanced characterization of functional surfaces and (nano)materials mechanics- Radiation hard and biocompatible integrated autonomous/flexible systems. Fraunhofer Institute (IBMT): Biomaterials for scaffolding Queen Mary University (QMU): Modelling and simulations of sensing-related processes University of Bremen (UNIBREM): Data communication and machine learning IRP (Institute for Pediatric Research) -University of Padova (UNIPD): Flow cytometry-single mass cytometry University of Brighton (UoB): Numerical modelling of biodevices and biomaterials NON-ACADEMIC PARTNERS Optosmart srl: Optical fibres sensors Optrace LTD: Holographic sensing Flexenable LTD: Flexible electronic Mjr Pharmjet GMBH: Functionalized particles Regemat3D SL: 4D-bioprinting GSNET SRL*: AR for wound IR detection CRIL LTD: Micro Raman for biomedical Footfalls and heartbeats LTD: Patches for wound healing ASSOCIATED ACADEMIC PARTNERS Nagoya Institute of Technology: Acoustic sensing and CFD Harvard University: Hyper-resolution Microscopy Laboratory for Interdisciplinary Physics - Grenoble: Microfluidic devices seeded with endothelial cells ASAcampus JL, ASA Res Div-DSBSC, University of Florence: Scientific Coordinator Life and Medical Science
Impact The Project commenced in January 2020. No outputs yet.
Start Year 2020
 
Description ESA CORA MAP Research Project: Wound Healing In Space- Key challenges towards Intelligent and Enabling Sensing platforms (WHISKIES) 
Organisation University of Padova
Country Italy 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution UoB has been performing numerical simulations for the optimization of the bandage characteristics (topology, porosity, wettability) with respect to the physical properties of the exudate and gravity conditions. From a fluid-dynamics point of view, the rate of exudate absorption into wound dressings is governed by the interaction of two immiscible fluids, with a clearly defined interface between them; Ambient air that pre-exists in the pore structure of the wound dressing at the moment of application and the liquid exudate that leaks out from the affected wound. Hence, the actual resulting absorption rate is interplay of the following fluid dynamics related mechanisms: • Two-phase flow Interface dynamics between gaseous and liquid fluid phases • Capillary action within micro-passages • Wettability For this purpose, an enhanced Volume Of Fluid (VOF) based model that accounts for spurious currents reduction, which has been previously implemented in OpenFOAM CFD Toolbox (an open source CFD software), and it was validated and applied by part of the investigators' team for the case of two-phase flow interfacial dynamics, in similar spatial and temporal scales, is going to be utilised. The idea is to create a simplified numerical analogue of the phenomenon, in order to see the adsorption rate of a droplet, as well as a group of droplets and a thin liquid film against different viscosities in order to investigate quantitatively the effect of the viscosity and the absorption rate at the phenomenon. This numerical investigation aims in the development of an optimum, open-source numerical simulation tool that will be able to quantify in detail the absorption rate of exudate for particular values of viscosity and wound dressing type (i.e. different values of porosity).
Collaborator Contribution Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB) - Microgravity Research Centre and Laboratoire de Médecine Expérimentale: Scientific Coordinator, Financial Administration of the project and Spherization of red blood cells The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge (UCAM-CGC): Graphene-based materials for electrodes in sensing- RFID sensing The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge (UCAM-DoC): Tensile sensitive fibers and Big data and Machine learning for biomedical Institute for microsystems and microelectronics - CNR (CNR-IMM): Optical Sensing for wound monitoring and cells cultures Technological University Dublin (TUDUBLIN): photo-sensitive materials for optical sensing Institute of microelectronics - IMB-CNM-CSIC (CSIC-IMB): Micro/nanofabrication for electronic sensors and tissue engineering platforms- Advanced characterization of functional surfaces and (nano)materials mechanics- Radiation hard and biocompatible integrated autonomous/flexible systems. Fraunhofer Institute (IBMT): Biomaterials for scaffolding Queen Mary University (QMU): Modelling and simulations of sensing-related processes University of Bremen (UNIBREM): Data communication and machine learning IRP (Institute for Pediatric Research) -University of Padova (UNIPD): Flow cytometry-single mass cytometry University of Brighton (UoB): Numerical modelling of biodevices and biomaterials NON-ACADEMIC PARTNERS Optosmart srl: Optical fibres sensors Optrace LTD: Holographic sensing Flexenable LTD: Flexible electronic Mjr Pharmjet GMBH: Functionalized particles Regemat3D SL: 4D-bioprinting GSNET SRL*: AR for wound IR detection CRIL LTD: Micro Raman for biomedical Footfalls and heartbeats LTD: Patches for wound healing ASSOCIATED ACADEMIC PARTNERS Nagoya Institute of Technology: Acoustic sensing and CFD Harvard University: Hyper-resolution Microscopy Laboratory for Interdisciplinary Physics - Grenoble: Microfluidic devices seeded with endothelial cells ASAcampus JL, ASA Res Div-DSBSC, University of Florence: Scientific Coordinator Life and Medical Science
Impact The Project commenced in January 2020. No outputs yet.
Start Year 2020
 
Description ESA Drop Tower µCOFfEe experiment 
Organisation Wroclaw University of Science and Technology
Country Poland 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The HyHP team contributed to the writing of the proposal, providing scientific objectives and justifying the necessity of the requested microgravity platform. Moreover, the experience of the team in the field of microfluidics for space applications contributed to reach the scientific environment and skills of involved personnel required by the European Space Agency.
Collaborator Contribution Our partner at Wroclaw University of Science and Technology contributed to the design and manufacturing of the test-rig. Our partner contributed also with their experience in drop tower microgravity platform.
Impact Successful proposal to the European Space Agency call for the use of the drop tower microgravity platform.
Start Year 2019
 
Description ESA MAP ENCOM-4 
Organisation Airbus Group
Country France 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We are working on two work packages on VOF simulations of condensation
Collaborator Contribution EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The ENCOM-4 (Enhanced CONdenser in Microgravity) research project is aimed at the experimental and numerical study of condensation and its applications in ground and space conditions. Condensation is the change of the physical state of aggregation of matter from a vapor phase into a liquid phase and it can be found in many natural and industrial processes (energy conversion, refrigeration, space thermal control, chemical and pharmaceutical industries). The proposed research, starting from the knowledge acquired during the previous ENCOM projects, moves a step forward in the understanding of fluid-dynamics and heat transfer mechanisms that take place during filmwise and dropwise condensation. The project can count on a scientific team involving eleven academic partners and seven industrial partners. The collaboration is fundamental to gain useful deep knowledge related to the mechanisms controlling condensation but, also, to orient the present research to possibly achieve some significant technological improvement. The project will also support two condensation experiments planned aboard the International Space Station (Condensation on Fins and In-tube Condensation). Condensers have different behaviour on earth and in microgravity conditions. By performing experiments without the interference of gravity it is possible to provide the basics required to formulate precise models and support the optimisation of system designs. Besides, the knowledge of the gravity effect can provide key information for the design and optimization of condensation devices also in ground environment. In particular, the study of surface wettability opens nowadays a wide range of possibilities for heat transfer enhancement in the condenser. The project foresees the development of parabolic flight experiments and the definition of two experiments for the ISS. The application perspective of this project includes advancements in in-tube convective condensation, dropwise condensation, water harvesting from humid air, air dehumidification, condensation in heat pipes, development of CFD tools for phase change heat transfer. The present consortium is based on three cornerstones: • inclusion of different groups working already in these research topics which have effectively demonstrated a number of fruitful collaborations; • integration of sophisticated complementary equipment and facilities for elaborated experiments with powerful theoretical techniques. • close collaboration between strong research groups and industrial laboratories, which will lead to achieve practical solutions to real problems.
Impact Not yet
Start Year 2019
 
Description ESA MAP ENCOM-4 
Organisation Aix-Marseille University
Country France 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We are working on two work packages on VOF simulations of condensation
Collaborator Contribution EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The ENCOM-4 (Enhanced CONdenser in Microgravity) research project is aimed at the experimental and numerical study of condensation and its applications in ground and space conditions. Condensation is the change of the physical state of aggregation of matter from a vapor phase into a liquid phase and it can be found in many natural and industrial processes (energy conversion, refrigeration, space thermal control, chemical and pharmaceutical industries). The proposed research, starting from the knowledge acquired during the previous ENCOM projects, moves a step forward in the understanding of fluid-dynamics and heat transfer mechanisms that take place during filmwise and dropwise condensation. The project can count on a scientific team involving eleven academic partners and seven industrial partners. The collaboration is fundamental to gain useful deep knowledge related to the mechanisms controlling condensation but, also, to orient the present research to possibly achieve some significant technological improvement. The project will also support two condensation experiments planned aboard the International Space Station (Condensation on Fins and In-tube Condensation). Condensers have different behaviour on earth and in microgravity conditions. By performing experiments without the interference of gravity it is possible to provide the basics required to formulate precise models and support the optimisation of system designs. Besides, the knowledge of the gravity effect can provide key information for the design and optimization of condensation devices also in ground environment. In particular, the study of surface wettability opens nowadays a wide range of possibilities for heat transfer enhancement in the condenser. The project foresees the development of parabolic flight experiments and the definition of two experiments for the ISS. The application perspective of this project includes advancements in in-tube convective condensation, dropwise condensation, water harvesting from humid air, air dehumidification, condensation in heat pipes, development of CFD tools for phase change heat transfer. The present consortium is based on three cornerstones: • inclusion of different groups working already in these research topics which have effectively demonstrated a number of fruitful collaborations; • integration of sophisticated complementary equipment and facilities for elaborated experiments with powerful theoretical techniques. • close collaboration between strong research groups and industrial laboratories, which will lead to achieve practical solutions to real problems.
Impact Not yet
Start Year 2019
 
Description ESA MAP ENCOM-4 
Organisation Aristotle University of Thessaloniki
Country Greece 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We are working on two work packages on VOF simulations of condensation
Collaborator Contribution EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The ENCOM-4 (Enhanced CONdenser in Microgravity) research project is aimed at the experimental and numerical study of condensation and its applications in ground and space conditions. Condensation is the change of the physical state of aggregation of matter from a vapor phase into a liquid phase and it can be found in many natural and industrial processes (energy conversion, refrigeration, space thermal control, chemical and pharmaceutical industries). The proposed research, starting from the knowledge acquired during the previous ENCOM projects, moves a step forward in the understanding of fluid-dynamics and heat transfer mechanisms that take place during filmwise and dropwise condensation. The project can count on a scientific team involving eleven academic partners and seven industrial partners. The collaboration is fundamental to gain useful deep knowledge related to the mechanisms controlling condensation but, also, to orient the present research to possibly achieve some significant technological improvement. The project will also support two condensation experiments planned aboard the International Space Station (Condensation on Fins and In-tube Condensation). Condensers have different behaviour on earth and in microgravity conditions. By performing experiments without the interference of gravity it is possible to provide the basics required to formulate precise models and support the optimisation of system designs. Besides, the knowledge of the gravity effect can provide key information for the design and optimization of condensation devices also in ground environment. In particular, the study of surface wettability opens nowadays a wide range of possibilities for heat transfer enhancement in the condenser. The project foresees the development of parabolic flight experiments and the definition of two experiments for the ISS. The application perspective of this project includes advancements in in-tube convective condensation, dropwise condensation, water harvesting from humid air, air dehumidification, condensation in heat pipes, development of CFD tools for phase change heat transfer. The present consortium is based on three cornerstones: • inclusion of different groups working already in these research topics which have effectively demonstrated a number of fruitful collaborations; • integration of sophisticated complementary equipment and facilities for elaborated experiments with powerful theoretical techniques. • close collaboration between strong research groups and industrial laboratories, which will lead to achieve practical solutions to real problems.
Impact Not yet
Start Year 2019
 
Description ESA MAP ENCOM-4 
Organisation EPSILON, France
Country France 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution We are working on two work packages on VOF simulations of condensation
Collaborator Contribution EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The ENCOM-4 (Enhanced CONdenser in Microgravity) research project is aimed at the experimental and numerical study of condensation and its applications in ground and space conditions. Condensation is the change of the physical state of aggregation of matter from a vapor phase into a liquid phase and it can be found in many natural and industrial processes (energy conversion, refrigeration, space thermal control, chemical and pharmaceutical industries). The proposed research, starting from the knowledge acquired during the previous ENCOM projects, moves a step forward in the understanding of fluid-dynamics and heat transfer mechanisms that take place during filmwise and dropwise condensation. The project can count on a scientific team involving eleven academic partners and seven industrial partners. The collaboration is fundamental to gain useful deep knowledge related to the mechanisms controlling condensation but, also, to orient the present research to possibly achieve some significant technological improvement. The project will also support two condensation experiments planned aboard the International Space Station (Condensation on Fins and In-tube Condensation). Condensers have different behaviour on earth and in microgravity conditions. By performing experiments without the interference of gravity it is possible to provide the basics required to formulate precise models and support the optimisation of system designs. Besides, the knowledge of the gravity effect can provide key information for the design and optimization of condensation devices also in ground environment. In particular, the study of surface wettability opens nowadays a wide range of possibilities for heat transfer enhancement in the condenser. The project foresees the development of parabolic flight experiments and the definition of two experiments for the ISS. The application perspective of this project includes advancements in in-tube convective condensation, dropwise condensation, water harvesting from humid air, air dehumidification, condensation in heat pipes, development of CFD tools for phase change heat transfer. The present consortium is based on three cornerstones: • inclusion of different groups working already in these research topics which have effectively demonstrated a number of fruitful collaborations; • integration of sophisticated complementary equipment and facilities for elaborated experiments with powerful theoretical techniques. • close collaboration between strong research groups and industrial laboratories, which will lead to achieve practical solutions to real problems.
Impact Not yet
Start Year 2019
 
Description ESA MAP ENCOM-4 
Organisation EURAPO
Country Italy 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution We are working on two work packages on VOF simulations of condensation
Collaborator Contribution EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The ENCOM-4 (Enhanced CONdenser in Microgravity) research project is aimed at the experimental and numerical study of condensation and its applications in ground and space conditions. Condensation is the change of the physical state of aggregation of matter from a vapor phase into a liquid phase and it can be found in many natural and industrial processes (energy conversion, refrigeration, space thermal control, chemical and pharmaceutical industries). The proposed research, starting from the knowledge acquired during the previous ENCOM projects, moves a step forward in the understanding of fluid-dynamics and heat transfer mechanisms that take place during filmwise and dropwise condensation. The project can count on a scientific team involving eleven academic partners and seven industrial partners. The collaboration is fundamental to gain useful deep knowledge related to the mechanisms controlling condensation but, also, to orient the present research to possibly achieve some significant technological improvement. The project will also support two condensation experiments planned aboard the International Space Station (Condensation on Fins and In-tube Condensation). Condensers have different behaviour on earth and in microgravity conditions. By performing experiments without the interference of gravity it is possible to provide the basics required to formulate precise models and support the optimisation of system designs. Besides, the knowledge of the gravity effect can provide key information for the design and optimization of condensation devices also in ground environment. In particular, the study of surface wettability opens nowadays a wide range of possibilities for heat transfer enhancement in the condenser. The project foresees the development of parabolic flight experiments and the definition of two experiments for the ISS. The application perspective of this project includes advancements in in-tube convective condensation, dropwise condensation, water harvesting from humid air, air dehumidification, condensation in heat pipes, development of CFD tools for phase change heat transfer. The present consortium is based on three cornerstones: • inclusion of different groups working already in these research topics which have effectively demonstrated a number of fruitful collaborations; • integration of sophisticated complementary equipment and facilities for elaborated experiments with powerful theoretical techniques. • close collaboration between strong research groups and industrial laboratories, which will lead to achieve practical solutions to real problems.
Impact Not yet
Start Year 2019
 
Description ESA MAP ENCOM-4 
Organisation Hephaestus
Country Greece 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution We are working on two work packages on VOF simulations of condensation
Collaborator Contribution EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The ENCOM-4 (Enhanced CONdenser in Microgravity) research project is aimed at the experimental and numerical study of condensation and its applications in ground and space conditions. Condensation is the change of the physical state of aggregation of matter from a vapor phase into a liquid phase and it can be found in many natural and industrial processes (energy conversion, refrigeration, space thermal control, chemical and pharmaceutical industries). The proposed research, starting from the knowledge acquired during the previous ENCOM projects, moves a step forward in the understanding of fluid-dynamics and heat transfer mechanisms that take place during filmwise and dropwise condensation. The project can count on a scientific team involving eleven academic partners and seven industrial partners. The collaboration is fundamental to gain useful deep knowledge related to the mechanisms controlling condensation but, also, to orient the present research to possibly achieve some significant technological improvement. The project will also support two condensation experiments planned aboard the International Space Station (Condensation on Fins and In-tube Condensation). Condensers have different behaviour on earth and in microgravity conditions. By performing experiments without the interference of gravity it is possible to provide the basics required to formulate precise models and support the optimisation of system designs. Besides, the knowledge of the gravity effect can provide key information for the design and optimization of condensation devices also in ground environment. In particular, the study of surface wettability opens nowadays a wide range of possibilities for heat transfer enhancement in the condenser. The project foresees the development of parabolic flight experiments and the definition of two experiments for the ISS. The application perspective of this project includes advancements in in-tube convective condensation, dropwise condensation, water harvesting from humid air, air dehumidification, condensation in heat pipes, development of CFD tools for phase change heat transfer. The present consortium is based on three cornerstones: • inclusion of different groups working already in these research topics which have effectively demonstrated a number of fruitful collaborations; • integration of sophisticated complementary equipment and facilities for elaborated experiments with powerful theoretical techniques. • close collaboration between strong research groups and industrial laboratories, which will lead to achieve practical solutions to real problems.
Impact Not yet
Start Year 2019
 
Description ESA MAP ENCOM-4 
Organisation Manchester University
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We are working on two work packages on VOF simulations of condensation
Collaborator Contribution EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The ENCOM-4 (Enhanced CONdenser in Microgravity) research project is aimed at the experimental and numerical study of condensation and its applications in ground and space conditions. Condensation is the change of the physical state of aggregation of matter from a vapor phase into a liquid phase and it can be found in many natural and industrial processes (energy conversion, refrigeration, space thermal control, chemical and pharmaceutical industries). The proposed research, starting from the knowledge acquired during the previous ENCOM projects, moves a step forward in the understanding of fluid-dynamics and heat transfer mechanisms that take place during filmwise and dropwise condensation. The project can count on a scientific team involving eleven academic partners and seven industrial partners. The collaboration is fundamental to gain useful deep knowledge related to the mechanisms controlling condensation but, also, to orient the present research to possibly achieve some significant technological improvement. The project will also support two condensation experiments planned aboard the International Space Station (Condensation on Fins and In-tube Condensation). Condensers have different behaviour on earth and in microgravity conditions. By performing experiments without the interference of gravity it is possible to provide the basics required to formulate precise models and support the optimisation of system designs. Besides, the knowledge of the gravity effect can provide key information for the design and optimization of condensation devices also in ground environment. In particular, the study of surface wettability opens nowadays a wide range of possibilities for heat transfer enhancement in the condenser. The project foresees the development of parabolic flight experiments and the definition of two experiments for the ISS. The application perspective of this project includes advancements in in-tube convective condensation, dropwise condensation, water harvesting from humid air, air dehumidification, condensation in heat pipes, development of CFD tools for phase change heat transfer. The present consortium is based on three cornerstones: • inclusion of different groups working already in these research topics which have effectively demonstrated a number of fruitful collaborations; • integration of sophisticated complementary equipment and facilities for elaborated experiments with powerful theoretical techniques. • close collaboration between strong research groups and industrial laboratories, which will lead to achieve practical solutions to real problems.
Impact Not yet
Start Year 2019
 
Description ESA MAP ENCOM-4 
Organisation OPTEC, Belgium
Country Belgium 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution We are working on two work packages on VOF simulations of condensation
Collaborator Contribution EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The ENCOM-4 (Enhanced CONdenser in Microgravity) research project is aimed at the experimental and numerical study of condensation and its applications in ground and space conditions. Condensation is the change of the physical state of aggregation of matter from a vapor phase into a liquid phase and it can be found in many natural and industrial processes (energy conversion, refrigeration, space thermal control, chemical and pharmaceutical industries). The proposed research, starting from the knowledge acquired during the previous ENCOM projects, moves a step forward in the understanding of fluid-dynamics and heat transfer mechanisms that take place during filmwise and dropwise condensation. The project can count on a scientific team involving eleven academic partners and seven industrial partners. The collaboration is fundamental to gain useful deep knowledge related to the mechanisms controlling condensation but, also, to orient the present research to possibly achieve some significant technological improvement. The project will also support two condensation experiments planned aboard the International Space Station (Condensation on Fins and In-tube Condensation). Condensers have different behaviour on earth and in microgravity conditions. By performing experiments without the interference of gravity it is possible to provide the basics required to formulate precise models and support the optimisation of system designs. Besides, the knowledge of the gravity effect can provide key information for the design and optimization of condensation devices also in ground environment. In particular, the study of surface wettability opens nowadays a wide range of possibilities for heat transfer enhancement in the condenser. The project foresees the development of parabolic flight experiments and the definition of two experiments for the ISS. The application perspective of this project includes advancements in in-tube convective condensation, dropwise condensation, water harvesting from humid air, air dehumidification, condensation in heat pipes, development of CFD tools for phase change heat transfer. The present consortium is based on three cornerstones: • inclusion of different groups working already in these research topics which have effectively demonstrated a number of fruitful collaborations; • integration of sophisticated complementary equipment and facilities for elaborated experiments with powerful theoretical techniques. • close collaboration between strong research groups and industrial laboratories, which will lead to achieve practical solutions to real problems.
Impact Not yet
Start Year 2019
 
Description ESA MAP ENCOM-4 
Organisation Paul Sabatier University (University of Toulouse III)
Country France 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We are working on two work packages on VOF simulations of condensation
Collaborator Contribution EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The ENCOM-4 (Enhanced CONdenser in Microgravity) research project is aimed at the experimental and numerical study of condensation and its applications in ground and space conditions. Condensation is the change of the physical state of aggregation of matter from a vapor phase into a liquid phase and it can be found in many natural and industrial processes (energy conversion, refrigeration, space thermal control, chemical and pharmaceutical industries). The proposed research, starting from the knowledge acquired during the previous ENCOM projects, moves a step forward in the understanding of fluid-dynamics and heat transfer mechanisms that take place during filmwise and dropwise condensation. The project can count on a scientific team involving eleven academic partners and seven industrial partners. The collaboration is fundamental to gain useful deep knowledge related to the mechanisms controlling condensation but, also, to orient the present research to possibly achieve some significant technological improvement. The project will also support two condensation experiments planned aboard the International Space Station (Condensation on Fins and In-tube Condensation). Condensers have different behaviour on earth and in microgravity conditions. By performing experiments without the interference of gravity it is possible to provide the basics required to formulate precise models and support the optimisation of system designs. Besides, the knowledge of the gravity effect can provide key information for the design and optimization of condensation devices also in ground environment. In particular, the study of surface wettability opens nowadays a wide range of possibilities for heat transfer enhancement in the condenser. The project foresees the development of parabolic flight experiments and the definition of two experiments for the ISS. The application perspective of this project includes advancements in in-tube convective condensation, dropwise condensation, water harvesting from humid air, air dehumidification, condensation in heat pipes, development of CFD tools for phase change heat transfer. The present consortium is based on three cornerstones: • inclusion of different groups working already in these research topics which have effectively demonstrated a number of fruitful collaborations; • integration of sophisticated complementary equipment and facilities for elaborated experiments with powerful theoretical techniques. • close collaboration between strong research groups and industrial laboratories, which will lead to achieve practical solutions to real problems.
Impact Not yet
Start Year 2019
 
Description ESA MAP ENCOM-4 
Organisation Solar Tomorrow Inc.
Country Canada 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution We are working on two work packages on VOF simulations of condensation
Collaborator Contribution EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The ENCOM-4 (Enhanced CONdenser in Microgravity) research project is aimed at the experimental and numerical study of condensation and its applications in ground and space conditions. Condensation is the change of the physical state of aggregation of matter from a vapor phase into a liquid phase and it can be found in many natural and industrial processes (energy conversion, refrigeration, space thermal control, chemical and pharmaceutical industries). The proposed research, starting from the knowledge acquired during the previous ENCOM projects, moves a step forward in the understanding of fluid-dynamics and heat transfer mechanisms that take place during filmwise and dropwise condensation. The project can count on a scientific team involving eleven academic partners and seven industrial partners. The collaboration is fundamental to gain useful deep knowledge related to the mechanisms controlling condensation but, also, to orient the present research to possibly achieve some significant technological improvement. The project will also support two condensation experiments planned aboard the International Space Station (Condensation on Fins and In-tube Condensation). Condensers have different behaviour on earth and in microgravity conditions. By performing experiments without the interference of gravity it is possible to provide the basics required to formulate precise models and support the optimisation of system designs. Besides, the knowledge of the gravity effect can provide key information for the design and optimization of condensation devices also in ground environment. In particular, the study of surface wettability opens nowadays a wide range of possibilities for heat transfer enhancement in the condenser. The project foresees the development of parabolic flight experiments and the definition of two experiments for the ISS. The application perspective of this project includes advancements in in-tube convective condensation, dropwise condensation, water harvesting from humid air, air dehumidification, condensation in heat pipes, development of CFD tools for phase change heat transfer. The present consortium is based on three cornerstones: • inclusion of different groups working already in these research topics which have effectively demonstrated a number of fruitful collaborations; • integration of sophisticated complementary equipment and facilities for elaborated experiments with powerful theoretical techniques. • close collaboration between strong research groups and industrial laboratories, which will lead to achieve practical solutions to real problems.
Impact Not yet
Start Year 2019
 
Description ESA MAP ENCOM-4 
Organisation University Libre Bruxelles (Université Libre de Bruxelles ULB)
Country Belgium 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We are working on two work packages on VOF simulations of condensation
Collaborator Contribution EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The ENCOM-4 (Enhanced CONdenser in Microgravity) research project is aimed at the experimental and numerical study of condensation and its applications in ground and space conditions. Condensation is the change of the physical state of aggregation of matter from a vapor phase into a liquid phase and it can be found in many natural and industrial processes (energy conversion, refrigeration, space thermal control, chemical and pharmaceutical industries). The proposed research, starting from the knowledge acquired during the previous ENCOM projects, moves a step forward in the understanding of fluid-dynamics and heat transfer mechanisms that take place during filmwise and dropwise condensation. The project can count on a scientific team involving eleven academic partners and seven industrial partners. The collaboration is fundamental to gain useful deep knowledge related to the mechanisms controlling condensation but, also, to orient the present research to possibly achieve some significant technological improvement. The project will also support two condensation experiments planned aboard the International Space Station (Condensation on Fins and In-tube Condensation). Condensers have different behaviour on earth and in microgravity conditions. By performing experiments without the interference of gravity it is possible to provide the basics required to formulate precise models and support the optimisation of system designs. Besides, the knowledge of the gravity effect can provide key information for the design and optimization of condensation devices also in ground environment. In particular, the study of surface wettability opens nowadays a wide range of possibilities for heat transfer enhancement in the condenser. The project foresees the development of parabolic flight experiments and the definition of two experiments for the ISS. The application perspective of this project includes advancements in in-tube convective condensation, dropwise condensation, water harvesting from humid air, air dehumidification, condensation in heat pipes, development of CFD tools for phase change heat transfer. The present consortium is based on three cornerstones: • inclusion of different groups working already in these research topics which have effectively demonstrated a number of fruitful collaborations; • integration of sophisticated complementary equipment and facilities for elaborated experiments with powerful theoretical techniques. • close collaboration between strong research groups and industrial laboratories, which will lead to achieve practical solutions to real problems.
Impact Not yet
Start Year 2019
 
Description ESA MAP ENCOM-4 
Organisation University of Mons
Department Laboratory of Surface and Interfacial Physics
Country Belgium 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We are working on two work packages on VOF simulations of condensation
Collaborator Contribution EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The ENCOM-4 (Enhanced CONdenser in Microgravity) research project is aimed at the experimental and numerical study of condensation and its applications in ground and space conditions. Condensation is the change of the physical state of aggregation of matter from a vapor phase into a liquid phase and it can be found in many natural and industrial processes (energy conversion, refrigeration, space thermal control, chemical and pharmaceutical industries). The proposed research, starting from the knowledge acquired during the previous ENCOM projects, moves a step forward in the understanding of fluid-dynamics and heat transfer mechanisms that take place during filmwise and dropwise condensation. The project can count on a scientific team involving eleven academic partners and seven industrial partners. The collaboration is fundamental to gain useful deep knowledge related to the mechanisms controlling condensation but, also, to orient the present research to possibly achieve some significant technological improvement. The project will also support two condensation experiments planned aboard the International Space Station (Condensation on Fins and In-tube Condensation). Condensers have different behaviour on earth and in microgravity conditions. By performing experiments without the interference of gravity it is possible to provide the basics required to formulate precise models and support the optimisation of system designs. Besides, the knowledge of the gravity effect can provide key information for the design and optimization of condensation devices also in ground environment. In particular, the study of surface wettability opens nowadays a wide range of possibilities for heat transfer enhancement in the condenser. The project foresees the development of parabolic flight experiments and the definition of two experiments for the ISS. The application perspective of this project includes advancements in in-tube convective condensation, dropwise condensation, water harvesting from humid air, air dehumidification, condensation in heat pipes, development of CFD tools for phase change heat transfer. The present consortium is based on three cornerstones: • inclusion of different groups working already in these research topics which have effectively demonstrated a number of fruitful collaborations; • integration of sophisticated complementary equipment and facilities for elaborated experiments with powerful theoretical techniques. • close collaboration between strong research groups and industrial laboratories, which will lead to achieve practical solutions to real problems.
Impact Not yet
Start Year 2019
 
Description ESA MAP ENCOM-4 
Organisation University of Padova
Department Department of Industrial Engineering
Country Italy 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We are working on two work packages on VOF simulations of condensation
Collaborator Contribution EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The ENCOM-4 (Enhanced CONdenser in Microgravity) research project is aimed at the experimental and numerical study of condensation and its applications in ground and space conditions. Condensation is the change of the physical state of aggregation of matter from a vapor phase into a liquid phase and it can be found in many natural and industrial processes (energy conversion, refrigeration, space thermal control, chemical and pharmaceutical industries). The proposed research, starting from the knowledge acquired during the previous ENCOM projects, moves a step forward in the understanding of fluid-dynamics and heat transfer mechanisms that take place during filmwise and dropwise condensation. The project can count on a scientific team involving eleven academic partners and seven industrial partners. The collaboration is fundamental to gain useful deep knowledge related to the mechanisms controlling condensation but, also, to orient the present research to possibly achieve some significant technological improvement. The project will also support two condensation experiments planned aboard the International Space Station (Condensation on Fins and In-tube Condensation). Condensers have different behaviour on earth and in microgravity conditions. By performing experiments without the interference of gravity it is possible to provide the basics required to formulate precise models and support the optimisation of system designs. Besides, the knowledge of the gravity effect can provide key information for the design and optimization of condensation devices also in ground environment. In particular, the study of surface wettability opens nowadays a wide range of possibilities for heat transfer enhancement in the condenser. The project foresees the development of parabolic flight experiments and the definition of two experiments for the ISS. The application perspective of this project includes advancements in in-tube convective condensation, dropwise condensation, water harvesting from humid air, air dehumidification, condensation in heat pipes, development of CFD tools for phase change heat transfer. The present consortium is based on three cornerstones: • inclusion of different groups working already in these research topics which have effectively demonstrated a number of fruitful collaborations; • integration of sophisticated complementary equipment and facilities for elaborated experiments with powerful theoretical techniques. • close collaboration between strong research groups and industrial laboratories, which will lead to achieve practical solutions to real problems.
Impact Not yet
Start Year 2019
 
Description ESA MAP ENCOM-4 
Organisation University of Toronto
Department Department of Physics
Country Canada 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We are working on two work packages on VOF simulations of condensation
Collaborator Contribution EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The ENCOM-4 (Enhanced CONdenser in Microgravity) research project is aimed at the experimental and numerical study of condensation and its applications in ground and space conditions. Condensation is the change of the physical state of aggregation of matter from a vapor phase into a liquid phase and it can be found in many natural and industrial processes (energy conversion, refrigeration, space thermal control, chemical and pharmaceutical industries). The proposed research, starting from the knowledge acquired during the previous ENCOM projects, moves a step forward in the understanding of fluid-dynamics and heat transfer mechanisms that take place during filmwise and dropwise condensation. The project can count on a scientific team involving eleven academic partners and seven industrial partners. The collaboration is fundamental to gain useful deep knowledge related to the mechanisms controlling condensation but, also, to orient the present research to possibly achieve some significant technological improvement. The project will also support two condensation experiments planned aboard the International Space Station (Condensation on Fins and In-tube Condensation). Condensers have different behaviour on earth and in microgravity conditions. By performing experiments without the interference of gravity it is possible to provide the basics required to formulate precise models and support the optimisation of system designs. Besides, the knowledge of the gravity effect can provide key information for the design and optimization of condensation devices also in ground environment. In particular, the study of surface wettability opens nowadays a wide range of possibilities for heat transfer enhancement in the condenser. The project foresees the development of parabolic flight experiments and the definition of two experiments for the ISS. The application perspective of this project includes advancements in in-tube convective condensation, dropwise condensation, water harvesting from humid air, air dehumidification, condensation in heat pipes, development of CFD tools for phase change heat transfer. The present consortium is based on three cornerstones: • inclusion of different groups working already in these research topics which have effectively demonstrated a number of fruitful collaborations; • integration of sophisticated complementary equipment and facilities for elaborated experiments with powerful theoretical techniques. • close collaboration between strong research groups and industrial laboratories, which will lead to achieve practical solutions to real problems.
Impact Not yet
Start Year 2019
 
Description ESA MAP ENCOM-4 
Organisation York University Toronto
Country Canada 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We are working on two work packages on VOF simulations of condensation
Collaborator Contribution EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The ENCOM-4 (Enhanced CONdenser in Microgravity) research project is aimed at the experimental and numerical study of condensation and its applications in ground and space conditions. Condensation is the change of the physical state of aggregation of matter from a vapor phase into a liquid phase and it can be found in many natural and industrial processes (energy conversion, refrigeration, space thermal control, chemical and pharmaceutical industries). The proposed research, starting from the knowledge acquired during the previous ENCOM projects, moves a step forward in the understanding of fluid-dynamics and heat transfer mechanisms that take place during filmwise and dropwise condensation. The project can count on a scientific team involving eleven academic partners and seven industrial partners. The collaboration is fundamental to gain useful deep knowledge related to the mechanisms controlling condensation but, also, to orient the present research to possibly achieve some significant technological improvement. The project will also support two condensation experiments planned aboard the International Space Station (Condensation on Fins and In-tube Condensation). Condensers have different behaviour on earth and in microgravity conditions. By performing experiments without the interference of gravity it is possible to provide the basics required to formulate precise models and support the optimisation of system designs. Besides, the knowledge of the gravity effect can provide key information for the design and optimization of condensation devices also in ground environment. In particular, the study of surface wettability opens nowadays a wide range of possibilities for heat transfer enhancement in the condenser. The project foresees the development of parabolic flight experiments and the definition of two experiments for the ISS. The application perspective of this project includes advancements in in-tube convective condensation, dropwise condensation, water harvesting from humid air, air dehumidification, condensation in heat pipes, development of CFD tools for phase change heat transfer. The present consortium is based on three cornerstones: • inclusion of different groups working already in these research topics which have effectively demonstrated a number of fruitful collaborations; • integration of sophisticated complementary equipment and facilities for elaborated experiments with powerful theoretical techniques. • close collaboration between strong research groups and industrial laboratories, which will lead to achieve practical solutions to real problems.
Impact Not yet
Start Year 2019
 
Description ESA MAP TOPDESS 
Organisation AEROSPAZIO Tecnologie s.r.l.
Country Italy 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution We are leading the project. We have prepared the proposal together with the partners, we have submitted it.
Collaborator Contribution EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Deployable structures are capable of large configuration changes in an autonomous way. Their configuration can change from a packed, compact state to a deployed, sizable state when their service configuration is required. Deployable structures have many applications both on Earth and in space, where they have been implemented since the former Soviet Union first satellite as a practical way to obtain large, lightweight structures for remote locations in space. The design of a deployable space structures is often a trade-off between volume and weight of the packed structures and the complexity of the operations required when in the deployed state. Deployable systems can be used for several primary functions: solar radiation collection (solar arrays), signal transmission (booms, antennas), heat dissipation (radiators, reflectors) and propulsion (solar wings). Designing a deployable structure can be a challenge because it is strongly affected by thermal issues, and particular care from the thermal point of view has to be taken to guarantee a correct deploying/folding process, and thermal management as an auxiliary function. Consequently, the thermal management assumes the role of key technology, both to serve a specific use of the structures in terms of heat control and to serve the thermalisation of constructions, in order to decrease the issues linked to thermal expansion and joint failures. From this perspective, future technologies for thermal control system must be efficient, compact, lightweight, reliable and durable. The integration of active technologies like pumps, cryocoolers and compressors, although common options in the space field, is very complex and involves bulky components; moreover, they require source of energy throughout their operational life and present many sources of potential fault. Passive systems, such as heat pipes, can be of great interest, even if the presence of a wicked wall (sintered wick or a grooved capillary) can be a limitation in terms of flexibility and durability. Therefore, wickless systems seem the most suitable to be employed in thermal management of deployable structures. Today, there is a strong drive worldwide toward the development of Pulsating Heat Pipes (PHP) and their use for smartphones, high power electronics and cooling boards. The evidences of this interest also for space is signalled by experiments in space, from NASA and Air Force Research Laboratory (STP-H4-ATT) to JAXA (SDS-4). Starting from the previous MAP project focused on "Innovative Wickless Heat Pipe Systems for Ground and Space Applications" (INWIP), TOPDESS aims at increasing the knowledge of the basic physical phenomena in PHP and pursuing the development in the applicability of wickless PHP by making optimal use of ground-based and space research facilities, such as Parabolic Flights and the Large Diameter Centrifuge. The main idea is to explore flexible thermal solutions, which will reach TLR 3 at the end of the project. The project is developed in four areas of interest: 1) Flexible Thermal Devices, 2) Materials and Manufacturing, 3) Measurement Techniques, 4) Modelling Tools. Moreover, an improved experimental characterization of large diameter PHPs, the so-called Space PHPs, will contribute to the development of the PHP experiment on the Heat Transfer Host of the ISS. The physical phenomena taking place inside foldable or flexible PHP add a further complexity to the research developed in the previous MAP INWIP. This proposal will address questions related to the characterization of thermo-hydraulics phenomena affecting the performance of PHP with different fluids and at varying gravity levels, the effect of joints made of advanced materials (such as shape memory materials), the technological design of a polymeric heat pipe coated by a metal layer. Advanced measurement techniques will be developed, relying on cutting-edge equipment available within the consortium, such as Medium Wave High-Speed IR Camera, for the measure of the liquid film thickness and the temperature, or the use of the Inverse Heat Conduction Problem technique to estimate the internal heat transfer coefficients. TOPDESS will constitute the state-of-the-art in terms of modelling and simulations of PHP using both 1D modelling and DNS VOF simulations. In particular, CFD simulations will have an impact in terms of advanced modelling of evaporation, boiling and condensation, while the 1D modelling will lead to a robust tool for PHP design. A feasibility study of the design of flexible space radiators will close the project, posing the basis to a further development in direction of a real application. TOPDESS presents a word-level quality consortium in the field of two-phase flows and heat pipe devices, with 9 partners, 10 companies and 2 associate academic institutions. We are expecting more than 30 Journal papers, at least 5 parabolic flight campaigns, 2 LDC campaigns, an important presence in international conferences, 6 consortium meetings, plus a number of technical projects with the industrial partners. Starting from blue-sky research, TOPDESS will put the basis for a great impact in terms of future flexible thermal solutions for ground and space applications.
Impact The project just started.
Start Year 2019
 
Description ESA MAP TOPDESS 
Organisation Airbus Group
Country France 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We are leading the project. We have prepared the proposal together with the partners, we have submitted it.
Collaborator Contribution EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Deployable structures are capable of large configuration changes in an autonomous way. Their configuration can change from a packed, compact state to a deployed, sizable state when their service configuration is required. Deployable structures have many applications both on Earth and in space, where they have been implemented since the former Soviet Union first satellite as a practical way to obtain large, lightweight structures for remote locations in space. The design of a deployable space structures is often a trade-off between volume and weight of the packed structures and the complexity of the operations required when in the deployed state. Deployable systems can be used for several primary functions: solar radiation collection (solar arrays), signal transmission (booms, antennas), heat dissipation (radiators, reflectors) and propulsion (solar wings). Designing a deployable structure can be a challenge because it is strongly affected by thermal issues, and particular care from the thermal point of view has to be taken to guarantee a correct deploying/folding process, and thermal management as an auxiliary function. Consequently, the thermal management assumes the role of key technology, both to serve a specific use of the structures in terms of heat control and to serve the thermalisation of constructions, in order to decrease the issues linked to thermal expansion and joint failures. From this perspective, future technologies for thermal control system must be efficient, compact, lightweight, reliable and durable. The integration of active technologies like pumps, cryocoolers and compressors, although common options in the space field, is very complex and involves bulky components; moreover, they require source of energy throughout their operational life and present many sources of potential fault. Passive systems, such as heat pipes, can be of great interest, even if the presence of a wicked wall (sintered wick or a grooved capillary) can be a limitation in terms of flexibility and durability. Therefore, wickless systems seem the most suitable to be employed in thermal management of deployable structures. Today, there is a strong drive worldwide toward the development of Pulsating Heat Pipes (PHP) and their use for smartphones, high power electronics and cooling boards. The evidences of this interest also for space is signalled by experiments in space, from NASA and Air Force Research Laboratory (STP-H4-ATT) to JAXA (SDS-4). Starting from the previous MAP project focused on "Innovative Wickless Heat Pipe Systems for Ground and Space Applications" (INWIP), TOPDESS aims at increasing the knowledge of the basic physical phenomena in PHP and pursuing the development in the applicability of wickless PHP by making optimal use of ground-based and space research facilities, such as Parabolic Flights and the Large Diameter Centrifuge. The main idea is to explore flexible thermal solutions, which will reach TLR 3 at the end of the project. The project is developed in four areas of interest: 1) Flexible Thermal Devices, 2) Materials and Manufacturing, 3) Measurement Techniques, 4) Modelling Tools. Moreover, an improved experimental characterization of large diameter PHPs, the so-called Space PHPs, will contribute to the development of the PHP experiment on the Heat Transfer Host of the ISS. The physical phenomena taking place inside foldable or flexible PHP add a further complexity to the research developed in the previous MAP INWIP. This proposal will address questions related to the characterization of thermo-hydraulics phenomena affecting the performance of PHP with different fluids and at varying gravity levels, the effect of joints made of advanced materials (such as shape memory materials), the technological design of a polymeric heat pipe coated by a metal layer. Advanced measurement techniques will be developed, relying on cutting-edge equipment available within the consortium, such as Medium Wave High-Speed IR Camera, for the measure of the liquid film thickness and the temperature, or the use of the Inverse Heat Conduction Problem technique to estimate the internal heat transfer coefficients. TOPDESS will constitute the state-of-the-art in terms of modelling and simulations of PHP using both 1D modelling and DNS VOF simulations. In particular, CFD simulations will have an impact in terms of advanced modelling of evaporation, boiling and condensation, while the 1D modelling will lead to a robust tool for PHP design. A feasibility study of the design of flexible space radiators will close the project, posing the basis to a further development in direction of a real application. TOPDESS presents a word-level quality consortium in the field of two-phase flows and heat pipe devices, with 9 partners, 10 companies and 2 associate academic institutions. We are expecting more than 30 Journal papers, at least 5 parabolic flight campaigns, 2 LDC campaigns, an important presence in international conferences, 6 consortium meetings, plus a number of technical projects with the industrial partners. Starting from blue-sky research, TOPDESS will put the basis for a great impact in terms of future flexible thermal solutions for ground and space applications.
Impact The project just started.
Start Year 2019
 
Description ESA MAP TOPDESS 
Organisation Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA)
Country France 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution We are leading the project. We have prepared the proposal together with the partners, we have submitted it.
Collaborator Contribution EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Deployable structures are capable of large configuration changes in an autonomous way. Their configuration can change from a packed, compact state to a deployed, sizable state when their service configuration is required. Deployable structures have many applications both on Earth and in space, where they have been implemented since the former Soviet Union first satellite as a practical way to obtain large, lightweight structures for remote locations in space. The design of a deployable space structures is often a trade-off between volume and weight of the packed structures and the complexity of the operations required when in the deployed state. Deployable systems can be used for several primary functions: solar radiation collection (solar arrays), signal transmission (booms, antennas), heat dissipation (radiators, reflectors) and propulsion (solar wings). Designing a deployable structure can be a challenge because it is strongly affected by thermal issues, and particular care from the thermal point of view has to be taken to guarantee a correct deploying/folding process, and thermal management as an auxiliary function. Consequently, the thermal management assumes the role of key technology, both to serve a specific use of the structures in terms of heat control and to serve the thermalisation of constructions, in order to decrease the issues linked to thermal expansion and joint failures. From this perspective, future technologies for thermal control system must be efficient, compact, lightweight, reliable and durable. The integration of active technologies like pumps, cryocoolers and compressors, although common options in the space field, is very complex and involves bulky components; moreover, they require source of energy throughout their operational life and present many sources of potential fault. Passive systems, such as heat pipes, can be of great interest, even if the presence of a wicked wall (sintered wick or a grooved capillary) can be a limitation in terms of flexibility and durability. Therefore, wickless systems seem the most suitable to be employed in thermal management of deployable structures. Today, there is a strong drive worldwide toward the development of Pulsating Heat Pipes (PHP) and their use for smartphones, high power electronics and cooling boards. The evidences of this interest also for space is signalled by experiments in space, from NASA and Air Force Research Laboratory (STP-H4-ATT) to JAXA (SDS-4). Starting from the previous MAP project focused on "Innovative Wickless Heat Pipe Systems for Ground and Space Applications" (INWIP), TOPDESS aims at increasing the knowledge of the basic physical phenomena in PHP and pursuing the development in the applicability of wickless PHP by making optimal use of ground-based and space research facilities, such as Parabolic Flights and the Large Diameter Centrifuge. The main idea is to explore flexible thermal solutions, which will reach TLR 3 at the end of the project. The project is developed in four areas of interest: 1) Flexible Thermal Devices, 2) Materials and Manufacturing, 3) Measurement Techniques, 4) Modelling Tools. Moreover, an improved experimental characterization of large diameter PHPs, the so-called Space PHPs, will contribute to the development of the PHP experiment on the Heat Transfer Host of the ISS. The physical phenomena taking place inside foldable or flexible PHP add a further complexity to the research developed in the previous MAP INWIP. This proposal will address questions related to the characterization of thermo-hydraulics phenomena affecting the performance of PHP with different fluids and at varying gravity levels, the effect of joints made of advanced materials (such as shape memory materials), the technological design of a polymeric heat pipe coated by a metal layer. Advanced measurement techniques will be developed, relying on cutting-edge equipment available within the consortium, such as Medium Wave High-Speed IR Camera, for the measure of the liquid film thickness and the temperature, or the use of the Inverse Heat Conduction Problem technique to estimate the internal heat transfer coefficients. TOPDESS will constitute the state-of-the-art in terms of modelling and simulations of PHP using both 1D modelling and DNS VOF simulations. In particular, CFD simulations will have an impact in terms of advanced modelling of evaporation, boiling and condensation, while the 1D modelling will lead to a robust tool for PHP design. A feasibility study of the design of flexible space radiators will close the project, posing the basis to a further development in direction of a real application. TOPDESS presents a word-level quality consortium in the field of two-phase flows and heat pipe devices, with 9 partners, 10 companies and 2 associate academic institutions. We are expecting more than 30 Journal papers, at least 5 parabolic flight campaigns, 2 LDC campaigns, an important presence in international conferences, 6 consortium meetings, plus a number of technical projects with the industrial partners. Starting from blue-sky research, TOPDESS will put the basis for a great impact in terms of future flexible thermal solutions for ground and space applications.
Impact The project just started.
Start Year 2019
 
Description ESA MAP TOPDESS 
Organisation Euro Heat Pipes
Country Belgium 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution We are leading the project. We have prepared the proposal together with the partners, we have submitted it.
Collaborator Contribution EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Deployable structures are capable of large configuration changes in an autonomous way. Their configuration can change from a packed, compact state to a deployed, sizable state when their service configuration is required. Deployable structures have many applications both on Earth and in space, where they have been implemented since the former Soviet Union first satellite as a practical way to obtain large, lightweight structures for remote locations in space. The design of a deployable space structures is often a trade-off between volume and weight of the packed structures and the complexity of the operations required when in the deployed state. Deployable systems can be used for several primary functions: solar radiation collection (solar arrays), signal transmission (booms, antennas), heat dissipation (radiators, reflectors) and propulsion (solar wings). Designing a deployable structure can be a challenge because it is strongly affected by thermal issues, and particular care from the thermal point of view has to be taken to guarantee a correct deploying/folding process, and thermal management as an auxiliary function. Consequently, the thermal management assumes the role of key technology, both to serve a specific use of the structures in terms of heat control and to serve the thermalisation of constructions, in order to decrease the issues linked to thermal expansion and joint failures. From this perspective, future technologies for thermal control system must be efficient, compact, lightweight, reliable and durable. The integration of active technologies like pumps, cryocoolers and compressors, although common options in the space field, is very complex and involves bulky components; moreover, they require source of energy throughout their operational life and present many sources of potential fault. Passive systems, such as heat pipes, can be of great interest, even if the presence of a wicked wall (sintered wick or a grooved capillary) can be a limitation in terms of flexibility and durability. Therefore, wickless systems seem the most suitable to be employed in thermal management of deployable structures. Today, there is a strong drive worldwide toward the development of Pulsating Heat Pipes (PHP) and their use for smartphones, high power electronics and cooling boards. The evidences of this interest also for space is signalled by experiments in space, from NASA and Air Force Research Laboratory (STP-H4-ATT) to JAXA (SDS-4). Starting from the previous MAP project focused on "Innovative Wickless Heat Pipe Systems for Ground and Space Applications" (INWIP), TOPDESS aims at increasing the knowledge of the basic physical phenomena in PHP and pursuing the development in the applicability of wickless PHP by making optimal use of ground-based and space research facilities, such as Parabolic Flights and the Large Diameter Centrifuge. The main idea is to explore flexible thermal solutions, which will reach TLR 3 at the end of the project. The project is developed in four areas of interest: 1) Flexible Thermal Devices, 2) Materials and Manufacturing, 3) Measurement Techniques, 4) Modelling Tools. Moreover, an improved experimental characterization of large diameter PHPs, the so-called Space PHPs, will contribute to the development of the PHP experiment on the Heat Transfer Host of the ISS. The physical phenomena taking place inside foldable or flexible PHP add a further complexity to the research developed in the previous MAP INWIP. This proposal will address questions related to the characterization of thermo-hydraulics phenomena affecting the performance of PHP with different fluids and at varying gravity levels, the effect of joints made of advanced materials (such as shape memory materials), the technological design of a polymeric heat pipe coated by a metal layer. Advanced measurement techniques will be developed, relying on cutting-edge equipment available within the consortium, such as Medium Wave High-Speed IR Camera, for the measure of the liquid film thickness and the temperature, or the use of the Inverse Heat Conduction Problem technique to estimate the internal heat transfer coefficients. TOPDESS will constitute the state-of-the-art in terms of modelling and simulations of PHP using both 1D modelling and DNS VOF simulations. In particular, CFD simulations will have an impact in terms of advanced modelling of evaporation, boiling and condensation, while the 1D modelling will lead to a robust tool for PHP design. A feasibility study of the design of flexible space radiators will close the project, posing the basis to a further development in direction of a real application. TOPDESS presents a word-level quality consortium in the field of two-phase flows and heat pipe devices, with 9 partners, 10 companies and 2 associate academic institutions. We are expecting more than 30 Journal papers, at least 5 parabolic flight campaigns, 2 LDC campaigns, an important presence in international conferences, 6 consortium meetings, plus a number of technical projects with the industrial partners. Starting from blue-sky research, TOPDESS will put the basis for a great impact in terms of future flexible thermal solutions for ground and space applications.
Impact The project just started.
Start Year 2019
 
Description ESA MAP TOPDESS 
Organisation Kayser Space
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution We are leading the project. We have prepared the proposal together with the partners, we have submitted it.
Collaborator Contribution EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Deployable structures are capable of large configuration changes in an autonomous way. Their configuration can change from a packed, compact state to a deployed, sizable state when their service configuration is required. Deployable structures have many applications both on Earth and in space, where they have been implemented since the former Soviet Union first satellite as a practical way to obtain large, lightweight structures for remote locations in space. The design of a deployable space structures is often a trade-off between volume and weight of the packed structures and the complexity of the operations required when in the deployed state. Deployable systems can be used for several primary functions: solar radiation collection (solar arrays), signal transmission (booms, antennas), heat dissipation (radiators, reflectors) and propulsion (solar wings). Designing a deployable structure can be a challenge because it is strongly affected by thermal issues, and particular care from the thermal point of view has to be taken to guarantee a correct deploying/folding process, and thermal management as an auxiliary function. Consequently, the thermal management assumes the role of key technology, both to serve a specific use of the structures in terms of heat control and to serve the thermalisation of constructions, in order to decrease the issues linked to thermal expansion and joint failures. From this perspective, future technologies for thermal control system must be efficient, compact, lightweight, reliable and durable. The integration of active technologies like pumps, cryocoolers and compressors, although common options in the space field, is very complex and involves bulky components; moreover, they require source of energy throughout their operational life and present many sources of potential fault. Passive systems, such as heat pipes, can be of great interest, even if the presence of a wicked wall (sintered wick or a grooved capillary) can be a limitation in terms of flexibility and durability. Therefore, wickless systems seem the most suitable to be employed in thermal management of deployable structures. Today, there is a strong drive worldwide toward the development of Pulsating Heat Pipes (PHP) and their use for smartphones, high power electronics and cooling boards. The evidences of this interest also for space is signalled by experiments in space, from NASA and Air Force Research Laboratory (STP-H4-ATT) to JAXA (SDS-4). Starting from the previous MAP project focused on "Innovative Wickless Heat Pipe Systems for Ground and Space Applications" (INWIP), TOPDESS aims at increasing the knowledge of the basic physical phenomena in PHP and pursuing the development in the applicability of wickless PHP by making optimal use of ground-based and space research facilities, such as Parabolic Flights and the Large Diameter Centrifuge. The main idea is to explore flexible thermal solutions, which will reach TLR 3 at the end of the project. The project is developed in four areas of interest: 1) Flexible Thermal Devices, 2) Materials and Manufacturing, 3) Measurement Techniques, 4) Modelling Tools. Moreover, an improved experimental characterization of large diameter PHPs, the so-called Space PHPs, will contribute to the development of the PHP experiment on the Heat Transfer Host of the ISS. The physical phenomena taking place inside foldable or flexible PHP add a further complexity to the research developed in the previous MAP INWIP. This proposal will address questions related to the characterization of thermo-hydraulics phenomena affecting the performance of PHP with different fluids and at varying gravity levels, the effect of joints made of advanced materials (such as shape memory materials), the technological design of a polymeric heat pipe coated by a metal layer. Advanced measurement techniques will be developed, relying on cutting-edge equipment available within the consortium, such as Medium Wave High-Speed IR Camera, for the measure of the liquid film thickness and the temperature, or the use of the Inverse Heat Conduction Problem technique to estimate the internal heat transfer coefficients. TOPDESS will constitute the state-of-the-art in terms of modelling and simulations of PHP using both 1D modelling and DNS VOF simulations. In particular, CFD simulations will have an impact in terms of advanced modelling of evaporation, boiling and condensation, while the 1D modelling will lead to a robust tool for PHP design. A feasibility study of the design of flexible space radiators will close the project, posing the basis to a further development in direction of a real application. TOPDESS presents a word-level quality consortium in the field of two-phase flows and heat pipe devices, with 9 partners, 10 companies and 2 associate academic institutions. We are expecting more than 30 Journal papers, at least 5 parabolic flight campaigns, 2 LDC campaigns, an important presence in international conferences, 6 consortium meetings, plus a number of technical projects with the industrial partners. Starting from blue-sky research, TOPDESS will put the basis for a great impact in terms of future flexible thermal solutions for ground and space applications.
Impact The project just started.
Start Year 2019
 
Description ESA MAP TOPDESS 
Organisation Liebherr
Country Switzerland 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution We are leading the project. We have prepared the proposal together with the partners, we have submitted it.
Collaborator Contribution EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Deployable structures are capable of large configuration changes in an autonomous way. Their configuration can change from a packed, compact state to a deployed, sizable state when their service configuration is required. Deployable structures have many applications both on Earth and in space, where they have been implemented since the former Soviet Union first satellite as a practical way to obtain large, lightweight structures for remote locations in space. The design of a deployable space structures is often a trade-off between volume and weight of the packed structures and the complexity of the operations required when in the deployed state. Deployable systems can be used for several primary functions: solar radiation collection (solar arrays), signal transmission (booms, antennas), heat dissipation (radiators, reflectors) and propulsion (solar wings). Designing a deployable structure can be a challenge because it is strongly affected by thermal issues, and particular care from the thermal point of view has to be taken to guarantee a correct deploying/folding process, and thermal management as an auxiliary function. Consequently, the thermal management assumes the role of key technology, both to serve a specific use of the structures in terms of heat control and to serve the thermalisation of constructions, in order to decrease the issues linked to thermal expansion and joint failures. From this perspective, future technologies for thermal control system must be efficient, compact, lightweight, reliable and durable. The integration of active technologies like pumps, cryocoolers and compressors, although common options in the space field, is very complex and involves bulky components; moreover, they require source of energy throughout their operational life and present many sources of potential fault. Passive systems, such as heat pipes, can be of great interest, even if the presence of a wicked wall (sintered wick or a grooved capillary) can be a limitation in terms of flexibility and durability. Therefore, wickless systems seem the most suitable to be employed in thermal management of deployable structures. Today, there is a strong drive worldwide toward the development of Pulsating Heat Pipes (PHP) and their use for smartphones, high power electronics and cooling boards. The evidences of this interest also for space is signalled by experiments in space, from NASA and Air Force Research Laboratory (STP-H4-ATT) to JAXA (SDS-4). Starting from the previous MAP project focused on "Innovative Wickless Heat Pipe Systems for Ground and Space Applications" (INWIP), TOPDESS aims at increasing the knowledge of the basic physical phenomena in PHP and pursuing the development in the applicability of wickless PHP by making optimal use of ground-based and space research facilities, such as Parabolic Flights and the Large Diameter Centrifuge. The main idea is to explore flexible thermal solutions, which will reach TLR 3 at the end of the project. The project is developed in four areas of interest: 1) Flexible Thermal Devices, 2) Materials and Manufacturing, 3) Measurement Techniques, 4) Modelling Tools. Moreover, an improved experimental characterization of large diameter PHPs, the so-called Space PHPs, will contribute to the development of the PHP experiment on the Heat Transfer Host of the ISS. The physical phenomena taking place inside foldable or flexible PHP add a further complexity to the research developed in the previous MAP INWIP. This proposal will address questions related to the characterization of thermo-hydraulics phenomena affecting the performance of PHP with different fluids and at varying gravity levels, the effect of joints made of advanced materials (such as shape memory materials), the technological design of a polymeric heat pipe coated by a metal layer. Advanced measurement techniques will be developed, relying on cutting-edge equipment available within the consortium, such as Medium Wave High-Speed IR Camera, for the measure of the liquid film thickness and the temperature, or the use of the Inverse Heat Conduction Problem technique to estimate the internal heat transfer coefficients. TOPDESS will constitute the state-of-the-art in terms of modelling and simulations of PHP using both 1D modelling and DNS VOF simulations. In particular, CFD simulations will have an impact in terms of advanced modelling of evaporation, boiling and condensation, while the 1D modelling will lead to a robust tool for PHP design. A feasibility study of the design of flexible space radiators will close the project, posing the basis to a further development in direction of a real application. TOPDESS presents a word-level quality consortium in the field of two-phase flows and heat pipe devices, with 9 partners, 10 companies and 2 associate academic institutions. We are expecting more than 30 Journal papers, at least 5 parabolic flight campaigns, 2 LDC campaigns, an important presence in international conferences, 6 consortium meetings, plus a number of technical projects with the industrial partners. Starting from blue-sky research, TOPDESS will put the basis for a great impact in terms of future flexible thermal solutions for ground and space applications.
Impact The project just started.
Start Year 2019
 
Description ESA MAP TOPDESS 
Organisation MBS
Country Italy 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution We are leading the project. We have prepared the proposal together with the partners, we have submitted it.
Collaborator Contribution EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Deployable structures are capable of large configuration changes in an autonomous way. Their configuration can change from a packed, compact state to a deployed, sizable state when their service configuration is required. Deployable structures have many applications both on Earth and in space, where they have been implemented since the former Soviet Union first satellite as a practical way to obtain large, lightweight structures for remote locations in space. The design of a deployable space structures is often a trade-off between volume and weight of the packed structures and the complexity of the operations required when in the deployed state. Deployable systems can be used for several primary functions: solar radiation collection (solar arrays), signal transmission (booms, antennas), heat dissipation (radiators, reflectors) and propulsion (solar wings). Designing a deployable structure can be a challenge because it is strongly affected by thermal issues, and particular care from the thermal point of view has to be taken to guarantee a correct deploying/folding process, and thermal management as an auxiliary function. Consequently, the thermal management assumes the role of key technology, both to serve a specific use of the structures in terms of heat control and to serve the thermalisation of constructions, in order to decrease the issues linked to thermal expansion and joint failures. From this perspective, future technologies for thermal control system must be efficient, compact, lightweight, reliable and durable. The integration of active technologies like pumps, cryocoolers and compressors, although common options in the space field, is very complex and involves bulky components; moreover, they require source of energy throughout their operational life and present many sources of potential fault. Passive systems, such as heat pipes, can be of great interest, even if the presence of a wicked wall (sintered wick or a grooved capillary) can be a limitation in terms of flexibility and durability. Therefore, wickless systems seem the most suitable to be employed in thermal management of deployable structures. Today, there is a strong drive worldwide toward the development of Pulsating Heat Pipes (PHP) and their use for smartphones, high power electronics and cooling boards. The evidences of this interest also for space is signalled by experiments in space, from NASA and Air Force Research Laboratory (STP-H4-ATT) to JAXA (SDS-4). Starting from the previous MAP project focused on "Innovative Wickless Heat Pipe Systems for Ground and Space Applications" (INWIP), TOPDESS aims at increasing the knowledge of the basic physical phenomena in PHP and pursuing the development in the applicability of wickless PHP by making optimal use of ground-based and space research facilities, such as Parabolic Flights and the Large Diameter Centrifuge. The main idea is to explore flexible thermal solutions, which will reach TLR 3 at the end of the project. The project is developed in four areas of interest: 1) Flexible Thermal Devices, 2) Materials and Manufacturing, 3) Measurement Techniques, 4) Modelling Tools. Moreover, an improved experimental characterization of large diameter PHPs, the so-called Space PHPs, will contribute to the development of the PHP experiment on the Heat Transfer Host of the ISS. The physical phenomena taking place inside foldable or flexible PHP add a further complexity to the research developed in the previous MAP INWIP. This proposal will address questions related to the characterization of thermo-hydraulics phenomena affecting the performance of PHP with different fluids and at varying gravity levels, the effect of joints made of advanced materials (such as shape memory materials), the technological design of a polymeric heat pipe coated by a metal layer. Advanced measurement techniques will be developed, relying on cutting-edge equipment available within the consortium, such as Medium Wave High-Speed IR Camera, for the measure of the liquid film thickness and the temperature, or the use of the Inverse Heat Conduction Problem technique to estimate the internal heat transfer coefficients. TOPDESS will constitute the state-of-the-art in terms of modelling and simulations of PHP using both 1D modelling and DNS VOF simulations. In particular, CFD simulations will have an impact in terms of advanced modelling of evaporation, boiling and condensation, while the 1D modelling will lead to a robust tool for PHP design. A feasibility study of the design of flexible space radiators will close the project, posing the basis to a further development in direction of a real application. TOPDESS presents a word-level quality consortium in the field of two-phase flows and heat pipe devices, with 9 partners, 10 companies and 2 associate academic institutions. We are expecting more than 30 Journal papers, at least 5 parabolic flight campaigns, 2 LDC campaigns, an important presence in international conferences, 6 consortium meetings, plus a number of technical projects with the industrial partners. Starting from blue-sky research, TOPDESS will put the basis for a great impact in terms of future flexible thermal solutions for ground and space applications.
Impact The project just started.
Start Year 2019
 
Description ESA MAP TOPDESS 
Organisation Polytechnic University of Milan
Country Italy 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We are leading the project. We have prepared the proposal together with the partners, we have submitted it.
Collaborator Contribution EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Deployable structures are capable of large configuration changes in an autonomous way. Their configuration can change from a packed, compact state to a deployed, sizable state when their service configuration is required. Deployable structures have many applications both on Earth and in space, where they have been implemented since the former Soviet Union first satellite as a practical way to obtain large, lightweight structures for remote locations in space. The design of a deployable space structures is often a trade-off between volume and weight of the packed structures and the complexity of the operations required when in the deployed state. Deployable systems can be used for several primary functions: solar radiation collection (solar arrays), signal transmission (booms, antennas), heat dissipation (radiators, reflectors) and propulsion (solar wings). Designing a deployable structure can be a challenge because it is strongly affected by thermal issues, and particular care from the thermal point of view has to be taken to guarantee a correct deploying/folding process, and thermal management as an auxiliary function. Consequently, the thermal management assumes the role of key technology, both to serve a specific use of the structures in terms of heat control and to serve the thermalisation of constructions, in order to decrease the issues linked to thermal expansion and joint failures. From this perspective, future technologies for thermal control system must be efficient, compact, lightweight, reliable and durable. The integration of active technologies like pumps, cryocoolers and compressors, although common options in the space field, is very complex and involves bulky components; moreover, they require source of energy throughout their operational life and present many sources of potential fault. Passive systems, such as heat pipes, can be of great interest, even if the presence of a wicked wall (sintered wick or a grooved capillary) can be a limitation in terms of flexibility and durability. Therefore, wickless systems seem the most suitable to be employed in thermal management of deployable structures. Today, there is a strong drive worldwide toward the development of Pulsating Heat Pipes (PHP) and their use for smartphones, high power electronics and cooling boards. The evidences of this interest also for space is signalled by experiments in space, from NASA and Air Force Research Laboratory (STP-H4-ATT) to JAXA (SDS-4). Starting from the previous MAP project focused on "Innovative Wickless Heat Pipe Systems for Ground and Space Applications" (INWIP), TOPDESS aims at increasing the knowledge of the basic physical phenomena in PHP and pursuing the development in the applicability of wickless PHP by making optimal use of ground-based and space research facilities, such as Parabolic Flights and the Large Diameter Centrifuge. The main idea is to explore flexible thermal solutions, which will reach TLR 3 at the end of the project. The project is developed in four areas of interest: 1) Flexible Thermal Devices, 2) Materials and Manufacturing, 3) Measurement Techniques, 4) Modelling Tools. Moreover, an improved experimental characterization of large diameter PHPs, the so-called Space PHPs, will contribute to the development of the PHP experiment on the Heat Transfer Host of the ISS. The physical phenomena taking place inside foldable or flexible PHP add a further complexity to the research developed in the previous MAP INWIP. This proposal will address questions related to the characterization of thermo-hydraulics phenomena affecting the performance of PHP with different fluids and at varying gravity levels, the effect of joints made of advanced materials (such as shape memory materials), the technological design of a polymeric heat pipe coated by a metal layer. Advanced measurement techniques will be developed, relying on cutting-edge equipment available within the consortium, such as Medium Wave High-Speed IR Camera, for the measure of the liquid film thickness and the temperature, or the use of the Inverse Heat Conduction Problem technique to estimate the internal heat transfer coefficients. TOPDESS will constitute the state-of-the-art in terms of modelling and simulations of PHP using both 1D modelling and DNS VOF simulations. In particular, CFD simulations will have an impact in terms of advanced modelling of evaporation, boiling and condensation, while the 1D modelling will lead to a robust tool for PHP design. A feasibility study of the design of flexible space radiators will close the project, posing the basis to a further development in direction of a real application. TOPDESS presents a word-level quality consortium in the field of two-phase flows and heat pipe devices, with 9 partners, 10 companies and 2 associate academic institutions. We are expecting more than 30 Journal papers, at least 5 parabolic flight campaigns, 2 LDC campaigns, an important presence in international conferences, 6 consortium meetings, plus a number of technical projects with the industrial partners. Starting from blue-sky research, TOPDESS will put the basis for a great impact in terms of future flexible thermal solutions for ground and space applications.
Impact The project just started.
Start Year 2019
 
Description ESA MAP TOPDESS 
Organisation Sonaca
Country Germany 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution We are leading the project. We have prepared the proposal together with the partners, we have submitted it.
Collaborator Contribution EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Deployable structures are capable of large configuration changes in an autonomous way. Their configuration can change from a packed, compact state to a deployed, sizable state when their service configuration is required. Deployable structures have many applications both on Earth and in space, where they have been implemented since the former Soviet Union first satellite as a practical way to obtain large, lightweight structures for remote locations in space. The design of a deployable space structures is often a trade-off between volume and weight of the packed structures and the complexity of the operations required when in the deployed state. Deployable systems can be used for several primary functions: solar radiation collection (solar arrays), signal transmission (booms, antennas), heat dissipation (radiators, reflectors) and propulsion (solar wings). Designing a deployable structure can be a challenge because it is strongly affected by thermal issues, and particular care from the thermal point of view has to be taken to guarantee a correct deploying/folding process, and thermal management as an auxiliary function. Consequently, the thermal management assumes the role of key technology, both to serve a specific use of the structures in terms of heat control and to serve the thermalisation of constructions, in order to decrease the issues linked to thermal expansion and joint failures. From this perspective, future technologies for thermal control system must be efficient, compact, lightweight, reliable and durable. The integration of active technologies like pumps, cryocoolers and compressors, although common options in the space field, is very complex and involves bulky components; moreover, they require source of energy throughout their operational life and present many sources of potential fault. Passive systems, such as heat pipes, can be of great interest, even if the presence of a wicked wall (sintered wick or a grooved capillary) can be a limitation in terms of flexibility and durability. Therefore, wickless systems seem the most suitable to be employed in thermal management of deployable structures. Today, there is a strong drive worldwide toward the development of Pulsating Heat Pipes (PHP) and their use for smartphones, high power electronics and cooling boards. The evidences of this interest also for space is signalled by experiments in space, from NASA and Air Force Research Laboratory (STP-H4-ATT) to JAXA (SDS-4). Starting from the previous MAP project focused on "Innovative Wickless Heat Pipe Systems for Ground and Space Applications" (INWIP), TOPDESS aims at increasing the knowledge of the basic physical phenomena in PHP and pursuing the development in the applicability of wickless PHP by making optimal use of ground-based and space research facilities, such as Parabolic Flights and the Large Diameter Centrifuge. The main idea is to explore flexible thermal solutions, which will reach TLR 3 at the end of the project. The project is developed in four areas of interest: 1) Flexible Thermal Devices, 2) Materials and Manufacturing, 3) Measurement Techniques, 4) Modelling Tools. Moreover, an improved experimental characterization of large diameter PHPs, the so-called Space PHPs, will contribute to the development of the PHP experiment on the Heat Transfer Host of the ISS. The physical phenomena taking place inside foldable or flexible PHP add a further complexity to the research developed in the previous MAP INWIP. This proposal will address questions related to the characterization of thermo-hydraulics phenomena affecting the performance of PHP with different fluids and at varying gravity levels, the effect of joints made of advanced materials (such as shape memory materials), the technological design of a polymeric heat pipe coated by a metal layer. Advanced measurement techniques will be developed, relying on cutting-edge equipment available within the consortium, such as Medium Wave High-Speed IR Camera, for the measure of the liquid film thickness and the temperature, or the use of the Inverse Heat Conduction Problem technique to estimate the internal heat transfer coefficients. TOPDESS will constitute the state-of-the-art in terms of modelling and simulations of PHP using both 1D modelling and DNS VOF simulations. In particular, CFD simulations will have an impact in terms of advanced modelling of evaporation, boiling and condensation, while the 1D modelling will lead to a robust tool for PHP design. A feasibility study of the design of flexible space radiators will close the project, posing the basis to a further development in direction of a real application. TOPDESS presents a word-level quality consortium in the field of two-phase flows and heat pipe devices, with 9 partners, 10 companies and 2 associate academic institutions. We are expecting more than 30 Journal papers, at least 5 parabolic flight campaigns, 2 LDC campaigns, an important presence in international conferences, 6 consortium meetings, plus a number of technical projects with the industrial partners. Starting from blue-sky research, TOPDESS will put the basis for a great impact in terms of future flexible thermal solutions for ground and space applications.
Impact The project just started.
Start Year 2019
 
Description ESA MAP TOPDESS 
Organisation University Libre Bruxelles (Université Libre de Bruxelles ULB)
Country Belgium 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We are leading the project. We have prepared the proposal together with the partners, we have submitted it.
Collaborator Contribution EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Deployable structures are capable of large configuration changes in an autonomous way. Their configuration can change from a packed, compact state to a deployed, sizable state when their service configuration is required. Deployable structures have many applications both on Earth and in space, where they have been implemented since the former Soviet Union first satellite as a practical way to obtain large, lightweight structures for remote locations in space. The design of a deployable space structures is often a trade-off between volume and weight of the packed structures and the complexity of the operations required when in the deployed state. Deployable systems can be used for several primary functions: solar radiation collection (solar arrays), signal transmission (booms, antennas), heat dissipation (radiators, reflectors) and propulsion (solar wings). Designing a deployable structure can be a challenge because it is strongly affected by thermal issues, and particular care from the thermal point of view has to be taken to guarantee a correct deploying/folding process, and thermal management as an auxiliary function. Consequently, the thermal management assumes the role of key technology, both to serve a specific use of the structures in terms of heat control and to serve the thermalisation of constructions, in order to decrease the issues linked to thermal expansion and joint failures. From this perspective, future technologies for thermal control system must be efficient, compact, lightweight, reliable and durable. The integration of active technologies like pumps, cryocoolers and compressors, although common options in the space field, is very complex and involves bulky components; moreover, they require source of energy throughout their operational life and present many sources of potential fault. Passive systems, such as heat pipes, can be of great interest, even if the presence of a wicked wall (sintered wick or a grooved capillary) can be a limitation in terms of flexibility and durability. Therefore, wickless systems seem the most suitable to be employed in thermal management of deployable structures. Today, there is a strong drive worldwide toward the development of Pulsating Heat Pipes (PHP) and their use for smartphones, high power electronics and cooling boards. The evidences of this interest also for space is signalled by experiments in space, from NASA and Air Force Research Laboratory (STP-H4-ATT) to JAXA (SDS-4). Starting from the previous MAP project focused on "Innovative Wickless Heat Pipe Systems for Ground and Space Applications" (INWIP), TOPDESS aims at increasing the knowledge of the basic physical phenomena in PHP and pursuing the development in the applicability of wickless PHP by making optimal use of ground-based and space research facilities, such as Parabolic Flights and the Large Diameter Centrifuge. The main idea is to explore flexible thermal solutions, which will reach TLR 3 at the end of the project. The project is developed in four areas of interest: 1) Flexible Thermal Devices, 2) Materials and Manufacturing, 3) Measurement Techniques, 4) Modelling Tools. Moreover, an improved experimental characterization of large diameter PHPs, the so-called Space PHPs, will contribute to the development of the PHP experiment on the Heat Transfer Host of the ISS. The physical phenomena taking place inside foldable or flexible PHP add a further complexity to the research developed in the previous MAP INWIP. This proposal will address questions related to the characterization of thermo-hydraulics phenomena affecting the performance of PHP with different fluids and at varying gravity levels, the effect of joints made of advanced materials (such as shape memory materials), the technological design of a polymeric heat pipe coated by a metal layer. Advanced measurement techniques will be developed, relying on cutting-edge equipment available within the consortium, such as Medium Wave High-Speed IR Camera, for the measure of the liquid film thickness and the temperature, or the use of the Inverse Heat Conduction Problem technique to estimate the internal heat transfer coefficients. TOPDESS will constitute the state-of-the-art in terms of modelling and simulations of PHP using both 1D modelling and DNS VOF simulations. In particular, CFD simulations will have an impact in terms of advanced modelling of evaporation, boiling and condensation, while the 1D modelling will lead to a robust tool for PHP design. A feasibility study of the design of flexible space radiators will close the project, posing the basis to a further development in direction of a real application. TOPDESS presents a word-level quality consortium in the field of two-phase flows and heat pipe devices, with 9 partners, 10 companies and 2 associate academic institutions. We are expecting more than 30 Journal papers, at least 5 parabolic flight campaigns, 2 LDC campaigns, an important presence in international conferences, 6 consortium meetings, plus a number of technical projects with the industrial partners. Starting from blue-sky research, TOPDESS will put the basis for a great impact in terms of future flexible thermal solutions for ground and space applications.
Impact The project just started.
Start Year 2019
 
Description ESA MAP TOPDESS 
Organisation University of Liverpool
Department School of Engineering
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We are leading the project. We have prepared the proposal together with the partners, we have submitted it.
Collaborator Contribution EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Deployable structures are capable of large configuration changes in an autonomous way. Their configuration can change from a packed, compact state to a deployed, sizable state when their service configuration is required. Deployable structures have many applications both on Earth and in space, where they have been implemented since the former Soviet Union first satellite as a practical way to obtain large, lightweight structures for remote locations in space. The design of a deployable space structures is often a trade-off between volume and weight of the packed structures and the complexity of the operations required when in the deployed state. Deployable systems can be used for several primary functions: solar radiation collection (solar arrays), signal transmission (booms, antennas), heat dissipation (radiators, reflectors) and propulsion (solar wings). Designing a deployable structure can be a challenge because it is strongly affected by thermal issues, and particular care from the thermal point of view has to be taken to guarantee a correct deploying/folding process, and thermal management as an auxiliary function. Consequently, the thermal management assumes the role of key technology, both to serve a specific use of the structures in terms of heat control and to serve the thermalisation of constructions, in order to decrease the issues linked to thermal expansion and joint failures. From this perspective, future technologies for thermal control system must be efficient, compact, lightweight, reliable and durable. The integration of active technologies like pumps, cryocoolers and compressors, although common options in the space field, is very complex and involves bulky components; moreover, they require source of energy throughout their operational life and present many sources of potential fault. Passive systems, such as heat pipes, can be of great interest, even if the presence of a wicked wall (sintered wick or a grooved capillary) can be a limitation in terms of flexibility and durability. Therefore, wickless systems seem the most suitable to be employed in thermal management of deployable structures. Today, there is a strong drive worldwide toward the development of Pulsating Heat Pipes (PHP) and their use for smartphones, high power electronics and cooling boards. The evidences of this interest also for space is signalled by experiments in space, from NASA and Air Force Research Laboratory (STP-H4-ATT) to JAXA (SDS-4). Starting from the previous MAP project focused on "Innovative Wickless Heat Pipe Systems for Ground and Space Applications" (INWIP), TOPDESS aims at increasing the knowledge of the basic physical phenomena in PHP and pursuing the development in the applicability of wickless PHP by making optimal use of ground-based and space research facilities, such as Parabolic Flights and the Large Diameter Centrifuge. The main idea is to explore flexible thermal solutions, which will reach TLR 3 at the end of the project. The project is developed in four areas of interest: 1) Flexible Thermal Devices, 2) Materials and Manufacturing, 3) Measurement Techniques, 4) Modelling Tools. Moreover, an improved experimental characterization of large diameter PHPs, the so-called Space PHPs, will contribute to the development of the PHP experiment on the Heat Transfer Host of the ISS. The physical phenomena taking place inside foldable or flexible PHP add a further complexity to the research developed in the previous MAP INWIP. This proposal will address questions related to the characterization of thermo-hydraulics phenomena affecting the performance of PHP with different fluids and at varying gravity levels, the effect of joints made of advanced materials (such as shape memory materials), the technological design of a polymeric heat pipe coated by a metal layer. Advanced measurement techniques will be developed, relying on cutting-edge equipment available within the consortium, such as Medium Wave High-Speed IR Camera, for the measure of the liquid film thickness and the temperature, or the use of the Inverse Heat Conduction Problem technique to estimate the internal heat transfer coefficients. TOPDESS will constitute the state-of-the-art in terms of modelling and simulations of PHP using both 1D modelling and DNS VOF simulations. In particular, CFD simulations will have an impact in terms of advanced modelling of evaporation, boiling and condensation, while the 1D modelling will lead to a robust tool for PHP design. A feasibility study of the design of flexible space radiators will close the project, posing the basis to a further development in direction of a real application. TOPDESS presents a word-level quality consortium in the field of two-phase flows and heat pipe devices, with 9 partners, 10 companies and 2 associate academic institutions. We are expecting more than 30 Journal papers, at least 5 parabolic flight campaigns, 2 LDC campaigns, an important presence in international conferences, 6 consortium meetings, plus a number of technical projects with the industrial partners. Starting from blue-sky research, TOPDESS will put the basis for a great impact in terms of future flexible thermal solutions for ground and space applications.
Impact The project just started.
Start Year 2019
 
Description ESA MAP TOPDESS 
Organisation University of Naples
Country Italy 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We are leading the project. We have prepared the proposal together with the partners, we have submitted it.
Collaborator Contribution EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Deployable structures are capable of large configuration changes in an autonomous way. Their configuration can change from a packed, compact state to a deployed, sizable state when their service configuration is required. Deployable structures have many applications both on Earth and in space, where they have been implemented since the former Soviet Union first satellite as a practical way to obtain large, lightweight structures for remote locations in space. The design of a deployable space structures is often a trade-off between volume and weight of the packed structures and the complexity of the operations required when in the deployed state. Deployable systems can be used for several primary functions: solar radiation collection (solar arrays), signal transmission (booms, antennas), heat dissipation (radiators, reflectors) and propulsion (solar wings). Designing a deployable structure can be a challenge because it is strongly affected by thermal issues, and particular care from the thermal point of view has to be taken to guarantee a correct deploying/folding process, and thermal management as an auxiliary function. Consequently, the thermal management assumes the role of key technology, both to serve a specific use of the structures in terms of heat control and to serve the thermalisation of constructions, in order to decrease the issues linked to thermal expansion and joint failures. From this perspective, future technologies for thermal control system must be efficient, compact, lightweight, reliable and durable. The integration of active technologies like pumps, cryocoolers and compressors, although common options in the space field, is very complex and involves bulky components; moreover, they require source of energy throughout their operational life and present many sources of potential fault. Passive systems, such as heat pipes, can be of great interest, even if the presence of a wicked wall (sintered wick or a grooved capillary) can be a limitation in terms of flexibility and durability. Therefore, wickless systems seem the most suitable to be employed in thermal management of deployable structures. Today, there is a strong drive worldwide toward the development of Pulsating Heat Pipes (PHP) and their use for smartphones, high power electronics and cooling boards. The evidences of this interest also for space is signalled by experiments in space, from NASA and Air Force Research Laboratory (STP-H4-ATT) to JAXA (SDS-4). Starting from the previous MAP project focused on "Innovative Wickless Heat Pipe Systems for Ground and Space Applications" (INWIP), TOPDESS aims at increasing the knowledge of the basic physical phenomena in PHP and pursuing the development in the applicability of wickless PHP by making optimal use of ground-based and space research facilities, such as Parabolic Flights and the Large Diameter Centrifuge. The main idea is to explore flexible thermal solutions, which will reach TLR 3 at the end of the project. The project is developed in four areas of interest: 1) Flexible Thermal Devices, 2) Materials and Manufacturing, 3) Measurement Techniques, 4) Modelling Tools. Moreover, an improved experimental characterization of large diameter PHPs, the so-called Space PHPs, will contribute to the development of the PHP experiment on the Heat Transfer Host of the ISS. The physical phenomena taking place inside foldable or flexible PHP add a further complexity to the research developed in the previous MAP INWIP. This proposal will address questions related to the characterization of thermo-hydraulics phenomena affecting the performance of PHP with different fluids and at varying gravity levels, the effect of joints made of advanced materials (such as shape memory materials), the technological design of a polymeric heat pipe coated by a metal layer. Advanced measurement techniques will be developed, relying on cutting-edge equipment available within the consortium, such as Medium Wave High-Speed IR Camera, for the measure of the liquid film thickness and the temperature, or the use of the Inverse Heat Conduction Problem technique to estimate the internal heat transfer coefficients. TOPDESS will constitute the state-of-the-art in terms of modelling and simulations of PHP using both 1D modelling and DNS VOF simulations. In particular, CFD simulations will have an impact in terms of advanced modelling of evaporation, boiling and condensation, while the 1D modelling will lead to a robust tool for PHP design. A feasibility study of the design of flexible space radiators will close the project, posing the basis to a further development in direction of a real application. TOPDESS presents a word-level quality consortium in the field of two-phase flows and heat pipe devices, with 9 partners, 10 companies and 2 associate academic institutions. We are expecting more than 30 Journal papers, at least 5 parabolic flight campaigns, 2 LDC campaigns, an important presence in international conferences, 6 consortium meetings, plus a number of technical projects with the industrial partners. Starting from blue-sky research, TOPDESS will put the basis for a great impact in terms of future flexible thermal solutions for ground and space applications.
Impact The project just started.
Start Year 2019
 
Description ESA MAP TOPDESS 
Organisation University of Parma
Country Italy 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We are leading the project. We have prepared the proposal together with the partners, we have submitted it.
Collaborator Contribution EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Deployable structures are capable of large configuration changes in an autonomous way. Their configuration can change from a packed, compact state to a deployed, sizable state when their service configuration is required. Deployable structures have many applications both on Earth and in space, where they have been implemented since the former Soviet Union first satellite as a practical way to obtain large, lightweight structures for remote locations in space. The design of a deployable space structures is often a trade-off between volume and weight of the packed structures and the complexity of the operations required when in the deployed state. Deployable systems can be used for several primary functions: solar radiation collection (solar arrays), signal transmission (booms, antennas), heat dissipation (radiators, reflectors) and propulsion (solar wings). Designing a deployable structure can be a challenge because it is strongly affected by thermal issues, and particular care from the thermal point of view has to be taken to guarantee a correct deploying/folding process, and thermal management as an auxiliary function. Consequently, the thermal management assumes the role of key technology, both to serve a specific use of the structures in terms of heat control and to serve the thermalisation of constructions, in order to decrease the issues linked to thermal expansion and joint failures. From this perspective, future technologies for thermal control system must be efficient, compact, lightweight, reliable and durable. The integration of active technologies like pumps, cryocoolers and compressors, although common options in the space field, is very complex and involves bulky components; moreover, they require source of energy throughout their operational life and present many sources of potential fault. Passive systems, such as heat pipes, can be of great interest, even if the presence of a wicked wall (sintered wick or a grooved capillary) can be a limitation in terms of flexibility and durability. Therefore, wickless systems seem the most suitable to be employed in thermal management of deployable structures. Today, there is a strong drive worldwide toward the development of Pulsating Heat Pipes (PHP) and their use for smartphones, high power electronics and cooling boards. The evidences of this interest also for space is signalled by experiments in space, from NASA and Air Force Research Laboratory (STP-H4-ATT) to JAXA (SDS-4). Starting from the previous MAP project focused on "Innovative Wickless Heat Pipe Systems for Ground and Space Applications" (INWIP), TOPDESS aims at increasing the knowledge of the basic physical phenomena in PHP and pursuing the development in the applicability of wickless PHP by making optimal use of ground-based and space research facilities, such as Parabolic Flights and the Large Diameter Centrifuge. The main idea is to explore flexible thermal solutions, which will reach TLR 3 at the end of the project. The project is developed in four areas of interest: 1) Flexible Thermal Devices, 2) Materials and Manufacturing, 3) Measurement Techniques, 4) Modelling Tools. Moreover, an improved experimental characterization of large diameter PHPs, the so-called Space PHPs, will contribute to the development of the PHP experiment on the Heat Transfer Host of the ISS. The physical phenomena taking place inside foldable or flexible PHP add a further complexity to the research developed in the previous MAP INWIP. This proposal will address questions related to the characterization of thermo-hydraulics phenomena affecting the performance of PHP with different fluids and at varying gravity levels, the effect of joints made of advanced materials (such as shape memory materials), the technological design of a polymeric heat pipe coated by a metal layer. Advanced measurement techniques will be developed, relying on cutting-edge equipment available within the consortium, such as Medium Wave High-Speed IR Camera, for the measure of the liquid film thickness and the temperature, or the use of the Inverse Heat Conduction Problem technique to estimate the internal heat transfer coefficients. TOPDESS will constitute the state-of-the-art in terms of modelling and simulations of PHP using both 1D modelling and DNS VOF simulations. In particular, CFD simulations will have an impact in terms of advanced modelling of evaporation, boiling and condensation, while the 1D modelling will lead to a robust tool for PHP design. A feasibility study of the design of flexible space radiators will close the project, posing the basis to a further development in direction of a real application. TOPDESS presents a word-level quality consortium in the field of two-phase flows and heat pipe devices, with 9 partners, 10 companies and 2 associate academic institutions. We are expecting more than 30 Journal papers, at least 5 parabolic flight campaigns, 2 LDC campaigns, an important presence in international conferences, 6 consortium meetings, plus a number of technical projects with the industrial partners. Starting from blue-sky research, TOPDESS will put the basis for a great impact in terms of future flexible thermal solutions for ground and space applications.
Impact The project just started.
Start Year 2019
 
Description ESA MAP TOPDESS 
Organisation University of Pisa
Department Faculty of Engineering
Country Italy 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We are leading the project. We have prepared the proposal together with the partners, we have submitted it.
Collaborator Contribution EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Deployable structures are capable of large configuration changes in an autonomous way. Their configuration can change from a packed, compact state to a deployed, sizable state when their service configuration is required. Deployable structures have many applications both on Earth and in space, where they have been implemented since the former Soviet Union first satellite as a practical way to obtain large, lightweight structures for remote locations in space. The design of a deployable space structures is often a trade-off between volume and weight of the packed structures and the complexity of the operations required when in the deployed state. Deployable systems can be used for several primary functions: solar radiation collection (solar arrays), signal transmission (booms, antennas), heat dissipation (radiators, reflectors) and propulsion (solar wings). Designing a deployable structure can be a challenge because it is strongly affected by thermal issues, and particular care from the thermal point of view has to be taken to guarantee a correct deploying/folding process, and thermal management as an auxiliary function. Consequently, the thermal management assumes the role of key technology, both to serve a specific use of the structures in terms of heat control and to serve the thermalisation of constructions, in order to decrease the issues linked to thermal expansion and joint failures. From this perspective, future technologies for thermal control system must be efficient, compact, lightweight, reliable and durable. The integration of active technologies like pumps, cryocoolers and compressors, although common options in the space field, is very complex and involves bulky components; moreover, they require source of energy throughout their operational life and present many sources of potential fault. Passive systems, such as heat pipes, can be of great interest, even if the presence of a wicked wall (sintered wick or a grooved capillary) can be a limitation in terms of flexibility and durability. Therefore, wickless systems seem the most suitable to be employed in thermal management of deployable structures. Today, there is a strong drive worldwide toward the development of Pulsating Heat Pipes (PHP) and their use for smartphones, high power electronics and cooling boards. The evidences of this interest also for space is signalled by experiments in space, from NASA and Air Force Research Laboratory (STP-H4-ATT) to JAXA (SDS-4). Starting from the previous MAP project focused on "Innovative Wickless Heat Pipe Systems for Ground and Space Applications" (INWIP), TOPDESS aims at increasing the knowledge of the basic physical phenomena in PHP and pursuing the development in the applicability of wickless PHP by making optimal use of ground-based and space research facilities, such as Parabolic Flights and the Large Diameter Centrifuge. The main idea is to explore flexible thermal solutions, which will reach TLR 3 at the end of the project. The project is developed in four areas of interest: 1) Flexible Thermal Devices, 2) Materials and Manufacturing, 3) Measurement Techniques, 4) Modelling Tools. Moreover, an improved experimental characterization of large diameter PHPs, the so-called Space PHPs, will contribute to the development of the PHP experiment on the Heat Transfer Host of the ISS. The physical phenomena taking place inside foldable or flexible PHP add a further complexity to the research developed in the previous MAP INWIP. This proposal will address questions related to the characterization of thermo-hydraulics phenomena affecting the performance of PHP with different fluids and at varying gravity levels, the effect of joints made of advanced materials (such as shape memory materials), the technological design of a polymeric heat pipe coated by a metal layer. Advanced measurement techniques will be developed, relying on cutting-edge equipment available within the consortium, such as Medium Wave High-Speed IR Camera, for the measure of the liquid film thickness and the temperature, or the use of the Inverse Heat Conduction Problem technique to estimate the internal heat transfer coefficients. TOPDESS will constitute the state-of-the-art in terms of modelling and simulations of PHP using both 1D modelling and DNS VOF simulations. In particular, CFD simulations will have an impact in terms of advanced modelling of evaporation, boiling and condensation, while the 1D modelling will lead to a robust tool for PHP design. A feasibility study of the design of flexible space radiators will close the project, posing the basis to a further development in direction of a real application. TOPDESS presents a word-level quality consortium in the field of two-phase flows and heat pipe devices, with 9 partners, 10 companies and 2 associate academic institutions. We are expecting more than 30 Journal papers, at least 5 parabolic flight campaigns, 2 LDC campaigns, an important presence in international conferences, 6 consortium meetings, plus a number of technical projects with the industrial partners. Starting from blue-sky research, TOPDESS will put the basis for a great impact in terms of future flexible thermal solutions for ground and space applications.
Impact The project just started.
Start Year 2019
 
Description ESA MAP TOPDESS 
Organisation University of Poitiers
Country France 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We are leading the project. We have prepared the proposal together with the partners, we have submitted it.
Collaborator Contribution EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Deployable structures are capable of large configuration changes in an autonomous way. Their configuration can change from a packed, compact state to a deployed, sizable state when their service configuration is required. Deployable structures have many applications both on Earth and in space, where they have been implemented since the former Soviet Union first satellite as a practical way to obtain large, lightweight structures for remote locations in space. The design of a deployable space structures is often a trade-off between volume and weight of the packed structures and the complexity of the operations required when in the deployed state. Deployable systems can be used for several primary functions: solar radiation collection (solar arrays), signal transmission (booms, antennas), heat dissipation (radiators, reflectors) and propulsion (solar wings). Designing a deployable structure can be a challenge because it is strongly affected by thermal issues, and particular care from the thermal point of view has to be taken to guarantee a correct deploying/folding process, and thermal management as an auxiliary function. Consequently, the thermal management assumes the role of key technology, both to serve a specific use of the structures in terms of heat control and to serve the thermalisation of constructions, in order to decrease the issues linked to thermal expansion and joint failures. From this perspective, future technologies for thermal control system must be efficient, compact, lightweight, reliable and durable. The integration of active technologies like pumps, cryocoolers and compressors, although common options in the space field, is very complex and involves bulky components; moreover, they require source of energy throughout their operational life and present many sources of potential fault. Passive systems, such as heat pipes, can be of great interest, even if the presence of a wicked wall (sintered wick or a grooved capillary) can be a limitation in terms of flexibility and durability. Therefore, wickless systems seem the most suitable to be employed in thermal management of deployable structures. Today, there is a strong drive worldwide toward the development of Pulsating Heat Pipes (PHP) and their use for smartphones, high power electronics and cooling boards. The evidences of this interest also for space is signalled by experiments in space, from NASA and Air Force Research Laboratory (STP-H4-ATT) to JAXA (SDS-4). Starting from the previous MAP project focused on "Innovative Wickless Heat Pipe Systems for Ground and Space Applications" (INWIP), TOPDESS aims at increasing the knowledge of the basic physical phenomena in PHP and pursuing the development in the applicability of wickless PHP by making optimal use of ground-based and space research facilities, such as Parabolic Flights and the Large Diameter Centrifuge. The main idea is to explore flexible thermal solutions, which will reach TLR 3 at the end of the project. The project is developed in four areas of interest: 1) Flexible Thermal Devices, 2) Materials and Manufacturing, 3) Measurement Techniques, 4) Modelling Tools. Moreover, an improved experimental characterization of large diameter PHPs, the so-called Space PHPs, will contribute to the development of the PHP experiment on the Heat Transfer Host of the ISS. The physical phenomena taking place inside foldable or flexible PHP add a further complexity to the research developed in the previous MAP INWIP. This proposal will address questions related to the characterization of thermo-hydraulics phenomena affecting the performance of PHP with different fluids and at varying gravity levels, the effect of joints made of advanced materials (such as shape memory materials), the technological design of a polymeric heat pipe coated by a metal layer. Advanced measurement techniques will be developed, relying on cutting-edge equipment available within the consortium, such as Medium Wave High-Speed IR Camera, for the measure of the liquid film thickness and the temperature, or the use of the Inverse Heat Conduction Problem technique to estimate the internal heat transfer coefficients. TOPDESS will constitute the state-of-the-art in terms of modelling and simulations of PHP using both 1D modelling and DNS VOF simulations. In particular, CFD simulations will have an impact in terms of advanced modelling of evaporation, boiling and condensation, while the 1D modelling will lead to a robust tool for PHP design. A feasibility study of the design of flexible space radiators will close the project, posing the basis to a further development in direction of a real application. TOPDESS presents a word-level quality consortium in the field of two-phase flows and heat pipe devices, with 9 partners, 10 companies and 2 associate academic institutions. We are expecting more than 30 Journal papers, at least 5 parabolic flight campaigns, 2 LDC campaigns, an important presence in international conferences, 6 consortium meetings, plus a number of technical projects with the industrial partners. Starting from blue-sky research, TOPDESS will put the basis for a great impact in terms of future flexible thermal solutions for ground and space applications.
Impact The project just started.
Start Year 2019
 
Description KTP project with ETL 
Organisation European Thermodynamics
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution We are partner in the project about the design, construction and experimental test of a Loop Heat Pipe
Collaborator Contribution ETL is leading the project
Impact A Loop Heat Pipe has been designed and built and it is now under experimental analysis.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Novel technique for wick manufacturing for vapour chambers and heat pipes 
Organisation University of Toronto
Country Canada 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Together with the Centre for Advanced Coating Technology of the University of Toronto we have develop a new manufacturing technique for wicks. With this technique, an ultra-large flat plate heat pipe, that is significantly larger than that previously reported in the literature, has been fabricated and thermally characterized. The porous copper wick was constructed by flame spraying a copper-aluminum mixture onto a copper plate through a stainless steel mesh and then removing the aluminum. The effects of varying the applied heat flux and liquid filling ratio were studied. The radial thermal conductivity increased with applied heat flux, prior to the onset of dry-out, for all filling ratios. A peak radial thermal conductivity of 920 W/m K is observed for the largest filling ratio of 65% for an applied heat flux of 7.5 W/cm2. This represents a 2.4 times performance increase and a 33% reduction in weight over pure copper. The lowest filling ratio of 35% was shown to performed better at the lowest applied heat fluxes than its 50% and 65% counterparts. A model was developed to calculate the evaporator dry-out radius for a given applied heat flux and filling ratio. Predictions from the model agreed well with the experimental data. Dry-out was noted when the rate of fluid recirculation to the central region of the heat pipe was less than the rate of evaporation, which produced a sharp increase in the lateral thermal resistance. Once dry-out occurs further increase of the applied heat flux results in the dry-out region growing radially outward. This work highlights the performance and viability of a thermally sprayed porous wick for heat pipe application. This technology is an attractive technique to deposit porous coatings on large, irregular surfaces and overcoming limitations associated with traditional wick fabrication techniques.
Collaborator Contribution We had the first idea, but the design, the construction and the tuning of the technique together with the whole experimental analysis was carried out in Toronto.
Impact A novel ultra-large flat plate heat pipe manufactured by thermal spray C. Feng, M.J. Gibbons, M. Marengo, S. Chandra https://doi.org/10.1016/j.applthermaleng.2020.115030
Start Year 2017
 
Description Two-phase battery thermal control 
Organisation Ricardo UK Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Starting from our work on Pulsating Heat Pipes, we have proposed to RICARDO to continue in working on this technology for thermal control of batteries for electric vehicles
Collaborator Contribution RICARDO has supported a PhD thesis
Impact Test bench in the laboratory of the Advanced Engineering Centre for the experimental analysis of battery thermal control using two-phase passive systems
Start Year 2019
 
Description Brighton Science Festival Event 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The event took place at Brighton Palace Pier on Friday 8th of September 2017. The research team of HyHP engaged with the general public and discussed with individuals the particulars of their research regarding the thermofluidic behavior of closed loop passive heat transfer devices in microgravity (at a level suitable for general public) and inspire the visitors to experience the same as astronauts or PFC experimenters (albeit at different levels of duration and g values) in the roller coaster and discussed afterwards with the "crew" about their experience. The event attracted also the interest of the press.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://blogs.brighton.ac.uk/hyhp/2017/09/11/british-science-festival/
 
Description Cover Page and Article in Brighton Futures Magazine published by the University of Brighton 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact An article published in Brighton Futures printed and online Magazine that describes the present EPSRC project. The proposed project also made it as the cover page of this summer 2017 edition.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.brighton.ac.uk/research-and-enterprise/films-and-publications/brighton-futures/index.asp...
 
Description Dedicated Website to HyHP 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A dedicated Website/blog has been created within the University of Brighton Website with updates and info of the overall outputs and news regarding HyHP Project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017,2018
URL http://blogs.brighton.ac.uk/hyhp/
 
Description Fly-your-thesis 2019 University of Brighton engineering student team PHP^3 mentoring and support - Application of PHP in CubeSat 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact A team of MSc Students from University of Brighton that were mentored by the HyHP research team went through a highly competitive selection process (after submitting a proposal) and have been selected as one of two top teams from universities all around Europe to fly their scientific experiment in microgravity conditions through the European Space Agency's 'Fly Your Thesis' campaign.
This competition encourages university teams from around Europe to design, develop and finally test space technologies in a Zero-G aircraft. The proposed student team from University of Brighton is the first team from a UK university in eight years to have progressed to this final stage of the competition and to have an opportunity to test their experiment in micro gravity.
Their experiment involves in exploring the feasibility of having a Pulsating Heat Pipe device as a the cooling system in a Cube satellite.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018,2019
URL http://www.PHP-Cubed.com
 
Description Heat Transfer Research, Education and Practice in the UK - UK National Heat Transfer Committee Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Dr. Anastasios Georgoulas was invited as a panel member to give a talk entitled "Thermal Management solutions for Space & Ground applications: Development & Application of Design Tools for Heat Pipes" in the "Thermal Management in Vehicles" panel in the proposed workshop.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.uknhtc.org/post/2019/01/26/heat-transfer-research-education-and-practice-in-the-uk-regis...
 
Description Interview of Prof. Marengo (PI of HYHP) in ESA TV 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact The PI of the project Prof. Marco Marengo gave an interview to ESA TV during the 68th European Space Agency Parabolic Flight Campaign where a Single Loop Pulsating Heat Pipe was experimentally characterised through high speed infrared imaging, high speed visible spectrum imaging and pressure and temperature measurements. The overall aim of the proposed parabolic flight campaign was to observe and characterise the thermofluid behaviour of a working fluid in varying gravity conditions.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.esa.int/esatv/Videos/2017/12/Zero-G_science/Soundbites_Professor_Marco_Marengo_-Universi...
 
Description Investing in UK Aerospace Forum 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact This Forum provided a timely opportunity to explore how the UK can retain and build upon its position as a world leader in developing aerospace technology. A member from the HyHP Research Team that attended the proposed forum gain insights from best practice case studies from across industry and research institutions who are working in partnership to pool and further cultivate specialist skills. The creation of cutting edge technology, and how to apply it in innovative ways to utilise the full potential of aerospace technology and increase future funding opportunities was also discussed.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Invited lecture of Prof. Marengo in Italian Union Of Thermo-Fluid Mechanics 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The Pulsating Heat Pipes: Experimental Analysis And Numerical Simulations In Terrestrial And Microgravity Conditions
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Invited lecture of Prof. Marengo in University Of Florence 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Five Cases on Experimental And Numerical Analysis Of Two-Phase Flows
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Invited lecture of Prof. Marengo in University Of Pavia 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Experimental And Numerical Analysis of The Novel Hybrid Pulsating Heat Pipe
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Invited lecture of Prof. Marengo in University of Warwick 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Influence of Surface Wettability on Pool Boiling Onset
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Invited talk of Dr. Pietrasanta at NASA 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact On October 16-17, 2019, NASA SLPSRA Fluid Physics Workshop was hosted by the Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. This event brought together scientists and engineers from academia, industry, and other government agencies to provide recommendations to NASA on exploration-related microgravity challenges in multiphase systems and thermal transport processes.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL http://www.cvent.com/events/2019-nasa-slpsra-fluid-physics-workshop/event-summary-0a98f56ee636488d9b...
 
Description Local Newspaper article on the parabolic flight experimental activities of HyHP 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Newspaper article describing to the general public the HyHP research activities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.theargus.co.uk/news/15715503.One_giant_leap_for_university_teddy_mascot/
 
Description Surface Wettability Effects on Phase Change Phenomena (SWEP) Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This workshop aimed at providing a forum for researchers to exchange knowledge on two-phase flows experiments, modelling and simulation, to discuss with worldwide experts their current research, and to propose a better comprehension on the effect of surface wettability on phase-change phenomena.
Specific topics included:
• Experimental techniques to measure the variation of phase change phenomena in presence of a surface with different wettability.
• Modelling of the effect of wettability on boiling
• Molecular dynamics simulations of phase change phenomena
• Mesoscale phenomena
• Mathematical models and computational techniques for phase
change processes
Eight invited lecturers gave stimulating lectures on various topics related to SWEP, offering a panoramic view of the field and on the most recent results.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://cpb-eu-w2.wpmucdn.com/blogs.brighton.ac.uk/dist/e/2879/files/2018/04/SWEP-Conf-2018-A3-2-1gz...
 
Description UK Special Interest Group kick off in "Developing commercial microgravity opportunities in the UK" 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact The UK Space Agency is reviewing how it can support UK players in the emerging Commercial Microgravity sector. Through discussions with various stakeholders over the last year a concept of a 'Community Business Developer' has emerged and the UK Space Agency has been reviewing how this role could operate in partnership with industry stakeholders and has asked Innovate UK's Knowledge Transfer Network to further define a possible vehicle for delivery of this role which would:

• bring together potential commercial users of microgravity with platform developers and academia.
• Raise awareness, promote and inform industry, including non-traditional space markets who to date are unaware of the possibilities of the microgravity research environment.
• Understand the needs of the market
• Identify barriers, enablers, risks, standards and legislation
• Roadmap the process from project idea through to full commercial activity
• Connect and enable collaboration
As part of the scoping process, the HyHP research Team was invited to a workshop on the 5th March 2019 at the European Centre for Space Applications and Telecommunications (ECSAT) to learn more about this work and input their views to the process.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description invited lecture of Prof. Marengo in Gordon Conference In Lucca 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Understanding Surface Wettability Effects on Ice Formation
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019