PRISM: Platform for Research In Simulation Methods

Lead Research Organisation: Imperial College London

Abstract

Computational science is a multidisciplinary research endeavour spanning applied mathematics, computer science and engineering together with input from application areas across science, technology and medicine. Advanced simulation methods have the potential to revolutionise not only scientific research but also to transform the industrial economy, offering companies a competitive advantage in their products, better productivity, and an environment for creative exploration and innovation.

The huge range of topics that computational science encapsulates means that the field is vast and new methods are constantly being published. These methods relate not only to the core simulation techniques but also to problems which rely on simulation. These problems include quantifying uncertainty (i.e. asking for error bars), blending models with data to make better predictions, solving inverse problems (if the output is Y, what is the input X?), and optimising designs (e.g. finding a vehicle shape that is the most aerodynamic). Unfortunately, the process through which advanced new methods find their way into applications and industrial practice is very slow.

One of the reasons for this is that applying mathematical algorithms to complex simulation models is very intrusive; mostly they cannot treat the simulation code as a "black box". They often require rewriting of the software, which is very time consuming and expensive. In our research we address this problem by using automating the generation of computer code for simulation. The key idea is that the simulation algorithm is described in some abstract way (which looks as much like the underlying mathematics as possible, after thinking carefully about what the key aspects are), and specialised software tools are used to automatically build the computer code. When some aspect of the implementation needs to change (for example a new type of computer is being used) then these tools can be used to rebuild the code from the abstract description. This flexibility dramatically accelerates the application of advanced algorithms to real-world problems.

Consider the example of optimising the shape of a Formula 1 car to minimise its drag. The optimisation process is highly invasive: it must solve auxiliary problems to learn how to improve the design, and it be able to modify the shape used in the simulation at each iteration. Typically this invasiveness would require extensive modifications to the simulation software. But by storing a symbolic representation of the aerodynamic equations, all operations necessary for the optimisation can be generated in our system, without needing to rewrite or modify the aerodynamics code at all.

The research goal of our platform is to investigate and promote this methodology, and to produce publicly available, sustainable open-source software that ensures its uptake. The platform will allow us to make advances in our software approach that enables us to continue to secure industrial and government funding in the broad range of application areas we work in, including aerospace and automotive sectors, renewable energy, medicine and surgery, the environment, and manufacturing.

Planned Impact

Academic and industrial users of computational modelling software will benefit from this research since the outputs of the platform will give them access to robust performance-portable implementations of advanced simulation methods, including the composition of models with mathematical algorithms that can solve optimisation problems, quantify uncertainty, assimilate data, etc. This includes our own industrial collaborators from BAE Systems, Airbus, McLaren Racing, Rolls Royce, Arup Consulting, Meygen, EDF, AMEC, Shell, BP, Intel and NVIDIA. Computational modelling is becoming a greater part of the digital economy as a replacement for physical prototyping for many of these industries. Advanced computational modelling can be used to allow high-tech companies to obtain an edge over competitors, to improve productivity in their processes and products, and to provide a environment for creativity and innovation. We also collaborate with public sector research centres such as the UK Met Office, the National Oceanographic Centre in Southampton and Liverpool, and the British Antarctic Survey, for whom the improved modelling capability will enable them to better inform government policy on energy and the environment.

The platform team have an exceptional track record of delivering professionally engineered software tools which, in contrast to much academic software, are well designed, robustly tested, comprehensively documented and ready for translation into production use. This key distinguishing point is critical in guaranteeing that effective wider impact is actually achieved. The institutionalization of best practice in scientific software development also creates maintainable software with an effective and usable life far beyond that of the platform.

There is a continuing need for multidisciplinary researchers with skills in computer science, computational mathematics and numerical modelling. Our Platform grant will enable training in multiple disciplines to address this demand from both industry and academia. Our Platform directly targets the barriers to impact that prevent sophisticated modelling techniques from finding widespread application in industry and science. Further, software tools developed in the platform will support systematic, flexible mapping from the science and engineering "business requirements" of a numerical modelling project right down to the gates and wires of a computational simulation.

We will ensure the impact is maximized by holding regular events where we showcase our work and share ideas with industrial collaborators, and give our researchers the opportunity to network, including a stakeholder input workshop upon renewal. We will fund projects that bring our researchers into direct contact with industrial partners, building proof-of- concept products and interacting on benchmarks and challenges; thus disseminating our ideas and software and collecting industrial user needs. Further, we will aim to influence and keep up with the latest innovations from hardware vendors. The type of multidisciplinary experience that we provide to researchers on this project will make them experts in both numerical modelling and the necessary computer science and software engineering foundations, ensuring they become very employable within both academia and industry.

Publications

10 25 50
 
Description The grant has funded a nunber of open source codes, freely available to all researchers, which can be used ot more accuractely predict fluid flows and designed new numerical methods to solve problems beyond fluid flows.
Exploitation Route The open source software allows anyone to build on our current efforts.
Sectors Aerospace, Defence and Marine,Energy,Manufacturing, including Industrial Biotechology,Transport

URL http://www.prism.ac.uk
 
Description The PI was invited to participate in a Blackett Review on modelling due to his role in this Platform grant and its predecessor. We have translated some of our software (Nektar++) in house to McLaren and Rolls Royce who are exploring its usage in their design process
First Year Of Impact 2018
Sector Aerospace, Defence and Marine,Environment,Transport
Impact Types Policy & public services

 
Description Research Software Engineering and PRISM
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
URL https://prism.ac.uk/2020/08/research-software-engineering-and-prism/
 
Description 'COVAIR': Is SARS-CoV-2 airborne and does it interact with particle pollutants?
Amount £515,964 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/V052462/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2021 
End 12/2021
 
Description (DJINN) - Decrease Jet-Installation Noise
Amount € 4,995,210 (EUR)
Funding ID 861438 
Organisation European Commission 
Sector Public
Country European Union (EU)
Start 05/2020 
End 05/2023
 
Description (HPCWE) - High performance computing for wind energy
Amount € 2,195,651 (EUR)
Funding ID 828799 
Organisation European Commission 
Sector Public
Country European Union (EU)
Start 05/2019 
End 11/2021
 
Description (SSeCoID) - Stability and Sensitivity Methods for Flow Control and Industrial Design
Amount € 4,121,913 (EUR)
Funding ID 955923 
Organisation European Commission 
Sector Public
Country European Union (EU)
Start 01/2021 
End 12/2024
 
Description A Research Software Engineering Hub for Computational Research
Amount £639,259 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/R025460/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 02/2018 
End 01/2023
 
Description ARCHER2-eCSE01-20 PI: Dr David A Ham (Imperial College) Scalable I/O and checkpointing for Firedrake (10 months)
Amount £96,390 (GBP)
Funding ID ARCHER2-eCSE01-20 
Organisation ARCHER 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2020 
End 08/2021
 
Description ARCHER2-eCSE03-4 PI: Prof Matthew Piggott (Imperial College London) Goal-oriented mesh adaptation for Firedrake (12 months)
Amount £10,000 (GBP)
Funding ID ARCHER2-eCSE03-4 
Organisation ARCHER 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 07/2021 
End 07/2022
 
Description ARCHER2-eCSE04-5 PI: Dr David A Ham (Imperial College) Scalable and robust Firedrake deployment on ARCHER2 and beyond (6 months)
Amount £54,876 (GBP)
Funding ID ARCHER2-eCSE04-5 
Organisation ARCHER 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 11/2021 
End 04/2022
 
Description Advanced Parallel in Time Algorithms for Partial Differential Equations Co-I: David Moxey and Colin Cotter
Amount £1,152,297 (GBP)
Organisation United Kingdom Research and Innovation 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 05/2021 
End 05/2024
 
Description Application Customisation: Enhancing Design Quality and Developer Productivity
Amount £1,263,356 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/P010040/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 03/2017 
End 02/2022
 
Description COMAC Centre
Amount £3,000,000 (GBP)
Funding ID Beijing Aeronautical Science& Technology Research Institute (BASTRI) of Commercial Aircraft Corporation of China (COMAC) 
Organisation Commercial Aircraft Corporation of China 
Sector Private
Country China
Start 06/2019 
End 07/2024
 
Description COvid-19 Transmission Risk Assessment Case Studies - education Establishments
Amount £814,959 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/W001411/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 02/2021 
End 07/2022
 
Description ELEMENT - Exascale Mesh Network
Amount £245,611 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/V001345/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 03/2020 
End 06/2021
 
Description EPSRC CENTRE FOR DOCTORAL TRAINING IN THE MATHEMATICS OF PLANET EARTH AT IMPERIAL COLLEGE LONDON AND THE UNIVERSITY OF READING
Amount £5,463,490 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/L016613/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 03/2014 
End 09/2022
 
Description EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in High Performance Embedded and Distributed Systems
Amount £4,081,693 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/L016796/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 03/2014 
End 09/2022
 
Description EPSRC Impact Acceleration award "Multi-scale adjoint-enabled modelling to improve operational storm surge forecasting at the Flood Forecasting Centre (FFC) and support the wider modelling community" (PI - Matt Piggott)
Amount £66,000 (GBP)
Funding ID EPSRC Impact Acceleration award "Multi-scale adjoint-enabled modelling to improve operational storm surge forecasting at the Flood Forecasting Centre (FFC) and support the wider modelling community" 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2019 
End 09/2021
 
Description EPSRC Impact Acceleration award (Co-I Colin Cotter)
Amount £25,349 (GBP)
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2019 
End 03/2020
 
Description EPSRC iCASE PhD project with Shell "Computational / data science techniques to improve and integrate weather forecasting in business decision-making" (Matt Piggott)
Amount £100,000 (GBP)
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2019 
End 09/2023
 
Description Efficient Cross-Domain DSL Development for Exascale
Amount £430,061 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/W007789/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 07/2021 
End 08/2024
 
Description Efficient Cross-Domain DSL Development for Exascale
Amount £577,148 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/W007940/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 07/2021 
End 08/2024
 
Description ExCALIBUR phase 1b SysGenX: Composable software generation for system-level simulation at Exascale
Amount £764,866 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/W026260/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 12/2021 
End 11/2024
 
Description ExCALIBUR: Examining the performance of Nektar++ for fusion applications PIs: Dr Moxey/Dr Cantwell/Prof Sherwin
Amount £252,000 (GBP)
Funding ID 252000 
Organisation United Kingdom Research and Innovation 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2021 
End 06/2022
 
Description ExCALIBUR: Solving high-dimensional plasma kinetics using Nektar++ PIs: Dr Cantwell/Dr Moxey/Prof Sherwin
Amount £156,000 (GBP)
Organisation United Kingdom Research and Innovation 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 12/2021 
End 09/2022
 
Description Gen X: ExCALIBUR working group on Exascale continuum mechanics through code generation.
Amount £159,456 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/V001493/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 03/2020 
End 06/2021
 
Description Health assessment across biological length scales for personal pollution exposure and its mitigation (INHALE)
Amount £2,793,915 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/T003189/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 03/2019 
End 03/2022
 
Description JUNO: A Network for Japan - UK Nuclear Opportunities
Amount £488,145 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/P013600/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 11/2016 
End 11/2021
 
Description Managing Air for Green Inner Cities
Amount £4,173,134 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/N010221/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 12/2015 
End 12/2020
 
Description Meteorological Office UK: SPF ExCALIBUR: EX20-8 - SPF EX20-8 Exposing Parallelism: Parallelin-Time (DN517492)
Amount £1,152,298 (GBP)
Funding ID DN517492 
Organisation Meteorological Office UK 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2021 
End 12/2024
 
Description NSFPLR-NERC: Melting at Thwaites grounding zone and its control on sea level (THWAITES-MELT)
Amount £206,031 (GBP)
Funding ID NE/S006427/1 
Organisation Natural Environment Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 08/2018 
End 08/2023
 
Description New Generation Modelling Suite for the Survivability of Wave Energy Convertors in Marine Environments (WavE-Suite)
Amount £1,003,317 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/V040235/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 07/2021 
End 08/2024
 
Description Next generation particle filters for stochastic partial differential equations
Amount £304,744 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/W016125/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2022 
End 12/2023
 
Description On the way to the asymptotic limit: mathematics of slow-fast coupling in PDEs
Amount £849,609 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/R029628/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 07/2018 
End 07/2022
 
Description On the way to the asymptotic limit: mathematics of slow-fast coupling in PDEs
Amount £849,609 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/R029628/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 07/2018 
End 07/2022
 
Description PREdictive Modelling with QuantIfication of UncERtainty for MultiphasE Systems (PREMIERE)
Amount £6,560,538 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/T000414/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2019 
End 09/2024
 
Description Parallel-in-time computation for sedimentary landscapes
Amount £80,619 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/W015439/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 03/2022 
End 02/2023
 
Description PhD studentship from the EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Partial Differential Equations
Amount £4,324,919 (GBP)
Organisation University of Oxford 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2021 
End 09/2025
 
Description PhD studentship from the EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Partial Differential Equations
Amount £58,000 (GBP)
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2018 
End 10/2021
 
Description PhD studentship from the EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Partial Differential Equations
Amount £58,000 (GBP)
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2018 
End 10/2021
 
Description PyFR: Towards Industry and Exascale
Amount £1,080,908 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/R030340/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 08/2018 
End 03/2022
 
Description Risk EvaLuatIon fAst iNtelligent Tool (RELIANT) for COVID19
Amount £1,356,505 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/V036777/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2020 
End 04/2022
 
Description SysGenX: Composable software generation for system-level simulation at Exascale
Amount £458,761 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/W026066/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 12/2021 
End 11/2024
 
Description TRACK: Transport Risk Assessment for COVID Knowledge
Amount £1,374,632 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/V032658/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 08/2020 
End 03/2022
 
Description The large-scale oceanic distribution of trace elements: disentangling preformed contributions, regenerative processes, subsurface sources and sinks
Amount £196,895 (GBP)
Funding ID NE/M017826/2 
Organisation Natural Environment Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 06/2018 
End 12/2020
 
Description Three dimensionality and Instabilities of Leading-Edge Vortices
Amount £449,805 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/S029389/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 08/2019 
End 09/2022
 
Description UK Turbulence Consortium
Amount £693,229 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/R029326/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2018 
End 09/2022
 
Description Uncertainty Quantification at the Exascale (EXA-UQ)
Amount £1,006,031 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/W007886/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 07/2021 
End 08/2024
 
Description Uncertainty Quantification at the Exascale (EXA-UQ) - Co-I: David Moxey
Amount £1,006,031 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/W007886/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 07/2021 
End 08/2024
 
Description Understanding and Nurturing an Integrated Vision for Education in RSE and HPC (UNIVERSE-HPC)
Amount £506,812 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/W035731/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 03/2022 
End 03/2025
 
Description [D*]stratify: harnessing energetics to control thermally stratified fluids
Amount £640,259 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/V033883/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 08/2021 
End 09/2024
 
Title Research Software Engineering and PRISM 
Description The PRISM platform is characterised by its group of advanced scientific research software and the teams that build and maintain this software. Software engineering expertise is therefore a significant part of PRISM. The term Research Software Engineering or RSE is becoming increasingly common within the research community. Indeed, the acronym "RSE" may be something that you are already familiar with or have encountered as it becomes more widely used. The RSE movement, which has developed over recent years, goes beyond purely considering expertise in building research software to include aspects such as best practices, careers, training, policy development and various other areas. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2020 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact Within the teams that are part of PRISM, there are many researchers and academics who spend much of their time writing code. In some cases, these individuals may identify themselves as Research Software Engineers while in other cases they may simply consider themselves as researchers who spend a lot of their time coding. Either way, there is lots that an active research software community can offer these people, from events at which to present their work and network with others developing software in different research fields through to offering training and offering opportunities to get involved with providing training to others. Imperial College London has a Research Software Community in which there are members of PRISM who are active participants. This includes helping to run the community as part of its organisational committee and attending events and activities provided by the community. PRISM also has links with the wider London and South East of England regional research software community RSLondon. One of UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC)'s 11 Research Software Engineering Fellows is directly linked with PRISM through a work programme that includes continuation of a previous collaboration with the Nektar++ team. This work is developing tools and services to support bridging the gap between the code and growing user communities. These user communities include individuals who have limited technical computing knowledge but advanced scientific and mathematical knowledge to support their use of the code and its outputs. 
URL https://prism.ac.uk/2020/08/research-software-engineering-and-prism/
 
Description Collaboration with Prof Kumbakonam Rajagopal (Texas A&M University) 
Organisation Texas A&M University
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Prof Patrick Farrell started working with Prof Kumbakonam Rajagopal from Texas A&M University on implicitly constituted models in elast
Collaborator Contribution Prof Patrick Farrell started working with Prof Kumbakonam Rajagopal from Texas A&M University on implicitly constituted models in elast
Impact Prof Patrick Farrell started working with Prof Kumbakonam Rajagopal from Texas A&M University on implicitly constituted models in elast
Start Year 2021
 
Description Collaboration with São Paulo Excellence Chair (SPEC) project 
Organisation Universidade de São Paulo
Country Brazil 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This project proposes to develop into a centre of excellence in FC research by  tapping into world-class researchers from both UK and Brazil. By starting the project with  state-of-the-art knowledge and a diversity of points of view, a fundamental goal of this SPEC  is to bring about a multiscale modelling-driven perspective into the now mature Brazilian FC community and share this knowledge, and the advances obtained through it, through the  multi- and transdisciplinarity of the RCGI. Seeing as how the traditional FC community has yet to deliver on critical components of a practical FC device, this project reaches out to leaders in research subjects that are cornerstones of FC technology, viz., quantum and molecular mechanics, meso and macroscopic transport phenomena, and electrocatalysis. These are coupled together via energetic and innovative young researchers, and a modelling driven approach backed by advanced experimental techniques towards validation of multi-scale models of FC devices. Thus, this São Paulo Excellence Chair (SPEC) aims at providing the state of São Paulo with a research nucleus in FCs through the participation of  Professors Nigel Brandon, Spencer Sherwin, Erich Muller and Anthony Kucernak, who are  world leading researchers in their respective fields. Tackling core and applied sciences, this SPEC advances on FC technologies as viable options to Brazil, where (bio)methane and bioethanol evolve to be important players in its future energy scenario. The proposed research hub is a joint initiative of leading institutions within the framework of the Research Centre for Gas Innovation (RCGI), at USP, and its paired institution, the Sustainable Gas  Institute (SGI), at Imperial College London (IC).
Collaborator Contribution The UNICAMP Department of Science and Technology Policy has established a new research and doctoral teaching programme on innovation policy and innovation systems centered around a São Paulo Excellence Chair (SPEC). This SPEC programme aims at: (i) reinforcing research excellence on innovation policy and management at the University of Campinas; (ii) further internationalizing the work of DPCT; and (iii) placing UNICAMP among the top ranking academic units in the field on a global scale. The programme has four areas of concentration: systems of innovation, programme and policy appraisal and evaluation, strategic partnerships and networks, and knowledge-based entrepreneurship. Doctoral and post-doctoral training is a core part of the programme with several positions to be announced in its duration. All these positions are international aiming at attracting to UNICAMP strong talent from all over Brazil and abroad. The programme promotes academic research, publications in refereed journals and books, grant and contract work, executive training, seminars and workshops, and public engagement in the form of advising to both governments and the private sector thus extending the already significant engagement of UNICAMP with both sectors. The SPEC programme will also organize five international workshops and two conferences during its first five years.
Impact This project proposes to develop into a centre of excellence in FC research by  tapping into world-class researchers from both UK and Brazil. By starting the project with  state-of-the-art knowledge and a diversity of points of view, a fundamental goal of this SPEC  is to bring about a multiscale modelling-driven perspective into the now mature Brazilian FC community and share this knowledge, and the advances obtained through it, through the  multi- and transdisciplinarity of the RCGI. Seeing as how the traditional FC community has yet to deliver on critical components of a practical FC device, this project reaches out to leaders in research subjects that are cornerstones of FC technology, viz., quantum and molecular mechanics, meso and macroscopic transport phenomena, and electrocatalysis. These are coupled together via energetic and innovative young researchers, and a modelling driven approach backed by advanced experimental techniques towards validation of multi-scale models of FC devices. Thus, this São Paulo Excellence Chair (SPEC) aims at providing the state of São Paulo with a research nucleus in FCs through the participation of  Professors Nigel Brandon, Spencer Sherwin, Erich Muller and Anthony Kucernak, who are  world leading researchers in their respective fields. Tackling core and applied sciences, this SPEC advances on FC technologies as viable options to Brazil, where (bio)methane and bioethanol evolve to be important players in its future energy scenario. The proposed research hub is a joint initiative of leading institutions within the framework of the Research Centre for Gas Innovation (RCGI), at USP, and its paired institution, the Sustainable Gas  Institute (SGI), at Imperial College London (IC).
Start Year 2022
 
Description Firedrake and EDF 
Organisation EDF Energy
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Firedrake is used in EDF's simulations in support of their geological storage of nuclear waste. The ability to rapidly combine sophisticated linear solvers and preconditioners has enabled them to overcome the scaling limitations of their current approaches, and they have committed resources to implement the improvements in their production code.
Collaborator Contribution Firedrake is used in EDF's simulations in support of their geological storage of nuclear waste. The ability to rapidly combine sophisticated linear solvers and preconditioners has enabled them to overcome the scaling limitations of their current approaches, and they have committed resources to implement the improvements in their production code.
Impact Firedrake is used in EDF's simulations in support of their geological storage of nuclear waste. The ability to rapidly combine sophisticated linear solvers and preconditioners has enabled them to overcome the scaling limitations of their current approaches, and they have committed resources to implement the improvements in their production code.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Firedrake and Finnish Meteorological Institute 
Organisation Finnish Meteorological Institute
Country Finland 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The Finnish Meteorological Institute have built a coastal ocean modelling system, Thetis, directly using Firedrake. They use the 3D version of this model to develop their understanding of the complex internal processes that characterise the coastal ocean. The 2D version of the model enables sea level simulation over a wide area and has been chosen as the basis for their next generation operational forecasting capability.
Collaborator Contribution The Finnish Meteorological Institute have built a coastal ocean modelling system, Thetis, directly using Firedrake. They use the 3D version of this model to develop their understanding of the complex internal processes that characterise the coastal ocean. The 2D version of the model enables sea level simulation over a wide area and has been chosen as the basis for their next generation operational forecasting capability.
Impact The Finnish Meteorological Institute have built a coastal ocean modelling system, Thetis, directly using Firedrake. They use the 3D version of this model to develop their understanding of the complex internal processes that characterise the coastal ocean. The 2D version of the model enables sea level simulation over a wide area and has been chosen as the basis for their next generation operational forecasting capability.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Hewlett Packard: Gen X: ExCALIBUR working group on Exascale continuum mechanics through code generation 
Organisation Hewlett Packard Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Continuous physical processes pervade every aspect of our society, industry and the natural world. From the flow of air over an aircraft to the propagation of mobile phone signals, to the behaviour of chemical components at every point of the manufacturing processes, continuum mechanics is at the heart of our industrial processes. In medicine, the electrical behaviour of the heart and brain, the flow of blood and other fluids through the body, and the detection of disorders using all manner of scanners and detectors are all continuum mechanics processes. In the natural world, detecting and understanding the movement and composition of the Earth enable us to understand earthquakes and to hunt for valuable minerals, while advanced understanding of the complex interaction of fluids and electromagnetic fields allows us to understand stars, the cosmos and our place in it. In all of these cases and many more beside, the mathematical equations describing phenomena are known, but solutions very rarely exist. Science and engineering are essentially dependent on computer simulation to understand any of these systems, and to design the devices and processes which use them. Many of these phenomena are so complex or have such a range of spatial scales that existing petascale computer systems are a limit on scientific advance. In addition, there is a need to go beyond mere simulation to simulate the uncertainty in processes, find the optimal solution, or discover the multiple possible outcomes of a system. The advent of exascale computing presents the opportunity to address these limitations. However, increasing computational scale, increasingly complex simulation algorithms, and the vast quantities of data produced by exascale computing will defeat not just existing simulation software, but also existing ways of writing simulation software. Gen X is a project to establish the requirements for exascale simulation software for continuum mechanics, and to provide a concrete way of achieving this capability within the next five years. The Gen X approach is to move beyond just writing code to a system of specialist simulation languages which enable scientists and engineers to specify the problem they want to solve and the algorithms they want by writing mathematics, the language of science. The actual code will be automatically generated by specialist compilers rather than hand-written. Rather than an algorithm developer writing a paper about their new development and hoping that simulation scientists will find the time to code it up for their specific problem, the algorithm will be encoded in a domain specific language and implemented in its compiler. The simulation scientist will then be able to access the algorithm directly without recoding. At exascale, writing all the simulation outputs to disk for later analysis is impossible. Instead, simulation data must be processed, analysed and visualised as the simulation is conducted, and only the results stored for later use. Gen X will provide mathematical languages for this process which will enable the scientist or engineer to concisely specify the analysis to be performed, and to have confidence that the resulting calculations will be both efficient and correct. By enabling scientists and engineers to work at a higher mathematical level while also accessing more sophisticated algorithms and hardware-specific implementations than previously possible, Gen X will make simulation science both more capable and more productive. In this manner, Gen X is essential to realising the potential of exascale computing while also making the most efficient use of research resources.
Collaborator Contribution Continuous physical processes pervade every aspect of our society, industry and the natural world. From the flow of air over an aircraft to the propagation of mobile phone signals, to the behaviour of chemical components at every point of the manufacturing processes, continuum mechanics is at the heart of our industrial processes. In medicine, the electrical behaviour of the heart and brain, the flow of blood and other fluids through the body, and the detection of disorders using all manner of scanners and detectors are all continuum mechanics processes. In the natural world, detecting and understanding the movement and composition of the Earth enable us to understand earthquakes and to hunt for valuable minerals, while advanced understanding of the complex interaction of fluids and electromagnetic fields allows us to understand stars, the cosmos and our place in it. In all of these cases and many more beside, the mathematical equations describing phenomena are known, but solutions very rarely exist. Science and engineering are essentially dependent on computer simulation to understand any of these systems, and to design the devices and processes which use them. Many of these phenomena are so complex or have such a range of spatial scales that existing petascale computer systems are a limit on scientific advance. In addition, there is a need to go beyond mere simulation to simulate the uncertainty in processes, find the optimal solution, or discover the multiple possible outcomes of a system. The advent of exascale computing presents the opportunity to address these limitations. However, increasing computational scale, increasingly complex simulation algorithms, and the vast quantities of data produced by exascale computing will defeat not just existing simulation software, but also existing ways of writing simulation software. Gen X is a project to establish the requirements for exascale simulation software for continuum mechanics, and to provide a concrete way of achieving this capability within the next five years. The Gen X approach is to move beyond just writing code to a system of specialist simulation languages which enable scientists and engineers to specify the problem they want to solve and the algorithms they want by writing mathematics, the language of science. The actual code will be automatically generated by specialist compilers rather than hand-written. Rather than an algorithm developer writing a paper about their new development and hoping that simulation scientists will find the time to code it up for their specific problem, the algorithm will be encoded in a domain specific language and implemented in its compiler. The simulation scientist will then be able to access the algorithm directly without recoding. At exascale, writing all the simulation outputs to disk for later analysis is impossible. Instead, simulation data must be processed, analysed and visualised as the simulation is conducted, and only the results stored for later use. Gen X will provide mathematical languages for this process which will enable the scientist or engineer to concisely specify the analysis to be performed, and to have confidence that the resulting calculations will be both efficient and correct. By enabling scientists and engineers to work at a higher mathematical level while also accessing more sophisticated algorithms and hardware-specific implementations than previously possible, Gen X will make simulation science both more capable and more productive. In this manner, Gen X is essential to realising the potential of exascale computing while also making the most efficient use of research resources.
Impact multi-disciplinary
Start Year 2020
 
Description IBM: Gen X: ExCALIBUR working group on Exascale continuum mechanics through code generation 
Organisation IBM
Country United States 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Continuous physical processes pervade every aspect of our society, industry and the natural world. From the flow of air over an aircraft to the propagation of mobile phone signals, to the behaviour of chemical components at every point of the manufacturing processes, continuum mechanics is at the heart of our industrial processes. In medicine, the electrical behaviour of the heart and brain, the flow of blood and other fluids through the body, and the detection of disorders using all manner of scanners and detectors are all continuum mechanics processes. In the natural world, detecting and understanding the movement and composition of the Earth enable us to understand earthquakes and to hunt for valuable minerals, while advanced understanding of the complex interaction of fluids and electromagnetic fields allows us to understand stars, the cosmos and our place in it. In all of these cases and many more beside, the mathematical equations describing phenomena are known, but solutions very rarely exist. Science and engineering are essentially dependent on computer simulation to understand any of these systems, and to design the devices and processes which use them. Many of these phenomena are so complex or have such a range of spatial scales that existing petascale computer systems are a limit on scientific advance. In addition, there is a need to go beyond mere simulation to simulate the uncertainty in processes, find the optimal solution, or discover the multiple possible outcomes of a system. The advent of exascale computing presents the opportunity to address these limitations. However, increasing computational scale, increasingly complex simulation algorithms, and the vast quantities of data produced by exascale computing will defeat not just existing simulation software, but also existing ways of writing simulation software. Gen X is a project to establish the requirements for exascale simulation software for continuum mechanics, and to provide a concrete way of achieving this capability within the next five years. The Gen X approach is to move beyond just writing code to a system of specialist simulation languages which enable scientists and engineers to specify the problem they want to solve and the algorithms they want by writing mathematics, the language of science. The actual code will be automatically generated by specialist compilers rather than hand-written. Rather than an algorithm developer writing a paper about their new development and hoping that simulation scientists will find the time to code it up for their specific problem, the algorithm will be encoded in a domain specific language and implemented in its compiler. The simulation scientist will then be able to access the algorithm directly without recoding. At exascale, writing all the simulation outputs to disk for later analysis is impossible. Instead, simulation data must be processed, analysed and visualised as the simulation is conducted, and only the results stored for later use. Gen X will provide mathematical languages for this process which will enable the scientist or engineer to concisely specify the analysis to be performed, and to have confidence that the resulting calculations will be both efficient and correct. By enabling scientists and engineers to work at a higher mathematical level while also accessing more sophisticated algorithms and hardware-specific implementations than previously possible, Gen X will make simulation science both more capable and more productive. In this manner, Gen X is essential to realising the potential of exascale computing while also making the most efficient use of research resources.
Collaborator Contribution Continuous physical processes pervade every aspect of our society, industry and the natural world. From the flow of air over an aircraft to the propagation of mobile phone signals, to the behaviour of chemical components at every point of the manufacturing processes, continuum mechanics is at the heart of our industrial processes. In medicine, the electrical behaviour of the heart and brain, the flow of blood and other fluids through the body, and the detection of disorders using all manner of scanners and detectors are all continuum mechanics processes. In the natural world, detecting and understanding the movement and composition of the Earth enable us to understand earthquakes and to hunt for valuable minerals, while advanced understanding of the complex interaction of fluids and electromagnetic fields allows us to understand stars, the cosmos and our place in it. In all of these cases and many more beside, the mathematical equations describing phenomena are known, but solutions very rarely exist. Science and engineering are essentially dependent on computer simulation to understand any of these systems, and to design the devices and processes which use them. Many of these phenomena are so complex or have such a range of spatial scales that existing petascale computer systems are a limit on scientific advance. In addition, there is a need to go beyond mere simulation to simulate the uncertainty in processes, find the optimal solution, or discover the multiple possible outcomes of a system. The advent of exascale computing presents the opportunity to address these limitations. However, increasing computational scale, increasingly complex simulation algorithms, and the vast quantities of data produced by exascale computing will defeat not just existing simulation software, but also existing ways of writing simulation software. Gen X is a project to establish the requirements for exascale simulation software for continuum mechanics, and to provide a concrete way of achieving this capability within the next five years. The Gen X approach is to move beyond just writing code to a system of specialist simulation languages which enable scientists and engineers to specify the problem they want to solve and the algorithms they want by writing mathematics, the language of science. The actual code will be automatically generated by specialist compilers rather than hand-written. Rather than an algorithm developer writing a paper about their new development and hoping that simulation scientists will find the time to code it up for their specific problem, the algorithm will be encoded in a domain specific language and implemented in its compiler. The simulation scientist will then be able to access the algorithm directly without recoding. At exascale, writing all the simulation outputs to disk for later analysis is impossible. Instead, simulation data must be processed, analysed and visualised as the simulation is conducted, and only the results stored for later use. Gen X will provide mathematical languages for this process which will enable the scientist or engineer to concisely specify the analysis to be performed, and to have confidence that the resulting calculations will be both efficient and correct. By enabling scientists and engineers to work at a higher mathematical level while also accessing more sophisticated algorithms and hardware-specific implementations than previously possible, Gen X will make simulation science both more capable and more productive. In this manner, Gen X is essential to realising the potential of exascale computing while also making the most efficient use of research resources.
Impact multi-disciplinary
Start Year 2020
 
Description McLaren Racing 
Organisation McLaren Racing
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution We have transferred fundamental ideas behind vortex stability and identification to their design practice. More recently we are been applying computational modelling tools developed in an academic setting to example flow problems of direct interest to McLaren.
Collaborator Contribution Data and motivation on how to focus our research direction
Impact .
Start Year 2007
 
Description Met Office 
Organisation Meteorological Office UK
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution GungHo - a next generation atmospheric dynamical core for weather and climate modelling Some of the key aspects The grid that the model is discretized on. Removal of the singularity in the current latitude-longitude grid is considered essential to achieving good scalability. Although no alternative grid is without its own issues, the cubed-sphere grid has a number of advantages over other choices and is currently the preferred option. Highly scalable implicit solvers. There are significant advantages to retaining a two-time-level implicit temporal discretization, but this is only viable if the resulting implicit system, with its global connectivity, can be efficiently solved on hundreds of thousands of processors. Inherently conservative advection schemes. Only dry mass is inherently conserved by the current dynamical core, yet there is a growing need to exactly conserve a number of tracer fields, as well as possibly such quantities as energy and angular momentum. This requires replacement of the current pointwise semi-Lagrangian scheme with a flux-form conserving advection scheme, be that a semi-Lagrangian one or an Eulerian one, while preserving the good phase properties of the current scheme. The spatial discretization. A mixed finite-element spatial discretization, as distinct from the current finite-difference/finite-volume approach, permits the use of alternative grid structures without some of the disadvantages that those grids incur with a finite-difference discretization. A new modelling infrastructure has been designed to permit the efficient implementation of these changes. This is called LFRic after Lewis Fry Richardson (see Related pages). A further important element is how each of the above interacts with, and depends upon, each other. Key aims To design and develop a dynamical core that scales well on hundreds of thousands of processors while maintaining at least the accuracy and robustness of its contemporary dynamical core. To improve the conservation properties of the dynamical core.
Collaborator Contribution Some of the key aspects The grid that the model is discretized on. Removal of the singularity in the current latitude-longitude grid is considered essential to achieving good scalability. Although no alternative grid is without its own issues, the cubed-sphere grid has a number of advantages over other choices and is currently the preferred option. Highly scalable implicit solvers. There are significant advantages to retaining a two-time-level implicit temporal discretization, but this is only viable if the resulting implicit system, with its global connectivity, can be efficiently solved on hundreds of thousands of processors. Inherently conservative advection schemes. Only dry mass is inherently conserved by the current dynamical core, yet there is a growing need to exactly conserve a number of tracer fields, as well as possibly such quantities as energy and angular momentum. This requires replacement of the current pointwise semi-Lagrangian scheme with a flux-form conserving advection scheme, be that a semi-Lagrangian one or an Eulerian one, while preserving the good phase properties of the current scheme. The spatial discretization. A mixed finite-element spatial discretization, as distinct from the current finite-difference/finite-volume approach, permits the use of alternative grid structures without some of the disadvantages that those grids incur with a finite-difference discretization. A new modelling infrastructure has been designed to permit the efficient implementation of these changes. This is called LFRic after Lewis Fry Richardson (see Related pages). A further important element is how each of the above interacts with, and depends upon, each other. Key aims To design and develop a dynamical core that scales well on hundreds of thousands of processors while maintaining at least the accuracy and robustness of its contemporary dynamical core. To improve the conservation properties of the dynamical core.
Impact multi-disciplinary
Start Year 2010
 
Description Naval Postgraduate School 
Organisation Naval Postgraduate School, Monterrey CA
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Collaboration with DR THOMAS GIBSON (NRC fellow at the Naval Postgraduate School) who actively develops for the Firedrake Project: an open-source software package for automating the solution of PDEs using the finite element method.
Collaborator Contribution Collaboration with DR THOMAS GIBSON (NRC fellow at the Naval Postgraduate School) who actively develops for the Firedrake Project: an open-source software package for automating the solution of PDEs using the finite element method.
Impact Collaboration with DR THOMAS GIBSON (NRC fellow at the Naval Postgraduate School) who actively develops for the Firedrake Project: an open-source software package for automating the solution of PDEs using the finite element method.
Start Year 2019
 
Description PyFr and Zenotech 
Organisation Zenotech
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Zenotech, based in Bristol, delivers market-leading high-performance computing tool and consultancy services for businesses in the aerospace, automotive, civil and renewable energy sectors. Zenotech has added a flux reconstruction solver based on PyFr to its proprietary zCFD codebase, complementing the existing finite volume solver. The resulting high order solver is being used by Zenotech to simulate aircraft parts and in acoustic problems for the rail sector.
Collaborator Contribution Zenotech, based in Bristol, delivers market-leading high-performance computing tool and consultancy services for businesses in the aerospace, automotive, civil and renewable energy sectors. Zenotech has added a flux reconstruction solver based on PyFr to its proprietary zCFD codebase, complementing the existing finite volume solver. The resulting high order solver is being used by Zenotech to simulate aircraft parts and in acoustic problems for the rail sector.
Impact Zenotech, based in Bristol, delivers market-leading high-performance computing tool and consultancy services for businesses in the aerospace, automotive, civil and renewable energy sectors. Zenotech has added a flux reconstruction solver based on PyFr to its proprietary zCFD codebase, complementing the existing finite volume solver. The resulting high order solver is being used by Zenotech to simulate aircraft parts and in acoustic problems for the rail sector.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Rolls Royce 
Organisation Rolls Royce Group Plc
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution We have been exploring the application of the Nektar++ software to turbo-machinery problem.
Collaborator Contribution Access to data and expert knowledge of the field as well as exposure to other researcher supported by Rolls Royce
Impact Presentations of methods at international conferences and internal workshops
Start Year 2017
 
Description Schlumberger: Gen X: ExCALIBUR working group on Exascale continuum mechanics through code generation 
Organisation Schumberger
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Continuous physical processes pervade every aspect of our society, industry and the natural world. From the flow of air over an aircraft to the propagation of mobile phone signals, to the behaviour of chemical components at every point of the manufacturing processes, continuum mechanics is at the heart of our industrial processes. In medicine, the electrical behaviour of the heart and brain, the flow of blood and other fluids through the body, and the detection of disorders using all manner of scanners and detectors are all continuum mechanics processes. In the natural world, detecting and understanding the movement and composition of the Earth enable us to understand earthquakes and to hunt for valuable minerals, while advanced understanding of the complex interaction of fluids and electromagnetic fields allows us to understand stars, the cosmos and our place in it. In all of these cases and many more beside, the mathematical equations describing phenomena are known, but solutions very rarely exist. Science and engineering are essentially dependent on computer simulation to understand any of these systems, and to design the devices and processes which use them. Many of these phenomena are so complex or have such a range of spatial scales that existing petascale computer systems are a limit on scientific advance. In addition, there is a need to go beyond mere simulation to simulate the uncertainty in processes, find the optimal solution, or discover the multiple possible outcomes of a system. The advent of exascale computing presents the opportunity to address these limitations. However, increasing computational scale, increasingly complex simulation algorithms, and the vast quantities of data produced by exascale computing will defeat not just existing simulation software, but also existing ways of writing simulation software. Gen X is a project to establish the requirements for exascale simulation software for continuum mechanics, and to provide a concrete way of achieving this capability within the next five years. The Gen X approach is to move beyond just writing code to a system of specialist simulation languages which enable scientists and engineers to specify the problem they want to solve and the algorithms they want by writing mathematics, the language of science. The actual code will be automatically generated by specialist compilers rather than hand-written. Rather than an algorithm developer writing a paper about their new development and hoping that simulation scientists will find the time to code it up for their specific problem, the algorithm will be encoded in a domain specific language and implemented in its compiler. The simulation scientist will then be able to access the algorithm directly without recoding. At exascale, writing all the simulation outputs to disk for later analysis is impossible. Instead, simulation data must be processed, analysed and visualised as the simulation is conducted, and only the results stored for later use. Gen X will provide mathematical languages for this process which will enable the scientist or engineer to concisely specify the analysis to be performed, and to have confidence that the resulting calculations will be both efficient and correct. By enabling scientists and engineers to work at a higher mathematical level while also accessing more sophisticated algorithms and hardware-specific implementations than previously possible, Gen X will make simulation science both more capable and more productive. In this manner, Gen X is essential to realising the potential of exascale computing while also making the most efficient use of research resources.
Collaborator Contribution Continuous physical processes pervade every aspect of our society, industry and the natural world. From the flow of air over an aircraft to the propagation of mobile phone signals, to the behaviour of chemical components at every point of the manufacturing processes, continuum mechanics is at the heart of our industrial processes. In medicine, the electrical behaviour of the heart and brain, the flow of blood and other fluids through the body, and the detection of disorders using all manner of scanners and detectors are all continuum mechanics processes. In the natural world, detecting and understanding the movement and composition of the Earth enable us to understand earthquakes and to hunt for valuable minerals, while advanced understanding of the complex interaction of fluids and electromagnetic fields allows us to understand stars, the cosmos and our place in it. In all of these cases and many more beside, the mathematical equations describing phenomena are known, but solutions very rarely exist. Science and engineering are essentially dependent on computer simulation to understand any of these systems, and to design the devices and processes which use them. Many of these phenomena are so complex or have such a range of spatial scales that existing petascale computer systems are a limit on scientific advance. In addition, there is a need to go beyond mere simulation to simulate the uncertainty in processes, find the optimal solution, or discover the multiple possible outcomes of a system. The advent of exascale computing presents the opportunity to address these limitations. However, increasing computational scale, increasingly complex simulation algorithms, and the vast quantities of data produced by exascale computing will defeat not just existing simulation software, but also existing ways of writing simulation software. Gen X is a project to establish the requirements for exascale simulation software for continuum mechanics, and to provide a concrete way of achieving this capability within the next five years. The Gen X approach is to move beyond just writing code to a system of specialist simulation languages which enable scientists and engineers to specify the problem they want to solve and the algorithms they want by writing mathematics, the language of science. The actual code will be automatically generated by specialist compilers rather than hand-written. Rather than an algorithm developer writing a paper about their new development and hoping that simulation scientists will find the time to code it up for their specific problem, the algorithm will be encoded in a domain specific language and implemented in its compiler. The simulation scientist will then be able to access the algorithm directly without recoding. At exascale, writing all the simulation outputs to disk for later analysis is impossible. Instead, simulation data must be processed, analysed and visualised as the simulation is conducted, and only the results stored for later use. Gen X will provide mathematical languages for this process which will enable the scientist or engineer to concisely specify the analysis to be performed, and to have confidence that the resulting calculations will be both efficient and correct. By enabling scientists and engineers to work at a higher mathematical level while also accessing more sophisticated algorithms and hardware-specific implementations than previously possible, Gen X will make simulation science both more capable and more productive. In this manner, Gen X is essential to realising the potential of exascale computing while also making the most efficient use of research resources.
Impact multi-disciplinary
Start Year 2020
 
Description Scientists in the dynamics research group at the Met Office are using Firedrake to develop new numerics and solvers for weather and climate simulation. 
Organisation Meteorological Office UK
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Scientists in the dynamics research group at the Met Office are using Firedrake to develop new numerics and solvers for weather and climate simulation.
Collaborator Contribution Scientists in the dynamics research group at the Met Office are using Firedrake to develop new numerics and solvers for weather and climate simulation.
Impact Scientists in the dynamics research group at the Met Office are using Firedrake to develop new numerics and solvers for weather and climate simulation.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Technical University of Munich: Gen X: ExCALIBUR working group on Exascale continuum mechanics through code generation 
Organisation Technical University of Munich
Country Germany 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Continuous physical processes pervade every aspect of our society, industry and the natural world. From the flow of air over an aircraft to the propagation of mobile phone signals, to the behaviour of chemical components at every point of the manufacturing processes, continuum mechanics is at the heart of our industrial processes. In medicine, the electrical behaviour of the heart and brain, the flow of blood and other fluids through the body, and the detection of disorders using all manner of scanners and detectors are all continuum mechanics processes. In the natural world, detecting and understanding the movement and composition of the Earth enable us to understand earthquakes and to hunt for valuable minerals, while advanced understanding of the complex interaction of fluids and electromagnetic fields allows us to understand stars, the cosmos and our place in it. In all of these cases and many more beside, the mathematical equations describing phenomena are known, but solutions very rarely exist. Science and engineering are essentially dependent on computer simulation to understand any of these systems, and to design the devices and processes which use them. Many of these phenomena are so complex or have such a range of spatial scales that existing petascale computer systems are a limit on scientific advance. In addition, there is a need to go beyond mere simulation to simulate the uncertainty in processes, find the optimal solution, or discover the multiple possible outcomes of a system. The advent of exascale computing presents the opportunity to address these limitations. However, increasing computational scale, increasingly complex simulation algorithms, and the vast quantities of data produced by exascale computing will defeat not just existing simulation software, but also existing ways of writing simulation software. Gen X is a project to establish the requirements for exascale simulation software for continuum mechanics, and to provide a concrete way of achieving this capability within the next five years. The Gen X approach is to move beyond just writing code to a system of specialist simulation languages which enable scientists and engineers to specify the problem they want to solve and the algorithms they want by writing mathematics, the language of science. The actual code will be automatically generated by specialist compilers rather than hand-written. Rather than an algorithm developer writing a paper about their new development and hoping that simulation scientists will find the time to code it up for their specific problem, the algorithm will be encoded in a domain specific language and implemented in its compiler. The simulation scientist will then be able to access the algorithm directly without recoding. At exascale, writing all the simulation outputs to disk for later analysis is impossible. Instead, simulation data must be processed, analysed and visualised as the simulation is conducted, and only the results stored for later use. Gen X will provide mathematical languages for this process which will enable the scientist or engineer to concisely specify the analysis to be performed, and to have confidence that the resulting calculations will be both efficient and correct. By enabling scientists and engineers to work at a higher mathematical level while also accessing more sophisticated algorithms and hardware-specific implementations than previously possible, Gen X will make simulation science both more capable and more productive. In this manner, Gen X is essential to realising the potential of exascale computing while also making the most efficient use of research resources.
Collaborator Contribution Continuous physical processes pervade every aspect of our society, industry and the natural world. From the flow of air over an aircraft to the propagation of mobile phone signals, to the behaviour of chemical components at every point of the manufacturing processes, continuum mechanics is at the heart of our industrial processes. In medicine, the electrical behaviour of the heart and brain, the flow of blood and other fluids through the body, and the detection of disorders using all manner of scanners and detectors are all continuum mechanics processes. In the natural world, detecting and understanding the movement and composition of the Earth enable us to understand earthquakes and to hunt for valuable minerals, while advanced understanding of the complex interaction of fluids and electromagnetic fields allows us to understand stars, the cosmos and our place in it. In all of these cases and many more beside, the mathematical equations describing phenomena are known, but solutions very rarely exist. Science and engineering are essentially dependent on computer simulation to understand any of these systems, and to design the devices and processes which use them. Many of these phenomena are so complex or have such a range of spatial scales that existing petascale computer systems are a limit on scientific advance. In addition, there is a need to go beyond mere simulation to simulate the uncertainty in processes, find the optimal solution, or discover the multiple possible outcomes of a system. The advent of exascale computing presents the opportunity to address these limitations. However, increasing computational scale, increasingly complex simulation algorithms, and the vast quantities of data produced by exascale computing will defeat not just existing simulation software, but also existing ways of writing simulation software. Gen X is a project to establish the requirements for exascale simulation software for continuum mechanics, and to provide a concrete way of achieving this capability within the next five years. The Gen X approach is to move beyond just writing code to a system of specialist simulation languages which enable scientists and engineers to specify the problem they want to solve and the algorithms they want by writing mathematics, the language of science. The actual code will be automatically generated by specialist compilers rather than hand-written. Rather than an algorithm developer writing a paper about their new development and hoping that simulation scientists will find the time to code it up for their specific problem, the algorithm will be encoded in a domain specific language and implemented in its compiler. The simulation scientist will then be able to access the algorithm directly without recoding. At exascale, writing all the simulation outputs to disk for later analysis is impossible. Instead, simulation data must be processed, analysed and visualised as the simulation is conducted, and only the results stored for later use. Gen X will provide mathematical languages for this process which will enable the scientist or engineer to concisely specify the analysis to be performed, and to have confidence that the resulting calculations will be both efficient and correct. By enabling scientists and engineers to work at a higher mathematical level while also accessing more sophisticated algorithms and hardware-specific implementations than previously possible, Gen X will make simulation science both more capable and more productive. In this manner, Gen X is essential to realising the potential of exascale computing while also making the most efficient use of research resources.
Impact multi-disciplinary
Start Year 2020
 
Description Technical University of Munich: Gen X: ExCALIBUR working group on Exascale continuum mechanics through code generation 
Organisation Technical University of Munich
Country Germany 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Continuous physical processes pervade every aspect of our society, industry and the natural world. From the flow of air over an aircraft to the propagation of mobile phone signals, to the behaviour of chemical components at every point of the manufacturing processes, continuum mechanics is at the heart of our industrial processes. In medicine, the electrical behaviour of the heart and brain, the flow of blood and other fluids through the body, and the detection of disorders using all manner of scanners and detectors are all continuum mechanics processes. In the natural world, detecting and understanding the movement and composition of the Earth enable us to understand earthquakes and to hunt for valuable minerals, while advanced understanding of the complex interaction of fluids and electromagnetic fields allows us to understand stars, the cosmos and our place in it. In all of these cases and many more beside, the mathematical equations describing phenomena are known, but solutions very rarely exist. Science and engineering are essentially dependent on computer simulation to understand any of these systems, and to design the devices and processes which use them. Many of these phenomena are so complex or have such a range of spatial scales that existing petascale computer systems are a limit on scientific advance. In addition, there is a need to go beyond mere simulation to simulate the uncertainty in processes, find the optimal solution, or discover the multiple possible outcomes of a system. The advent of exascale computing presents the opportunity to address these limitations. However, increasing computational scale, increasingly complex simulation algorithms, and the vast quantities of data produced by exascale computing will defeat not just existing simulation software, but also existing ways of writing simulation software. Gen X is a project to establish the requirements for exascale simulation software for continuum mechanics, and to provide a concrete way of achieving this capability within the next five years. The Gen X approach is to move beyond just writing code to a system of specialist simulation languages which enable scientists and engineers to specify the problem they want to solve and the algorithms they want by writing mathematics, the language of science. The actual code will be automatically generated by specialist compilers rather than hand-written. Rather than an algorithm developer writing a paper about their new development and hoping that simulation scientists will find the time to code it up for their specific problem, the algorithm will be encoded in a domain specific language and implemented in its compiler. The simulation scientist will then be able to access the algorithm directly without recoding. At exascale, writing all the simulation outputs to disk for later analysis is impossible. Instead, simulation data must be processed, analysed and visualised as the simulation is conducted, and only the results stored for later use. Gen X will provide mathematical languages for this process which will enable the scientist or engineer to concisely specify the analysis to be performed, and to have confidence that the resulting calculations will be both efficient and correct. By enabling scientists and engineers to work at a higher mathematical level while also accessing more sophisticated algorithms and hardware-specific implementations than previously possible, Gen X will make simulation science both more capable and more productive. In this manner, Gen X is essential to realising the potential of exascale computing while also making the most efficient use of research resources.
Collaborator Contribution Continuous physical processes pervade every aspect of our society, industry and the natural world. From the flow of air over an aircraft to the propagation of mobile phone signals, to the behaviour of chemical components at every point of the manufacturing processes, continuum mechanics is at the heart of our industrial processes. In medicine, the electrical behaviour of the heart and brain, the flow of blood and other fluids through the body, and the detection of disorders using all manner of scanners and detectors are all continuum mechanics processes. In the natural world, detecting and understanding the movement and composition of the Earth enable us to understand earthquakes and to hunt for valuable minerals, while advanced understanding of the complex interaction of fluids and electromagnetic fields allows us to understand stars, the cosmos and our place in it. In all of these cases and many more beside, the mathematical equations describing phenomena are known, but solutions very rarely exist. Science and engineering are essentially dependent on computer simulation to understand any of these systems, and to design the devices and processes which use them. Many of these phenomena are so complex or have such a range of spatial scales that existing petascale computer systems are a limit on scientific advance. In addition, there is a need to go beyond mere simulation to simulate the uncertainty in processes, find the optimal solution, or discover the multiple possible outcomes of a system. The advent of exascale computing presents the opportunity to address these limitations. However, increasing computational scale, increasingly complex simulation algorithms, and the vast quantities of data produced by exascale computing will defeat not just existing simulation software, but also existing ways of writing simulation software. Gen X is a project to establish the requirements for exascale simulation software for continuum mechanics, and to provide a concrete way of achieving this capability within the next five years. The Gen X approach is to move beyond just writing code to a system of specialist simulation languages which enable scientists and engineers to specify the problem they want to solve and the algorithms they want by writing mathematics, the language of science. The actual code will be automatically generated by specialist compilers rather than hand-written. Rather than an algorithm developer writing a paper about their new development and hoping that simulation scientists will find the time to code it up for their specific problem, the algorithm will be encoded in a domain specific language and implemented in its compiler. The simulation scientist will then be able to access the algorithm directly without recoding. At exascale, writing all the simulation outputs to disk for later analysis is impossible. Instead, simulation data must be processed, analysed and visualised as the simulation is conducted, and only the results stored for later use. Gen X will provide mathematical languages for this process which will enable the scientist or engineer to concisely specify the analysis to be performed, and to have confidence that the resulting calculations will be both efficient and correct. By enabling scientists and engineers to work at a higher mathematical level while also accessing more sophisticated algorithms and hardware-specific implementations than previously possible, Gen X will make simulation science both more capable and more productive. In this manner, Gen X is essential to realising the potential of exascale computing while also making the most efficient use of research resources.
Impact multi-disciplinary
Start Year 2020
 
Description UCL: Gen X: ExCALIBUR working group on Exascale continuum mechanics through code generation 
Organisation University College London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Continuous physical processes pervade every aspect of our society, industry and the natural world. From the flow of air over an aircraft to the propagation of mobile phone signals, to the behaviour of chemical components at every point of the manufacturing processes, continuum mechanics is at the heart of our industrial processes. In medicine, the electrical behaviour of the heart and brain, the flow of blood and other fluids through the body, and the detection of disorders using all manner of scanners and detectors are all continuum mechanics processes. In the natural world, detecting and understanding the movement and composition of the Earth enable us to understand earthquakes and to hunt for valuable minerals, while advanced understanding of the complex interaction of fluids and electromagnetic fields allows us to understand stars, the cosmos and our place in it. In all of these cases and many more beside, the mathematical equations describing phenomena are known, but solutions very rarely exist. Science and engineering are essentially dependent on computer simulation to understand any of these systems, and to design the devices and processes which use them. Many of these phenomena are so complex or have such a range of spatial scales that existing petascale computer systems are a limit on scientific advance. In addition, there is a need to go beyond mere simulation to simulate the uncertainty in processes, find the optimal solution, or discover the multiple possible outcomes of a system. The advent of exascale computing presents the opportunity to address these limitations. However, increasing computational scale, increasingly complex simulation algorithms, and the vast quantities of data produced by exascale computing will defeat not just existing simulation software, but also existing ways of writing simulation software. Gen X is a project to establish the requirements for exascale simulation software for continuum mechanics, and to provide a concrete way of achieving this capability within the next five years. The Gen X approach is to move beyond just writing code to a system of specialist simulation languages which enable scientists and engineers to specify the problem they want to solve and the algorithms they want by writing mathematics, the language of science. The actual code will be automatically generated by specialist compilers rather than hand-written. Rather than an algorithm developer writing a paper about their new development and hoping that simulation scientists will find the time to code it up for their specific problem, the algorithm will be encoded in a domain specific language and implemented in its compiler. The simulation scientist will then be able to access the algorithm directly without recoding. At exascale, writing all the simulation outputs to disk for later analysis is impossible. Instead, simulation data must be processed, analysed and visualised as the simulation is conducted, and only the results stored for later use. Gen X will provide mathematical languages for this process which will enable the scientist or engineer to concisely specify the analysis to be performed, and to have confidence that the resulting calculations will be both efficient and correct. By enabling scientists and engineers to work at a higher mathematical level while also accessing more sophisticated algorithms and hardware-specific implementations than previously possible, Gen X will make simulation science both more capable and more productive. In this manner, Gen X is essential to realising the potential of exascale computing while also making the most efficient use of research resources.
Collaborator Contribution Continuous physical processes pervade every aspect of our society, industry and the natural world. From the flow of air over an aircraft to the propagation of mobile phone signals, to the behaviour of chemical components at every point of the manufacturing processes, continuum mechanics is at the heart of our industrial processes. In medicine, the electrical behaviour of the heart and brain, the flow of blood and other fluids through the body, and the detection of disorders using all manner of scanners and detectors are all continuum mechanics processes. In the natural world, detecting and understanding the movement and composition of the Earth enable us to understand earthquakes and to hunt for valuable minerals, while advanced understanding of the complex interaction of fluids and electromagnetic fields allows us to understand stars, the cosmos and our place in it. In all of these cases and many more beside, the mathematical equations describing phenomena are known, but solutions very rarely exist. Science and engineering are essentially dependent on computer simulation to understand any of these systems, and to design the devices and processes which use them. Many of these phenomena are so complex or have such a range of spatial scales that existing petascale computer systems are a limit on scientific advance. In addition, there is a need to go beyond mere simulation to simulate the uncertainty in processes, find the optimal solution, or discover the multiple possible outcomes of a system. The advent of exascale computing presents the opportunity to address these limitations. However, increasing computational scale, increasingly complex simulation algorithms, and the vast quantities of data produced by exascale computing will defeat not just existing simulation software, but also existing ways of writing simulation software. Gen X is a project to establish the requirements for exascale simulation software for continuum mechanics, and to provide a concrete way of achieving this capability within the next five years. The Gen X approach is to move beyond just writing code to a system of specialist simulation languages which enable scientists and engineers to specify the problem they want to solve and the algorithms they want by writing mathematics, the language of science. The actual code will be automatically generated by specialist compilers rather than hand-written. Rather than an algorithm developer writing a paper about their new development and hoping that simulation scientists will find the time to code it up for their specific problem, the algorithm will be encoded in a domain specific language and implemented in its compiler. The simulation scientist will then be able to access the algorithm directly without recoding. At exascale, writing all the simulation outputs to disk for later analysis is impossible. Instead, simulation data must be processed, analysed and visualised as the simulation is conducted, and only the results stored for later use. Gen X will provide mathematical languages for this process which will enable the scientist or engineer to concisely specify the analysis to be performed, and to have confidence that the resulting calculations will be both efficient and correct. By enabling scientists and engineers to work at a higher mathematical level while also accessing more sophisticated algorithms and hardware-specific implementations than previously possible, Gen X will make simulation science both more capable and more productive. In this manner, Gen X is essential to realising the potential of exascale computing while also making the most efficient use of research resources.
Impact multi-disciplinary
Start Year 2020
 
Description University at Buffalo (SUNY): Gen X: ExCALIBUR working group on Exascale continuum mechanics through code generation 
Organisation University at Buffalo
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Continuous physical processes pervade every aspect of our society, industry and the natural world. From the flow of air over an aircraft to the propagation of mobile phone signals, to the behaviour of chemical components at every point of the manufacturing processes, continuum mechanics is at the heart of our industrial processes. In medicine, the electrical behaviour of the heart and brain, the flow of blood and other fluids through the body, and the detection of disorders using all manner of scanners and detectors are all continuum mechanics processes. In the natural world, detecting and understanding the movement and composition of the Earth enable us to understand earthquakes and to hunt for valuable minerals, while advanced understanding of the complex interaction of fluids and electromagnetic fields allows us to understand stars, the cosmos and our place in it. In all of these cases and many more beside, the mathematical equations describing phenomena are known, but solutions very rarely exist. Science and engineering are essentially dependent on computer simulation to understand any of these systems, and to design the devices and processes which use them. Many of these phenomena are so complex or have such a range of spatial scales that existing petascale computer systems are a limit on scientific advance. In addition, there is a need to go beyond mere simulation to simulate the uncertainty in processes, find the optimal solution, or discover the multiple possible outcomes of a system. The advent of exascale computing presents the opportunity to address these limitations. However, increasing computational scale, increasingly complex simulation algorithms, and the vast quantities of data produced by exascale computing will defeat not just existing simulation software, but also existing ways of writing simulation software. Gen X is a project to establish the requirements for exascale simulation software for continuum mechanics, and to provide a concrete way of achieving this capability within the next five years. The Gen X approach is to move beyond just writing code to a system of specialist simulation languages which enable scientists and engineers to specify the problem they want to solve and the algorithms they want by writing mathematics, the language of science. The actual code will be automatically generated by specialist compilers rather than hand-written. Rather than an algorithm developer writing a paper about their new development and hoping that simulation scientists will find the time to code it up for their specific problem, the algorithm will be encoded in a domain specific language and implemented in its compiler. The simulation scientist will then be able to access the algorithm directly without recoding. At exascale, writing all the simulation outputs to disk for later analysis is impossible. Instead, simulation data must be processed, analysed and visualised as the simulation is conducted, and only the results stored for later use. Gen X will provide mathematical languages for this process which will enable the scientist or engineer to concisely specify the analysis to be performed, and to have confidence that the resulting calculations will be both efficient and correct. By enabling scientists and engineers to work at a higher mathematical level while also accessing more sophisticated algorithms and hardware-specific implementations than previously possible, Gen X will make simulation science both more capable and more productive. In this manner, Gen X is essential to realising the potential of exascale computing while also making the most efficient use of research resources.
Collaborator Contribution Continuous physical processes pervade every aspect of our society, industry and the natural world. From the flow of air over an aircraft to the propagation of mobile phone signals, to the behaviour of chemical components at every point of the manufacturing processes, continuum mechanics is at the heart of our industrial processes. In medicine, the electrical behaviour of the heart and brain, the flow of blood and other fluids through the body, and the detection of disorders using all manner of scanners and detectors are all continuum mechanics processes. In the natural world, detecting and understanding the movement and composition of the Earth enable us to understand earthquakes and to hunt for valuable minerals, while advanced understanding of the complex interaction of fluids and electromagnetic fields allows us to understand stars, the cosmos and our place in it. In all of these cases and many more beside, the mathematical equations describing phenomena are known, but solutions very rarely exist. Science and engineering are essentially dependent on computer simulation to understand any of these systems, and to design the devices and processes which use them. Many of these phenomena are so complex or have such a range of spatial scales that existing petascale computer systems are a limit on scientific advance. In addition, there is a need to go beyond mere simulation to simulate the uncertainty in processes, find the optimal solution, or discover the multiple possible outcomes of a system. The advent of exascale computing presents the opportunity to address these limitations. However, increasing computational scale, increasingly complex simulation algorithms, and the vast quantities of data produced by exascale computing will defeat not just existing simulation software, but also existing ways of writing simulation software. Gen X is a project to establish the requirements for exascale simulation software for continuum mechanics, and to provide a concrete way of achieving this capability within the next five years. The Gen X approach is to move beyond just writing code to a system of specialist simulation languages which enable scientists and engineers to specify the problem they want to solve and the algorithms they want by writing mathematics, the language of science. The actual code will be automatically generated by specialist compilers rather than hand-written. Rather than an algorithm developer writing a paper about their new development and hoping that simulation scientists will find the time to code it up for their specific problem, the algorithm will be encoded in a domain specific language and implemented in its compiler. The simulation scientist will then be able to access the algorithm directly without recoding. At exascale, writing all the simulation outputs to disk for later analysis is impossible. Instead, simulation data must be processed, analysed and visualised as the simulation is conducted, and only the results stored for later use. Gen X will provide mathematical languages for this process which will enable the scientist or engineer to concisely specify the analysis to be performed, and to have confidence that the resulting calculations will be both efficient and correct. By enabling scientists and engineers to work at a higher mathematical level while also accessing more sophisticated algorithms and hardware-specific implementations than previously possible, Gen X will make simulation science both more capable and more productive. In this manner, Gen X is essential to realising the potential of exascale computing while also making the most efficient use of research resources.
Impact multi-disciplinary
Start Year 2020
 
Description University of Bath: Gen X: ExCALIBUR working group on Exascale continuum mechanics through code generation 
Organisation University of Bath
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Continuous physical processes pervade every aspect of our society, industry and the natural world. From the flow of air over an aircraft to the propagation of mobile phone signals, to the behaviour of chemical components at every point of the manufacturing processes, continuum mechanics is at the heart of our industrial processes. In medicine, the electrical behaviour of the heart and brain, the flow of blood and other fluids through the body, and the detection of disorders using all manner of scanners and detectors are all continuum mechanics processes. In the natural world, detecting and understanding the movement and composition of the Earth enable us to understand earthquakes and to hunt for valuable minerals, while advanced understanding of the complex interaction of fluids and electromagnetic fields allows us to understand stars, the cosmos and our place in it. In all of these cases and many more beside, the mathematical equations describing phenomena are known, but solutions very rarely exist. Science and engineering are essentially dependent on computer simulation to understand any of these systems, and to design the devices and processes which use them. Many of these phenomena are so complex or have such a range of spatial scales that existing petascale computer systems are a limit on scientific advance. In addition, there is a need to go beyond mere simulation to simulate the uncertainty in processes, find the optimal solution, or discover the multiple possible outcomes of a system. The advent of exascale computing presents the opportunity to address these limitations. However, increasing computational scale, increasingly complex simulation algorithms, and the vast quantities of data produced by exascale computing will defeat not just existing simulation software, but also existing ways of writing simulation software. Gen X is a project to establish the requirements for exascale simulation software for continuum mechanics, and to provide a concrete way of achieving this capability within the next five years. The Gen X approach is to move beyond just writing code to a system of specialist simulation languages which enable scientists and engineers to specify the problem they want to solve and the algorithms they want by writing mathematics, the language of science. The actual code will be automatically generated by specialist compilers rather than hand-written. Rather than an algorithm developer writing a paper about their new development and hoping that simulation scientists will find the time to code it up for their specific problem, the algorithm will be encoded in a domain specific language and implemented in its compiler. The simulation scientist will then be able to access the algorithm directly without recoding. At exascale, writing all the simulation outputs to disk for later analysis is impossible. Instead, simulation data must be processed, analysed and visualised as the simulation is conducted, and only the results stored for later use. Gen X will provide mathematical languages for this process which will enable the scientist or engineer to concisely specify the analysis to be performed, and to have confidence that the resulting calculations will be both efficient and correct. By enabling scientists and engineers to work at a higher mathematical level while also accessing more sophisticated algorithms and hardware-specific implementations than previously possible, Gen X will make simulation science both more capable and more productive. In this manner, Gen X is essential to realising the potential of exascale computing while also making the most efficient use of research resources.
Collaborator Contribution Continuous physical processes pervade every aspect of our society, industry and the natural world. From the flow of air over an aircraft to the propagation of mobile phone signals, to the behaviour of chemical components at every point of the manufacturing processes, continuum mechanics is at the heart of our industrial processes. In medicine, the electrical behaviour of the heart and brain, the flow of blood and other fluids through the body, and the detection of disorders using all manner of scanners and detectors are all continuum mechanics processes. In the natural world, detecting and understanding the movement and composition of the Earth enable us to understand earthquakes and to hunt for valuable minerals, while advanced understanding of the complex interaction of fluids and electromagnetic fields allows us to understand stars, the cosmos and our place in it. In all of these cases and many more beside, the mathematical equations describing phenomena are known, but solutions very rarely exist. Science and engineering are essentially dependent on computer simulation to understand any of these systems, and to design the devices and processes which use them. Many of these phenomena are so complex or have such a range of spatial scales that existing petascale computer systems are a limit on scientific advance. In addition, there is a need to go beyond mere simulation to simulate the uncertainty in processes, find the optimal solution, or discover the multiple possible outcomes of a system. The advent of exascale computing presents the opportunity to address these limitations. However, increasing computational scale, increasingly complex simulation algorithms, and the vast quantities of data produced by exascale computing will defeat not just existing simulation software, but also existing ways of writing simulation software. Gen X is a project to establish the requirements for exascale simulation software for continuum mechanics, and to provide a concrete way of achieving this capability within the next five years. The Gen X approach is to move beyond just writing code to a system of specialist simulation languages which enable scientists and engineers to specify the problem they want to solve and the algorithms they want by writing mathematics, the language of science. The actual code will be automatically generated by specialist compilers rather than hand-written. Rather than an algorithm developer writing a paper about their new development and hoping that simulation scientists will find the time to code it up for their specific problem, the algorithm will be encoded in a domain specific language and implemented in its compiler. The simulation scientist will then be able to access the algorithm directly without recoding. At exascale, writing all the simulation outputs to disk for later analysis is impossible. Instead, simulation data must be processed, analysed and visualised as the simulation is conducted, and only the results stored for later use. Gen X will provide mathematical languages for this process which will enable the scientist or engineer to concisely specify the analysis to be performed, and to have confidence that the resulting calculations will be both efficient and correct. By enabling scientists and engineers to work at a higher mathematical level while also accessing more sophisticated algorithms and hardware-specific implementations than previously possible, Gen X will make simulation science both more capable and more productive. In this manner, Gen X is essential to realising the potential of exascale computing while also making the most efficient use of research resources.
Impact multi-disciplinary
Start Year 2020
 
Description University of Durham 
Organisation Durham University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Collaboration with Dr Lawrence Mitchell (Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science) who develops compilers and software abstractions for the development of numerical models implemented using the finite element method. This research is concretely realised in the open source Firedrake project.
Collaborator Contribution Collaboration with Dr Lawrence Mitchell (Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science) who develops compilers and software abstractions for the development of numerical models implemented using the finite element method. This research is concretely realised in the open source Firedrake project.
Impact Collaboration with Dr Lawrence Mitchell (Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science) who develops compilers and software abstractions for the development of numerical models implemented using the finite element method. This research is concretely realised in the open source Firedrake project.
Start Year 2019
 
Description University of Leeds: Gen X: ExCALIBUR working group on Exascale continuum mechanics through code generation 
Organisation University of Leeds
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Continuous physical processes pervade every aspect of our society, industry and the natural world. From the flow of air over an aircraft to the propagation of mobile phone signals, to the behaviour of chemical components at every point of the manufacturing processes, continuum mechanics is at the heart of our industrial processes. In medicine, the electrical behaviour of the heart and brain, the flow of blood and other fluids through the body, and the detection of disorders using all manner of scanners and detectors are all continuum mechanics processes. In the natural world, detecting and understanding the movement and composition of the Earth enable us to understand earthquakes and to hunt for valuable minerals, while advanced understanding of the complex interaction of fluids and electromagnetic fields allows us to understand stars, the cosmos and our place in it. In all of these cases and many more beside, the mathematical equations describing phenomena are known, but solutions very rarely exist. Science and engineering are essentially dependent on computer simulation to understand any of these systems, and to design the devices and processes which use them. Many of these phenomena are so complex or have such a range of spatial scales that existing petascale computer systems are a limit on scientific advance. In addition, there is a need to go beyond mere simulation to simulate the uncertainty in processes, find the optimal solution, or discover the multiple possible outcomes of a system. The advent of exascale computing presents the opportunity to address these limitations. However, increasing computational scale, increasingly complex simulation algorithms, and the vast quantities of data produced by exascale computing will defeat not just existing simulation software, but also existing ways of writing simulation software. Gen X is a project to establish the requirements for exascale simulation software for continuum mechanics, and to provide a concrete way of achieving this capability within the next five years. The Gen X approach is to move beyond just writing code to a system of specialist simulation languages which enable scientists and engineers to specify the problem they want to solve and the algorithms they want by writing mathematics, the language of science. The actual code will be automatically generated by specialist compilers rather than hand-written. Rather than an algorithm developer writing a paper about their new development and hoping that simulation scientists will find the time to code it up for their specific problem, the algorithm will be encoded in a domain specific language and implemented in its compiler. The simulation scientist will then be able to access the algorithm directly without recoding. At exascale, writing all the simulation outputs to disk for later analysis is impossible. Instead, simulation data must be processed, analysed and visualised as the simulation is conducted, and only the results stored for later use. Gen X will provide mathematical languages for this process which will enable the scientist or engineer to concisely specify the analysis to be performed, and to have confidence that the resulting calculations will be both efficient and correct. By enabling scientists and engineers to work at a higher mathematical level while also accessing more sophisticated algorithms and hardware-specific implementations than previously possible, Gen X will make simulation science both more capable and more productive. In this manner, Gen X is essential to realising the potential of exascale computing while also making the most efficient use of research resources.
Collaborator Contribution Continuous physical processes pervade every aspect of our society, industry and the natural world. From the flow of air over an aircraft to the propagation of mobile phone signals, to the behaviour of chemical components at every point of the manufacturing processes, continuum mechanics is at the heart of our industrial processes. In medicine, the electrical behaviour of the heart and brain, the flow of blood and other fluids through the body, and the detection of disorders using all manner of scanners and detectors are all continuum mechanics processes. In the natural world, detecting and understanding the movement and composition of the Earth enable us to understand earthquakes and to hunt for valuable minerals, while advanced understanding of the complex interaction of fluids and electromagnetic fields allows us to understand stars, the cosmos and our place in it. In all of these cases and many more beside, the mathematical equations describing phenomena are known, but solutions very rarely exist. Science and engineering are essentially dependent on computer simulation to understand any of these systems, and to design the devices and processes which use them. Many of these phenomena are so complex or have such a range of spatial scales that existing petascale computer systems are a limit on scientific advance. In addition, there is a need to go beyond mere simulation to simulate the uncertainty in processes, find the optimal solution, or discover the multiple possible outcomes of a system. The advent of exascale computing presents the opportunity to address these limitations. However, increasing computational scale, increasingly complex simulation algorithms, and the vast quantities of data produced by exascale computing will defeat not just existing simulation software, but also existing ways of writing simulation software. Gen X is a project to establish the requirements for exascale simulation software for continuum mechanics, and to provide a concrete way of achieving this capability within the next five years. The Gen X approach is to move beyond just writing code to a system of specialist simulation languages which enable scientists and engineers to specify the problem they want to solve and the algorithms they want by writing mathematics, the language of science. The actual code will be automatically generated by specialist compilers rather than hand-written. Rather than an algorithm developer writing a paper about their new development and hoping that simulation scientists will find the time to code it up for their specific problem, the algorithm will be encoded in a domain specific language and implemented in its compiler. The simulation scientist will then be able to access the algorithm directly without recoding. At exascale, writing all the simulation outputs to disk for later analysis is impossible. Instead, simulation data must be processed, analysed and visualised as the simulation is conducted, and only the results stored for later use. Gen X will provide mathematical languages for this process which will enable the scientist or engineer to concisely specify the analysis to be performed, and to have confidence that the resulting calculations will be both efficient and correct. By enabling scientists and engineers to work at a higher mathematical level while also accessing more sophisticated algorithms and hardware-specific implementations than previously possible, Gen X will make simulation science both more capable and more productive. In this manner, Gen X is essential to realising the potential of exascale computing while also making the most efficient use of research resources.
Impact Continuous physical processes pervade every aspect of our society, industry and the natural world. From the flow of air over an aircraft to the propagation of mobile phone signals, to the behaviour of chemical components at every point of the manufacturing processes, continuum mechanics is at the heart of our industrial processes. In medicine, the electrical behaviour of the heart and brain, the flow of blood and other fluids through the body, and the detection of disorders using all manner of scanners and detectors are all continuum mechanics processes. In the natural world, detecting and understanding the movement and composition of the Earth enable us to understand earthquakes and to hunt for valuable minerals, while advanced understanding of the complex interaction of fluids and electromagnetic fields allows us to understand stars, the cosmos and our place in it. In all of these cases and many more beside, the mathematical equations describing phenomena are known, but solutions very rarely exist. Science and engineering are essentially dependent on computer simulation to understand any of these systems, and to design the devices and processes which use them. Many of these phenomena are so complex or have such a range of spatial scales that existing petascale computer systems are a limit on scientific advance. In addition, there is a need to go beyond mere simulation to simulate the uncertainty in processes, find the optimal solution, or discover the multiple possible outcomes of a system. The advent of exascale computing presents the opportunity to address these limitations. However, increasing computational scale, increasingly complex simulation algorithms, and the vast quantities of data produced by exascale computing will defeat not just existing simulation software, but also existing ways of writing simulation software. Gen X is a project to establish the requirements for exascale simulation software for continuum mechanics, and to provide a concrete way of achieving this capability within the next five years. The Gen X approach is to move beyond just writing code to a system of specialist simulation languages which enable scientists and engineers to specify the problem they want to solve and the algorithms they want by writing mathematics, the language of science. The actual code will be automatically generated by specialist compilers rather than hand-written. Rather than an algorithm developer writing a paper about their new development and hoping that simulation scientists will find the time to code it up for their specific problem, the algorithm will be encoded in a domain specific language and implemented in its compiler. The simulation scientist will then be able to access the algorithm directly without recoding. At exascale, writing all the simulation outputs to disk for later analysis is impossible. Instead, simulation data must be processed, analysed and visualised as the simulation is conducted, and only the results stored for later use. Gen X will provide mathematical languages for this process which will enable the scientist or engineer to concisely specify the analysis to be performed, and to have confidence that the resulting calculations will be both efficient and correct. By enabling scientists and engineers to work at a higher mathematical level while also accessing more sophisticated algorithms and hardware-specific implementations than previously possible, Gen X will make simulation science both more capable and more productive. In this manner, Gen X is essential to realising the potential of exascale computing while also making the most efficient use of research resources.
Start Year 2020
 
Description University of São Paulo 
Organisation Federal University of São Paulo
Country Brazil 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Researchers at the university of Sao Paulo are using Firedrake for a variety of challenges related to seismic inversion. Dr Ham visited in November 2019 and gave a Firedrake tutorial.
Collaborator Contribution Researchers at the university of Sao Paulo are using Firedrake for a variety of challenges related to seismic inversion. Dr Ham visited in November 2019 and gave a Firedrake tutorial.
Impact Researchers at the university of Sao Paulo are using Firedrake for a variety of challenges related to seismic inversion. Dr Ham visited in November 2019 and gave a Firedrake tutorial.
Start Year 2019
 
Title DEVITO V4.0 
Description Devito is a Domain-specific Language (DSL) and code generation framework for the design of highly optimised finite difference kernels for use in inversion methods. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2019 
Open Source License? Yes  
Impact Devito is a Domain-specific Language (DSL) and code generation framework for the design of highly optimised finite difference kernels for use in inversion methods. 
 
Title Devito 4.7.x 
Description Devito 4.7.x has been released: https://github.com/devitocodes/devito/releases. The update inlcuded lots of new features, examples/tutorials, optimisations and container overhauls to help users to GSD faster and better than ever. 
Type Of Technology New/Improved Technique/Technology 
Year Produced 2022 
Impact Devito 4.7.x has been released: https://github.com/devitocodes/devito/releases. The update inlcuded lots of new features, examples/tutorials, optimisations and container overhauls to help users to GSD faster and better than ever. 
URL https://github.com/devitocodes/devito/releases
 
Title Devito v4.2 
Description A Domain-specific Language (DSL) and code generation framework for the design of highly optimised finite difference kernels for use in inversion methods. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2020 
Open Source License? Yes  
Impact Devito v4.2 now supports multi-node-multi-GPU domain-decomposition parallelization and has become a NumFOCUS affiliated project 
 
Title Devito v4.6 released 
Description Devito is a domain-specific Language (DSL) and code generation framework for the design of highly optimised finite difference kernels for use in inversion methods. Devito utilises SymPy to allow the definition of operators from high-level symbolic equations and generates optimised and automatically tuned code specific to a given target architecture. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2021 
Open Source License? Yes  
Impact Devito is a domain-specific Language (DSL) and code generation framework for the design of highly optimised finite difference kernels for use in inversion methods. Devito utilises SymPy to allow the definition of operators from high-level symbolic equations and generates optimised and automatically tuned code specific to a given target architecture. 
URL https://github.com/devitocodes/devito/releases/tag/v4.6
 
Title Latest Release - PyFR 1.12.2 
Description PyFR is an open-source Python based framework for solving advection-diffusion type problems on streaming architectures using the Flux Reconstruction approach of Huynh. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2021 
Open Source License? Yes  
Impact PyFR is an open-source Python based framework for solving advection-diffusion type problems on streaming architectures using the Flux Reconstruction approach of Huynh. 
URL https://github.com/PyFR/PyFR/archive/v1.12.2.zip
 
Title NEKTAR++V5.0.0 
Description Nektar++ is a tensor product based finite element package designed to allow one to construct efficient classical low polynomial order h-type solvers (where h is the size of the finite element) as well as higher p-order piecewise polynomial order solvers. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2019 
Open Source License? Yes  
Impact The latest version of Nektar++, v5.0.0, was released on the 9th December 2019. It can be downloaded from the downloads page.This release includes a wide range of new library features as well as many other improvements and bug fixes. Many of the solvers and utilities have also received major improvements. 
 
Title Nekmesh: an open-source high-order mesh generator 
Description High-order curvilinear meshes are both an enabler and a bottleneck towards achieving high-resolution flow simulations about complex geometries. The open-source code Nekmesh is the Imperial College London contribution towards improving the high-order mesh generation process, an area where both commercial and academic codes are scarce. Nekmesh has been specifically designed to tackle the significant challenge of automatically generating valid, high-quality curvilinear meshes for complex three-dimensional geometries with a particular emphasis on simulating high-Reynolds number aeronautical and fluid dynamics flows. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2018 
Open Source License? Yes  
Impact One of the very few codes either commercial or academic able to generate high-order meshes from CAD. Unique in allowing generation of meshes with polynomial orders P>4. 
 
Title Nektar++ Version 4.2.0 
Description Nektar++ is a tensor product based finite element package designed to allow one to construct efficient classical low polynomial order h-type solvers (where h is the size of the finite element) as well as higher p-order piecewise polynomial order solvers. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2015 
Open Source License? Yes  
Impact The Nektar++ framework has been an underpinning framework for a range of solver technologies which at Imperial includes: 1) Incompressible flow simulation and stability analysis related to car aerodynamics with McLaren Racing and offshore engineering 2) Biomedical modelling in atrial arrthymia in collaboration Hammersmith Hospital and Cardiovascular modelling in collaboration with Bioengineering 3) Compressible flow modelling with collaboration with Airbus and more recent interest form Rolls Royce. The wider community of Nektar++ usage can be captured in the following: - It has an active user list currently with 76 registered from Europe, USA, South America, Australia and China - It has an active code development community: Over the past 3.5 years we have had over 4500 commits and had 500 merge requests completed in our Gitlab repository. - Over the past five months, the most recent version of the code (v4.2.0) has been downloaded 2473 times with increasing usage of Debian and Fedora packages. - Our overview paper (doi:10.1016/j.cpc.2015.02.008) was published in Computer Physics Communications in July 2015 and has been either 1st or 2nd on the most downloaded list since this time. - Our inaugural Nektar++ workshop in 2015 had 30 participants from the UK, Europe and Australia. (http://www.nektar.info/community/workshops/nektar-2015/) - The package is supported on a number of HPC facilities e.g. ARCHER, Argonne/ORNL, INRIA, Imperial HPC cluster (Cx1,Helen) External to imperial our closest development activities are currently with the Universities of Utah and Brown in USA, University of Madrid (Spain), University of Darmstadt (Germany) and the University of Sao Paolo (Brazil). We have also had recent interest from UK users at Cambridge, Nottingham and Loughborogh Universities as well as notable users acvitity from Warsaw University, Harbin Institute of Technology in China, Beihang University, Middle East Technical University, Monash University and the University of Western Australia. 
URL http://www.nektar.info/downloads/file/nektar-4-2-0-tar-gz/
 
Title Nektar++ v5.0.1 
Description A tensor product based finite element package designed to allow one to construct efficient classical low polynomial order h-type solvers (where h is the size of the finite element) as well as higher p-order piecewise polynomial order solvers. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2021 
Open Source License? Yes  
Impact The latest version of Nektar++, v5.0.1, was released on the 21st January 2021. It can be downloaded from the downloads page. 
 
Title Nektar++, v5.2.0 
Description The latest version of Nektar++, v5.2.0, was released on the 23rd August 2022. This release includes a range of new features and improvements over the 5.1.0 release. A full list of the changes is available in the CHANGELOG.md file distributed with the source code. 
Type Of Technology New/Improved Technique/Technology 
Year Produced 2022 
Impact The latest version of Nektar++, v5.2.0, was released on the 23rd August 2022. This release includes a range of new features and improvements over the 5.1.0 release. A full list of the changes is available in the CHANGELOG.md file distributed with the source code. 
URL https://www.nektar.info/
 
Title PYFR 1.9.0 
Description PyFR is an open-source Python based framework for solving advection-diffusion type problems on streaming architectures using the Flux Reconstruction approach of Huynh. The framework is designed to solve a range of governing systems on mixed unstructured grids containing various element types. It is also designed to target a range of hardware platforms via use of an in-built domain specific language derived from the Mako templating engine. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2019 
Open Source License? Yes  
Impact Latest release of PyFR 1.9.0 includes: • Improved strong scaling. • Added support for Gmsh v4.1. • Fixed performance issue with OpenCL backend. 
 
Title PyFR 1.15.0 
Description PyFR 1.15.0: Improved performance and scaling of CUDA backend. Improved performance across all backends via revised GiMMiK kernels. Support for detecting load imbalances for multi-rank simulations. Support for heterogeneous CPUs in the OpenMP backend. A quick remidner PyFR v1.14.0 was released in May 2022  and PyFR v1.13.0 in February 2022 
Type Of Technology New/Improved Technique/Technology 
Year Produced 2022 
Open Source License? Yes  
Impact Improved performance and scaling of CUDA backend. Improved performance across all backends via revised GiMMiK kernels. Support for detecting load imbalances for multi-rank simulations. Support for heterogeneous CPUs in the OpenMP backend. A quick remidner PyFR v1.14.0 was released in May 2022  and PyFR v1.13.0 in February 2022 
URL https://www.pyfr.org/
 
Title THETIS 
Description Unstructured mesh coastal ocean model in 2D and 3D, built using Firdrake and including adaptive mesh and adjoint capabilities. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2019 
Open Source License? Yes  
Impact A new (coastal) ocean model, in 2D and 3D, using finite element methods, and implemented via the Firedrake framework. Includes an adjoint capability for sensitivity analyses and optimisation. Also includes a preliminary mesh adaptivity capability. 
 
Title The latest version of Nektar++, v5.0.2 
Description The latest version of Nektar++, v5.1.0, was released on the 24th November 2021. This release includes a range of new features and improvements over the 5.0.0 release. A full list of the changes is available in the CHANGELOG.md file distributed with the source code. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2021 
Open Source License? Yes  
Impact The latest version of Nektar++, v5.1.0, was released on the 24th November 2021. This release includes a range of new features and improvements over the 5.0.0 release. A full list of the changes is available in the CHANGELOG.md file distributed with the source code. 
URL https://www.nektar.info/nektar-5-1-0-released/
 
Title Thetis 
Description A new (coastal) ocean model, in 2D and 3D, using finite element methods, and implemented via the Firedrake framework. Includes an adjoint capability for sensitivity analyses and optimisation. Also includes a preliminary mesh adaptivity capability. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2016 
Open Source License? Yes  
Impact Basis for ongoing collaboration with the wider ocean model development community. 
URL http://thetisproject.org/
 
Company Name DEVITO CODES LTD 
Description Devito Codes Ltd is the commercial arm of the open-source platform Devito. Products and services include: Retainer Devito Support Agreements Performance optimisation for client computer architectures, clusters and Cloud. Bespoke software development projects. DevitoPro - application specific plugins. SaaS and PaaS on Cloud. 
Year Established 2020 
Impact In February 2020 Dr Gerard Gorman and Dr Fabio Luporini founded Devito Codes Ltd to secure the long-term future of Devito. Key to our strategy is drawing clear lines between the open-source Devito project and DevitoPro. All general-purpose symbolic and compiler software technology will continue to be developed and maintained as open-source and patent-free. The basic research underpinning Devito will continue to be published in the open literature. Devito Codes Ltd focuses on providing professional services including technical support, training, bespoke software development services and bespoke optimization for clients hardware. We are also developing a new software product called DevitoPro, which consists of proprietary extension packs such as a toolkit for integration with legacy codes. Finally, we are also proud to announce that we have signed a partnership agreement with DUG to provide HPC software development services on DUG-McCloud. Over the last few years, we have significantly benefited from working with closely with our friends at DUG. We look forward to continuing this relationship into the future. In particular, to explore how the knowhow and disruptive software technologies developed within Devito can be reapplied to other compute-intense big-data problems.
Website http://www.devitocodes.com/
 
Description 10th International Conference on Sustainable Development in the Building and Environment (SuDBE2021) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Date: 4-7 November 2021.
The aim of this event is to encourage academics, designers and engineers, policy-makers to share the most up-to-date research outcomes and practical experience in green buildings and low-carbon eco-cities.
Christopher Pain was talking about "Multi-physics and multi-scale adaptive mesh AI-modelling for the urban environment"
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL http://www.sudbeconference.com/
 
Description 1st PRISM Residential Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Date: 10-12 January 2021
Venue: Chicheley Hall

Summary:
After the success of on-line workshops, we were thrilled to be back with another educational and inspirational event. The aim of the 1st PRISM Residential Workshop was for the PRIMS research groups to know each other's work, and to hopefully spark some interesting/unexpected collaborations among group members. Because the researchers have been working in isolation much more (or in much more closed/defined groups), there's likely to be less awareness of what everyone's doing and where our work fits in to the wider PRISM research space.

Objectives:
1. Disseminating research/work
2. Finding synergies
3. Establishing collaborations
4. Resetting our ideas of where our work fits in the wider community
5. Reconnecting with collaborators and learn about their current work
6. Developing new plans for future research opportunities/grants
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://prism.ac.uk/2021/12/1st-prism-residential-workshop/
 
Description 2020 RICE OIL & GAS HPC CONFERENCE, Workshop: From Zero-to-Devito 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The Devito workshop participants learnt how to implement finite difference and inverse solvers using Devito.

https://www.devitoproject.org/
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description 2ND FIREDRAKE WORKSHOP 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact The second workshop provided the opportunity for Firedrake users and developers to engage with each other to communicate the ways that Firedrake can be used in simulation science, the latest developments in the project, and the future developments anticipated.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description 2nd PRISM workshop on applications: Beyond CFD 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Beyond CFD: In this workshop experiences on application of PDE solvers which go beyond CFD tools, for example composable solvers, stability analysis, inverse problems, data assimilation and uncertainty quantification were shared. The format of the on-line workshop involved a series of 3 short 10-minutes talks followed by small group discussions/panel meeting and a summary session.

The event's programme included:

2.00pm-2.15pm Matt Knepley (University at Buffalo) on "Building Complex Solvers in PETSc"
2.15pm-2.30pm Patrick Farrell (University of Oxford) on "Computing multiple solutions of PDEs"
2.30pm-2.45pm Koki Sagiyama (Imperial College London) on "Firedrake: Solving equations on subspaces "
2.45pm-3.30pm Small group discussions/Panel meeting
3.30pm-3.45pm Summary session
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://prism.ac.uk/2020/09/2nd-prism-workshop-on-applications-beyond-cfd/
 
Description 3RD FIREDRAKE WORKSHOP 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact The workshop began with a half day Firedrake tutorial for interested new users. See the programme for detailed timings: https://firedrakeproject.org/firedrake_19.html.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description 4TH FIREDRAKE WORKSHOP 2020 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact This was a first workshop in North America at the University of Washington
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description 4th NEKTAR++ WORKSHOP 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The 4th annual Nektar++ Workshop brought together developers and users of all experiences to hear about new and future developments in Nektar++ and the exciting science and engineering being undertaken with the code. The first two days included a comprehensive programme of talks, which were followed by a number of parallel informal group sessions allowing developers and users to discuss and work on specific aspects of the code.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description 5th Firedrake Workshop 2021 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Date: 15-17 September 2021
The fifth Firedrake user and developer workshop was held online.The workshop was an opportunity for Firedrake users and developers to engage with each other to communicate the ways that Firedrake can be used in simulation science, the latest developments in the project, and the future developments anticipated. The event provided Firedrake users with the opportunity to interact directly with developers and other users.
Programme:
The recorded talks are available on Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/showcase/8850810
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://easychair.org/smart-program/Firedrake'21/
 
Description 5th Nektar++ Workshop 2021 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact The 5th annual Nektar++ Workshop brought together developers and users of all experiences to hear about new and future developments in Nektar++ and the exciting science and engineering being undertaken with the code. As part of this years workshop we offered some introductory training on spectral/hp element methods and high order meshing as part of the ITN on Stability and Sensitivity Methds for Flow Control and Industrial Design (SSeCoID).

The workshop was organised as an on-line event, allowing attendees to join either in person (limited places available) or remotely. The main talks will run in the afternoons (GMT) to allow as many remote attendees to join as possible across different timezones. The three afternoons will include a comprehensive programme of talks, given either in-person or pre-recorded. In-person attendees can participate in training sessions during the morning sessions.

The main workshop will be followed by parallel informal group sessions allowing developers and users to discuss and work on specific aspects of the code and influence the future direction of Nektar++.
Schedule (GMT)
Monday 13th December

12:00 - 13:00 Lunch & Registration

13:00 - 15:00 Session 1 (Talks)

15:00 - 15:30 Refreshment break

15:30 - 17:30 Session 2 (Talks)
Tuesday 14th December

09:00 - 12:00 Lectures & Training 1

12:00 - 13:00 Lunch

13:00 - 15:00 Session 3 (Talks)

15:00 - 15:30 Refreshment break

15:30 - 17:30 Session 4 (Talks)

19:00 - 21:00 Workshop dinner
Wednesday 15th December

09:00 - 12:00 Lectures & Training 2

12:00 - 13:00 Lunch

13:00 - 15:00 Session 5 (Talks)

15:00 - 15:30 Refreshment break

15:30 - 17:30 Session 6 (Talks)

17:30 Close
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://www.prism.ac.uk/2021/10/5th-nektar-workshop-2021/
 
Description 6th Nektar++ Workshop 2022 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The 6th annual Nektar++ Workshop brought together developers and users of all experiences to hear about new and future developments in the Nektar++ spectral/hp element framework and the exciting science and engineering being undertaken with the code.

The three days included a comprehensive programme of talks and a poster session. The workshop was run primarily as an in-person event, but the talks were also streamed online. It is hoped we can offer a limited number of remote presentations for those unable to travel.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2022
URL https://www.nektar.info/community/workshops/nektar-workshop-2022/
 
Description Automating forward and adjoint coupling in finite element geoscience simulations 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact In this project we are enabling 'coupling' in the Firedrake stack, for the purpose of simulation, optimisation and uncertainty quantification. We are particularly interested in the type of coupling in which two or more domains of possibly distinct physical natures interact with each other via interfaces.

One characteristic example of such coupling is 'ocean-atmosphere coupling' that aims to explain global climate taking into account the interaction between the ocean currents and the atmospheric circulation via, e.g., heat exchange on the ocean surface. Another is 'domain-decomposition' often employed in wave propagation problems; an originally monolithic domain is artificially decomposed into smaller subdomains of appropriate size for computation, and solutions in the subdomains interact with each other via the artificial interface to finally form a global solution. A third example is fluid-structure interaction, where the fluid and solid satisfy different equations that need to be coupled at the boundary. This has important applications e.g. in designing wave/wind/tidal turbines etc.

Our current development in Firedrake is to facilitate numerical simulations and model development in these fields.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://prism.ac.uk/2020/04/blog-entry-automating-forward-and-adjoint-coupling-in-finite-element-geo...
 
Description Chongqing University 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Chongqing University
Date: 2 June 2021,
Christopher Pain and Fangxin Fang presented an invited talk entitled "CFD, reduced-order models and neural networks for Urban and Indoor flows: Results from INHALE, MAGIC, PREMIERE consortia"
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
 
Description Conference on the Numerical Solution of Differential and Differential-Algebraic Equations (NUMDIFF-16) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Date: 6 - 10 September 2021
Conference on the Numerical Solution of Differential and Differential-Algebraic Equations (NUMDIFF-16) took place in Germany. This conference was devoted to all numerical aspects of time-dependent differential equations and differential-algebraic equations. PRISM's team member, Colin Cotter, organised mini-symposum during this event which was dedicated to "Fluid dynamics: innovative discretisations and algorithms".
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://sim.mathematik.uni-halle.de/numdiff/Numdiff16/programme/
 
Description Devito Book Summer Project with Imperial College London 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact Rini Banerjee, a student of Joint Mathematics and Computer Science at Imperial College London who spent summer 2020 doing a remote research internship on the Devito Project, under the supervision of Prof Paul Kelly and Dr Gerard Gorman. Rini has been working on the Devito Book: a set of Jupyter Notebook tutorials that teach the finite difference method for solving partial differential equations using Devito, based on the textbook "Finite Difference Computing with PDEs - A Modern Software Approach" by H. P. Langtangen and S. Linge.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://techcommunity.microsoft.com/t5/educator-developer-blog/devito-book-summer-project-with-imper...
 
Description Exascale Computing Challenges: Parallel-in-Time Algorithms 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact In this workshop we focused on time-parallel methods. Following exciting developments in both mathematical analysis and practical experience, time-parallel methods are undergoing a revival as a potentially powerful route to exploiting future massively parallel exascale supercomputers. Time-parallel methods address the question of what to do when one has reached the limits of strong scaling (decreasing wallclock time by increasing the number of processors working in parallel) through domain decomposition parallelisation in space. A key lesson from the recent literature is that the success of parallel-in-time algorithms critically depends on them being carefully adapted to the equation being solved. Much like regular timestepping methods, there are many parallel-in-time algorithms, and the right algorithm needs to be designed and selected according to the mathematical properties and applications requirements of the underlying system.

This workshop combined lectures with practical demonstrations to introduce timestepping challenges and how to overcome them using time-parallel methods, such as parareal, deferred corrections and paradiag. The practical demonstrations will be based on jupyter notebooks and some experience of using python is desirable.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2022
URL https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/exascale-computing-challenges-parallel-in-time-algorithms-registratio...
 
Description FIREDRAKE TUTORIAL - GERMANY 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact There was a hands-on Firedrake tutorial at the Aachen Institute for Advanced Study in Computational Engineering Science (AICES).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description FIREDRAKE TUTORIAL - UK 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact The Firedrake team once again offered a half day Firedrake tutorial aimed at new Firedrake users. The tutorial was an introduction to solving PDEs using the finite element method with Firedrake. The lecture was pitched at new MRes and PhD students just starting to use or develop Firedrake
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description FIREDRAKE TUTORIAL - USA 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact The Firedrake team presented a live cloud tutorial at the SIAM Conference on Computational Science and Engineering in Spokane Washington.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Firedrake '23 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Firedrake '23 user and developer workshop was held at Dartington Hall in Totnes from 4-6 January 2023. The event is cohosted by the University of Exeter and Imperial College London.

The workshop was an opportunity for Firedrake users and developers to engage with each other to communicate the ways that Firedrake can be used in simulation science, the latest developments in the project, and the future developments anticipated. The event provides Firedrake users with the opportunity to interact directly with developers and other users.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2023
URL https://www.firedrakeproject.org/firedrake_22.html
 
Description Fluids & AI modelling methods and applications, Computational Fluid Dynamic and Artificial Intelligence Workshop 2021 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Fluids & AI modelling methods and applications,
Computational Fluid Dynamic and Artificial Intelligence Workshop 2021,
Shanghai University,
Date: 30 August 2021
Presenters: Christopher Pain
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
 
Description G-Adopt Firedrake workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact We are delighted to announce that the first G-ADOPT workshop on automating finite element methods for geodynamics via firedrake was held on April 28th - 29th, 2022, at the Australian National University in Canberra. This workshop provided an opportunity for the G-Adopt development team to showcase progress on the forward modelling component of this platform, using the Firedrake framework. The overarching goal of the workshop was to provide a background to the platform and training for potential users, thus facilitating community growth within Australia. Although our focus was on geodynamical application, we were eager to identify other research areas for future applicability. As such, there was an opportunity for interested practitioners to engage with developers and other participants, to ascertain whether their problems are tractable within Firedrake.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2022
URL https://g-adopt.github.io/workshop.html
 
Description Great Exhibition Festival 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The Great Exhibition Road Festival is a free three-day celebration of curiosity, discovery and exploration in South Kensington. Over the summer, Imperial partnered with 20 neighbours across Exhibition Road and South Kensington, including some of the world's most iconic museums, to create a unique new festival. Over 60,000 people attended the first ever Great Exhibition Road Festival at the end of June to enjoy a mixture of art and science, culture and local history, technology and curiosity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description HIFICOMA 2019: WORKSHOP ON SPECTRAL/HP ELEMENT METHOD USING NEKTAR++ 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact We are delighted to report that the following members of the PRISM team: Chris Cantwell, Dave Moxey, Joaquim Peiro, Spencer Sherwin were invited to organise workshop on Spectral/hp element method using Nektar++ during the symposium International Symposium on High-Fidelity Computational Methods & Applications 2019, HiFiCoMa 2019, which was held in Shanghai. The objective of this symposium was to bring together experts in computational science and experts in engineering application to exchange new ideas and discuss development perspectives of high-fidelity methods. It also offered a platform to show the exciting scientific and engineering study undertaken in this area. The symposium ended with a Nektar++ workshop to provide a more opportunity to understand how to apply high order spectral/hp element software. More information on the event is available here: https://www.ishfcma.org/
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON SPECTRAL AND HIGH ORDER METHODS (ICOSAHOM) 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Scientific scope: The purpose of this conference series was to bring together researchers and practitioners with an interest in the theoretical, computational and applied aspects of high-order and spectral methods for the solution of differential equations.
Subjects included, but were not limited to: spectral methods, high-order finite difference methods, p and hp finite element methods, discontinuous Galerkin methods, ENO/WENO methods, high order methods for integral equations, wavelet-based methods, stochastic methods, efficient solvers and preconditioners for high order methods, efficient time-stepping methods, parallel and computational aspects, flux reconstruction.
Outcomes:
• The Christine Bernardi Award was given for her outstanding contributions in the area of "high-order approximations for the solution of PDE's". The 2018 Christine Bernardi Award was presented with a €1,000 cash prize during the celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Laboratoire Jacques Louis Lions where she was working. The Laureate was invited to give a talk at this occasion. The award was presented to honor Christine Bernardi, CNRS senior researcher at Laboratoire Jacques-Louis Lions at Sorbonne University (formerly known as Université Pierre et Marie Curie) in numerical analysis, who prematurely passed away on March 10, 2018. She was a leading figure in the domain of finite element and spectral methods and had contributions both in delicate a priori and posteriori estimates and in new numerical approaches in fluid flows and electromagnetism.
• The live streams of all the conference plenary talks can be found on the plenary speakers' page. http://icosahom2018.org/programme/plenaryspeakers/
• WINASc reception for female participants: there was a special drinks reception for women participants on Tuesday evening, 18:30-19:45, at 170 Queens Gate in the Drawing Room. This reception was hosted by Fengyan Li, Jennifer Ryan, and Beth Wingate, in conjunction with WINASc (Women in Numerical Analysis and Scientific Computing) and was made possible through the ICOSAHOM organization and their sponsors (EPSRC, Rolls-Royce, PRISM, AFOSR, and Imperial College London).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Improving the performance of Nektar++ with SIMD 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact In modern computer architectures, the gap between processor clock speed and memory bandwidth is constantly increasing, meaning that to attain optimal performance, algorithms with a high degree of arithmetic intensity - i.e the ratio between computations performed and the amount of data transferred from the memory (DRAM) - are required. In this context, high-order finite element methods are particularly attractive due to their high (and tunable) arithmetic intensity. Nektar++ is a finite element package designed to allow one to construct efficient classical low polynomial order h-type solvers (where h is the size of the finite element) as well as higher p-order piecewise polynomial solvers. The Nektar++ library comes with a number of solvers and also allows one to construct a variety of new ones. The main solvers provided are a continuous Galerkin incompressible Navier-Stokes solver and a discontinuous Galerkin compressible Navier-Stokes solver. These solvers are routinely applied to industrially relevant simulations; typical applications encompass external aerodynamics (for instance the flow around cars) as well as internal aerodynamics (for instance the flow in aircraft engines). The use single-instruction multiple-data (SIMD) vectorization, that is prevalent on modern hardware, is a well-studied solution for the efficient implementation of high-order operators. We are in the process of integrating within the Nektar++ library some operators (which are based on the work of Moxey et al., 2020) that take advantage SIMD hardware. The intent is to improve the efficiency of the Nektar++ library with the specific end goal of accelerating the compressible flow solver. Figure Caption: Roofline analysis for the vectorized Helmholtz operator (Moxey et al., 2020) on Broadwell CPU using deformed hexadral (triangle) and undeformed hexahedral (squares) elements with varying polynomial order (1-20).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://prism.ac.uk/2020/04/blog-entry-improving-the-performance-of-nektar-with-simd/
 
Description Introduction to Firedrake 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Firedake team hosted an in-person tutorial at Imperial College London for new users to get to grips with Firedrake.

Tutorial contentsThe tutorial was primarily aimed at postgraduate students, especially MSc students who expect to use Firedrake in their summer projects. However, non-students are also welcome.

The group was working through the Firedrake tutorial notebooks, which were provided in advance so attendees could understand the scope of the course.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2022
URL https://www.firedrakeproject.org/notebooks.html
 
Description JCP seminar featuring Prof. Peter Vincent on PyFR: Latest Developments and Future Roadmap 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact JCP seminar featuring Prof. Peter Vincent on PyFR: Latest Developments and Future Roadmap
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2022
URL https://cassyni.com/events/34SPqPcia9jHFfdaQsyf7B
 
Description Nuclear Institute Evening talk: Can Nuclear Modelling Techniques Help National Efforts to Combat COVID-19? 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Date: 28 September 2021
Presenters: Christopher Pain, Paul Smith
"Over many decades nuclear scientists and engineers have developed advanced techniques for modelling the behaviour of nuclear reactors under normal operation and accident conditions. These techniques have also been extended to other nuclear facilities and systems such as; decommissioning, nuclear and waste processing. Much of the phenomenology is analogous to the spread of a virus during a pandemic. For instance, the neutron multiplication factor in a nuclear reactor, k-effective, is in many ways analogous to the Reproduction Number (RO) in a pandemic. The transport of fission products on aerosols resulting from a nuclear reactor severe accident has many similarities with the spread of a virus on airborne aerosols. The presenters will explore such similarities and how the advanced modelling techniques developed in the nuclear industry can contribute to the simulation of the spread of a virus during a pandemic."
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://www.nuclearinst.com/Events-List/Could-Nuclear-Modelling-Techniques-Help-the-National-Efforts...
 
Description Organisation of 3rd PRISM Workshop on Application of Time-Stepping Techniques 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact In this workshop we wish to shared experiences on application of time-stepping techniques, for example parallel time integration, encapsulation of time integration and implicit time integration. As before the format of the on-line workshop involved a series of 3 short 15-minutes talks followed by a group discussions and a summary session.

The event's programme included:

3.00pm-3.15pm Scott MacLachlan (Memorial University of Newfoundland) on Parallel time integration

3.20pm-3.35pm Rob Kirby (Baylor University) on Encapsulation of time integration

3.40pm-3.55pm Zhenguo Yan  (Imperial College London) on Implicit time integration

4.00pm-4.30pm Group discussions

4.30pm-4.45pm Summary
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://prism.ac.uk/2021/01/3rd-prism-workshop-on-application-of-time-stepping-techniques/
 
Description PRISM workshop on best practices for software training and workshops 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact PRISM workshop on best practices for software training and workshops: Exploring online teaching in a post-pandemic era!
Date: 21st May 2020
Location: on-line
Summary: In this workshop we shared experiences and best practices on the use of workshops and tutorials for the PRISM related software. In light of the currently changes due to the Covid-19 pandemic it was also interesting to ask how our training experiences are likely to change at a broader level including all forms of remote teaching. The format of the on-line workshop involved a series of 3 or 4 short 10-minutes talks followed by small group discussions and a summary session.
The programme included presentations by:

2.00pm-2.15pm David Ham on Firedrake
2.15pm-2.30pm Spencer Sherwin / David Moxey on Nektar ++
2.30pm-2.45pm Matt Piggott / Gerard Gorman on Jupiter notebook
2.45pm-3pm Katerina Michalickova on Software Carpentry
3pm-4pm Brainstorming session on establishing best practices.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://prism.ac.uk/2020/05/prism-workshop-on-best-practices-for-software-training-and-workshops/
 
Description Participation in the first global, virtual TRANSFORM 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The first global, virtual TRANSFORM took place in September 2020 (TRANSFORM 2020: Schedule). The Software Underground brought lots of interesting and useful sessions on the digital subsurface. This event was a bit different from most conferences: the sessions were fully participatory and interactive.

Rhodri Nelson from Imperial College London gave a tutorial on "Geophysical Modeling with Devito" which can be seen in full here: Tutorial: Geophysical Modeling with Devito - YouTube
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://transform2020.sched.com/
 
Description Prof Farrell gave a keynote talk at the minisymposium organised by Peter Ohm, John Shadid and Matthias Mayr at the ECCOMAS Congress in Oslo, Norway. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Prof Farrell gave a keynote talk at the minisymposium organised by Peter Ohm, John Shadid and Matthias Mayr at the ECCOMAS Congress in Oslo, Norway.
8th European Congress on Computational Methods in Applied Sciences and Engineering (ECCOMAS Congress 2022) was held in Oslo, Norway, on 5th - 9th of June, 2022.
Nordic Association for Computational Mechanics (NoACM) represents the interest for the Nordic countries: Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, and the Baltic countries: Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania in the European Community on Computational Methods in Applied Sciences (ECCOMAS) and the International Association for Computational Mechanics (IACM). NoACM was founded in 1988.

The objective of the NoACM shall be to stimulate and promote research and practice in computational mechanics, to foster the interchange of ideas among the various fields contributing to computational mechanics and to provide forums and meetings for dissemination of knowledge about computational mechanics.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2022
URL https://www.eccomas2022.org/frontal/Introduction.asp
 
Description Prof Farrell gave a plenary talk at the 24th Conference of the International Linear Algebra Society in Galway, Ireland. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The 24th Conference of the International Linear Algebra Society took place at the National University of Ireland, Galway. The programme followed a similar format to other recent ILAS conferences - lectures and minisymposia from Monday to Friday, with an excursion on Wednesday afternoon followed by a banquet on Wednesday evening. In addition to the plenary lectures, there was full programme of minisymposia and contributed sessions.

The conference theme is "Classical Connections". This is reflected in the plenary programme and minisymposia, and all participants are encouraged to think about relating their themes to their historical roots. Contributions on all aspects of linear algebra and its applications are welcome. The conference proceedings will be published as a special issue of Linear Algebra and its Applications.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2022
URL http://ilas2020.ie/
 
Description Prof Farrell I gave a contributed talk at the 9th International Symposium on Bifurcations and Instabilities in Fluid Dynamics in Groningen, the Netherlands. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The 9th International Symposium on Bifurcations and Instabilities in Fluid Dynamics was held during 16-19 August 2022 in Groningen, the Netherlands. The symposium was hosted by the Bernoulli Institute of the University of Groningen.

The Bifurcations and Instabilities in Fluid Dynamics Association (BIFD) is a non-profit organization devoted to the promotion of research in instabilities and bifurcations in fluid mechanics, whose main objective is the organization of a bi-annual international scientific conference. The purpose of the meeting is to present and to discuss original theoretical, computational, and experimental research in stability and bifurcation theory related to fluid dynamical phenomena, with emphasis on open questions and benchmark problems, in order to stimulate international scientific cooperation in the field.

Its scope includes the classical hydrodynamic instabilities in shear, rotating, and convective flows (Taylor-Couette, Rayleigh-Bénard, Kelvin-Helmholtz, Bénard-Marangoni, Rayleigh-Taylor, Faraday) and related topics such as flow in thin films, transition to turbulence, magnetohydrodynamics, geophysical and astrophysical fluids, flow control, bio-locomotion. Industrial, environmental and biomedical applications are welcome; experimental, theoretical and computational studies are all encouraged.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2022
URL https://www.bifd2022.org/
 
Description Prof Farrell gave a talk in the Tufts Applied Mathematics seminar, hosted by Misha Kilmer and James Adler. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Prof Farrell gave a talk in the Tufts Applied Mathematics seminar, hosted by Misha Kilmer and James Adler.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2022
URL https://sites.tufts.edu/appliedmathseminar/
 
Description Prof Farrell gave a talk at the 30 years of Acta Numerica conference at the Banach Centre in Bedlewo, Poland. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Institute of Mathematics of Polish Academy of Sciences held 30th Birthday of Acta Numerica on 26 June - 02 July 2022
Acta Numerica is the top-ranked mathematics journal as measured by both Impact Factor and by MCQ. Its annual collection of review articles includes survey papers by leading researchers in numerical analysis, scientific computing and computational mathematics. The papers present overviews of recent advances and provide state-of-the-art techniques and analysis. Covering the breadth of numerical analysis, articles are written in a style accessible to researchers at all levels and can serve as advanced teaching aids. Broad subject areas for inclusion are computational methods in linear algebra, optimization, ordinary and partial differential equations, approximation theory, stochastic analysis and nonlinear dynamical systems, as well as the application of computational techniques in science and engineering and the mathematical theory underlying numerical methods.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2022
URL https://mat.ug.edu.pl/~kmalina/Acta_Numerica.html
 
Description Prof Farrell gave a talk at the SciCADE International Conference on Scientific Computation and Differential Equations in Reykjavik, Iceland, in the minisymposium MS32 Structure-preserving numerical methods for plasma models organised by Cecilia Pagliantini and Kaibo Hu. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact SciCADE, the International Conference on Scientific Computation and Differential Equations, was hosted by the University of Iceland, Reykjavík, July 25 - 29, 2022.
SciCADE is a biennial meeting that focuses on scientific computation using numerical methods for ordinary and partial differential equations, differential algebraic equations, stochastic differential equations and dynamical systems, among others
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2022
URL https://scicade2021.hi.is/
 
Description Prof Farrell gave a talk in the Courant Computational Mathematics and Scientific Computing seminar, hosted by Georg Stadler and Benjamin Peherstorfer. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Prof Farrelll gave a talk in the Courant Computational Mathematics and Scientific Computing seminar, hosted by Georg Stadler and Benjamin Peherstorfer.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2022
URL https://cs.nyu.edu/dynamic/news/seminar_event/1279/
 
Description Prof Farrell gave a talk in the KAUST Computer Science Graduate Seminar, hosted by David Keyes. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Prof Farrell gave a talk in the KAUST Computer Science Graduate Seminar, hosted by David Keyes.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2022
URL https://cemse.kaust.edu.sa/cs/events/graduate-seminar
 
Description Prof Farrell gave an invited presentation (Numerical Analysis and Applications section) at the Equadiff 15 conference in Brno, Czechia. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The Equadiff conferences are a series of international meetings devoted to the field of differential equations in the broadest sense
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2022
URL https://conference.math.muni.cz/equadiff15/
 
Description Prof Farrell organised a workshop on Defects and Distortions of Layered Complex Fluids (22w5159) at the Banff International Research Station, Canada, alongside Scott MacLachlan, Tim Atherton, Emmanuelle Lacaze and Francesca Serra. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The Banff International Research Station hosted the "Defects and Distortions of Layered Complex Fluids" workshop in Banff from October 02 to October 07, 2022.

Complex fluids that incorporate periodic layered order, such as smectic liquid crystals, block copolymers, membranes, and vesicles, possess remarkable properties because of the geometric and topological consequences of layering: external influences, such as boundary conditions and applied fields, may force deformations of the fluid that are incompatible with the layering, leading to geometric frustration and the spontaneous assembly of a wide variety of textures with characteristic defect structures.

There has been a recent explosion of interest in exploiting the ability of smectics, as a paradigmatic example of a layered fluid, to repeatedly self-assemble over device length-scales. Applications have been driven by advances in surface control, leveraging surface patterning, topographical features such as grooves or posts, confinement in droplets or upon curved surfaces to produce emergent patterns that are optically active as lenses, gratings, photonic crystals or lithographic templates. Moreover, defect structures in the texture can be used to efficiently trap dispersed nanoparticles, making these materials useful for hierarchical or synergistic assembly processes that could potentially be adopted for metamaterial, sensor or solar cell production.

Despite the remarkable experimental interest, the very complicated structures that emerge in these systems have proven to be extremely challenging to model computationally. While many observed phenomena have been understood through elegant geometric approaches or by perturbing from a less-ordered phase, to date there have been few successful efforts to use computation to predict the structures adopted by smectics in general configurations. Such methods could be of great benefit to structure prediction, particularly in scenarios where partial smectic order exists, such as during phase transitions, or to understand dynamical phenomena such as the shape evolution of films and bubbles.

The primary objective of this workshop is, therefore, to bring together bring together computational physicists, applied mathematicians and experimentalists together to identify: Geometries and experimental phenomena of interest that have become amenable to simulation; New theoretical questions about the structure and self-assembly of layered media that could be investigated computationally; New experiments that may now be possible due to emerging computational modelling approaches; Opportunities to formulate simulation methods for other layered media beyond smectics; New mathematical approaches that might further accelerate research on the broad category of layered fluids; How to exploit the interplay of geometry, topology and computation for improved algorithms.

The Banff International Research Station for Mathematical Innovation and Discovery (BIRS) is a collaborative Canada-US-Mexico venture that provides an environment for creative interaction as well as the exchange of ideas, knowledge, and methods within the Mathematical Sciences, with related disciplines and with industry. The research station is located at The Banff Centre in Alberta and is supported by Canada's Natural Science and Engineering Research Council (NSERC), the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), Alberta's Advanced Education and Technology, and Mexico's Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACYT).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2022
URL https://www.birs.ca/events/2022/5-day-workshops/22w5159
 
Description Prof Farrell talk at a talk at the workshop on Recent Advances in Numerical Linear Algebra for PDEs, Optimization, and Data Assimilation at the ICMS in Edinburgh, organised by John Pearson and Jemima Tabeart. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A talk at the workshop on Recent Advances in Numerical Linear Algebra for PDEs, Optimization, and Data Assimilation at the ICMS in Edinburgh, organised by John Pearson and Jemima Tabeart.

High-dimensional problems from numerical linear algebra underpin a wide variety of mathematical and scientific applications, including the solution of large-scale systems arising from PDEs, optimization problems, and data assimilation for weather forecasting. In this workshop the fast and robust solution of linear systems that result from such problems were considered. The presentations discussed the use of widely-applicable numerical linear algebra techniques as well as problem-specific tools, in order to design efficient implementations and algorithms to exploit modern computer architectures.

This workshop did consist of presentations from a number of leading researchers from academia and industry, aimed to encourage an exchange of ideas to further advance the state of the art in the application of numerical linear algebra to PDEs, optimization, and data assimilation.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2022
URL https://www.icms.org.uk/workshops/2022/recent-advances-numerical-linear-algebra-pdes-optimization-an...
 
Description PyFR Seminar Series 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The series comprises invited talks on a range of topics related to the theory of high-order Flux Reconstruction schemes, their implementation in the PyFR (www.pyfr.org) flow solver, and their application to industrially relevant flow problems. The overarching objective of the series is to help bridge the gap between academic research activities and real-world industrial requirements.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2022,2023
URL https://cassyni.com/s/pyfr
 
Description PyFR Seminar Series 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact The series comprises invited talks on a range of topics related to the theory of high-order Flux Reconstruction schemes, their implementation in the PyFR (www.pyfr.org) flow solver, and their application to industrially relevant flow problems. The overarching objective of the series is to help bridge the gap between academic research activities and real-world industrial requirements.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://cassyni.com/s/pyfr
 
Description RSE HACK EVENT WITH MICROSOFT AND THE ALAN TURING INSTITUTE 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This event focused on the theory and practise of automated testing and verification of research software and is critical reproducible research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description SIAM Conference on Mathematical & Computational Issues in the Geosciences 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Date: 21-24 June
This is the meeting of the SIAM Activity Group on Geosciences.
Christopher Pain presenting at conference aimed to stimulate the exchange of ideas among geoscientific modelers, applied mathematicians, statisticians, and other scientists, fostering new research in the mathematical foundations with an impact on geoscience applications.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://www.siam.org/conferences/cm/conference/gs21
 
Description Software Underground's annual virtual conference TRANSFORM 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The first global, virtual TRANSFORM took place in September 2020 (TRANSFORM 2020: Schedule). The Software Underground brought lots of interesting and useful sessions on the digital subsurface. This event was a bit different from most conferences: the sessions were fully participatory and interactive.
Rhodri Nelson from Imperial College London gave a tutorial on "Geophysical Modeling with Devito" which can be seen in full here: Tutorial: Geophysical Modeling with Devito - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=druSsV_1O6w
In the following year, in April 2021 another Transform 2021 event took place. A week-long celebration of open subsurface code and data included a hackathon, 21 tutorials, 20 lightning talks, and an annual general meeting. The heart of the conference week itself was the 21 amazing tutorials including the one from Devito team: Tutorial:
Synthetic seismic models with GemPy, Devito, and Pyvista.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020,2021
URL https://softwareunderground.org/
 
Description Spectral/hp element methods for flow modelling using Nektar++ 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Nektar++ is an open-source framework that provides a flexible, high-performance and scalable platform for the development of solvers for partial differential equations using the high-order spectral/hp element method. In particular, Nektar++ aims to overcome the complex implementation challenges that are often associated with high-order methods, thereby allowing them to be more readily used in a wide range of application areas. In this presentation we provided some motivation behind the spectral/hp element method and the development of Nektar++. We then provided some background on the code design and finally show some of the more challenging applications areas we have been tackling.

The presentation were given by three of the four team leaders of the project namely, Spencer Sherwin, Chris Cantwell and David Moxey.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2022
URL https://www.prism.ac.uk/2022/05/spectral-hp-element-methods-for-flow-modelling-using-nektar/
 
Description THE IUTAM SYMPOSIUM ON LAMINAR-TURBULENT TRANSITION 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The scientific programme covered a range of fundamental topic areas, including: Global analysis of instabilities and receptivities for complex configurations; Nonlinear dynamical-systems approaches to minimal seeds and transition to turbulence; Influence of multi-physics phenomena on transition: reactive flows, non-Newtonian material behaviour, interfacial flows, flows with interacting structures; Novel experimental measurement and evaluation techniques for transition in complex flows; Roughness-induced transition; transition from steps, gaps, junctions and other geometric imperfections; Transition in hypersonic flows; prediction of thermal loads; Active and passive control of flows undergoing transition; transition delay; Transition mechanisms in natural and controlled environments; receptivity techniques and studies; Late stages of transition and the breakdown to fully developed turbulence; Transient growth problems and bypass mechanisms and their role in the transition process.

Outcomes:
• We received very positive feedback from attendees on the well organised and attended meeting.
• Symposium was well attended by early-career academics, post-graduate students, industry representatives, senior members of the community and invited guests.
• 175 registered delegates of which 40% are PhDs
• Evening reception (Monday, 2nd September) and conferenced dinner (on the 5th September) provided networking opportunities for attendees to discuss future collaborations.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description The 9th edition of the International Conference on Computational Methods for Coupled Problems in Science and Engineering (COUPLED PROBLEMS 2021) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Date: 14 - 16 June 2021
Spencer Sherwin gave a plenary lecture on "The thick strip method for slender body fluid structure interaction"
The objectives of COUPLED PROBLEMS 2021 were to present and discuss state of the art, mathematical models, numerical methods and computational techniques for solving coupling problems of multidisciplinary character in science and engineering. The conference goal was to make step forward in the formulation and solution of real life problems with a multidisciplinary vision, accounting for all the complex couplings involved in the physical description of the problem.
The conference was one of the Thematic Conferences of the European Community on Computational Methods in Applied Sciences (ECCOMAS) and a Special Interest Conference of the International Association for Computational Mechanics (IACM). It is also supported by other scientific organizations in Europe and worldwide.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://congress.cimne.com/Coupled2021/frontal/default.asp
 
Description The ANSWERS Seminar 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact The ANSWERS Seminar is the annual get-together of ANSWERS customers and staff associated with the development and use of ANSWERS software products.
The three-day event covered radiation shielding, reactor physics and nuclear criticality topics including presentations on recent software developments and applications of ANSWERS software to practical problems.
Christopher Pain was an invited speaker and introduced to the audience the following topic: "Trends in nuclear modelling: fluids, solids, coupling and AI"
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://www.answerssoftwareservice.com/seminar.html
 
Description The Nektar++ team gave an online seminar 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Spectral/hp element methods for flow modelling using Nektar++ talk by Spencer Sherwin, Chris Cantwell and David Moxey
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2022
URL https://cassyni.com/events/DoYHbFwP7rmnhib73QnNmT
 
Description The wake passing effect in LPTs with Nektar++ 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact In a gas turbine engine, the pressure expansion through the high- and low-pressure turbines (LPT) is achieved in a number of subsequent stages. The interaction of multiple stages of rotors and stators is a crucial source of deterministic unsteadiness which has repercussions on the loss production mechanisms, and it is thus of great importance to designers.

To model the bar passing effect, the Smoothed Profile Method (SPM) approach was adopted and incorporated in the Nektar++ framework. Extensive preliminary validation was carried out to ensure the generation of a realistic cylinder wake. As part of the SPM formulation, an interface thickness parameter must be selected to represent the rigid particles. The interface thickness was selected to ensure accurate representation of the SPM boundaries (thus driven by resolution requirements). An auxiliary study focused on varying the diameter of the cylinders at fixed interface thickness. A smaller bar diameter of 60% the width of the nominal diameter produced wake profiles and spectral characteristics that very closely match those of a corresponding DNS simulation over the entire range of Reynolds numbers analysed.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://prism.ac.uk/2020/11/blog-the-wake-passing-effect-in-lpts-with-nektar/
 
Description Thetis workshop at the Korean Institute of Ocean Science and Technology 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact 5-day finite element training
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Thetis workshop at the Maldives National University 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Thetis is an unstructured grid coastal ocean model built using the Firedrake finite element framework. Currently Thetis consists of 2D depth averaged and full 3D baroclinic models.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Virtual Symposium and Tutorial Day held for CFD solver PyFR 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact A symposium and tutorial day for the CFD solver PyFR have been held virtually.

PyFR is a high-order accurate CFD solver designed for solving unsteady turbulent flow problems in the vicinity of complex geometries. It has application in a range of engineering sectors, including commercial and military aviation, wind engineering and submarine design. The project is jointly led by Dr Peter Vincent in the Department of Aeronautics and Prof Freddie Witherden in the Department of Ocean Engineering at Texas A&M University.

The PyFR Symposium 2020 consisted of talks from both industry and the PyFR team. The event covered a range of topics related to the theory of high-order Flux Reconstruction schemes, their implementation in PyFR, and their application to industrially relevant flow problems.

An additional event, the PyFR Tutorial Day 2020, provided step-by-step guidance on running scale-resolving CFD simulations with PyFR in parallel on multiple GPUs, as well as an overview of the PyFR codebase, and deep-dive sessions into specific topics of interest. Access to computing resources were provided by Amazon via their cloud platform.

Dr Peter Vincent hailed both events as "a great success". He added that "the overarching objective of the symposium was to help bridge the gap between industrial requirements and academic research activities, and I think we achieved that - the talks have led to a lot of offline discussions, and opportunities for collaboration."

The symposium also saw talks from the likes of MBDA, Zenotech and Pointwise as well as from the PyFR team, who described recent developments in numerics/software, and application of PyFR to a range of test cases.

Recordings and slide decks taken from all the talks given at the PyFR Symposium are now available on the PyFR website: http://pyfr.org/events.php
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.imperial.ac.uk/news/199255/virtual-symposium-tutorial-day-held-cfd/