Human Data Interaction: Legibility, Agency, Negotiability

Lead Research Organisation: University of Glasgow
Department Name: School of Computing Science

Abstract

Within almost every discipline related to the digital economy, there are critical and emerging issues around humans and the data they generate either directly, or as a byproduct of their endeavours. Equally, the data economy has stimulated a range of initiatives responses within each of the three sectors (public, private and third), as well as a broad portfolio of research across relevant disciplines. However, while such important work is ongoing, such these efforts are often disparate and tend not to feed directly back into the science of data-driven systems itself. There is an urgent need to guide the realisation of system design principles that are productive, and yet fit with the ethics and values acceptable to wider society. Those who are expert in development of the systems, algorithms and analytics that raise such issues face challenging culture gaps: firstly, with regard to those who are expert in areas such as the arts and humanities, and secondly with regard to those who are inexpert in technology but who are increasingly impacted by it in their everyday lives. Core to these divisions are issues such as a lack of social understanding of the technical capabilities of data-driven systems, inconsistency of research and development effort across sectors and disciplines, and tensions between industrial, societal and academic drivers, and human needs. Such tensions are visible in several domains, though few as pointedly critical as health. One need only look at NHS' efforts to protect individuals' medical records, in contrast to contrasted against the corporate monetization of DNA samples, as individuals take advantage of advances in low-cost mobile self-monitoring and diagnosiseek low cost solutions to their health-managements. Here, state, corporate and individual-level drivers create inconsistent approaches to the management and value of data.

It is time to draw together, consolidate and formalise our efforts across disciplines. We must now seek to structure further endeavour, while considering how new and emerging systems are realised, received and responded to-not just within the bounds of the DE but cross-sector, i.e. within the range of organisations and communities that reflect and support daily human activity and concern. At a sectoral level, industry has often focused narrowly on either corporate monetisation of data from individuals, or individuals' efficiency and short-term optimisation of personal metrics (e.g. the 'quantified self'). Market pressures mean that technical advances are increasingly implemented before social and cultural effects can be determined. This means, however, that data-intensive systems to support long term social, cultural and creative benefits are rare. At the same time, academic research has often focused on questions of interest more to itself than to other sectors. Academic work with public and third sector organisations has been fragmented, with interactions often weighted in favour of shorter term innovation cycles rather than longer term social needs. Such challenges, divergences and tensions lead to duplications, contradictions, and unproductive effort. This is the problem space within which we operate.

Our network a holistic and inclusive network approach, sensitive to the socially situated nature of such systems. To achieve this we will (a) develop and sustain a collaborative, cross-sectoral community under the banner of Human Data Interaction, (b) develop a portfolio of system design projects addressing underexplored aspects of the DE (c) create cross-sectoral interdisciplinary synthesis of research under the HDI banner (d) conceptually develop and flesh-out the HDI framework, (e) create a suite of policy and public-facing case studies, papers, prototypes and educational materials, and (f) develop a set of core guidelines intended to inform the design of human-facing data-driven systems.

Planned Impact

The Human Data Interaction Network+ will have direct impact with industry, the wider public, media and education and skills. The concept is core to the vast majority of new and emerging systems with which we all interact on a daily basis, both above and below our immediate level of awareness. As such it will transform many areas under the Digital Economy theme. This is evident through the strength of support and interest articulated by our partners and collaborators, even before commencement of the work. There is no question that this is a critical area and, as such, will attract multiple opportunities for impact.
Specifically, this network will progress the state of the art in respect of systems design and research by (1) establishing the foundations for a new science of data-driven systems through (2) collaborative development of the Human Data Interaction framework. In order to achieve this, this Network+ will fund a portfolio of 45 projects, culminating in a review and showcase event. The work will establish the foundations for a new science of data-driven systems through the framework of human-data interaction.

We will promote the new approach within our research communities. We will organise a workshop at premier conferences, and present our work at leading research institutions (including those of our network members). We will pursue opportunities for outreach and advocacy among the general public, industry, the public and third sectors and the wider scientific community, e.g. demonstrations and displays at science festivals, trade fairs and industrial outreach events, and debate through learned societies. Indeed, part of this outreach is inherent in the design of the network. We will also draw upon the networks of our partners in order to communicate both network opportunities and findings of the research.

Our collaborations already include a broad range of industries and organisations. We will build on our ongoing collaborations with companies including Google, Microsoft Research, IBM, Spotify and Arup -reaching out to SMEs, startups and others through Digital Catapult and ICAEW. Through these mechanisms we will establish further collaborations with major companies, to expand our set of collaborators as the network matures. We will be assisted in this work by our partners, the planned workshops and our universities' Business Development Teams and Research & Enterprise units. Such collaborations will enable us to support and promote research, and demonstrate that any prototypes can operate in a definite market. Our collaborating partners will benefit from access to the leading researchers in this emerging area, the ability to shape the ongoing research as it happens, funded collaborations, and the ability to demonstrate and evaluate the work in deployments aligned with their commercial areas of interest.

The funded project arising from of the network activities will act as demonstrators for media, the public, and government, highlighting new areas of research, asking new questions and drawing together existing endeavour. In this way, the network+ in Human Data Interaction has the potential to be the driving force and public face of research under this banner, exploiting the relationships forged during the life of the network into the long term. Through our government partners, this network will contribute towards evidence based policy-making and influencing public policies and legislation at a local, regional, national and international level.

Lastly, we will inform skills development through our partnerships with professional bodies (ICAEW and ALT) in addition to our strong links into the network of local authorities. In summary, the impacts of this network will be broad and far reaching, even beyond the life of the project.

Organisations

 
Title Do I have to use that technology in school? 
Description This animation was published on the 1st of April 2021 on YouTube,, aimed at 16-18 year olds. It was produced by SciAni. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Number of People Reached: ongoing but so far impressions on Twitter: 30, 168, with 2321 engagements, and 2783 views on YouTube 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g1x06ba3u60
 
Title Similar Sounds: A Virtual Agent in Live Coding 
Description As a follow-up of the workshop held in London (IKLECTIK) the original plan was to held an on-site concert in London (IKLECTIK). Due to the pandemic, we adapted the original idea to what was currently possible with an emphasis on the online experience. We offered two performances by Anna Xambó (De Montfort University) and Gerard Roma (University of Huddersfield) respectively, and a follow-up Q&A panel with the two musicians, Sam Roig (L'Ull Cec) and Iván Paz (TOPLAP). The audience was invited to ask questions on the YouTube Live Chat. 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2020 
Impact During the concert and talk there was a total of 818 views (YouTube and Facebook) 60% UK - 20 % Spain - 20% other countries (incl. Japan, Italy and United States). At present (January 2021) there is a total of 1068 views - 60% UK - 20 % Spain - 20% other countries (incl. Japan, Italy and United States). 
URL https://mirlca.dmu.ac.uk/concerts/
 
Title Sun Begins to Fade: a composition for AI and human singer 
Description This is a composition by Max de Wardener commissioned as part of the HDI network research project 'Call and Response' 
Type Of Art Composition/Score 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact This is a forthcoming work but we expect it will be performed to the general public. 
URL https://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/29828
 
Title They Are the Robots 
Description An online live coding session performed by Anna Xambó during Transnodal TOPLAP (19-21 February 2021). In this session, the MIRLCa library is used, which is a self-built tool for live coding enhanced with a virtual agent. This version includes the feedback from participants of the workshops organised together with IKLECTIK, l'ull cec/TOPLAP Barcelona, and Leicester Hackspace. 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact The performance had an average of 50-100 viewers. After the performance, an acknowledgment message was received by a viewer from USA: "I just wanted to say I really loved your set on the livestream. It's always such a joy to just tune in when I can and stumble on some amazing music. I look forward to eventually grabbing some stuff on Bandcamp and digging deeper into your work. Just wanted you to know I appreciated it though. Thank you!" 
URL https://mirlca.dmu.ac.uk/posts/live-coding-session-at-transnodal-toplap-february-2021/
 
Description The Human Data Interaction approach involved three design aims or tenets: legibility of how one's (personal) data is being used, agency with regard to the control of how that data is taken and used in systems, and negotiability with regard to system support for negotiation with the people taking and using it. We've learnt a lot about the ways in which these three tenets work, including how HDI shows perhaps too many individualistic assumptions about how one person would manage the data about themselves, but we've also determined that we need a fourth tenet: resistance.

Why? Well, what happens when you can see your data that comes out of a system, and how it's used in that system and others (legibility), and you try to control that (agency) and negotiate with the people using it... but that all fails? If the data is going to be leaving you, then one option remains: active resistance against the processing of data by others, i.e. messing up what those other people are trying to do with the data, but in ways that are legal and that still let you do what you want to do.

We also detailed some ways in which not everyone wants to (or sees it as their place to) resist in this way, and there are endlessly fine (and interesting) details of how privacy, trust, action and the like work out in lived practice, but nevertheless we see design for resistance as a wide open and potentially very valuable area for future development.

Lastly, to summarise information combining outcomes detailed in other sections, we note the high levels of representation by some of those under-represented in wider EPSRC funding: 21 projects (62%) had an ECR as lead or joint lead; 15 female (71%), 5 male and 1 non-binary. Overall: 33/124 members were ECRs; 54 female (43%), 67 male (54%) and 4 non-binary (3%).
Exploitation Route Many of the network members are already taking their work forward in new projects, or are putting together proposals for new projects based on the work they did in the N+. The HDI conceptual framework is proving to be a practical and beneficial tool to use when studying and designing systems that deal with personal data.
Sectors Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software)

URL https://hdi-network.org/
 
Description Bakir, V., McStay, A. and Urquhart, L. (2020) EMOTION RECOGNITION: TRENDS, SOCIAL FEELING, POLICY ( (For UK All Party Parliamentary Group on Artificial Intelligence)
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Implementation circular/rapid advice/letter to e.g. Ministry of Health
URL https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Hyix108Ly1140qZuggCo7HrwzSOFaIrL/view
 
Description HDI cited in World Economic Forum Paper 'On the Importance of Human-centricity and Data'
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
URL http://www3.weforum.org/docs/WEF_On_the_Importance_of_Human_Centricity_2021.pdf
 
Description Influencing the Inquiry into the Impact of Social Media on Elections & Electoral Administration, Electoral Matters Committee, Parliament of Victoria (Australia).
Geographic Reach Australia 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a national consultation
Impact Our invited research fed into nine of the Inquiry's 70 Findings, and two out of the Inquiry's 33 Recommendations (2021).
URL https://emotionalai.org/news/2021/9/20/emotional-disinformation-on-social-media-advising-australias-...
 
Description Input into the Government CDEI report on home assistants
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Gave evidence to a government review
Impact Our research provided evidence for the "Smart Speakers and Voice Assistants" paper as part of the "CDEI Snapshot Series" The Centre for Data Ethics and Innovation (CDEI) is an advisory body set up by the UK government and led by an independent board of experts. It is tasked with identifying the measures we need to take to maximise the benefits of AI and data-driven technology for our society and economy. The CDEI has a unique mandate to advise government on these issues, drawing on expertise and perspectives from across society. The CDEI Snapshots are a series of briefing papers that aim to improve public understanding of topical issues related to the development and deployment of AI. These papers are intended to separate fact from fiction, clarify what is known and unknown, and suggest areas for further investigation.
URL https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/8311...
 
Description Invited Taskforce member; World Economic Forum 'Empowered Data Societies' Project in partnership with government of Helsinki (link to launch event video)
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
URL https://weforum.zoom.us/rec/play/u5EEaSyGYGVwoZlelnnT3xr75MCj-shOKawgiMBbsb3SZU0XmzHgMW_M8H9Xisb4uas...
 
Description McStay delivered 2 lectures on Emotional AI and human rights for UN Global Campus of Human Rights MOOC
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description McStay is an IEEE P7014 member, helping to define a global standard for ethical considerations and practices in the design, creation and use of empathic technology.
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
Impact McStay is an IEEE P7014 member, helping to define a global standard for ethical considerations and practices in the design, creation and use of empathic technology.
 
Description McStay, A., Rosner, G., Miyashita, H. and Urquhart, L. (2020) Comment on Children's Rights In Relation To Emotional AI And The Digital Environment for UN Committee on the Rights of the Child.
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
Impact McStay, A., Rosner, G., Miyashita, H. and Urquhart, L. (2020) Comment on Children's Rights In Relation To Emotional AI And The Digital Environment for UN Committee on the Rights of the Child.
URL https://drive.google.com/file/d/1XVBKQKQkbv4FiBDT-eSBM3VqNiv63B_b/view
 
Description Open Data for social empowerment
Geographic Reach Africa 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact Three professors leading 50 students in total got engaged with the training activity. The training introduced the OER to support lecturers in appropriating new concepts and ideas regarding critical data literacy. They also were guided in how to design learning units that enable them to deliver the main concepts of this OER, namely legibility, agency, and negotiability. We are particularly focused on negotiability. In particular, we introduced a critical problem that small farmers face cornering either the absence of data in open data sets that inform policy or the invisibility of that data. This is particularly relevant for the concept of negotiability and agency. The main impact is the change of practice that were reported to us by two of our participants, I copy below: Educator X: A class of 25 students were taken through the class on "the making of a great business plan''. The materials on Open Data and critical data literacy came in handy especially on the two critical topics in their business plans. Students are now confident in writing their final Business plans based on the analysis gained from Open Data sources. Educator Y: A class of 32 students group presentation - Title: Open Data use to curb climate change in Kenya. The students engaged critically with the open data to research for the information relevant to the presentation. We have a second trainging planned with Tangaza University, they are keen to learn more about critical data literacy
URL https://datapraxis.net/chapter-narobi/the-open-data-for-empowerment-workshop-od4e/
 
Description UNICEF global policy guidance on AI for children
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
Impact With influence on 196 member states, the policy will also influence standards bodies (such as IEEE P7000, that McStay participates in) and diverse part of industry developing technologies for children.
URL https://www.unicef.org/globalinsight/media/1171/file
 
Description Connectivity and Digital Design for Promoting Health and Well-being Across Generations, Places and Spaces
Amount £1,618,597 (GBP)
Funding ID ES/V016113/1 
Organisation Economic and Social Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 03/2021 
End 02/2024
 
Description Industrial CASE award (EPSRC) in partnership with BBC (figure includes BBC contribution)
Amount £114,500 (GBP)
Funding ID 19000054 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2019 
End 09/2023
 
Description Integrated Clinical Academic Lectureship awarded to Dr Sam Malins
Amount £404,581 (GBP)
Organisation National Institute for Health Research 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 08/2021 
End 08/2024
 
Description MIDAS (Minimal Intervention Distributed Account System)
Amount £50,000 (GBP)
Organisation HORIZON Digital Economy Research 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 03/2021 
End 03/2022
 
Description New forms of Public Value at the Edge : Designing for HDI and Trust in Media IoT Futures
Amount £50,000 (GBP)
Organisation PETRAS National Centre of Excellence 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 12/2020 
End 05/2021
 
Description Privacy-Preserved Human Motion Analysis for Healthcare Applications
Amount £318,446 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/W01212X/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 03/2022 
End 03/2025
 
Title Blue Haze 
Description This is a bespoke Python environment for capturing the data streams from embodied music-making, or any immersive/ embodied activity and organising them into a robust database using MongoDB. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2021 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact Too early to assess impact 
URL https://github.com/Creative-AI-Research-Group/embodiedMusickingDataset
 
Title NewHaven01 
Description The performance of music involves the physical expression of musical material in a complex and multimodal process. Furthermore, musical performance involves a sense of 'flow', or immersion in the creative act, that can be better understood through a careful and holistic examination of data captured from this complex physical activity. Flow is especially relevant in improvisatory performance contexts where musicians must make real-time decisions about content and its expression. The project detailed in this paper involves the design and creation of a low-cost protocol for collecting simultaneous streams of data from improvising human musicians that are performing from a common score. The protocol records and synchronises audio recording with body-, facial- and physiological response tracking with a ground-truth annotation through the reported flow of a performer. This association yields a robust dataset that serves to capture the complex and multi-model process of making music 'in the flow'. This dataset can be a useful tool for a range of applications, such as creative AI practices, music generation in game engines, music information retrieval and humanisation of static systems-e.g. MIDI file playback and sound processing parameters. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2022 
Provided To Others? Yes  
URL https://figshare.dmu.ac.uk/articles/dataset/NewHaven01/19145684
 
Title NewHaven01 
Description The performance of music involves the physical expression of musical material in a complex and multimodal process. Furthermore, musical performance involves a sense of 'flow', or immersion in the creative act, that can be better understood through a careful and holistic examination of data captured from this complex physical activity. Flow is especially relevant in improvisatory performance contexts where musicians must make real-time decisions about content and its expression. The project detailed in this paper involves the design and creation of a low-cost protocol for collecting simultaneous streams of data from improvising human musicians that are performing from a common score. The protocol records and synchronises audio recording with body-, facial- and physiological response tracking with a ground-truth annotation through the reported flow of a performer. This association yields a robust dataset that serves to capture the complex and multi-model process of making music 'in the flow'. This dataset can be a useful tool for a range of applications, such as creative AI practices, music generation in game engines, music information retrieval and humanisation of static systems-e.g. MIDI file playback and sound processing parameters. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2022 
Provided To Others? Yes  
URL https://figshare.dmu.ac.uk/articles/dataset/NewHaven01/19145684/1
 
Title NewHaven02 
Description The performance of music involves the physical expression of musical material in a complex and multimodal process. Furthermore, musical performance involves a sense of 'flow', or immersion in the creative act, that can be better understood through a careful and holistic examination of data captured from this complex physical activity. Flow is especially relevant in improvisatory performance contexts where musicians must make real-time decisions about content and its expression. The project detailed in this paper involves the design and creation of a low-cost protocol for collecting simultaneous streams of data from improvising human musicians that are performing from a common score. The protocol records and synchronises audio recording with body-, facial- and physiological response tracking with a ground-truth annotation through the reported flow of a performer. This association yields a robust dataset that serves to capture the complex and multi-model process of making music 'in the flow'. This dataset can be a useful tool for a range of applications, such as creative AI practices, music generation in game engines, music information retrieval and humanisation of static systems-e.g. MIDI file playback and sound processing parameters. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2022 
Provided To Others? Yes  
URL https://figshare.dmu.ac.uk/articles/dataset/NewHaven02/19145699
 
Title NewHaven02 
Description The performance of music involves the physical expression of musical material in a complex and multimodal process. Furthermore, musical performance involves a sense of 'flow', or immersion in the creative act, that can be better understood through a careful and holistic examination of data captured from this complex physical activity. Flow is especially relevant in improvisatory performance contexts where musicians must make real-time decisions about content and its expression. The project detailed in this paper involves the design and creation of a low-cost protocol for collecting simultaneous streams of data from improvising human musicians that are performing from a common score. The protocol records and synchronises audio recording with body-, facial- and physiological response tracking with a ground-truth annotation through the reported flow of a performer. This association yields a robust dataset that serves to capture the complex and multi-model process of making music 'in the flow'. This dataset can be a useful tool for a range of applications, such as creative AI practices, music generation in game engines, music information retrieval and humanisation of static systems-e.g. MIDI file playback and sound processing parameters. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2022 
Provided To Others? Yes  
URL https://figshare.dmu.ac.uk/articles/dataset/NewHaven02/19145699/1
 
Title NewHaven03 
Description The performance of music involves the physical expression of musical material in a complex and multimodal process. Furthermore, musical performance involves a sense of 'flow', or immersion in the creative act, that can be better understood through a careful and holistic examination of data captured from this complex physical activity. Flow is especially relevant in improvisatory performance contexts where musicians must make real-time decisions about content and its expression. The project detailed in this paper involves the design and creation of a low-cost protocol for collecting simultaneous streams of data from improvising human musicians that are performing from a common score. The protocol records and synchronises audio recording with body-, facial- and physiological response tracking with a ground-truth annotation through the reported flow of a performer. This association yields a robust dataset that serves to capture the complex and multi-model process of making music 'in the flow'. This dataset can be a useful tool for a range of applications, such as creative AI practices, music generation in game engines, music information retrieval and humanisation of static systems-e.g. MIDI file playback and sound processing parameters. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2022 
Provided To Others? Yes  
URL https://figshare.dmu.ac.uk/articles/dataset/NewHaven03/19145672/1
 
Title NewHaven03 
Description The performance of music involves the physical expression of musical material in a complex and multimodal process. Furthermore, musical performance involves a sense of 'flow', or immersion in the creative act, that can be better understood through a careful and holistic examination of data captured from this complex physical activity. Flow is especially relevant in improvisatory performance contexts where musicians must make real-time decisions about content and its expression. The project detailed in this paper involves the design and creation of a low-cost protocol for collecting simultaneous streams of data from improvising human musicians that are performing from a common score. The protocol records and synchronises audio recording with body-, facial- and physiological response tracking with a ground-truth annotation through the reported flow of a performer. This association yields a robust dataset that serves to capture the complex and multi-model process of making music 'in the flow'. This dataset can be a useful tool for a range of applications, such as creative AI practices, music generation in game engines, music information retrieval and humanisation of static systems-e.g. MIDI file playback and sound processing parameters. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2022 
Provided To Others? Yes  
URL https://figshare.dmu.ac.uk/articles/dataset/NewHaven03/19145672
 
Title NewHaven04 
Description The performance of music involves the physical expression of musical material in a complex and multimodal process. Furthermore, musical performance involves a sense of 'flow', or immersion in the creative act, that can be better understood through a careful and holistic examination of data captured from this complex physical activity. Flow is especially relevant in improvisatory performance contexts where musicians must make real-time decisions about content and its expression. The project detailed in this paper involves the design and creation of a low-cost protocol for collecting simultaneous streams of data from improvising human musicians that are performing from a common score. The protocol records and synchronises audio recording with body-, facial- and physiological response tracking with a ground-truth annotation through the reported flow of a performer. This association yields a robust dataset that serves to capture the complex and multi-model process of making music 'in the flow'. This dataset can be a useful tool for a range of applications, such as creative AI practices, music generation in game engines, music information retrieval and humanisation of static systems-e.g. MIDI file playback and sound processing parameters. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2022 
Provided To Others? Yes  
URL https://figshare.dmu.ac.uk/articles/dataset/NewHaven04/19145693/1
 
Title NewHaven04 
Description The performance of music involves the physical expression of musical material in a complex and multimodal process. Furthermore, musical performance involves a sense of 'flow', or immersion in the creative act, that can be better understood through a careful and holistic examination of data captured from this complex physical activity. Flow is especially relevant in improvisatory performance contexts where musicians must make real-time decisions about content and its expression. The project detailed in this paper involves the design and creation of a low-cost protocol for collecting simultaneous streams of data from improvising human musicians that are performing from a common score. The protocol records and synchronises audio recording with body-, facial- and physiological response tracking with a ground-truth annotation through the reported flow of a performer. This association yields a robust dataset that serves to capture the complex and multi-model process of making music 'in the flow'. This dataset can be a useful tool for a range of applications, such as creative AI practices, music generation in game engines, music information retrieval and humanisation of static systems-e.g. MIDI file playback and sound processing parameters. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2022 
Provided To Others? Yes  
URL https://figshare.dmu.ac.uk/articles/dataset/NewHaven04/19145693
 
Title NewHaven05 
Description AbstractThe performance of music involves the physical expression of musical material in a complex and multimodal process. Furthermore, musical performance involves a sense of 'flow', or immersion in the creative act, that can be better understood through a careful and holistic examination of data captured from this complex physical activity. Flow is especially relevant in improvisatory performance contexts where musicians must make real-time decisions about content and its expression. The project detailed in this paper involves the design and creation of a low-cost protocol for collecting simultaneous streams of data from improvising human musicians that are performing from a common score. The protocol records and synchronises audio recording with body-, facial- and physiological response tracking with a ground-truth annotation through the reported flow of a performer. This association yields a robust dataset that serves to capture the complex and multi-model process of making music 'in the flow'. This dataset can be a useful tool for a range of applications, such as creative AI practices, music generation in game engines, music information retrieval and humanisation of static systems-e.g. MIDI file playback and sound processing parameters. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2022 
Provided To Others? Yes  
URL https://figshare.dmu.ac.uk/articles/dataset/NewHaven05/19145717/1
 
Title NewHaven05 
Description AbstractThe performance of music involves the physical expression of musical material in a complex and multimodal process. Furthermore, musical performance involves a sense of 'flow', or immersion in the creative act, that can be better understood through a careful and holistic examination of data captured from this complex physical activity. Flow is especially relevant in improvisatory performance contexts where musicians must make real-time decisions about content and its expression. The project detailed in this paper involves the design and creation of a low-cost protocol for collecting simultaneous streams of data from improvising human musicians that are performing from a common score. The protocol records and synchronises audio recording with body-, facial- and physiological response tracking with a ground-truth annotation through the reported flow of a performer. This association yields a robust dataset that serves to capture the complex and multi-model process of making music 'in the flow'. This dataset can be a useful tool for a range of applications, such as creative AI practices, music generation in game engines, music information retrieval and humanisation of static systems-e.g. MIDI file playback and sound processing parameters. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2022 
Provided To Others? Yes  
URL https://figshare.dmu.ac.uk/articles/dataset/NewHaven05/19145717
 
Title UK01 
Description AbstractThe performance of music involves the physical expression of musical material in a complex and multimodal process. Furthermore, musical performance involves a sense of 'flow', or immersion in the creative act, that can be better understood through a careful and holistic examination of data captured from this complex physical activity. Flow is especially relevant in improvisatory performance contexts where musicians must make real-time decisions about content and its expression. The project detailed in this paper involves the design and creation of a low-cost protocol for collecting simultaneous streams of data from improvising human musicians that are performing from a common score. The protocol records and synchronises audio recording with body-, facial- and physiological response tracking with a ground-truth annotation through the reported flow of a performer. This association yields a robust dataset that serves to capture the complex and multi-model process of making music 'in the flow'. This dataset can be a useful tool for a range of applications, such as creative AI practices, music generation in game engines, music information retrieval and humanisation of static systems-e.g. MIDI file playback and sound processing parameters. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2022 
Provided To Others? Yes  
URL https://figshare.dmu.ac.uk/articles/dataset/UK01/19145708/1
 
Title UK01 
Description AbstractThe performance of music involves the physical expression of musical material in a complex and multimodal process. Furthermore, musical performance involves a sense of 'flow', or immersion in the creative act, that can be better understood through a careful and holistic examination of data captured from this complex physical activity. Flow is especially relevant in improvisatory performance contexts where musicians must make real-time decisions about content and its expression. The project detailed in this paper involves the design and creation of a low-cost protocol for collecting simultaneous streams of data from improvising human musicians that are performing from a common score. The protocol records and synchronises audio recording with body-, facial- and physiological response tracking with a ground-truth annotation through the reported flow of a performer. This association yields a robust dataset that serves to capture the complex and multi-model process of making music 'in the flow'. This dataset can be a useful tool for a range of applications, such as creative AI practices, music generation in game engines, music information retrieval and humanisation of static systems-e.g. MIDI file playback and sound processing parameters. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2022 
Provided To Others? Yes  
URL https://figshare.dmu.ac.uk/articles/dataset/UK01/19145708
 
Title UK02 
Description The performance of music involves the physical expression of musical material in a complex and multimodal process. Furthermore, musical performance involves a sense of 'flow', or immersion in the creative act, that can be better understood through a careful and holistic examination of data captured from this complex physical activity. Flow is especially relevant in improvisatory performance contexts where musicians must make real-time decisions about content and its expression. The project detailed in this paper involves the design and creation of a low-cost protocol for collecting simultaneous streams of data from improvising human musicians that are performing from a common score. The protocol records and synchronises audio recording with body-, facial- and physiological response tracking with a ground-truth annotation through the reported flow of a performer. This association yields a robust dataset that serves to capture the complex and multi-model process of making music 'in the flow'. This dataset can be a useful tool for a range of applications, such as creative AI practices, music generation in game engines, music information retrieval and humanisation of static systems-e.g. MIDI file playback and sound processing parameters. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2022 
Provided To Others? Yes  
URL https://figshare.dmu.ac.uk/articles/dataset/UK02/19145690
 
Title UK02 
Description The performance of music involves the physical expression of musical material in a complex and multimodal process. Furthermore, musical performance involves a sense of 'flow', or immersion in the creative act, that can be better understood through a careful and holistic examination of data captured from this complex physical activity. Flow is especially relevant in improvisatory performance contexts where musicians must make real-time decisions about content and its expression. The project detailed in this paper involves the design and creation of a low-cost protocol for collecting simultaneous streams of data from improvising human musicians that are performing from a common score. The protocol records and synchronises audio recording with body-, facial- and physiological response tracking with a ground-truth annotation through the reported flow of a performer. This association yields a robust dataset that serves to capture the complex and multi-model process of making music 'in the flow'. This dataset can be a useful tool for a range of applications, such as creative AI practices, music generation in game engines, music information retrieval and humanisation of static systems-e.g. MIDI file playback and sound processing parameters. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2022 
Provided To Others? Yes  
URL https://figshare.dmu.ac.uk/articles/dataset/UK02/19145690/1
 
Title UK03 
Description AbstractThe performance of music involves the physical expression of musical material in a complex and multimodal process. Furthermore, musical performance involves a sense of 'flow', or immersion in the creative act, that can be better understood through a careful and holistic examination of data captured from this complex physical activity. Flow is especially relevant in improvisatory performance contexts where musicians must make real-time decisions about content and its expression. The project detailed in this paper involves the design and creation of a low-cost protocol for collecting simultaneous streams of data from improvising human musicians that are performing from a common score. The protocol records and synchronises audio recording with body-, facial- and physiological response tracking with a ground-truth annotation through the reported flow of a performer. This association yields a robust dataset that serves to capture the complex and multi-model process of making music 'in the flow'. This dataset can be a useful tool for a range of applications, such as creative AI practices, music generation in game engines, music information retrieval and humanisation of static systems-e.g. MIDI file playback and sound processing parameters. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2022 
Provided To Others? Yes  
URL https://figshare.dmu.ac.uk/articles/dataset/UK03/19145714/1
 
Title UK03 
Description AbstractThe performance of music involves the physical expression of musical material in a complex and multimodal process. Furthermore, musical performance involves a sense of 'flow', or immersion in the creative act, that can be better understood through a careful and holistic examination of data captured from this complex physical activity. Flow is especially relevant in improvisatory performance contexts where musicians must make real-time decisions about content and its expression. The project detailed in this paper involves the design and creation of a low-cost protocol for collecting simultaneous streams of data from improvising human musicians that are performing from a common score. The protocol records and synchronises audio recording with body-, facial- and physiological response tracking with a ground-truth annotation through the reported flow of a performer. This association yields a robust dataset that serves to capture the complex and multi-model process of making music 'in the flow'. This dataset can be a useful tool for a range of applications, such as creative AI practices, music generation in game engines, music information retrieval and humanisation of static systems-e.g. MIDI file playback and sound processing parameters. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2022 
Provided To Others? Yes  
URL https://figshare.dmu.ac.uk/articles/dataset/UK03/19145714
 
Title embodiedMusickingDatasetMay2021-UK04 
Description The performance of music involves the physical expression of musical material in a complex and multimodal process. Furthermore, musical performance involves a sense of 'flow', or immersion in the creative act, that can be better understood through a careful and holistic examination of data captured from this complex physical activity. Flow is especially relevant in improvisatory performance contexts where musicians must make real-time decisions about content and its expression. The project detailed in this paper involves the design and creation of a low-cost protocol for collecting simultaneous streams of data from improvising human musicians that are performing from a common score. The protocol records and synchronises audio recording with body-, facial- and physiological response tracking with a ground-truth annotation through the reported flow of a performer. This association yields a robust dataset that serves to capture the complex and multi-model process of making music 'in the flow'. This dataset can be a useful tool for a range of applications, such as creative AI practices, music generation in game engines, music information retrieval and humanisation of static systems-e.g. MIDI file playback and sound processing parameters. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2022 
Provided To Others? Yes  
URL https://figshare.dmu.ac.uk/articles/dataset/embodiedMusickingDatasetMay2021-UK04/19145666
 
Title embodiedMusickingDatasetMay2021-UK04 
Description The performance of music involves the physical expression of musical material in a complex and multimodal process. Furthermore, musical performance involves a sense of 'flow', or immersion in the creative act, that can be better understood through a careful and holistic examination of data captured from this complex physical activity. Flow is especially relevant in improvisatory performance contexts where musicians must make real-time decisions about content and its expression. The project detailed in this paper involves the design and creation of a low-cost protocol for collecting simultaneous streams of data from improvising human musicians that are performing from a common score. The protocol records and synchronises audio recording with body-, facial- and physiological response tracking with a ground-truth annotation through the reported flow of a performer. This association yields a robust dataset that serves to capture the complex and multi-model process of making music 'in the flow'. This dataset can be a useful tool for a range of applications, such as creative AI practices, music generation in game engines, music information retrieval and humanisation of static systems-e.g. MIDI file playback and sound processing parameters. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2022 
Provided To Others? Yes  
URL https://figshare.dmu.ac.uk/articles/dataset/embodiedMusickingDatasetMay2021-UK04/19145666/1
 
Description Assisted Interactive Machine Learning. 
Organisation Goldsmiths, University of London
Department Department of Computing
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This is a sub project of the Human Data Interaction Network Plus
Collaborator Contribution 1. Project Aims and Objectives The aims of the project are: ? To continue development of a system to map musical gestures to sound samples based on associating high level meta-data in the input domain to high level meta-data in the output domain ? To address problems of unevenness and sparseness of the audio feature space by apply- ing techniques of Self-Organising Maps (SOM) ? To develop a creative assistant to suggest increasingly pertinent associations between input meta-data and output meta-data using techniques of Reinforcement Learning (RL) ? To combine SOM and RL to create an end-to-end system for Assisted Interactive Ma- chine Learning (AIML) ? To evaluate the AIML system with musicians from the Music Hackspace community
Impact No outputs as of yet.
Start Year 2020
 
Description BREATHE - IoT in the wild (2019 - Still Active) 
Organisation Liskeard and South East Cornwall Breather's Group
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution This project builds on longstanding work with rural communities to understand how they might gain agency with smart sensor networks . It has a three way partnership approach- working with existing innovation ecosystem on e-health, with SMEs that are developing innovative approaches to data interactions around IoT and with the community partners from the rural villages and wider region. The key partners are: - Hi9 SME - The Patient's Association - Liskeard and South East Cornwall Breather's Group Replication and transferability
Collaborator Contribution The project was co-designed with Liskeard and South East Cornwall Breather's Group, supported by The patient's Association. The software/hardware development was developed at a first stage with Hi9, a Cornish based startup with expertise in smart speakers, AI and IoT
Impact We have developed a proof of concept prototype of a breathing sensor linked to a smart speaker.
Start Year 2019
 
Description BREATHE - IoT in the wild (2019 - Still Active) 
Organisation Patients Association
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution This project builds on longstanding work with rural communities to understand how they might gain agency with smart sensor networks . It has a three way partnership approach- working with existing innovation ecosystem on e-health, with SMEs that are developing innovative approaches to data interactions around IoT and with the community partners from the rural villages and wider region. The key partners are: - Hi9 SME - The Patient's Association - Liskeard and South East Cornwall Breather's Group Replication and transferability
Collaborator Contribution The project was co-designed with Liskeard and South East Cornwall Breather's Group, supported by The patient's Association. The software/hardware development was developed at a first stage with Hi9, a Cornish based startup with expertise in smart speakers, AI and IoT
Impact We have developed a proof of concept prototype of a breathing sensor linked to a smart speaker.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Call and Response 
Organisation Goldsmiths, University of London
Department Department of Computing
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This is a Sub Project of the Human Data Interaction Network Plus
Collaborator Contribution i. Project Aims and Objectives Objective 1) Interactive AI sound synthesis system. To create a prototype 'Call and Response' interactive AI system which is capable of generating exciting sonic movements as a controllable musical response to the human voice. Objective 2) Call and response composition To develop a music composition for AI and human voice using the prototype. Objective 3) Call and response recorded work To create a new recorded work involving the new AI system and the human voice. Objective 4) Evaluation and documentation To evaluate the experience of working with the system and to document the design process and technical outputs.
Impact Report and possible publications most likely next year.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Collaborative ResistancE to Web Surveillance (CREWS) 
Organisation University College London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This is a sub-project funded by the Human Data Interaction Network Plus.
Collaborator Contribution 1. Project Aims and Objectives The CREWS project will explore the tenets of HDI in the context of web-tracking. Specifically, where neither legibility, agency nor negotiability are available, we will examine how anony- mous communication technologies offer the possibility of resistance to tracking. The project will explore the space of individual vs collective resistance, and active vs passive resistance, firstly in the abstract (through analytical and numerical simulations) and secondly in the con- crete (through evaluating prototype modifications to Tor Browser that apply encryption to prevent eavesdropping).
Impact This project is multi-disciplinary involving engineering, computer science.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Countermeasures: Giving children better control over how they're observed by digital sensors 
Organisation Royal College of Art
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This is a sub-project of the Human Data Interaction Network Plus.
Collaborator Contribution 1. Project Aims and Objectives This project addresses the core funding area of 'surveillance and resistance' through a series of work packages that will actively address issues of privacy and control arising from the increased use of sensors in digital devices to collect user data. It aims to inform and empower the users of devices, specifically children aged 8-12, by co-designing tools to understand, resist, and subvert the sensors embedded in common digital devices and smart objects. The tools will provide children with agency over how their lives are presented through data, and how this is used to inform a range of products aimed at making money from them. Specifically, the objectives are to: ? Bring together a network of experts across relevant disciplines to define the issues stemming from the use of sensors in devices, and the design requirements for solutions ? Gain insights into how children perceive the sensing and data collecting capabilities of the devices they use ? Use co-design methods to produce an open-source toolkit of resources which enable children to understand, resist, and subvert the sensors on their devices ? Create an online platform for disseminating the toolkit and materials from the project ? Evaluate how one class of children, from an inner city school in London, and one from Glasgow use and understand the intention of the final toolkit ? Publish a journal paper documenting the insights and outcomes from the project ? Link the project with the expertise of other members of the HDI network by inviting them to participate in the planned networking events In doing so, the project will address the following research questions: 1. What understanding do children have of the sensing capabilities of the digital devices they use? 2. To what extent does a child's understanding of digital sensing affect their exposure to surveillance? 3. What practical methods of sensor blocking or disruption are most suited to provide children with agency in relation to surveillance? 4. How does the knowledge and use of sensor-disabling tools affect children's attitude towards digital sensing? 5. What would children's ability to alter data collecting sensors mean for the kids media industry?
Impact This project is multi-disciplinary involving design, computing science, NGOs, media education, art.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Creating Learner Awareness of the Right to Opt Out 
Organisation University of Winchester
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This is a sub-project of the Human Data Interaction Network Plus.
Collaborator Contribution 1. Project Aims and Objectives This project considers the pervasive nature of data collection about the individual, underage learn- er, through digital means, in the schooling context. Especially in light of the present-day global outbreak of Covid-19, learners will rely more than ever on digital systems to meet their basic hu- man right to be educated (Articles 28 and 29 of the Convention on the Rights of the Child). Yet while UNICEF states that the purpose of education is 'The preparation of the child for responsi- ble life in a free society', we question whether the commercialised power structure of learner data processing for the purpose of formal schooling will indeed instill taught freedom. In addition, children today have been born into a society in which privacy intrusion appears to be a social norm and where digital platforms have always featured within their school learning experience. We seek to directly and effectively educate the underage learner to be aware of their legal right to opt out, and why they might want to exercise this. We aim to: • Highlight the specificity of learner data processing in the mandatory schooling context • Critically examine schooling's culture of authority in regards to the learner's informational autonomy regarding digital data processing (using Michel Foucault) • Disrupt the 'banking model of education' (Paulo Freire) by empowering learners in a direct way, through the digital channels which form their community of knowledge • Create awareness through a targeted social media campaign with a key digital artefact (YouTube video) • Inform learners of their legal right to 'opt out' through further stakeholder dissemination in the local community
Impact No outputs as yet. This project is mainly centred around education.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Creative AI Dataset: development collaborators 
Organisation University of Leicester
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The research team at DMU developed the theoretical and technical infrastructure for this prototype.
Collaborator Contribution The partnership with the University of Leicester focused on designing the apparatus for capturing flow in the data capture and setting a baseline definition of individual flow for each participant
Impact Ongoing
Start Year 2020
 
Description Creative AI Dataset: development collaborators 
Organisation University of New Haven
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The research team at DMU developed the theoretical and technical infrastructure for this prototype.
Collaborator Contribution The partner academic has so far organised US participants for the data capture trials, of this prototype. Due to covid, this is currently stalled and awaiting local clearance.
Impact On-going
Start Year 2020
 
Description Data and disadvantage: taking a regional approach towards Human Data Interaction (HDI) to inform local and national digital skills policies' 
Organisation University of Wolverhampton
Department Faculty of Education Health and Wellbeing
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This is a sub-project of the Human Data Interaction Network Plus
Collaborator Contribution We aim to address a perceived deficit in regional plans (in terms of the HDI tenets of legibility, agency and negotiability) for developing digital skills to improve disadvantage in the Black Country. We will therefore develop cross-sector dialogue to illuminate issues concerning both Human Data Interaction (HDI) and attention to the personal, diverse 'postdigital' contexts of individual learners, not yet addressed in the Black Country Digital Skills Plan*
Impact No outputs as yet.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Design of 'Data Dialogues' in Media Recommenders 
Organisation British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Department BBC Research & Development
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Our team helped power the formative phase of the design research by looking into the realisation of HDI principles through the inclusion of a 'data dialogue' in media recommenders. A number of focus groups and co-design sessions were facilitated and academic papers and industry reports were produced.
Collaborator Contribution This project is an extension of a continuing partnership between the University of Nottingham and the BBC. This research, which was initiated in 2015, exploring the socio-technical challenges of using personal data in media experiences, has in the past managed to bring together organisations like the Universities of Nottingham, York and Lancaster, the DataBox team ( the Universities of Cambridge, Nottingham and Imperial ), British Council UK and FACT. Within the BBC, it saw the coming together of perspectives from various BBC depart-ments serving a variant range of media services like BBC Sport, BBC News, BBC iPlayer, BBC R&D, Children and Learning etc. to better understand the turn towards personal data use in their respective media services.
Impact A Late-Breaking Work Paper has been accepted at ACM CHI 2021 : "Designing for Human Data Interaction in Data-Driven Media Experiences."
Start Year 2020
 
Description Embodied Companionship 
Organisation Royal College of Art
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Sub Project Funded Under HDI Network Plus
Collaborator Contribution 1. Project Aims and Objectives The project aims to reframe existing relationships to machine learning and technological arti- facts. Approaching machine learning as an intra-active process that moves beyond quantifica- tion and the instrumentalization of embodied experiences and expression, the project pro- poses the development of new frameworks in which to explore machine learning and human- data interaction. As such, the project's objective is to expand on the vocabulary used to describe human-data interactions and engage with machine learning as a space of experimentation that builds on multiple input streams and acknowledges the complexities of both human and machine ex- pressivity and intentionality. Embodied Machine Learning attempts to create a discursive relationship between machine learn- ing and humans, one that is centered around nuance, curiosity and second order feedback loops. Using machine learning to not only train and "learn" human behaviours but create a symbiotic relationship with a technological artifact that rests on a mutual progression of un- derstanding, the project aims to embody and make legible machine learning processes and shed some light on the algorithmic black box.
Impact Multi Disciplinary. Art, Computer Science,
Start Year 2020
 
Description Embodied Companionship 
Organisation Umbrellium Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Sub Project Funded Under HDI Network Plus
Collaborator Contribution 1. Project Aims and Objectives The project aims to reframe existing relationships to machine learning and technological arti- facts. Approaching machine learning as an intra-active process that moves beyond quantifica- tion and the instrumentalization of embodied experiences and expression, the project pro- poses the development of new frameworks in which to explore machine learning and human- data interaction. As such, the project's objective is to expand on the vocabulary used to describe human-data interactions and engage with machine learning as a space of experimentation that builds on multiple input streams and acknowledges the complexities of both human and machine ex- pressivity and intentionality. Embodied Machine Learning attempts to create a discursive relationship between machine learn- ing and humans, one that is centered around nuance, curiosity and second order feedback loops. Using machine learning to not only train and "learn" human behaviours but create a symbiotic relationship with a technological artifact that rests on a mutual progression of un- derstanding, the project aims to embody and make legible machine learning processes and shed some light on the algorithmic black box.
Impact Multi Disciplinary. Art, Computer Science,
Start Year 2020
 
Description ExTRAPPOLATE 
Organisation Academy for Recovery Coaching C.I.C
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Organised the collaboration to facilitate the undertaking of the research.
Collaborator Contribution Conducted the research and advised on various aspects.
Impact Provided in detail elsewhere.
Start Year 2020
 
Description ExTRAPPOLATE 
Organisation University of Essex
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Organised the collaboration to facilitate the undertaking of the research.
Collaborator Contribution Conducted the research and advised on various aspects.
Impact Provided in detail elsewhere.
Start Year 2020
 
Description ExTRAPPOLATE 
Organisation University of Lincoln
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Organised the collaboration to facilitate the undertaking of the research.
Collaborator Contribution Conducted the research and advised on various aspects.
Impact Provided in detail elsewhere.
Start Year 2020
 
Description ExTRAPPOLATE 
Organisation University of Nottingham
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Organised the collaboration to facilitate the undertaking of the research.
Collaborator Contribution Conducted the research and advised on various aspects.
Impact Provided in detail elsewhere.
Start Year 2020
 
Description ExTRAPPOLATE 
Organisation Virtual Health Labs
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Organised the collaboration to facilitate the undertaking of the research.
Collaborator Contribution Conducted the research and advised on various aspects.
Impact Provided in detail elsewhere.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Furthering Third Sector and HE Collaboration 
Organisation Good Things Foundation
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This collaboration has developed as a direct outcome from the regional events we have run for our project: DATA AND DISADVANTAGE: TAKING A REGIONAL APPROACH TOWARDS HUMAN DATA INTERACTION (HDI) (http://educationobservatory.co.uk/human-data-interaction/) We have been asked to collaborate in several funding bids (now submitted).
Collaborator Contribution "Third sector and HE: why don't they get on better?" We have been working with Isobel Thomas, who is currently seconded as the Digital Inclusion Lead at the West Midlands Combined Authority (WMCA). Isobel has given an invited talk for us about her work at both the Good Things Foundation and on the West Midlands Coalition for Digital Inclusion. Isobel's talk was followed by questions and open debate around the topic of universities, their relationships with third sector agencies, regional engagement and partnerships.
Impact This collaboration is cross-sector. The outcomes so far include several submitted bids and two talks delivered at our collaborative events
Start Year 2020
 
Description Gaming Student Analytics 
Organisation Northumbria University
Department School of Computing Engineering and Information Science Northumbria
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This is a sub-project of the Human Data Interaction Network Plus.
Collaborator Contribution Aim: To work with a group of students to design and implement a prototype video game that critically addresses student analytics and learner surveillance. Objective 1: To work with a group of four games-design students to develop a game concept that critically addresses one or more aspects of a large university's policy documents on educational analytics and student privacy. Objective 2: To develop a prototype game using Unity and publish this on the web using WebGL. Objective 3: To create a reflective evaluation discussing the process and outcome of student-led critical games-design project focusing on student analytics and learner surveillance.
Impact This is a multi disciplinary project involving computing science and education.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Governing Philosophies in Technology Policy 
Organisation Leiden University
Country Netherlands 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution An informal collaboration on this project is arising with Leiden University involving in the first instance, ongoing discussions between Gilad Rosner and Lieden University on the topic of this project .
Collaborator Contribution Ongoing discussion of the topic of Governing Philosophies in Technology Policy (Permissionless Innovation vs. the Precautionary Principle), with Prof. dr. Simone van der Hof and Dr. Eduard Villaronga of Leiden University.
Impact none yet - but the project has an extension
Start Year 2021
 
Description Human Motion Analysis - Agency, Negotiation and Legibility in Data Handling 
Organisation University of Glasgow
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This project is a sub-project of the Human Data Interaction Network Plus.
Collaborator Contribution The project is focused on three key technological solutions to ethics and data privacy: • to develop systems that inherently minimise the privacy concerns by maximising the information processing at the patient side while they minimise the information required to be exchanged online and stored • to exploit disentangled representation in Artificial Intelligence (AI) systems that are pa- tient and activity-aware so that any unrelated information is excluded early in the pro- cessing pipeline to eliminate privacy concerns • to exploit intuitive interactive designs to develop a patient-centred system that is trans- parent and does not require expert knowledge to handle
Impact This collaboration involves computer science, health care, health informatics, mental health.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Infrastructural Interactions 
Organisation Delft University of Technology (TU Delft)
Country Netherlands 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This is a sub-project of the Human Data Interaction Network Plus.
Collaborator Contribution Infrastructural Interactions aims to set up an international participatory framework to develop creative, technical and ethnographic practices that can: • Make legible harms and damages on public life that result from extractive data- infrastructures such as cloud-based services as sites of human-data-interaction. • Reveal power asymmetries by design by shifting perspective from issues with personal data to data-infrastructures. • Work with artists, technologists and activists (specifically groups committed to non- extractivist data practices for and with refugees, anti-racist, trans* health and sex work), to develop an understanding of existing inventive technical practices in which communities are deploying alternative digital infrastructures that support their work, and inquire into how effective these creative responses for alternative digital infrastructures are. • Bring expertise from different fields together in workshops and digitally mediated events to experiment with practices, technical designs and methods for political and creative agency. • (re-)imagine and prototype technical alternatives, to Software-as-a-Service and agile solutions, that can support public life digital infrastructures. Inquiring into and documenting creative and grassroots approaches for infrastructural interactions that are being built, or will need to be built. • Develop and communicate a set of methods that serve to counter extractive data processing practices, without necessarily acknowledging their validity (participating in democratic processes or active protests are examples of upholding current practices). • Develop, together with participants, a framework for infrastructural ethics, both applied and speculative, for public data infrastructures that empower communities to both address extractivist services and propose more equitable practices. • Strengthen collectives' understanding of themselves as publics which can intervene in technological developments that are in the public interest, but perceived as outside of public intervention.
Impact This is a multi-disciplinary project featuring art, computing science, activism, ethics.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Infrastructural Interactions 
Organisation University of Plymouth
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This is a sub-project of the Human Data Interaction Network Plus.
Collaborator Contribution Infrastructural Interactions aims to set up an international participatory framework to develop creative, technical and ethnographic practices that can: • Make legible harms and damages on public life that result from extractive data- infrastructures such as cloud-based services as sites of human-data-interaction. • Reveal power asymmetries by design by shifting perspective from issues with personal data to data-infrastructures. • Work with artists, technologists and activists (specifically groups committed to non- extractivist data practices for and with refugees, anti-racist, trans* health and sex work), to develop an understanding of existing inventive technical practices in which communities are deploying alternative digital infrastructures that support their work, and inquire into how effective these creative responses for alternative digital infrastructures are. • Bring expertise from different fields together in workshops and digitally mediated events to experiment with practices, technical designs and methods for political and creative agency. • (re-)imagine and prototype technical alternatives, to Software-as-a-Service and agile solutions, that can support public life digital infrastructures. Inquiring into and documenting creative and grassroots approaches for infrastructural interactions that are being built, or will need to be built. • Develop and communicate a set of methods that serve to counter extractive data processing practices, without necessarily acknowledging their validity (participating in democratic processes or active protests are examples of upholding current practices). • Develop, together with participants, a framework for infrastructural ethics, both applied and speculative, for public data infrastructures that empower communities to both address extractivist services and propose more equitable practices. • Strengthen collectives' understanding of themselves as publics which can intervene in technological developments that are in the public interest, but perceived as outside of public intervention.
Impact This is a multi-disciplinary project featuring art, computing science, activism, ethics.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Infrastructural Interactions 
Organisation University of Westminster
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This is a sub-project of the Human Data Interaction Network Plus.
Collaborator Contribution Infrastructural Interactions aims to set up an international participatory framework to develop creative, technical and ethnographic practices that can: • Make legible harms and damages on public life that result from extractive data- infrastructures such as cloud-based services as sites of human-data-interaction. • Reveal power asymmetries by design by shifting perspective from issues with personal data to data-infrastructures. • Work with artists, technologists and activists (specifically groups committed to non- extractivist data practices for and with refugees, anti-racist, trans* health and sex work), to develop an understanding of existing inventive technical practices in which communities are deploying alternative digital infrastructures that support their work, and inquire into how effective these creative responses for alternative digital infrastructures are. • Bring expertise from different fields together in workshops and digitally mediated events to experiment with practices, technical designs and methods for political and creative agency. • (re-)imagine and prototype technical alternatives, to Software-as-a-Service and agile solutions, that can support public life digital infrastructures. Inquiring into and documenting creative and grassroots approaches for infrastructural interactions that are being built, or will need to be built. • Develop and communicate a set of methods that serve to counter extractive data processing practices, without necessarily acknowledging their validity (participating in democratic processes or active protests are examples of upholding current practices). • Develop, together with participants, a framework for infrastructural ethics, both applied and speculative, for public data infrastructures that empower communities to both address extractivist services and propose more equitable practices. • Strengthen collectives' understanding of themselves as publics which can intervene in technological developments that are in the public interest, but perceived as outside of public intervention.
Impact This is a multi-disciplinary project featuring art, computing science, activism, ethics.
Start Year 2020
 
Description MIRLCAuto: A Virtual Agent for Music Information Retrieval in Live Coding - Activities in Barcelona 
Organisation L'ull cec
Country Spain 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Our research team at DMU has coordinated the collaboration and has provided the structure and content for the activities organised in partnership with them.
Collaborator Contribution The partners l'ull cec and Phonos have focused on providing the technical and social infrastructure to run an online workshop and online concert.
Impact - Online workshop in collaboration with TOPLAP Barcelona. Date: 11/13/15.1.2021- 19:00-21:00 (CET). URL: https://mirlca.dmu.ac.uk/workshops/ - 3 Work-in-Progress videos from and interviews with workshop participants: 1) https://mirlca.dmu.ac.uk/posts/different-similar-sounds-interview-with-hernani-villasenor 2) https://mirlca.dmu.ac.uk/posts/different-similar-sounds-interview-with-ramon-casamajo 3) https://mirlca.dmu.ac.uk/posts/different-similar-sounds-interview-with-iris-saladino - Online concert in collaboration with TOPLAP Barcelona: Ongoing. - Conference paper. Ongoing. Multi-disciplinary collaboration: computer science, music technology, STEAM education, digital arts.
Start Year 2020
 
Description MIRLCAuto: A Virtual Agent for Music Information Retrieval in Live Coding - Activities in Barcelona 
Organisation Pompeu Fabra University
Department Phonos
Country Spain 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Our research team at DMU has coordinated the collaboration and has provided the structure and content for the activities organised in partnership with them.
Collaborator Contribution The partners l'ull cec and Phonos have focused on providing the technical and social infrastructure to run an online workshop and online concert.
Impact - Online workshop in collaboration with TOPLAP Barcelona. Date: 11/13/15.1.2021- 19:00-21:00 (CET). URL: https://mirlca.dmu.ac.uk/workshops/ - 3 Work-in-Progress videos from and interviews with workshop participants: 1) https://mirlca.dmu.ac.uk/posts/different-similar-sounds-interview-with-hernani-villasenor 2) https://mirlca.dmu.ac.uk/posts/different-similar-sounds-interview-with-ramon-casamajo 3) https://mirlca.dmu.ac.uk/posts/different-similar-sounds-interview-with-iris-saladino - Online concert in collaboration with TOPLAP Barcelona: Ongoing. - Conference paper. Ongoing. Multi-disciplinary collaboration: computer science, music technology, STEAM education, digital arts.
Start Year 2020
 
Description MIRLCAuto: A Virtual Agent for Music Information Retrieval in Live Coding - Activities in Leicester 
Organisation Leicester Hackspace
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Our research team at DMU has coordinated the collaboration and has provided the structure, content and technical infrastructure for the activities organised in partnership with them. We are also in charge of providing the technical and social infrastructure to run an online concert.
Collaborator Contribution The partner Leicester Hackspace has focused on providing the social infrastructure to run an online workshop.
Impact - Online workshop. Date: 25/27/29.1.2021 - 19:00-21.00 (GMT). URL: https://mirlca.dmu.ac.uk/workshops/ - Interview with a workshop participant: Ongoing. - Online concert: Ongoing. Multi-disciplinary collaboration: computer science, music technology, STEAM education, digital arts.
Start Year 2020
 
Description MIRLCAuto: A Virtual Agent for Music Information Retrieval in Live Coding - Activities in London 
Organisation IKLECTIK
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Our research team at DMU has coordinated the collaboration and has provided the structure and content for the activities organised in partnership with them.
Collaborator Contribution The partner IKLECTIK has focused on providing the technical and social infrastructure to run an online workshop and an online concert.
Impact - Online workshop. Date: 7/9/11.12.2020 - 19:00-21:00 (GMT). URL: https://mirlca.dmu.ac.uk/workshops/ - Online concert "Similar Sounds: A Virtual Agent in Live Coding. Two performances and a Q&A panel with Sam Roig (L'Ull Cec), Gerard Roma (University of Huddersfield), Iván Paz (TOPLAP), and Anna Xambó (De Montfort University)". Date: 12.12.2020 14:00-15:00 GMT. URL: https://mirlca.dmu.ac.uk/concerts/ - Conference paper. Ongoing. Multi-disciplinary collaboration: computer science, music technology, STEAM education, digital arts.
Start Year 2020
 
Description More-than-human data interactions in the smart city 
Organisation Bethnal Green Nature Reserve
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Funded project, following the workshop for the Beyond Smart Cities theme
Collaborator Contribution they are carrying out the research
Impact multidisciplinary: art/design, social science, computer science
Start Year 2020
 
Description More-than-human data interactions in the smart city 
Organisation City, University of London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Funded project, following the workshop for the Beyond Smart Cities theme
Collaborator Contribution they are carrying out the research
Impact multidisciplinary: art/design, social science, computer science
Start Year 2020
 
Description More-than-human data interactions in the smart city 
Organisation Cordwainers Grow
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Funded project, following the workshop for the Beyond Smart Cities theme
Collaborator Contribution they are carrying out the research
Impact multidisciplinary: art/design, social science, computer science
Start Year 2020
 
Description More-than-human data interactions in the smart city 
Organisation Goldsmiths, University of London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Funded project, following the workshop for the Beyond Smart Cities theme
Collaborator Contribution they are carrying out the research
Impact multidisciplinary: art/design, social science, computer science
Start Year 2020
 
Description More-than-human data interactions in the smart city 
Organisation London School of Economics and Political Science (University of London)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Funded project, following the workshop for the Beyond Smart Cities theme
Collaborator Contribution they are carrying out the research
Impact multidisciplinary: art/design, social science, computer science
Start Year 2020
 
Description More-than-human data interactions in the smart city 
Organisation Northumbria University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Funded project, following the workshop for the Beyond Smart Cities theme
Collaborator Contribution they are carrying out the research
Impact multidisciplinary: art/design, social science, computer science
Start Year 2020
 
Description More-than-human data interactions in the smart city 
Organisation The Roving Microscope
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Funded project, following the workshop for the Beyond Smart Cities theme
Collaborator Contribution they are carrying out the research
Impact multidisciplinary: art/design, social science, computer science
Start Year 2020
 
Description More-than-human data interactions in the smart city 
Organisation University of Warwick
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Funded project, following the workshop for the Beyond Smart Cities theme
Collaborator Contribution they are carrying out the research
Impact multidisciplinary: art/design, social science, computer science
Start Year 2020
 
Description Pivot Strategy: Making Ethics Intelligible and Negotiable 
Organisation Bethnal Green Ventures
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Funded this project, following the theme workshop on AI, Intelligibility and Public Trust
Collaborator Contribution they are carrying out the research
Impact multidisciplinary: media & communications, computer science
Start Year 2019
 
Description Pivot Strategy: Making Ethics Intelligible and Negotiable 
Organisation London School of Economics and Political Science (University of London)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Funded this project, following the theme workshop on AI, Intelligibility and Public Trust
Collaborator Contribution they are carrying out the research
Impact multidisciplinary: media & communications, computer science
Start Year 2019
 
Description Pivot Strategy: Making Ethics Intelligible and Negotiable 
Organisation Open Rights Group
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Funded this project, following the theme workshop on AI, Intelligibility and Public Trust
Collaborator Contribution they are carrying out the research
Impact multidisciplinary: media & communications, computer science
Start Year 2019
 
Description Polyphonic Intelligence 
Organisation Institute of Contemporary Arts
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Sub Project funded under the Human Data Interaction Network Plus
Collaborator Contribution The proposed project will construct a 'Polyphonic Intelligence', an interactive installation that brings together human and nonhuman participants in an improvised choral performance. How can we create a new sound that includes algorithmic processes, mythology, speculative strategies and artistic sensibilities, in order to move beyond simplistic divisions between human and machine subjects and producers? The result will be a performative interactive installation of voices that are not easily categorisable or identifiable, and therefore difficult to stereotype and discriminate against. We will experiment with building and customising voice and sound recognition modules that employ machine learning algorithms in order to improvise with hu- man vocalists in real-time. These virtual performers will attempt to maintain a feedback loop between the algorithms and human actors, in an effort to explore computer intelligence-driven vocal and sonic interaction in the realm of artistic sensibility, play and abstraction rather than functionality. The project will be accompanied by an online blog that will track and present the progress of the project throughout the proposed period, opening up our practice in an access- ible manner for those that may wish to experiment with creating these interlocutors for their own artistic exploration and allowing comments and suggestions from the wider public and anyone interested in the project.
Impact An album is being produced. This project is a collaboration between art practice, computing science, music.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Polyphonic Intelligence 
Organisation Royal College of Art
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Sub Project funded under the Human Data Interaction Network Plus
Collaborator Contribution The proposed project will construct a 'Polyphonic Intelligence', an interactive installation that brings together human and nonhuman participants in an improvised choral performance. How can we create a new sound that includes algorithmic processes, mythology, speculative strategies and artistic sensibilities, in order to move beyond simplistic divisions between human and machine subjects and producers? The result will be a performative interactive installation of voices that are not easily categorisable or identifiable, and therefore difficult to stereotype and discriminate against. We will experiment with building and customising voice and sound recognition modules that employ machine learning algorithms in order to improvise with hu- man vocalists in real-time. These virtual performers will attempt to maintain a feedback loop between the algorithms and human actors, in an effort to explore computer intelligence-driven vocal and sonic interaction in the realm of artistic sensibility, play and abstraction rather than functionality. The project will be accompanied by an online blog that will track and present the progress of the project throughout the proposed period, opening up our practice in an access- ible manner for those that may wish to experiment with creating these interlocutors for their own artistic exploration and allowing comments and suggestions from the wider public and anyone interested in the project.
Impact An album is being produced. This project is a collaboration between art practice, computing science, music.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Public Trust in Data Driven Systems and AI Futures 
Organisation British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Department BBC Research & Development
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution We funded the project, which came together following our AI, Intelligibility and Public Trust workshop.
Collaborator Contribution they are carrying out the research
Impact Multidisciplinary: social science, computer science
Start Year 2019
 
Description Public Trust in Data Driven Systems and AI Futures 
Organisation Open Data Institute
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution We funded the project, which came together following our AI, Intelligibility and Public Trust workshop.
Collaborator Contribution they are carrying out the research
Impact Multidisciplinary: social science, computer science
Start Year 2019
 
Description Public Trust in Data Driven Systems and AI Futures 
Organisation University of Sheffield
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We funded the project, which came together following our AI, Intelligibility and Public Trust workshop.
Collaborator Contribution they are carrying out the research
Impact Multidisciplinary: social science, computer science
Start Year 2019
 
Description Public trust and understanding of online content moderation, and its impacts on public discourse 
Organisation University of Glasgow
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Funded project, set up following the theme workshop on AI, Intelligibility and Public Trust
Collaborator Contribution they are carrying out the research
Impact Multidisciplinary: sociology and computer science
Start Year 2019
 
Description Resisting Surveillance in Connected Cars 
Organisation University College London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This is a sub-project funded by the Human Data Interaction Network Plus.
Collaborator Contribution Aim: This project aims to understand how users of connected cars respond to in-car surveillance and the imbalance of power between themselves as data subjects and car companies as data collectors. This will support the development of strategies for users to safely and legally resist data collection by car companies in situations where it is perceived as excessive. Objective: Scope users' knowledge about, and attitudes towards, in-car collection of data. By 15th January 2021, survey 100 connected car users, scoping how much they know about in-car data collection, to what extent they feel in control of in-car data collection, to what extent their privacy needs are met, and how they behave in situations where their privacy needs are not met. Collect information about respondents such as demographics, car use, and general privacy atti- tudes to contextualise the results. (Study 1) Objective: Establish whether and how the users want to resist in-car data collection, and what barriers they may come across. By 15th April 2021, conduct follow-up interviews with 30 participants recruited from among survey respondents: scope users' experience of car use (in rela- tion to data collection) between filling the survey and the time of interview; engage users in think- ing creatively about situations that might warrant resisting in-car data collection and the barriers that they might encounter. (Study 2)
Impact This is a multi-disciplinary mix of computer science, interaction design and design and social science.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Rights of Childhood: Affective Computing and Data Protection 
Organisation Bangor University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This is a network-funded project, within the AI, Intelligibility and Public Trust theme. We helped connect the collaborators in it, Prof. Andrew McStay and external consultant Gilad Rosner of the IOT Privacy Forum.
Collaborator Contribution they are carrying out the research
Impact McStay, A. (2019) Emotional AI and EdTech: Serving the Public Good, Learning Media & Technology. McStay, A. & Rosner, G. (2020 [in press]) ""Emotoys": Ethics, Emotions and Empathic Technologies" In A. Malinowska (Ed) Data Dating. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Computers, Privacy and Data Protection (CPDP 2020) panel presentation
Start Year 2019
 
Description Spoken Word Data: Artistic Interventions in the Everyday Spaces of Digital Capitalism 
Organisation Fruitmarket Gallery
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution This is a sub-project of the Human Data Interaction Network Plus
Collaborator Contribution 1. Project Aims and Objectives Today's digital technologies (commercial or otherwise) are almost entirely reliant on systems of data extraction and AI. While there are various forms of personal data that drive such systems, language as data is a relatively understudied - and yet vitally important - dimension of this ubiquit- ous economy, not least because of the complex ethical challenges it poses for us as subjects, cit- izens and consumers. The aims of the project are therefore to address this gap by shining a critical and creative light on our relationship with language and listening in a digital age, and to challenge and subvert the exploitation of the spoken word by digital technology companies such as Google or Amazon in our everyday lived spaces. The project has the following objectives: a) To develop and exhibit two new interactive artistic interventions which explore the ethical issues around the harvesting and monetisation of language by digital technologies. b) To examine how the monetisation of the spoken word processed through digital technologies impacts our behaviour and agency in varying lived spaces. c) To use creative intervention to encourage playful, yet critical ways in which to talk back to the technologies that harvest our words as data. d) To add to, and develop, the critical popular and academic debate around data privacy, surveil- lance and the Internet of Things (IoT).
Impact This project is still ongoing.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Spoken Word Data: Artistic Interventions in the Everyday Spaces of Digital Capitalism 
Organisation Scottish Poetry Library
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution This is a sub-project of the Human Data Interaction Network Plus
Collaborator Contribution 1. Project Aims and Objectives Today's digital technologies (commercial or otherwise) are almost entirely reliant on systems of data extraction and AI. While there are various forms of personal data that drive such systems, language as data is a relatively understudied - and yet vitally important - dimension of this ubiquit- ous economy, not least because of the complex ethical challenges it poses for us as subjects, cit- izens and consumers. The aims of the project are therefore to address this gap by shining a critical and creative light on our relationship with language and listening in a digital age, and to challenge and subvert the exploitation of the spoken word by digital technology companies such as Google or Amazon in our everyday lived spaces. The project has the following objectives: a) To develop and exhibit two new interactive artistic interventions which explore the ethical issues around the harvesting and monetisation of language by digital technologies. b) To examine how the monetisation of the spoken word processed through digital technologies impacts our behaviour and agency in varying lived spaces. c) To use creative intervention to encourage playful, yet critical ways in which to talk back to the technologies that harvest our words as data. d) To add to, and develop, the critical popular and academic debate around data privacy, surveil- lance and the Internet of Things (IoT).
Impact This project is still ongoing.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Spoken Word Data: Artistic Interventions in the Everyday Spaces of Digital Capitalism 
Organisation University of Dundee
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This is a sub-project of the Human Data Interaction Network Plus
Collaborator Contribution 1. Project Aims and Objectives Today's digital technologies (commercial or otherwise) are almost entirely reliant on systems of data extraction and AI. While there are various forms of personal data that drive such systems, language as data is a relatively understudied - and yet vitally important - dimension of this ubiquit- ous economy, not least because of the complex ethical challenges it poses for us as subjects, cit- izens and consumers. The aims of the project are therefore to address this gap by shining a critical and creative light on our relationship with language and listening in a digital age, and to challenge and subvert the exploitation of the spoken word by digital technology companies such as Google or Amazon in our everyday lived spaces. The project has the following objectives: a) To develop and exhibit two new interactive artistic interventions which explore the ethical issues around the harvesting and monetisation of language by digital technologies. b) To examine how the monetisation of the spoken word processed through digital technologies impacts our behaviour and agency in varying lived spaces. c) To use creative intervention to encourage playful, yet critical ways in which to talk back to the technologies that harvest our words as data. d) To add to, and develop, the critical popular and academic debate around data privacy, surveil- lance and the Internet of Things (IoT).
Impact This project is still ongoing.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Spoken Word Data: Artistic Interventions in the Everyday Spaces of Digital Capitalism 
Organisation University of Edinburgh
Department School of Geosciences Edinburgh
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This is a sub-project of the Human Data Interaction Network Plus
Collaborator Contribution 1. Project Aims and Objectives Today's digital technologies (commercial or otherwise) are almost entirely reliant on systems of data extraction and AI. While there are various forms of personal data that drive such systems, language as data is a relatively understudied - and yet vitally important - dimension of this ubiquit- ous economy, not least because of the complex ethical challenges it poses for us as subjects, cit- izens and consumers. The aims of the project are therefore to address this gap by shining a critical and creative light on our relationship with language and listening in a digital age, and to challenge and subvert the exploitation of the spoken word by digital technology companies such as Google or Amazon in our everyday lived spaces. The project has the following objectives: a) To develop and exhibit two new interactive artistic interventions which explore the ethical issues around the harvesting and monetisation of language by digital technologies. b) To examine how the monetisation of the spoken word processed through digital technologies impacts our behaviour and agency in varying lived spaces. c) To use creative intervention to encourage playful, yet critical ways in which to talk back to the technologies that harvest our words as data. d) To add to, and develop, the critical popular and academic debate around data privacy, surveil- lance and the Internet of Things (IoT).
Impact This project is still ongoing.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Trust in Home: Rethinking Interface Design in IoT (THRIDI) 
Organisation Brunel University London
Department School of Information Systems, Computing and Mathematics
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Sub Project of the HDI Network Plus
Collaborator Contribution The project aims to foster collaboration within an interdisciplinary community in the area of user-friendly interfaces for IoT in smart home settings. A rudimentary and catch-all approach to safeguard IoT systems are through access control infrastructures, which require high levels of privacy and security expertise to administer them, and therefore, are not fit for addressing legibility, agency and negotiability challenges in IoT.
Impact None as yet.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Trust in Home: Rethinking Interface Design in IoT (THRIDI) 
Organisation University of Nottingham
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Sub Project of the HDI Network Plus
Collaborator Contribution The project aims to foster collaboration within an interdisciplinary community in the area of user-friendly interfaces for IoT in smart home settings. A rudimentary and catch-all approach to safeguard IoT systems are through access control infrastructures, which require high levels of privacy and security expertise to administer them, and therefore, are not fit for addressing legibility, agency and negotiability challenges in IoT.
Impact None as yet.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Understanding data: praxis and politics 
Organisation Open University of Catalonia
Country Spain 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The research team is collaborating with them giving intellectual input for the content of critical data literacy, the design of a postgraduate course for in-service HE educators, and the training of staff.
Collaborator Contribution The contribution was manifold. In part, they are providing teachers, venues (Online virtual environment and technological infrastructure through which the pilot will be facilitated), access to staff and students for the pilot as well as the invited experts that will be talking each day of the pilot course. They also provided intellectual input when we adapted the content to their context (we have very different contexts, i.e. Nairobi, Latin America, UK and Europe)
Impact It is interdisciplinary, there are people in the area of informatics, philosophy, educational technologist, experts in open government and librarians. We have gathered 12 experts in different areas that are related to critical data literacies, invited speakers for the pilot in Uruguay. We have the online course designed and ready to go in Uruguay. For Catalunya, we have 4 international invited speakers and access to their technological infrastructure with the pilot ready to run. In the UK we have liaised with an expert in open data for social innovation, she is an expert in development studies.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Understanding data: praxis and politics 
Organisation University of Surrey
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The research team is collaborating with them giving intellectual input for the content of critical data literacy, the design of a postgraduate course for in-service HE educators, and the training of staff.
Collaborator Contribution The contribution was manifold. In part, they are providing teachers, venues (Online virtual environment and technological infrastructure through which the pilot will be facilitated), access to staff and students for the pilot as well as the invited experts that will be talking each day of the pilot course. They also provided intellectual input when we adapted the content to their context (we have very different contexts, i.e. Nairobi, Latin America, UK and Europe)
Impact It is interdisciplinary, there are people in the area of informatics, philosophy, educational technologist, experts in open government and librarians. We have gathered 12 experts in different areas that are related to critical data literacies, invited speakers for the pilot in Uruguay. We have the online course designed and ready to go in Uruguay. For Catalunya, we have 4 international invited speakers and access to their technological infrastructure with the pilot ready to run. In the UK we have liaised with an expert in open data for social innovation, she is an expert in development studies.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Understanding data: praxis and politics 
Organisation University of the Republic
Department Interdisciplinary centre for open educational resources
Country Uruguay 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The research team is collaborating with them giving intellectual input for the content of critical data literacy, the design of a postgraduate course for in-service HE educators, and the training of staff.
Collaborator Contribution The contribution was manifold. In part, they are providing teachers, venues (Online virtual environment and technological infrastructure through which the pilot will be facilitated), access to staff and students for the pilot as well as the invited experts that will be talking each day of the pilot course. They also provided intellectual input when we adapted the content to their context (we have very different contexts, i.e. Nairobi, Latin America, UK and Europe)
Impact It is interdisciplinary, there are people in the area of informatics, philosophy, educational technologist, experts in open government and librarians. We have gathered 12 experts in different areas that are related to critical data literacies, invited speakers for the pilot in Uruguay. We have the online course designed and ready to go in Uruguay. For Catalunya, we have 4 international invited speakers and access to their technological infrastructure with the pilot ready to run. In the UK we have liaised with an expert in open data for social innovation, she is an expert in development studies.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Who, then, in law is my neighbour? - Judgment, responsibility, and expectations of the onlife reality 
Organisation University of Winchester
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Interdisciplinary lenses (law & social sciences) as well as well expertise on interdisciplinary research methodology and approach.
Collaborator Contribution They provide the funding
Impact We have conducted 15 interviews and organised 5 focus groups (34 participants in total) - Final report with findings to be published in May 31th.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Yoshik: A Multimedia Tool in English for Engaging with Privacy 
Organisation University of Edinburgh
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This is a sub-project of the Human Data Interaction Network Plus.
Collaborator Contribution The multimedia tool (app) "Yoshik" (currently on Build 2.22) aims to empower and support millennials in understanding their consent and privacy preferences. The development of the tool is motivated by the need to guide users on making more conscious choices around privacy deci- sions online; previous research has demonstrated that it is necessary to incentivise literacy around privacy and online practices (Solove, 2012; Zaeem et al., 2018) in the context of the digital economy (Spiekermann et al., 2015). The app is intended originally only for Mexican and Spanish audiences, but after careful consid- eration, we would like to widen the audience, and this would require an additional stage of work, which is not part of a current PhD project, but will contribute further in the field of HDI. The project has three key goals: (1) the design of a Qualtrics text based version for non Android users, (2) data collection on responses and engagement with the app and (3) increase literacy around privacy and online practices in the delimited context. Which would provide a complete picture of (1) differences between individual responses and responses that have to do with col- lective risks (2) provide another opportunity to show users possible risks to their social circles and even strangers. For the effects of this research, the mentioned trade-offs relate to existing data protection models and the use of behavioral economics to analyze individual behavior, under the assumption that users, consumers, citizens exchange their personal data in exchange for services, or personal gain.
Impact No papers as yet. Yoshik system design.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Zoom Obscura: creative interventions for a data ethics of video conferencing beyond encryption 
Organisation King's College London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This is a sub-project of the Human Data Interaction Network Plus.
Collaborator Contribution The COVID-19 pandemic has gifted video conferencing companies such as Zoom with a vast amount of biometric data to be rendered knowable, translatable and ready for economic exchange - such as faces, voices, and chat scripts. It is however as yet unclear what the explosion in video conferencing software means for the exploitation and monetisation of potentially valuable data for NLP, facial recognition, ML and AI training and other drivers within the digital economy which require urgent critical scrutiny. Frequently we are offered 'solutions' to issues around data privacy and security that are based on a loose form of trust, with debate frequently reduced to the prevention of external malicious actors gaining access. This has led to a focus on 'end-to-end' encryption - but this still leaves individuals with limited access, control, and verifiability to challenge terms and conditions within. COVID-19 has, however, left us with little choice but to increase the volume of interactions we have in online spaces such as the video-call 'room', and with limited agency in how our personal data might be being stored and exploited. This leaves us with significant ethical, privacy, and political concerns. Zoom Obscura is a project that aims to give agency to the users of newly ubiquitous video conferencing technologies such as Zoom, while still allowing them to participate in online spaces and debates, enabling us to negotiate our own presence and our own value in these new spaces. We aim to do so by bringing together artists, academics, hackers, designers and creative technologists to develop critical interventions that make the problematic workings of these technologies legible to wider audiences while empowering users to experiment with, and control how their personal data (visual, audible, text input) manifest in online spaces. Playing on metaphorical (Kofman 1999) and material concepts of the Camera Obscura, with its inverted images and use of light and shadow, Zoom Obscura addresses these issues by harnessing the critical power of art, design and technology; blending and bringing into tension skills and genres to produce a range of interventions which give users the power to take back some of the agential power from platforms such as Zoom. Looking to the future, the project asks how can we contest / resist the inevitability of a future structured around video calls, conferences and seminars? Can we push back against the normalisation of the practices we have so quickly and readily adopted in the COVID-19 state of exception? How can we regain control of how our images and words manifest in these spaces? How can we move beyond encryption as a solution to privacy /security problems? Encryption might be a technical fix, and a politically popular (although controversial) narrative, but it doesn't solve the ethical problems that sit beneath, through, and around its implementation. This project seeks to explore a data ethics beyond encryption and technological solutionism. Specifically, the project has the following aims and objectives: Aims A1. To unpack and make legible, to diverse public audiences, the processes of the Zoom assemblage and to explore how video-conferencing data can be manipulated and exploited by both platforms and other users. A2. To explore the critical and creative ways of taking back control of how our data is displayed and recorded on video-calling platforms, allowing users as subjects of the camera to regain their agency in how they appear and participate in online spaces, and developing a data ethics that enables users to negotiate their presence and value in online spaces on their own terms, rather than those of the platform. A3. To examine video calling in the context of existing debates around the ethics, privacy and security of technology platforms, through a lens of creative intervention rather than the usual framings of encryption and technological solutionism.
Impact It is multi-disciplinary, featuring computer science, art, design.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Zoom Obscura: creative interventions for a data ethics of video conferencing beyond encryption 
Organisation Open Data Institute
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution This is a sub-project of the Human Data Interaction Network Plus.
Collaborator Contribution The COVID-19 pandemic has gifted video conferencing companies such as Zoom with a vast amount of biometric data to be rendered knowable, translatable and ready for economic exchange - such as faces, voices, and chat scripts. It is however as yet unclear what the explosion in video conferencing software means for the exploitation and monetisation of potentially valuable data for NLP, facial recognition, ML and AI training and other drivers within the digital economy which require urgent critical scrutiny. Frequently we are offered 'solutions' to issues around data privacy and security that are based on a loose form of trust, with debate frequently reduced to the prevention of external malicious actors gaining access. This has led to a focus on 'end-to-end' encryption - but this still leaves individuals with limited access, control, and verifiability to challenge terms and conditions within. COVID-19 has, however, left us with little choice but to increase the volume of interactions we have in online spaces such as the video-call 'room', and with limited agency in how our personal data might be being stored and exploited. This leaves us with significant ethical, privacy, and political concerns. Zoom Obscura is a project that aims to give agency to the users of newly ubiquitous video conferencing technologies such as Zoom, while still allowing them to participate in online spaces and debates, enabling us to negotiate our own presence and our own value in these new spaces. We aim to do so by bringing together artists, academics, hackers, designers and creative technologists to develop critical interventions that make the problematic workings of these technologies legible to wider audiences while empowering users to experiment with, and control how their personal data (visual, audible, text input) manifest in online spaces. Playing on metaphorical (Kofman 1999) and material concepts of the Camera Obscura, with its inverted images and use of light and shadow, Zoom Obscura addresses these issues by harnessing the critical power of art, design and technology; blending and bringing into tension skills and genres to produce a range of interventions which give users the power to take back some of the agential power from platforms such as Zoom. Looking to the future, the project asks how can we contest / resist the inevitability of a future structured around video calls, conferences and seminars? Can we push back against the normalisation of the practices we have so quickly and readily adopted in the COVID-19 state of exception? How can we regain control of how our images and words manifest in these spaces? How can we move beyond encryption as a solution to privacy /security problems? Encryption might be a technical fix, and a politically popular (although controversial) narrative, but it doesn't solve the ethical problems that sit beneath, through, and around its implementation. This project seeks to explore a data ethics beyond encryption and technological solutionism. Specifically, the project has the following aims and objectives: Aims A1. To unpack and make legible, to diverse public audiences, the processes of the Zoom assemblage and to explore how video-conferencing data can be manipulated and exploited by both platforms and other users. A2. To explore the critical and creative ways of taking back control of how our data is displayed and recorded on video-calling platforms, allowing users as subjects of the camera to regain their agency in how they appear and participate in online spaces, and developing a data ethics that enables users to negotiate their presence and value in online spaces on their own terms, rather than those of the platform. A3. To examine video calling in the context of existing debates around the ethics, privacy and security of technology platforms, through a lens of creative intervention rather than the usual framings of encryption and technological solutionism.
Impact It is multi-disciplinary, featuring computer science, art, design.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Zoom Obscura: creative interventions for a data ethics of video conferencing beyond encryption 
Organisation University of Bristol
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This is a sub-project of the Human Data Interaction Network Plus.
Collaborator Contribution The COVID-19 pandemic has gifted video conferencing companies such as Zoom with a vast amount of biometric data to be rendered knowable, translatable and ready for economic exchange - such as faces, voices, and chat scripts. It is however as yet unclear what the explosion in video conferencing software means for the exploitation and monetisation of potentially valuable data for NLP, facial recognition, ML and AI training and other drivers within the digital economy which require urgent critical scrutiny. Frequently we are offered 'solutions' to issues around data privacy and security that are based on a loose form of trust, with debate frequently reduced to the prevention of external malicious actors gaining access. This has led to a focus on 'end-to-end' encryption - but this still leaves individuals with limited access, control, and verifiability to challenge terms and conditions within. COVID-19 has, however, left us with little choice but to increase the volume of interactions we have in online spaces such as the video-call 'room', and with limited agency in how our personal data might be being stored and exploited. This leaves us with significant ethical, privacy, and political concerns. Zoom Obscura is a project that aims to give agency to the users of newly ubiquitous video conferencing technologies such as Zoom, while still allowing them to participate in online spaces and debates, enabling us to negotiate our own presence and our own value in these new spaces. We aim to do so by bringing together artists, academics, hackers, designers and creative technologists to develop critical interventions that make the problematic workings of these technologies legible to wider audiences while empowering users to experiment with, and control how their personal data (visual, audible, text input) manifest in online spaces. Playing on metaphorical (Kofman 1999) and material concepts of the Camera Obscura, with its inverted images and use of light and shadow, Zoom Obscura addresses these issues by harnessing the critical power of art, design and technology; blending and bringing into tension skills and genres to produce a range of interventions which give users the power to take back some of the agential power from platforms such as Zoom. Looking to the future, the project asks how can we contest / resist the inevitability of a future structured around video calls, conferences and seminars? Can we push back against the normalisation of the practices we have so quickly and readily adopted in the COVID-19 state of exception? How can we regain control of how our images and words manifest in these spaces? How can we move beyond encryption as a solution to privacy /security problems? Encryption might be a technical fix, and a politically popular (although controversial) narrative, but it doesn't solve the ethical problems that sit beneath, through, and around its implementation. This project seeks to explore a data ethics beyond encryption and technological solutionism. Specifically, the project has the following aims and objectives: Aims A1. To unpack and make legible, to diverse public audiences, the processes of the Zoom assemblage and to explore how video-conferencing data can be manipulated and exploited by both platforms and other users. A2. To explore the critical and creative ways of taking back control of how our data is displayed and recorded on video-calling platforms, allowing users as subjects of the camera to regain their agency in how they appear and participate in online spaces, and developing a data ethics that enables users to negotiate their presence and value in online spaces on their own terms, rather than those of the platform. A3. To examine video calling in the context of existing debates around the ethics, privacy and security of technology platforms, through a lens of creative intervention rather than the usual framings of encryption and technological solutionism.
Impact It is multi-disciplinary, featuring computer science, art, design.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Zoom Obscura: creative interventions for a data ethics of video conferencing beyond encryption 
Organisation University of Edinburgh
Department School of Informatics Edinburgh
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This is a sub-project of the Human Data Interaction Network Plus.
Collaborator Contribution The COVID-19 pandemic has gifted video conferencing companies such as Zoom with a vast amount of biometric data to be rendered knowable, translatable and ready for economic exchange - such as faces, voices, and chat scripts. It is however as yet unclear what the explosion in video conferencing software means for the exploitation and monetisation of potentially valuable data for NLP, facial recognition, ML and AI training and other drivers within the digital economy which require urgent critical scrutiny. Frequently we are offered 'solutions' to issues around data privacy and security that are based on a loose form of trust, with debate frequently reduced to the prevention of external malicious actors gaining access. This has led to a focus on 'end-to-end' encryption - but this still leaves individuals with limited access, control, and verifiability to challenge terms and conditions within. COVID-19 has, however, left us with little choice but to increase the volume of interactions we have in online spaces such as the video-call 'room', and with limited agency in how our personal data might be being stored and exploited. This leaves us with significant ethical, privacy, and political concerns. Zoom Obscura is a project that aims to give agency to the users of newly ubiquitous video conferencing technologies such as Zoom, while still allowing them to participate in online spaces and debates, enabling us to negotiate our own presence and our own value in these new spaces. We aim to do so by bringing together artists, academics, hackers, designers and creative technologists to develop critical interventions that make the problematic workings of these technologies legible to wider audiences while empowering users to experiment with, and control how their personal data (visual, audible, text input) manifest in online spaces. Playing on metaphorical (Kofman 1999) and material concepts of the Camera Obscura, with its inverted images and use of light and shadow, Zoom Obscura addresses these issues by harnessing the critical power of art, design and technology; blending and bringing into tension skills and genres to produce a range of interventions which give users the power to take back some of the agential power from platforms such as Zoom. Looking to the future, the project asks how can we contest / resist the inevitability of a future structured around video calls, conferences and seminars? Can we push back against the normalisation of the practices we have so quickly and readily adopted in the COVID-19 state of exception? How can we regain control of how our images and words manifest in these spaces? How can we move beyond encryption as a solution to privacy /security problems? Encryption might be a technical fix, and a politically popular (although controversial) narrative, but it doesn't solve the ethical problems that sit beneath, through, and around its implementation. This project seeks to explore a data ethics beyond encryption and technological solutionism. Specifically, the project has the following aims and objectives: Aims A1. To unpack and make legible, to diverse public audiences, the processes of the Zoom assemblage and to explore how video-conferencing data can be manipulated and exploited by both platforms and other users. A2. To explore the critical and creative ways of taking back control of how our data is displayed and recorded on video-calling platforms, allowing users as subjects of the camera to regain their agency in how they appear and participate in online spaces, and developing a data ethics that enables users to negotiate their presence and value in online spaces on their own terms, rather than those of the platform. A3. To examine video calling in the context of existing debates around the ethics, privacy and security of technology platforms, through a lens of creative intervention rather than the usual framings of encryption and technological solutionism.
Impact It is multi-disciplinary, featuring computer science, art, design.
Start Year 2020
 
Title Data Praxis 
Description 3 workshops on this site are designed for educators to use in their practice. The workshops are Online Educational Resources in themselves. In each workshop there are different materials and other smaller workshops embedded that serve as hands-on activities to be run in each workshop. All of the materials are OERs with a CC license so that they can be used, remixed and shared. These workshops are in Spanish but we have created an application that lives in the site for people to translate all the materials to the language they need. There is also a 'thinking tool' called 'Seven inequities | Seven opportunities', a prototype version of the interactive tool that will be co-designed with community members of the Black South West Network to mediate research between marginalised communities and research organisations and funders. Special attention will be given to the management of data and to the potential solutions based on data-intensive technologies. 
Type Of Technology Webtool/Application 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Has been taken up by HE institutions in Kenya, Peru, Argentina and Uruguay. 
URL https://datapraxis.net/
 
Title ISpy Sensors 
Description A web tool for use within facilitated evaluations of children's knowledge of how they are tracked and recorded by everyday technologies. 
Type Of Technology Webtool/Application 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact The tool had three outcomes - it allowed the Countermeasures project to test an approach to educating children about the components inside devices; it allowed the project to evaluate the outcomes of the co-design sessions with children; and provided an online resources which could be utilised by audiences beyond the timeframe of this research. 
URL https://unitydata1234.wixsite.com/my-site
 
Title Neural/ networks/ GANs/ WAVENET Google DeepMind 
Description As a part of the Polyphonic Intelligence project, the lamenting of 9 different speakers was used to create an artificially generated voice that never existed before. Neural Networks, specifically Generative Adversarial Networks (GANs) were used for the generation of new audio data from existing data. The data used was diverse and included text, images and even sound. After training of the GAN for a relatively short amount of time and with a relatively small sample of existing data, it is smart enough to create new real audio data. 
Type Of Technology New/Improved Technique/Technology 
Year Produced 2020 
Impact Using the same technology as Google used to generate its artificial voice, but with less resources (length of audio data and time, also), we were able to create a new voice that is remarkably good in quality and a sample that runs over 20 minutes long. Google DeepMind used the same model we are using in 2016 for audio generation and text to speech applications, the dataset it worked on has 109 different speakers speaking for almost 44 hours continuously, where in our cases, we only have 9 speakers speaking for almost 2 hours. Our dataset was also very diverse, including non-linguistic non-human data, as opposed to Google's use of strictly human native english speakers. The difference between the two datasets signals the exciting finding that the creation of a new voice is possible with limited resources and from diverse material that challenges the monopoly on AI by big companies, as well as the bias and limitations that come with their homogeneous approach. 
 
Title Respiration sensor with LoRaWAN interface to smart speaker 
Description - Blood Oximeter User device with connection to an access point - Messaging and notification system for the collected information through a customised smart speaker - Outdoor gateway notification with periodical cloud upload. - Notification Service for successful data upload. User device connection to an access point The device composes a Bluetooth enabled Arduino with a set of blood oximeter sensors allowing collecting data of interest. Access point data collection and exchange The main project focuses on the development of working, optimised solution for data collection, processing, packing and pushing data to an outdoor LorRaWAN gateway. The main purpose to achieve a balance between data amount and included information in such a way that the system is optimised for a low-cost cloud storage solution. Messaging and notification system for the collected information After data are transmitted to the cloud, the user is notified about current measurement with base advise and suggestions. In addition, the user is notified about successful data transmission. The oximeter is connected to a smart speaker through LoRa to act as the main point of notification. 
Type Of Technology New/Improved Technique/Technology 
Year Produced 2021 
Open Source License? Yes  
Impact This is an innovative proof of concept prototype that connect a respiration sensor to LoRA network. 
 
Title Tor web browser extension for collective resistance against tracking 
Description Offers an upgrade to HTTPS encryption by securely mixing one's data with the data of others, via the RAPPOR (Randomized Aggregatable Privacy-Preserving Ordinal Response) method. Stems from the Collaborative Resistance to Web Surveillance (CREWS) project, led by Steven Murdoch (UCL), within HDI's Resistance theme. See https://murdoch.is/projects/. 
Type Of Technology Webtool/Application 
Year Produced 2021 
Open Source License? Yes  
Impact Became part of the code base of the Tor Browser, an internationally known secure web browser. 
URL https://gitlab.torproject.org/sysrqb/crews_ext/
 
Title Yoshik 
Description Code for App for Android and data collection backend with the code available on GitHub . App consists of animated pre and post-survey, utilising game simulation (comparison between before and after results ), 12 validated vignettes with learning components tailored to create a personalised profile for millennial respondents. Updated the animated Android Version Yoshik : a. Undocumented Reverse engineering of the original Spanish version, for Java Android, C# and Unity. b. Rebuilt React admin panel and server-side for admin users. c. Reconfigured the environment for Aws and Azure. 
Type Of Technology Webtool/Application 
Year Produced 2020 
Open Source License? Yes  
Impact Collected results of the text based version of the validated tool. 1- Title: Infographic (Annexe 1. Infographic. And a high-quality pdf version) Date: Dec 8th, 2020. Type of Event: Twitter distribution (@yazmorlet). https://twitter.com/yazmorlet/status/1336327122202185728?s=20 Number of People Reached: 1,741 impressions. 121 total engagements. Primary Audience: General public and participating academics. Key Outcomes/Impact: disseminating results. 2- Title: Infographic (Annexe 1. Infographic. And a high-quality pdf version) Date: Dec 8th, 2020. Type of Event: LinkedIn distribution https://www.linkedin.com/posts/yazmin-morlet-corti-95188949_privacy-dataprotection-datarights-activity-6742202691692314624-kCcf Number of People Reached: 30 reactions, 625 views. Primary Audience: General public and participating academics. Key Outcomes/Impact: disseminating results. 3- Title: Semi Documented MIT open-source code of Yoshik https://github.com/iDisk/Yoshik Date: Uploaded December 2nd 2020 Type of Event: open source code available for use of the general public. Primary Audience: General public. Key Outcomes/Impact: publishing the code. 4- Title: Qualtrics Survey version - link, https://edinburgh.eu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_2cpYrj8XyYKMawJ Date: 27- 28th of November 2020. Type of Event: data collection. Number of People Reached: 139 Primary Audience: participants. Key Outcomes/Impact: Collected the data for analysis. 
URL https://github.com/iDisk/Yoshik
 
Title yeeking/ddsp-experiments: HDI call and response DOI release 
Description This is a release for the research project call and response funded by HDI research network / EPSRC, grant code EP/R045178/1 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2021 
Open Source License? Yes  
Impact This software was used for a live demonstration on BBC Radio 5 live national radio. It was presented as a positive use of AI. Here is a link: https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000pw9g 
URL https://zenodo.org/record/4598523
 
Description The performance of music involves the physical expression of musical material in a complex and multimodal process. Furthermore, musical performance involves a sense of 'flow', or immersion in the creative act, that can be better understood through a careful and holistic examination of data captured from this complex physical activity. Flow is especially relevant in improvisatory performance contexts where musicians must make real-time decisions about content and its expression. The project detailed in this paper involves the design and creation of a low-cost protocol for collecting simultaneous streams of data from improvising human musicians that are performing from a common score. The protocol records and synchronises audio recording with body-, facial- and physiological response tracking with a ground-truth annotation through the reported flow of a performer. This association yields a robust dataset that serves to capture the complex and multi-model process of making music 'in the flow'. This dataset can be a useful tool for a range of applications, such as creative AI practices, music generation in game engines, music information retrieval and humanisation of static systems-e.g. MIDI file playback and sound processing parameters. 
Type Of Technology  
Year Produced 2022 
Open Source License? Yes  
URL https://figshare.dmu.ac.uk/articles/software/Embodied_Musicking_data_capture_software/19161269/1
 
Description The performance of music involves the physical expression of musical material in a complex and multimodal process. Furthermore, musical performance involves a sense of 'flow', or immersion in the creative act, that can be better understood through a careful and holistic examination of data captured from this complex physical activity. Flow is especially relevant in improvisatory performance contexts where musicians must make real-time decisions about content and its expression. The project detailed in this paper involves the design and creation of a low-cost protocol for collecting simultaneous streams of data from improvising human musicians that are performing from a common score. The protocol records and synchronises audio recording with body-, facial- and physiological response tracking with a ground-truth annotation through the reported flow of a performer. This association yields a robust dataset that serves to capture the complex and multi-model process of making music 'in the flow'. This dataset can be a useful tool for a range of applications, such as creative AI practices, music generation in game engines, music information retrieval and humanisation of static systems-e.g. MIDI file playback and sound processing parameters. 
Type Of Technology  
Year Produced 2022 
Open Source License? Yes  
URL https://figshare.dmu.ac.uk/articles/software/Embodied_Musicking_data_capture_software/19161269
 
Description BugReporting as a method, 2020 REAL ML Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Workshop on using bugreporting as a method for reporting on ethics, data infrastructures and machine learning. The workshop took place "2020 REALML: A collaborative expert workshop for public interest researchers who are investigating the social impacts of algorithmic systems" organised and funded by the MacArthur Foundation. The workshop was attended by around 30 selected participants who had been invited as experts in public interest from across policy making, industry and academia internationally. The workshop demonstrated our methods and showed examples of how it is being used. It was a participatory session and it culminated in a discussion in which members of industry suggested they would like to support the work further through providing industry support to bugreport on ethics related to machine learning.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://realml.org/?talque=speaker-list&speakerId=RMA7nzO308nyNwIH6Va
 
Description Designing for human data interaction in data-driven media experiences 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact A poster presentation was delivered at ACM CHI 2021 ( online ) based on a late-breaking work paper that was accepted at the conference. The talk was followed by questions that helped increase interest in the concept of a PDS to support future data driven media experiences.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://dl.acm.org/doi/abs/10.1145/3411763.3451808
 
Description A set of workshops for startups 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact We became aware of the importance of business decisions made in a company, but we were not able to integrate business, technical considerations and individual ethical action positions together to observe how they influence one another and when individuals feel they have the agency to alter, change or shape the final decisions. Our HDI workshops enabled us to bring all of these considerations and iterate a successful workshop design that is engaging, stimulating and real life-like. Through these workshops we reached more than 50 participants across three cities: Belgrade, Edinburgh and London. In each city, we had vastly different participant profiles and this has enabled us to finetune our workshop materials and also scripts.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019,2020
 
Description BEYOND COVID-19 - LESSONS FOR ADVANCING DIGITAL INCLUSION IN THE REGION 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Hosted by the Education Observatory this second regional meeting was attended by approximately 30 participants and speakers from digital technology businesses, local agencies, lifelong learning, enterprise and regional transformation project staff from across the Black Country, including the West Midlands Combined Authority (WMCA), Wolverhampton City Council and West Midlands Combined Universities as well as academics from University of Wolverhampton and colleagues from the EPSRC funded Centre for Digital Citizens.

The meeting was opened with a strategic regional overview from Prof Nazira Karodia, who is the Pro-Vice Chancellor for Regional Development at the University of Wolverhampton. Nazira contextualised the Human Data Interaction event within the regional engagement work of the university that cuts across our research, knowledge exchange, teaching and professional activities bringing genuine economic, social and cultural benefits to the region. Nazira described the pre-pandemic work in the Black Country on digital inclusion and how the pandemic has amplified the criticality of this work. She discussed the connections between development of digital skills, proficiency and recognising how data is impacting on our lives and access to services for the community. The five missions of the new West Midlands Digital Roadmap are: to secure access for everyone to digital opportunities, share and use data to improve people's lives, become the UK's best-connected region, realise the potential of digital to transform our economy and build economic resilience and use digital public services to build a fairer, greener, healthier region. These missions are interconnected with our post-pandemic recovery and innovation and our focus on improving health and wellbeing,

Dr Stuart Connor then presented on Digital Inclusion and what happens when we succeed? He questioned how success in this area then impacts on the relationships we seek to develop, given that digital inclusion is so much more than simply connecting someone with a device. Stuart discussed the value of joining the recently formed WMCA Digital Inclusion Coalition who are looking at connections and data costs along with many broader issues, such as skills, knowledge and the contexts in which people reside. Stuart then raised the challenge that as we address one issue well, it can in turn create a whole new set of problems. Digital working from home can be convenient during the pandemic but may normalise overwork and destruction of work-life balance. Therefore, how do we recognise and evaluate success in the area of digital inclusion and what might be the costs that accompany success? So we achieve inclusion, but along with this can come the monitoring of our activities via video surveillance, email monitoring, attention, traffic, productivity and geo-location tracking and 'bossware'. There are products like Teramind, Time Doctor, VeriClock, ActivTrak and companies like Microsoft offer user productivity scores to clients based on a wide range of metrics. Stuart asked how such monitoring makes us feel and whether this can act as a barrier to people wishing to be digitally included. This is why the Human Data Interaction (HDI) agenda, which puts human concerns around agency, legibility and negotiability at the heart of discussions about big data and analytics, is crucial. There is a need to be transparent, to enable people who have been disadvantaged to begin to navigate these relationships, as they become digitally included, but support needs to be available to them from those they already know and trust in the community. There is also a need to ask the question: why are we seeking to get people digitally included? Is this to develop workers for the future, to keep things as they are, or does digital inclusion give people access to resources that will help them to disrupt their situation and realise new relationships in the region and more widely?

Following Stuart's presentation, participants raised questions concerning ways to resist surveillance. Given the intentions to become a more integrated ecosystem across the region, how might privacy also be maintained and how might citizens be better educated to protect their data? Whilst we all need to make individualised responses it is also important to discuss collective ways to address data and surveillance issues through digital governance.

Dr Alan Munro then introduced the EPSRC funded HDI Network Plus leading with the topic of: Why Human Data Interaction issues are crucial to address in digital skills agendas. Alan explained that although the HDI network had an original focus on developing software, in some of the funded projects there has also been very interesting debate on the interlinked social aspects. The intention has been to create a community, to fund innovative research and to 'be surprised' by the interesting directions people take this. Firstly, the work around data and humans has been somewhat fragmented. Matching system design principles with our ethics and values and at what levels is often easier said than done. There are conflicting industrial, societal and academic values concerning the use of the data we generate and there really wasn't much protection before GDPR. Secondly, there are amazing experts in systems and algorithms who are mystified by the social nature of these interactions leaving big culture gaps. Thirdly, there are those who we seek to include in digital skills and access to services who will also be impacted profoundly by these data challenges and the algorithmic mediation of all of our lives. An algorithm decides what we see on Facebook and Twitter for example, but if we seek transparency then there is a mass of coding and router activity to navigate. This is like 'chasing the contents of a snow globe'. So transparency of this kind is not enough. It is no basis for practical action and decisions on our data. The three core tenets the HDI network is based on and that are addressed by all of the funded projects are: legibility, agency and negotiability. So HDI draws on traditional ethical concerns such as autonomy, consent and agency and to frame these concerns in ways that speak to the technical community. HDI seeks to address choices, actions and effects via a framework that brings ethics to the forefront of systems design and so is a critical lens and a basis for practical action. Much collaboration is needed across different disciplines and actors to address issues like, for example, how traces of racism are picked up by algorithms and travel through data and systems. There are huge gulfs between close work on systems architecture, levels of politics and larger theoretical overviews of what the network aims to achieve. Whilst the devil is in the detail, the question Alan concluded with was: are the HDI tenets enough? Alan asked people to reflect on data literacy and to see ourselves as 'the product' when we are using different websites. How do we read these sites, knowing they are mediated by algorithms? How to understand where our data goes and who is finding things out about us. Privacy is no longer a given, so we each need to develop a literacy.

Following Alan's talk there were questions and comments concerning surveillance capitalism, the notion of being 'the product' and how this works in relation to the drivers of big tech companies. Also concerning the levels of literacy that people may be able to develop, given that there will be limits to us ever really understanding what happens to our data. This led to discussion concerning the Internet of Things (IoT) and former work on how such developments might be controlled. In the example of Ring, it may be necessary to delve deeply into such systems to cut off certain networks of access. RFID Guardian was developed to block some forms of access to data, but such approaches require particular levels of competence. There are many issues in HDI but these are radically contextual in their nature. It was suggested that when working with young people who are in far from an ideal place in their lives, will digital inclusion approaches achieve a desirable outcome for them? As they describe their future state in rich pictures they can certainly articulate how bad it is for them now, but does an expert view inform or hinder their progress towards something better? It was agreed that this is a really difficult question to answer, even for those who are considered experts in the digital world. In some ways there are analogies with the physical acts of enclosure that have happened in history. As data becomes a property of companies and governments, there is a very worrying trend with Bossware. Almost an act of enclosure by stealth. For those of us who know about tracking we can make small acts of resistance to leave the data trail we want to, rather than the one that others want us to.

The next speaker, Emmanuel Donaldson, from Progressive Media Entertainment, who is an Indie filmmaker and storyteller based in Birmingham was introduced by Matt Johnson. Matt and Manni conducted a dialogue about Manni's work which includes projects conducted around the world and in the West Midlands where digital is used as a way of opening up expression amongst young people. Manni has been running a project called Isolationships which amplifies people's voices, given the disruption that Covid-19 has created. He took on 8 - 10 young people from a variety of backgrounds and encouraged them to be creative in sharing their ideas about their relationships with themselves. The project also involved mentors from the music industry and TV actors. They each had to make an introductory video on what isolation meant to them. Some of the young people discussed struggling to come to terms with identity, gender, Black Lives Matter, their ideas concerning losing a friend to suicide. Under the guise of creativity, they were able to get their message out and share their data on their own terms, dealing with really sensitive topics, but in a way that gave agency in using the digital platforms to express their voice over animations. Their parents became involved too in directing and filming. Manni was then asked about the barriers he perceived in the digital space when working with young people and entrepreneurs in the West Midlands. Accessibility due to cost is a real barrier to kids getting to go to film school as there is no kind of bursary. Manni had been able to pay monthly and had vowed to help others from working class backgrounds to access such training in the future. He discussed the issues concerning data and monitoring but added that there needs to be a balance between dark and light sides to this topic when so much good can come from young people getting their stories out. Matt asked about Manni's work with so many diverse digital innovators and whether the people he works with really think about data and privacy concerns. Manni replied yes to this, as data is really important to those he works with. They are asked what they do and don't wish to share and whether they want to keep the camera on or not. Matt then asked Manni about any barriers, in terms of local funding, to the scaling up of digital skills and supporting so-called digital natives who have brilliant ideas. Manni said it is hard for small companies like his to access the funding. His partnership with Isolationships who are in London had enabled to funding for that programme. Funding tends to go to the organisations who have already built a history with the Arts Council for example. Matt summarised the wish to give a local perspective through his interview with Manni and then invited questions. An observation was made that if you are not from the right background then there all kinds of obstacles that need to be navigated just to be able to reach anything approaching a level playing field that others are on. Manni commented that whilst a lot of kids from West Brom or Birmingham and its surrounds can have ability to make films, there is a lot of nepotism in the film industry and the need for money to be able to get access to valuable knowledge through film school. It is hard to make money via YouTube views too, as so many views are needed. Analogies between online and offline experiences were made, for example, in the idea of moving to London in the past when it wasn't so expensive to live in order to get into comedy and TV. Now this would need a great deal of money that no one from a working class background could hope to invest. Comments were made from other participants with experience working in TV who said that to diversify who works in these areas are challenged by how many people want to move in this direction and how few are often taken. The question was asked as to why careers cannot be developed by moving around from company to company and gaining bits of experience, however diverse. This was suggested given that all companies now need to engage with digital media. There are routes out there that people can build alongside people doing their own thing online. Learning about a film that is going to be shot in the area and getting involved as an extra is another way to gain experience. Manni added that there are many ways to get into the game and this is a skillset every organisation now needs to have.

The final speaker was Catherine Perry from Wolverhampton City Council who provided a demonstration of the DigitalWolves site and community area. Catherine explained her role in relation to digital infrastructure and digital inclusion. DigitalWolves provides a repository of information for people to access training opportunities and career advice and to support businesses and charities. Catherine pointed out the overview and the location of the regional strategies on the website as well as the details of webinars that partners are running and the Twitter feed. The aim of the site is also to create a bit of a digital movement as a lot is happening in Wolverhampton and its surrounds concerning digital, but not everyone knows about it. From finding out if residents have the basics of equipment, access and enough skills and understanding to get online to linking digital buddies. There is support for people to get online through libraries and learning partnerships. There is a lending scheme for devices. There is also basic training available. People are signposted to digital skills training which is a huge area, so Catherine explained different areas to be developed and the need to link people to those they can trust and up to date content. She explained also how they are seeking to inspire people, provide links to gaming and film making and to raise people's aspirations so that they can feel that digital careers are something they can consider. There is a section for staying safe online and so Catherine added that further data literacy, privacy and data protection details will be added here too, after today's discussions. There are sections on diversity and finding a local digital centre. There is information for schools and on careers and apprenticeships. The need to help people who are already in work but need to keep developing their digital skills was also flagged up. Catherine also demonstrated pages that are aimed at businesses and charities and staying safe online, support for the workforce and on how social media can be used in business. There are pages on how the digital infrastructure is being developed across Wolverhampton, information on 5G and about getting online and pages that link to the Education Observatory. Catherine was then asked some questions, including how the message could get to those who are disadvantaged and not yet online. The council are working with local partners in this capacity, with digital buddies and developing a scheme that has run during Covid-19 lockdowns to deliver food parcels. Such volunteers are being trained in both supporting people to be vaccinated and in getting them online. Working then through both trusted local partners, such as The Learning Partnership, and building a network of supporters. As people are seeking ESOL, basic childcare and other help then these and local libraries will be able to respond. DigitalWolves is a starter for ten which gets information out to people initially. It is now important to work with partners to develop this. Catherine was asked if there is a Learning Management System built into the site for training pathways. Catherine replied that the site will signpost people to local education and skills providers, colleges and University of Wolverhampton. There is also an intention to develop a Telecoms Academy and to work with a range of partners, such as Adult Ed, Learn Play and School of Coding, to identify gaps and do pilots around gaps that exist. Participants then exchanged contacts with Catherine and offered to make introductions. Catherine invited participants to view and add to the DigitalWolves site and to increase the interactivity around the website. There were a few final questions and comments concerning Cities of Learning, job journeys and digital badges.

The last session of the meeting was led by Matt Johnson who provided a summary of the key themes/questions that emerged from the afternoon's discussions that could be gathered into a policy briefing, including:

Accessibility and barriers to participation within the digital space
What are we defining as the digital sector?
What is a successful outcome of digital inclusion?
Does this concern successful access, interaction online without being misled by misinformation, fraud or data and privacy issues?
How to reach the unreachable and take stock of the existing skills?
Demand led approaches
Knowledge transfer in relation to the places where companies are based.
How do we connect all of this innovative work with those who might be digital natives in deprived locations?
Governance - how are digital strategies being developed and what voices are being brought to the table to be included?

Matt added that we live and work in a location where there is a very young and potentially creative population. There is a need to match supply with demand to embed this creativity economically. The digital sector is fast-paced and it is important in the West Midlands to capture the diversity of voice to shape the right strategy for the West Midlands going forward.

Concluding remarks on the West Midlands Combined Authority's Digital Inclusion Coalition were made by Isobel Thomas, who has been seconded from the Good Things Foundation to work in this area. The Coalition has identified some priorities, but it needs to have strong community voices influencing what is done to work out what digital exclusion really means in the region. This includes questions like: how do we lobby government for change, or invest in the voluntary sector to ensure that people can be supported to become digitally included and gain skills, motivation and confidence? Isobel added that the issues of data and privacy that were discussed in this EPSRC HDI regional meeting today really come into this category of: skills, motivation and confidence. So being a confident user of the Internet who understands the downsides and can be safe online are crucial elements that the Coalition will pick up as plans for action and across the region's communities. This will address what we can do jointly to add value. The event concluded with sincere thanks to all speakers and contributors.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL http://educationobservatory.co.uk/event-beyond-covid-19-lessons-for-advancing-digital-inclusion-in-t...
 
Description Community/Patient group Co-design workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Patients, carers and/or patient groups
Results and Impact December 2019- March 2020
Co-design
Engaged with over 50 members of the Breather's Groups in Cornwall and Heather Eardley, Project Manager, The Patients Association.
12 Breather's group members have participated in the user fieldwork study.

- We attended a meeting of the Breathers where we introduced the aims and methods of the study and also gained feedback from the members as to how they interact with their health data.
- Members were then asked to volunteer for a one week study
- Each member had a pulse oximeter for one week and was asked to record their blood oxygen readings and also keep a diary of readings and comments on their health and breathing.
- Breathe members participated in the study with a 'buddy' who was asked to speak to the participant about their health and a person to 'share' their data with over the course of the week.
- We also obtained copies of the blood oxygen data readings that the breather's take every session when they meet (every fortnight).

- 10 December 2019- Initial contact and planning meeting with Breather's group organisers
- Ethical approval obtained Jan 2020.
- 14 Jan 2020- Meeting and briefing for fieldwork with Breather's group in Liskeard
- 28 Jan 2020 - Picking up oximeters from Breather's group Liskeard
- 11th Feb - Feedback on study to Breather's group Liskeard
- 13th Feb - Meeting and briefing with Breather's group Wadebridge

About Liskeard and South East Cornwall Breather's Group...

...is a non-profitmaking group that was set up in 2006 by a group of patients with COPD after completing an NHS rehabilitation course. They wanted to retain the benefits of the exercise regime they had learned, as well as providing a social support group for people with similar problems. They were then joined over the succeeding years by other patients who have found great benefit from the group, both from the social aspect, talks from health professionals, and the exercise regime at the group meetings.

Since then we have gone from strength to strength, lecturing in schools to dissuade schoolchildren from smoking; setting up additional groups around Cornwall; buying nebulisers for the local surgeries; receiving endorsements and support from organisations such as the NHS, Age UK and The British Lung Foundation. This culminated in July 2013 with the group winning the Queen's Award for Voluntary Services, which was presented to the group in September 2013 by the Lord Lieutenant of Cornwall.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019,2020
URL https://hdi-network.org/showcase-projects/#BREATHE-link
 
Description Critically Considering the Implementation of Data Protection Law in School EdTech 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact This presentation was held at the British Educational Research Association (BERA) Annual Conference, 13-16 Sept 2021. This is the largest and most well-known conference for school leadership, teachers, and other school staff such as Data Protection Officers. Secondary audience includes Ph.D. Students and professional staff in schools. The purpose of the presentation was to raise awareness on the Right to Object and disseminate results to the stakeholders. The conference was held online which did limit engagement but provided a lasting recording for further participation beyond the conference, to own colleagues.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://www.bera.ac.uk/conference/bera-conference-2021
 
Description DISADVANTAGE, DATA AND DIGITAL SKILLS regional cross-sector event 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact The first regional meeting for the EPSRC HDI project: 'Data and disadvantage: taking a regional approach towards Human Data Interaction (HDI) to inform local and national digital skills policies' took place on 9 September 2020

Hosted by the Education Observatory and attended by more than 20 participants from digital technology businesses, local agencies and policy makers from across the Black Country, such as West Midlands Combined Authority (WMCA), Black Country Consortium, Wolverhampton City Council and West Midlands Combined Universities as well as academics from University of Wolverhampton and representatives from schools and colleges, this first meeting heard from two speakers from the tech industry, followed by a lively interactive discussion on both challenges and opportunities for inclusive approaches to digital upskilling to aid employability and regeneration in the region.

The meeting concluded with a discussion about Digital Citizenship as a way into thinking about the Human Data Interaction (HDI) tenets that may not yet be attended to within digital skills training. These are necessary in enabling people to:

understand what is happening to data about them (legibility)
change relevant systems to be in better accord with their wishes (agency)
work with the people using the data so as to improve that processing (negotiability)
Considering these issues amongst digital citizenship, which is linked to all manner of skills and confidence that those seeking employment need to demonstrate to employers, is useful to ensure that vital factors are not omitted from re-training programmes. If left out, then those who are on the margins may experience further disadvantage.

The meeting concluded with a summary and plans to keep this cross-sector dialogue going with individuals ahead of the second HDI regional event which was scheduled in early 2021. Shortly after this meeting we were invited to participate in and contribute to a cross-sector West Midlands Digital Inclusion Coalition. We have received further invitations to participate in events and bids through this regional forum and we also drew speakers from the Coalition to speak at our second event in early 2021
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL http://educationobservatory.co.uk/education-observatory-hosts-event-on-disadvantage-data-and-digital...
 
Description Data Obscura : Cutting through the digital economy - invited talk at conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Pip Thornton and Andrew Dwyer are co-collaborators on a series of theoretical and artistic interventions into the exploitation of communication and imagery in an era of digital capitalism. Accelerated by the pandemic-led proliferation of video-conferencing, their latest project Zoom Obscura (with Chris Elsden and Mike Duggan), explores ways in which users of these technologies can regain agency over how their data is represented, controlled and utilised both by technology platforms and by other users.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://blogs.unsw.edu.au/tiic/files/2020/11/Dark-Eden-Program-1.pdf
 
Description Different Similar Sounds: An Interview with Hernani Villaseñor 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact We launched a series of interviews and work-in-progress (WiP) videos relate to our workshop with l'ull cec in collaboration with TOPLAP Barcelona. This is the first interview and work-in-progress video of the series. The interview is translated in English, Spanish and Catalan. So far, the WiP video had +160 views and 5 likes on YouTube.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://mirlca.dmu.ac.uk/posts/different-similar-sounds-interview-with-hernani-villasenor/
 
Description Different Similar Sounds: An Interview with Iris Saladino 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact We launched a series of interviews and work-in-progress (WiP) videos relate to our workshop with l'ull cec in collaboration with TOPLAP Barcelona. This is the third interview and work-in-progress video of the series. The interview is translated in English, Spanish and Catalan. So far, the WiP video had +70 views and 5 likes on YouTube.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://mirlca.dmu.ac.uk/posts/different-similar-sounds-interview-with-iris-saladino/
 
Description Different Similar Sounds: An Interview with Ramon Casamajó 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact We launched a series of interviews and work-in-progress (WiP) videos relate to our workshop with l'ull cec in collaboration with TOPLAP Barcelona. This is the second interview and work-in-progress video of the series. The interview is translated in English, Spanish and Catalan. So far, the WiP video had +100 views and 4 likes on YouTube.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://mirlca.dmu.ac.uk/posts/different-similar-sounds-interview-with-ramon-casamajo/
 
Description Dr Canonical / Frankenstein's ChatBot 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Title: Dr Canonical / Frankenstein's ChatBot (Pip Thornton/Andrew Dwyer) Date: Sept 2021 Type of Event: in person performance and panel discussion (Uni of Dundee) Number of People Reached: 300 Primary Audience: academic Key Outcomes/Impact: artificially (un)intelligent chatbot to be deployed as a panellist at the Critical Legal Conference, Dundee 2021 (postponed from 2020).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://clc2021.wordpress.com/plenaries/
 
Description Human Data Interaction in Data-Driven Media Experiences : An Exploration of Data Sensitive Responses to the Socio-Technical Challenges of Personal Data Leverage 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact A talk was given at ACM IMX 2021 ( Online ) based on a paper that was accepted at the conference. The talk was followed by questions that helped increase interest in the concept of a PDS to support future data driven media experiences.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://dl.acm.org/doi/abs/10.1145/3452918.3458797
 
Description Interview for Hamodia (New York-based news outlet for orthodox Jews) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Interview on solutions to global false information by Vian Bakir for Hamodia (New York-based news outlet for orthodox Jews) Nov 2021. Bakir is cited extensively in the story.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://research.bangor.ac.uk/portal/files/39703966/Hamodia_Nov_2021.pdf
 
Description Interview for Vodafone news 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Interview for industry body
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://newscentre.vodafone.co.uk/smart-living/digital-parenting/should-you-let-your-children-play-w...
 
Description Interview for national radio 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Matthew Yee-King was invited to join a discussion on Radio 5 Live about deep fake music and AI/ music in general. He was invited due to his expertise with AI and music. He took the opportunity to carry out a live demonstration of an AI system developed during the EPSRC funded HDI project call and response. One of the guests on the show sang into the AI system and it generated a synthesized response. The intention was to present AI in a positive light, showing that it can be used to enhance human creativity, not just overtake it.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000pw9g
 
Description Interview on Solutions to Global Misinformation (for EU Horizon 2020 project newsletter) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact The newsletter is for an EU funded project on Citizen Science (Citizen Scientists Investigating Cookies and App GDPR compliance) ( 1 Oct 2021). It is sent to the project's advisory board, project partners and wider dissemination routes
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://csi-cop.eu/third-newsletter
 
Description Interview with experts in the field of critical data literacy (the use/management of data and power dynamics, critical data literacy in resource constraint environment) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The podcast series is an ongoing (we are still adding podcasts) resource that aims to bring the expertise of professionals in different critical data literacy areas into the classroom to generate further discussion. It also provides resources to download and use for further teaching.
The participants in one of our four partner institutions in Tangaza University, Nairobi, reported that the information and the way the speakers delivered it changed their understanding of critical data literacy topics. They also said they would adopt these podcasts for their teaching practices.
One of the podcasts has already engaged, as can be seen in the statistic of the podcast host page, audience from Ghana, Netherlands, Italy, USA, and the UK.
The podcast with one of the experts (David Selassie Opoku) has resulted in a future collaboration with an initiative to impart critical data literacy to a community of farmers in Ghana.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://datapraxis.net/podcast-series/
 
Description Invited talk at The EDPS Civil Society Summit Big tech: from private platforms to public infrastructures 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Privacy Camp is an annual conference held the day before the start of CPDP. The event brings together digital rights advocates, activists as well as academics and policy-makers from all around Europe and beyond to discuss the most pressing issues facing human rights online. Privacy Camp is jointly organised by EDRi, VUB-LSTS, Privacy Salon vzw and the Institute for European Studies at USL-B. In a dynamic exchange between civil society and the European Data Protection Supervisor, we explore the wider consequences of the data intensive business models of dominant tech companies.The talk discussed the consequences for fundamental rights, and broader societal concerns. Who is in the end paying the costs of the societal shift of changing control of public infrastructures? We ask, on whose terms is such a shift taking place? How does this impact people and their fundamental rights? What are the requirements of data governance models to address this? Audience reported that the talk was insightful and it sparked discussion with policy makers on data infrastructures
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://privacycamp.eu/summit-the-edps-civil-society-summit-big-tech-from-private-platforms-to-publi...
 
Description Invited talk given at Push the Boat Out Poetry Festival 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Type of Event: in person invited artists talk Number of People Reached: 100 Primary Audience: writers, poets, public
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://www.summerhall.co.uk/sh-event/artist-talk-what-are-words-worth-in-a-digital-age-critiquing-l...
 
Description Learning and Education in a Datafied world. Do children have a right to opt-out? 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact This presentation was held at the BILETA British and Irish Law and Technology Association Annual Conference 2021, 14-16 April 2021. It was live online and received good engagement and lively discussion in the Q&A at the end.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://www.bileta.org.uk/annual-conference/
 
Description Live Coding Using Crowdsourced Sounds and a Virtual Agent: State of Affairs and Implications for HCI Research 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact The PI was invited to give an online talk about the project at the ATLAS Brown Bag Series at the University of Colorado Boulder in Boulder, CO, United States. This series is organised and hosted by Prof. Ellen Do.
The students asked several questions about the project. A question that emerged was whether there is a mailing list about the project. This question has appeared several times during the workshops as well, so it is worth considering. A question was whether the live coder learns from the performance, which is the next task of the project. Someone asked whether other APIs apart from Freesound are supported, for instance, weather, Spotify, and so on. We acknowledge that it is relevant to offer a modular solution looking forward. Other questions include whether the project will support multiple user training, collaborative training, and collaborative performance. We are considering these important features but they are out of the scope of this project at present.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://mirlca.dmu.ac.uk/posts/presentation-at-atlas-colloquium-february-2021/
 
Description McStay delivered 2 lectures for UN Global Campus of Human Rights MOOC 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact McStay delivered 2 lectures on Emotional AI and human rights for UN Global Campus of Human Rights MOOC (with Ed Snowden and Joe Cannataci) - Dec 2020
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description McStay, A., Rosner, G., Miyashita, H. and Urquhart, l. (2020) Comment on Children's Rights In Relation To Emotional AI And The Digital Environment for UN Committee on the Rights of the Child. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact On behalf of The Emotional AI Lab, this submission (Comment on Children's Rights In Relation To Emotional AI And The Digital Environment) to the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child.discusses technologies that gauge child biometrics to infer emotion and other qualitative states. It focusses on (1) children's toys and services; and (2) educational technologies (edtech). Paragraphs addressed are: 2, 14, 21, 25, 39, 42, 43, 56, 70, 76, 107.

Key insights
o Emotional AI technology is not yet in widespread use in children's products,
but is expected to increasingly appear in the 2020s.
o Parents have mixed feelings about emotional AI used with their children: they
see benefits, and they are wary.
o Experts in child development, child privacy, education technology, online
safety and emotional AI see serious potential harms to the introduction of
emotion and mood detection to children's products.
o Current data protection and privacy law is very focused on adults. Such
regulations are likely not comprehensive enough to address the potential
harms of child-focused emotional AI.
o Policymakers should consider a ban on using children's emotion data to
market to them or their parents.
o The use of emotion detection technologies, and the storage of data about
children's moods and emotions, could have long-lasting impacts and cause
children to be treated unfairly, both in childhood and later in adulthood.
o The UN's Convention on the Rights of the Child is valuable to guide the
governance of children's emotional AI technologies, but careful interpretation
of §1 Art. 29 (on development of the child to their fullest potential) is required.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://drive.google.com/file/d/1XVBKQKQkbv4FiBDT-eSBM3VqNiv63B_b/view
 
Description Mind the gap: surveillance capitalism in schools vs the child's right to object. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact This presentation was to a mostly academic audience, at an online conference titled 'Conceptualizing and Responding to Online Harms in Youth Digital Culture'. It was organised by the University of Surrey, 7th of July 2021. From here, the speakers were asked to contribute to a new edited collection on young people and online harms.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://www.ias.surrey.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/Online-Harms-workshop-programme-1.pdf
 
Description Mindtech PPI consultation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Patients, carers and/or patient groups
Results and Impact Two meetings with NIHR Mindtech Medtech co-operative PPI team to give information about the project, and to experiment with online workshop tools.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Music Performance with Crowdsourced Sounds: Collaboration by Chance 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact The PI of the project was invited to give an online guest lecture to the postgraduate students of the DMU master Music, Technology and Innovation MA in the module MUST5001 Aesthetics and Ideas in the Sonic Arts, De Montfort University, coordinated by Prof. John Young. The presentation outlined the precedents of music performance with crowdsourced sounds to then introduce three approaches to music performance with crowdsourced sounds: (1) corpus-based performance, (2) soundmap-based performance, and (3) crowdsourced-based performance, where the project is contextualised. The reactions of the students were positive and seemed to inspire some ideas for their final projects.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://mirlca.dmu.ac.uk/posts/presentation-at-must5001-aesthetics-and-ideas-in-the-sonic-arts-novem...
 
Description Narratives of privacy expectations in the age of platforms 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Title: Narratives of privacy expectations in the age of platforms
Date: 15 April 2021
Type of Event: presentation at British and Irish Law Education Technology Association (BILETA) Annual Conference 2021
Number of People Reached: ~30
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://www.bileta.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/Final-programme.pdf
 
Description Online videos of development of system 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Produced videos describing the tool under development, and details of how it has been developed. These videos were presented at the Mindtech 2020 online conference. They have also been used to disseminate information about the project to connections of the research team. This has resulted in further conversations with some groups/companies.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description OrgCon Design Challenge 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Connected to the OrgCon conference, an open design challenge was set up, based on the project's core concepts and message. There were 50+ entries, and 300+ participants at the conference. Note that the HDI funding was used to promote and extend work done in the VirtEU project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://designchallenge.virteuproject.eu/
 
Description Organising/Chairing Panel Discussion at HealTAC conference, Cardiff April 24-25 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact I was asked to organize a Panel Discussion at HealTAC conference titled: Natural language processing in mental health: progress, challenges and opportunities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description PPRG workshops 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Three workshops with members of the ExTRAPPOLATE Patient and practitioner reference group (PPRG). Group consisted of patients, carers, therapists, therapy trainers, service managers. Two of the workshops were organised as whole-group workshops, one workshop was divided by subgroup and run at convenient times for each group. Although planned to take place in person, workshops were run online as a result of covid restrictions. The workshops informed the research project and associated outputs, and influenced the design of the system under development in the project. The research team learnt from these. Participants learnt more about machine learning and natural language processing. Discussions were provoked after the workshops. Requests for further information also received.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020,2021
 
Description Panel member on King's Expert Series: Cities of the future 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Over the course of last year, we saw radical changes to our work and social lives in the wake of the global pandemic. Our usually vibrant cities became quiet and desolate places. As hope and optimism for the end of the pandemic grow, questions have begun to arise about the future of our cities. Will metropolitan life ever look the same or has the landscape of city living changed for good?

As part of our King's Experts Series, chair Mark Kleinman, Professor of Public Policy along with our panellists Philip Hubbard, Professor of Urban Studies and Katharine Willis, Professor of Smart Cities and Communities at the University of Plymouth and Visiting Research Fellow at the Centre for Urban Science and Progress at King's discuss how the pandemic may change the way we live and work and what the cities of the future may look like.

___

The King's Experts Series is a series of webinars exclusively for King's alumni. Each month, you'll have opportunity to tune in live, ask questions and hear from some of our leading academics, researchers and practitioners on some of the most important issues of our time.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://www.kcl.ac.uk/events/kings-expert-series-cities-of-the-future
 
Description Panel on Human Data Interaction at Dutch Design Week 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Human Data Interaction panel contribution as part of a submission entitled 'My Data, My Self' Exhibition at Dutch Design Week. at Dutch Design Week Saturday 17th to Sunday 25th of October. Accepted submission and videos found at https://ddw.nl/en/programme/2938/my-data-my-self-tv-station (episode 1; Designing from and with Data). - the submission process is competitive and selected by committee. Dutch Design Week is the largest annual design event in Northern Europe and presents work and concepts from more than 2,600 designers to more than 355,000 visitors from home and abroad. The purpose of the panel was to stimulate Designers to think more critically about data, not only and a product of the lived experience but also a material good.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://ddw.nl/en/programme/2938/my-data-my-self-tv-station
 
Description Performing with a Virtual Agent: Machine Learning for Live Coding Workshops 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Three workshops with 20-22 workshop attendees for each workshop (62 people in total). The same workshop was delivered online in collaboration with 3 different organisations: IKLECTIK (London), L'Ull Cec (Barcelona) and Leicester Hackspace (Leicester). Due to the pandemic, we adapted the workshop to online delivery and not only welcomed local participants but also international participants. We received positive feedback about the workshop, how inclusive it was, and 4-5 workshop attendees have been using the tool developed in the project in their artistic practice. A mailing list has been requested several times to keep updated about the project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020,2021
URL https://mirlca.dmu.ac.uk/workshops/
 
Description Public Talk - IoT resilience 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Invited talk to engage young researchers to debate and discuss on IoT systems resilience and security.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
 
Description Right2Object Webpage 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This webpage went live on the 13th of April 2021 ; it shows the video, public report (open pdf), project information and contact details.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL http://www.winchester.ac.uk/right2object.
 
Description Roundtable contribution on the twinned commodities of oil and data for Sonic Acts Festival 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Contribution to the roundtable discussion on the phrase "data is the new oil" for the international arts festival Sonic Acts. Among the roundtable participants were political and environmental anthropologist Omolade Adunbi, media artist and programmer Ryan Kuo, artist and geographer Helen Pritchard and interdisciplinary researcher Andrea Sempértegui. The roundtable provoked conversations around data infrastructures and fossil fuel economies.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://sonicacts.com/portal/sonic-acts-presents-exhaust--an-online-roundtable-discussion-on-oil-and...
 
Description Short term scientific mission 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Title: University of West Attika, Athens, Greece
Date: 20.11.2020 - 20.12.2020
Type of Event: Short Term Scientific Mission
Led a number of workshops and round table discussions on wearable interfaces and machine learning, using the Little Creature as a case study.
The University of West Attika kindly provided engineering resources to design and manufacture a miniaturized version of the heating control board f or the Little Creature.
Number of People Reached: 15
Primary Audience: Engineering and Design PhD Students & Faculty
Key Outcomes/Impact: collaborative design and cross-disciplinary dialogue between engineering, textiles and HDI. While the series of workshops was limited to 15 participants, the relationship with the University and the knowledge exchange is long lasting and an ongoing dialogue i s taking place. The Little Creature and the project in general introduced a very different approach to design and HDI to the faculty and students alike and we hope that this sensibility will be incorporated in the curriculum and learning modalities going forward.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.context-cost.eu/download/1503/
 
Description The Future of Mental Health 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact This workshop was organised in collaboration with eNurture Network+. The purpose of the event was to create new opportunities for academics, third sector and industry partners to network and brainstorm with the view to co-create innovative research proposals suitable for both HDI and eNurture Networks+ relevant to the area of digital mental health
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://hdi-network.org/fmh/
 
Description UNESCO Inclusive Policy Lab Education and Digital Skills 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Title: UNESCO Inclusive Policy Lab Education and Digital Skills: A Conversation Event
Date: 8 December 2021
Type of Event: International webinar and poster exhibition
Number of People Reached: several hundred
Primary Audience: international participants interested in inclusive digital skills
Link: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/unesco-inclusive-policy-lab-education-digital-skills-free-jewitt/
Key Outcomes/Impact: Our HDI Theory project poster is available at this DOI: https://doi.org/
10.21954/ou.rd.17212391.v1 and is among 28 that were presented and that can be browsed here:
https://ordo.open.ac.uk/browse
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/unesco-inclusive-policy-lab-education-digital-skills-free-jewitt/
 
Description Understanding data: praxis and politics 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact This is the main site for the OER, it is where the content lives and where participants will upload their digital artefacts that will be part of the OER. From this content an open textbook will be created in the future, after the project comes to an end, we collect the data and do the analysis.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://datapraxis.net/about/
 
Description Virtual Agents in Live Coding: Preliminary Investigations 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The PI of the project was invited to give an online talk at the Women in Art and Technology Meetup at NOTAM in Oslo, Norway. The presentation was about preliminary investigations of virtual agents (VAs) in live coding focusing on a short review of different perspectives of using VAs and about how this research connects with the project.
20-30 women from Norway and abroad attended the session. We discussed questions related to the differences between programmes and agents; the dimensions of social interactivity and learnability when describing the agents; how will the agent identify my musical taste; and how long does it take to train a model.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://mirlca.dmu.ac.uk/posts/presentation-at-WiAT-meetup-NOTAM-september-2020/
 
Description Visit to DCMS 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Researches at the University of Nottingham were invited, together with CDT students, to DCMS to provide presentations and expert advice on:

Monetising Services - Joseph Hubbard-Bailey, Kate Green
• How do companies providing a 'free' service make money?
• How is data monetised?
• How do cookies and advertising work?

Moderating online services - Ansgar Koene, Elvira Perez Vallejos, Liz Dowthwaite
• How does China prevent access to sites?
• How does AI (AI and other things like machine learning) work? How is it used to moderate content?
• How does the process of trusted flaggers work?

Encryption - Derek McAuley
• How does encryption, including end-to-end encryption affect the ability to identify harmful content?
• Where are online services going in terms of encryption and what risks does this bring?
• What is DOH and how might it impact the ability of companies/regulators to moderate content?
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Wordsworth 2.0 / Poet vs. Google 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This work was premiered at the Push the Boat Out International Poetry Festival, Edinburgh, 2021. Date: October 2021 Type of Event: live improv performance event Number of People Reached: 200 Primary Audience: writers, poets, public
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://theedinburghreporter.co.uk/2021/10/scotlands-second-ever-poetry-festival-launches-hybrid-pro...
 
Description Zoom Obscura 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact All artworks in the project were shown as part of the Data as Culture art stream
Date: Nov 2021
Type of Event: online summit
Number of People Reached: 1000
Primary Audience: Tech industry, policy makers, artists, academics

URL here is for the showreel.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://vimeo.com/619249282
 
Description Zoom Obscura - Works in Progress - session at Tinderbox PlayAway gaming and creative tech festival 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Work in progress event for Zoom Obscura as part of Tinderbox PlayAway festival. Tinderbox are partners on Zoom Obscura project
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://tinderboxcollective.org/2020/03/05/playaway-zoom-obscura/