RoboTIPS: Developing Responsible Robots for the Digital Economy

Lead Research Organisation: University of Oxford
Department Name: Computer Science

Abstract

This fellowship will to bring together a variety of people from different walks of life, including academics, industry, civil societies, policy makers and members of the public, in order to create new ways of developing and managing technological innovations. There is often a tension between the economic needs for increasing technological innovation and the ways in which these innovations may be developed responsibly - that is in a manner that is societally acceptable and desirable. We will develop an approach that aims to anticipate not only the positive outcomes but also the potentially negative consequences of technological innovations for society. We will draw on this and an understanding of people's lived rights and obligations to provide creative resources and methods for designers to develop responsible and accountable new technologies. Responsible Innovation lies at the heart of technologies in the Digital economy that aim to promote trust, identity, privacy and security.

Although it has been drawn on in other scientific domains, as yet we have no complete example of how responsible innovation can be successfully applied in the DE sector. The fellowship will consider a motivating example to develop responsible innovation in action. We will look into one particular domain of technology and develop an agile process which will take account of the views of a wide range of people in a fast-changing context, in order to have some influence over the trajectory of an innovation. We will focus on the domain of social robots, those which interact with people and make decisions about what to do on their own accord. Because they make their own decisions in order to perform actions, we need to be able to recover what they did and why they did it, when things seem to go wrong. We will develop an ethical black box (EBB) through which the social robot will be able to explain its behaviour in simple and understandable ways. The development of the EBB will be an example of responsible innovation. We will test this out in particular accident investigations as a social process and we will do this in 3 different study domains. In the final stages of the fellowship, we will show the outcomes of the technological development and the investigations through a variety of means, including through the web and a final public showcase event. This will be to a variety of people including the general public, policy makers, and developers.

Planned Impact

Science:
Key scientific communities will benefit from the knowledge generated by the fellowship and its responsible innovation (RI) approach. This includes fields across robotics, human robot interaction, robot ethics, ethical design, value sensitive design, Human-Computer Interaction, Artificial Intelligence and the social sciences. In particular, the development of the ethical black box (EBB) will form a motivating example of RI that is both human centred and based on a Trust, Rights and Relational approach, and that can generalised to other domains and technologies. The findings of the programme of work and its unique approach will be disseminated through high quality publications and conferences.
Industry:
The fellowship will develop a unique transparency mechanism that that can make robotic decision making open and accountable and thereby foster user trust in social robots across society. This fellowship work will therefore enhance responsibility in industry and advance the acceptance of social robots. The development of the EBB will benefit industry in the specific domains studied in phases 1 and 2 and will also reach a broader range of settings through later activities that will generalise the study findings and RI approach. Impact will be fostered through a series of stakeholder workshops and designer studies and will be supported by the fellowship's industrial partners.

Designers and innovators: The fellowship will benefit designers and innovators by fostering a reflective and inclusive innovation process and developing a Trust, Rights and Relational based approach to design which acknowledges the lived experiences of users and the networks and ecosystems they inhabit. Research activities involving design and innovation stakeholders will deepen understanding of how these professionals currently practice. This understanding will then be drawn on to produce mechanisms through which designers and innovators can embed responsibility within the development of technologies for the digital economy (DE). These mechanisms will include a responsibility toolkit.

Policy: The fellowship will engage critically with the concept of responsibility in the DE and will explore and engage with new forms of anticipatory governance. The perspectives of policy stakeholders will be elicited across the study and the outcomes of this engagement will be combined with other project activities to develop a responsibility toolkit and specify an agile governance approach for social robots. This fellowship will thereby benefit policy makers seeking to identify novel and effective means to regulate the use of social robots and, through the generalisation of the study findings, other innovative technologies.

Society and the general public: The EBB will benefit the wellbeing of citizens in the DE by fostering accountability in the use of social robots and a culture of transparency and responsibility in their use. It will also produce broad societal benefit through the development of a Trust, Rights and Relational approach which will elicit the concerns of citizens and consider how to address them in order to increase trust and forge better relationships to maximise the potential of new digital technologies. The fellowship will include dedicated public engagement and communications activities - to include educational materials, a video animation and participation in public understanding of science events.
 
Description Requirements for and development of the Ethical Black Box (EBB)
Through analysis of relevant literature and discussions with industry developers we have continued to identify the requirements for the Ethical Black Box for social robots. These include technical requirements such as compatibility with standard operating systems and formats for data storage, and non-functional requirements regarding the deployment of robots in different social contexts. We have been conducting coding work to build a module that will allow a software EBB to be incorporated into a robot. We have also been developing a framework to implement into different types of robot. Our next steps are to: 1) stress test the framework for the EBB; 2) publish the EBB source code; 3) publish an open standard for the EBB.


Accident/Incident investigation scenarios and witnessing
We have analysed relevant literature and worked closely with experts in the conduct of accident investigations in aviation and other transport sectors. We have adapted what we have learnt to the domain of social robots and developed an understanding of what is needed in our accident/incident investigation scenarios through which we will test the Ethical Black Box. We developed our first scenario, an accident involving an assistive robot in a social care setting, and conducted a failure modes analysis to establish a realistic malfunction for the robot and combined this with an analysis of the organisational structure to develop a scenario in which a technical failure combines with social actions to lead to an accident that harms a human user. We identified a suitable methodology for accident/incident investigation and prepared plans to run a mock investigation scenario with research participants. The COVID-19 pandemic has required us to defer plans to run this mock scenario but we plan to conduct as soon as social distancing constraints are lifted. We have used this interim period to advance our work on accident investigation in other ways. We have been scoping out opportunities for virtual accident scenarios and investigations, for instance using robot simulators and online workshops. We also set up and ran a virtual witness testimony interview study. Lay participants were invited to attend an online interview in which they were shown images of the accident scenario involving an assistive robot and asked to respond to it as if they were witnesses in the encounter. This produced valuable insights into contextually grounded aspects of human-robot interaction and human witnessing to adverse events involving robots.

Trust, rights and relational approach to design
We have conducted a series of online stakeholder workshops bringing together experts on design, policy, ethics etc. In these workshops we have presented participants with typical scenarios of living situations and asked them to talk through the changes that occur when robots are added to them. For instance, when a family with young children decide whether or not to get a household robot, who is consulted about this decision, who makes the final choice and who is responsible when things go wrong? We also ask participants to consider what rights and responsibilities exist in these scenarios. The aim of this work is to move beyond considerations of the individual relationship to robots to recognise that humans always exist in constellations with others, with multiple points of connection. The insights from this work demonstrate how responsibility for preventing and managing adverse incidents involving robots are distributed across constellations and that robot designers are considered to be part of these constellations. We are using these finding to develop a trust, rights and relational approach to design.


Practices of developers
We have interviewed further companies involved in the design and development of social robots to identify their work practices and their perspectives on safety and responsibility. This has revealed important insights, such as the tendency for products to be developed without a specific use case in mind, meaning that contextual issues of safety are not identified. In addition, the small size of many start up companies mean they do not have staff members dedicated to working on legal compliance and safety issues. These insights have been very useful with the development of our conceptual work on the trust, rights and relational approach to design.

AI regulation
We have taken part in further events to discuss the growing prevalence of AI in society and the opportunities for AI regulation. This has helped us to identify the issues of interest and concern to different stakeholder groups. For instance, the designers of automated vehicles and other social robots are aware of ethical concerns regarding automation and are keen for their work to be supported with guidance for good practice. They are particularly interested in guidance on real world dilemmas that emerge when they are developing and testing their technologies - as opposed to high level thought experiments over abstract scenarios. We also achieve impact in this work by contributing to important discussions on safe, trustworthy and responsible AI.

Best practice in online data collection
The COVID-19 pandemic required our data collection to move online. We have successfully run stakeholder workshops and interview studies in online formats. We spent a great deal of time carefully reviewing how to run this fieldwork so that it produced optimum results and was also ethical. For instance we had to consider issues such as time constraints, the best number of participants for an online discussion, privacy during online data collection and the protection of research participants from harms caused by online platforms for communication etc. collecting their personal data. We produced guidance on best practice in online data collection that informed our work and also helped other colleagues in the conduct of their own research projects.
Exploitation Route Two years in, the project is already achieving academic and non academic impact. We expect this to continue and grow significantly as we move forwards.
Sectors Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Healthcare,Government, Democracy and Justice,Transport

URL https://www.robotips.co.uk/
 
Description Through the span of the project we have produced a range of impacts. Research Since the start of the project, we have successfully written papers for various venues, including: Artificial Intelligence, the conference on Human Robot Interaction, the CHI conference on Human Factors in Computing, and the ACM Halfway to the Future conference, and Nature Machine Intelligence. We have an upcoming book chapter in an edited book about Software Engineering in robotics and two papers currently under review. We have also given presentations at a number of research workshops and conferences. These include invited presentations at ICRA 2020, RoboPhilosophy 2020 and ICT4S 2020. Marina Jirotka has secured funding for a sister project 'RoboTIPS International' through a donation to the University of Oxford from Amazon Web Services and we have an ongoing collaboration with another study on the design and development of a smart toy for children. We have contributed to ongoing research being conducted by others through attendance at workshops and also through sharing our work on best practice for online fieldwork. Policy In May 2019 the UK All Party Parliamentary Group on Data Analytics produced a report on Trust, Transparency and Technology. The report discussed how to build ethical data policies for the public good and specifically discusses the idea put forward by Alan Winfield and Marina Jirotka of the Ethical Black Box as a mechanism to foster societal trust by investigating incidents and accidents involving social robots. The report recommends the adoption of black boxes in automated vehicles. Through attendance at stakeholder engagement events the project team has also contributed to do the development of policy recommendations. These include the RUSI report 'Data Analytics and Algorithms in Policing in England and Wales: Towards A New Policy Framework' and ongoing work by the Royal Academy of Engineering to discuss the challenges of ethics and bias in AI systems. Industry We are building pathways towards positive impact on industry. We have established partnership in the project with a number of robotics companies - for instance Open Bionics and Consequential Robotics - and discuss matters of good practice in design and development with them. As the project has gone on we have developed further collaborations, for instance with Hewlett Packard and Akara Robotics. We have given presentations and been involved in panel discussions on good practice at a number of events involving industry - for instance the Future of Care workshop organised by the West of England Health Science Network and the AI Botics Global Conference. Education We have one doctoral student working alongside the project and have provided opportunities for three postgraduate students to gain project experience by working directly on tasks in the study. This summer we expect to have three MSc students working on projects focusing on issues connected to the EBB - explainability and data visualisations. We have taken part in workshops and mentoring sessions for PG students and given presentations about the project at outreach events for school children. Arts Our collaboration with Neon Dance is continuing. Preparations for the Prehension Blooms piece are underway - with adjustments to timing due to the ongoing COVID-19 restrictions. The piece will premiere in Japan in 2021 and dates for it to be exhibited in the UK in 2022 are being booked in. In spring 2021, Adrienne will be holding co-creation workshops with members of the public as part of the development of the piece. We are currently exploring further options for artistic collaborations to highlight key project themes in ways that are novel and accessible to broad sectors of the population. Public We have engaged with the public on project issues by participating in a research stand at the 2019 Oxford IF Science and Ideas Festival. We have also written about the project in Inspired Research, the outreach magazine of the Department of Computer Science at Oxford, blog posts and on our own project website. We will shortly be launching our Twitter account. Our planned public engagement activities for summer 2020 were unfortunately cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic however in summer 2021 we will be participating in the RAS Festival of Robotics by running a fun, interactive public engagement session that builds on ideas from our virtual witness testimony fieldwork. In spring 2021 we will take part in a workshop held by Neon Dance to discuss our collaboration with them and we are also currently preparing a podcast to be broadcast as part of the Oxford Sparks public engagement initiative.
First Year Of Impact 2020
Sector Education,Government, Democracy and Justice,Transport,Other
Impact Types Societal,Policy & public services

 
Description EPSRC - UKRI Artificial Intelligence and Public Engagement workshop
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description Membership of the expert advisory panel of the Topol Review
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact Alan Winfield contributed to the NHS Health Education England review, led by Dr Eric Topol, which led to publication of the final report "Preparing the healthcare workforce to deliver the digital future" - an independent report on behalf of the secretary of state for Health and Social Care, published in February 2019. Alan Winfield was a member of both Robotics & AI and ethics panels.
URL https://www.hee.nhs.uk/our-work/topol-review
 
Description UK All Party Parliamentary Group on Data Analytics report on Trust, Transparency and Technology.
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
URL https://www.policyconnect.org.uk/appgda/news/trust-transparency-tech-report-launch
 
Description Workshop: shaping the state of machine learning algorithms within law enforcement
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a national consultation
Impact Helena Webb attended a workshop run as part of a collaboration between the University of Winchester and the Royal United Services Institute on machine learning algorithmic systems used in the legal system in England and Wales. The workshop brought together academics, regulators, policy makers and criminal justice professionals. it had the particular aim to help establish a framework for the regulation of such algorithmic systems. The outcomes of the workshop formed part of a subsequent report https://rusi.org/publication/occasional-papers/data-analytics-and-algorithms-policing-england-and-wales-towards-new
URL https://rusi.org/publication/occasional-papers/data-analytics-and-algorithms-policing-england-and-wa...
 
Description Written response to Consultation on Automated Vehicle Trialling Code of Practice
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a national consultation
URL https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/automated-vehicle-trialling-code-of-practice-invitation-...
 
Description Prehension Blooms 
Organisation Neon Dance
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Neon Dance is an internationally renowned company that embraces a diverse and digital population; a place where artist, partners and people can engage in experiences that are experimental and original, yet accessible to all. Adrienne Hart established Neon Dance in 2004 with the aim of connecting audiences with rigorous artists and original thinkers. As Artistic Director, she cultivates an altruistic environment that enables risk taking and collaboration to flourish; developing works that explore technologies and design with the body as the central tenet. Following an initial conversation with Hannah Manktelow, Adrienne Hart was connected with Marina Jirotka, Professor of Human Centred Computing and Helena Webb, Senior Researcher at Oxford University. We discovered many shared interests and believe that the proposed project, exploring ideas around loneliness, companionship and belonging incorporating human centered computing and the development of responsible social robots will be strengthened as a result of our working together. Helena Webb and Marina Jirotka will engage with Neon Dance through meetings and workshops to contribute to the iterative development of the piece.
Collaborator Contribution Preparations for Adrienne's (Neon Dance) Prehension Blooms piece are underway - with adjustments to timing due to the ongoing COVID-19 restrictions. The piece will premiere in Japan in 2021 and dates for it to be exhibited in the UK in 2022 are being booked in. In spring 2021, Adrienne will be holding co-creation workshops with members of the public as part of the development of the piece. As described on the Neon Dance website: "Prehension Blooms by Neon Dance explores social connectivity and collaboration using bio-inspired robotics. The work is designed to unravel the origins of loneliness and explores the idea loneliness stems from the interaction of the individual with the social realm, so that it is not just mental, but also physical, sensorial and material. In Prehension Blooms the public will be free to roam in a performance space of at least 10 x 15m; they will encounter 5 dancers, an insect-like robot community and each other in playful and unexpected ways. By moving, sitting, lying down and congregating in the space, audiences can influence all aspects of the performance including light and sound design. The work can function as a 60-minute performance work and/or an installation work with shorter cycles of live performance lasting up to 15-minutes and running throughout the day. Our aim is for members of the public entering the space to feel intimately connected to their environment. There will be up to 6 tele-operated robots, which enable remote audiences to traverse the environment, interacting with physical audiences, fellow robots and performers. Our public engagement activity includes creating a set of easy-to operate, building-block devices, to demystify the work on robotics being embedded into the production. In a series of workshops, designed for isolated older / younger people, there will be the opportunity to play and experiment with these building blocks and co-author the design of our miniature robot community. Prehension Blooms has been conceived by Adrienne Hart with confirmed collaborators including the composer Sebastian Reynolds (Puzzle Creature, 2018 / 2019), visual artist Ana Rajcevic (robotic body-prosthesis), the technologist Hemma Philamore (Bristol Robotic Lab) and lighting / set designer Stuart Bailes (Empathy 2016 / 2018). Professor Marina Jirotka and Dr Helena Webb (University of Oxford) will support Neon Dance's research and development process with Prehension Blooms feeding into the ongoing project RoboTIPS: Developing Responsible Robots for the Digital Economy, which is a 5-year research study led by Marina Jirotka that seeks to foster practices for responsibility in the development and use of social robots."
Impact We have held regular progress meetings but the timings of workshops and the eventual dance piece have been delayed due to the ongoing COVID-19 restrictions.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Responsible Technology Institute and RoboTIPS International 
Organisation University of Oxford
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The University of Oxford has begun a new strategic collaboration with Amazon Web Services (AWS). The collaboration will focus on building a portfolio of new research projects relating to AI, robotics, cyber-physical systems, human-centred computing, and support to the University's new "Lighthouse" Doctoral Scholarships. This new university- industry collaboration is supported by a £7 million gift from AWS to the Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences Division, and will accelerate advances in AI and Data Science across the entire research portfolio of the University. Marina Jirotka has been given £1 000 000 from the gift. She is using this to establish the foundations for an Institute of Responsible Technology (RTI) and to expand work from the RoboTIPS project on the Ethical Black Box. There are very close synergies across the collaboration. Marina Jirotka is PI of RoboTIPS and Director of the RTI. Helena Webb is Senior Researcher on RoboTIPS and also Research Lead of the RTI. The flagship project of the RTI is RoboTIPS International, which takes the concept of the Ethical Black Box for social robots and explores the social, policy and legal issues around its use in different international contexts. The RoboTIPS team - in particular Prof Jirotka and Helena Webb - are assisting with the direction of this work. We also plan to hold shared engagement and dissemination activities.
Collaborator Contribution Members of the RTI and RoboTIPS International teams regularly feed back updates on their activities to the RoboTIPS team and discussions are held to identify cross project synergies. We also plan to hold shared engagement and dissemination activities.
Impact Various meetings and discussions to aid the development of both projects.
Start Year 2020
 
Description RoboTIPS/Purrble crossover study 
Organisation King's College London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This is a research collaboration between two projects: • RoboTIPS: Developing Responsible Robots for the Digital Economy (University of Oxford in collaboration with Bristol Robotics Lab) • Smart Companion Robotic Toys for Adolescent Mental Health (King's College London). The first project examines conceptual issues of trust and responsible innovation by developing an understanding of how designers and developers currently practise notions of responsibility in their work. Its empirical work focuses on robots designed to operate in human environments and interact with humans. The second explores the use of socially-assistive robots to provide emotion-regulatory support to neuro-typical young people. This addresses an unexplored component in mental health treatments where empowering users to develop their own competencies beyond in-person therapeutic sessions is crucial. The two projects are collaborating in a crossover study due to our shared interest in Responsible innovation (RI). The crossover will bring an RI perspective to a smart toy. The Purrble is a robot that has been designed to look like a small cuddly toy and support emotion regulation. This collaborative project will ask RI experts about the Purrble through individual interviews asking them to reflect on the benefits and risks of Purrble being incorporated into therapeutic settings, and focus group-style workshops to understand RI requirements for the Purrble. The study results will inform future research on embedding RI into design processes for robots early on. RoboTIPS team members are recruiting experts in RI and the ethics of design to elicit their perspectives on the the Purrble robot. We are conducting interview studies and co design workshops for the purposes of a deep dive into these issues, to inform the ongoing development of both projects.
Collaborator Contribution Our partners are providing access to the Purrble robot and helping us with the design of a study to elicit the perspectives of RI experts on it.
Impact Data collection about to commence
Start Year 2020
 
Description "Robot Accident Investigation"Alan Winfield invited talk at the ICRA 2020 workshop Robot Dystopias 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Alan Winfield was invited to give an online talk at a workshop of the 2020 ICRA conference. The theme of the workshop was 'Against Robot Dystopias' and its aims were to:

1. To identify ethical, legal and societal issues within robotics and automation.
2. To introduce and discuss technical methods for addressing these issues.

In this talk, Alan spoke about the RoboTIPS project and work on the Ethical Black Box and robot accident investigations.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://against-20.github.io
 
Description Industry Forum roundtable on 'Restoring trust in digital technology' 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Marina Jirotka was invited to participate in panel discussion to give her views on restoring trust in digital technologies. This was an invitation only event organised by the Industry Forum, a high profile group that seeks to promotes constructive dialogue between public policy makers, industry operating in the UK, and leading commentators. Details of the panel event can be read here http://www.industry-forum.org/event/restoring-trust-in-digital-tech/. Marina introduced ideas about the what it means to trust digital systems and the capacity for responsibility practices that can foster trust. This lead to discussion amongst those present about what kinds of practices can be put in place at the levels of design and policy.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL http://www.industry-forum.org/event/restoring-trust-in-digital-tech/
 
Description Ada Lovelace Day schools talk 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Helena Webb was invited to give an online talk for Ada Lovelace Day in October 2020. She spoke to an audience of secondary school students in the south east area. She spoke about her work and job role, and answered their questions.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Alan Winfield Plenary presentation at RoboPhilosophy conference 2020 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Alan Winfield was invited to give an plenary presentation at the online RoboPhilosophy 2020 conference in August 2020. His talk "Why did you just do that?" introduced a new approach to explainability for social robots
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://conferences.au.dk/robo-philosophy/aarhus2020/events/why-did-you-just-do-that-explainability-...
 
Description Bavarian Research Institute for Digital Transformation - invited talk by Marina Jirotka 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Marina Jirotka was invited to give a talk at the newly established Bavarian Research Institute for Digital Transformation. She gave a presentation about RoboTIPS and joined in discussion about the meaning of responsibility in robotics.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Blogpost for Bavarian Research Group for Digital Transformation (BIDT) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Marina Jirotka wrote a blog post for the website of the Bavarian Research Group for Digital Transformation (BIDT)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.bidt.digital/en/blog-responsible-robotics/
 
Description Ethics of AI panel at the Oxford UIDP summit 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Marina Jirotka was a guest speaker on a panel discussing AI ethics. This was a special panel session run at the 2019 Oxford UIDP summit, which brought together high level staff in industry, academia and policy. As part of the panel she spoke about the RoboTIPS project and opportunities for university-industry-policy collaboration in responsible innovation.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://uidp.org/event/oxford_uidp_summit/
 
Description Human Machine Collaboration AI Botics Webinar 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact As part of the Oxford-Singapore Human-Machine collaboration, the AI Botics Global conference on ethics and responsibility in AI and robotics included a pre-recorded webinar involving Marina Jirotka and Helena Webb. They engaged in discussion around core RoboTIPS project themes, including the meaning of responsibility and the Ethical Black Box as a safety mechanism to enhance trust in social robots. This was broadcast on 6th August and also made available for repeated viewings online.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://tcc.cloud.tencent.com/c/aibotics.tech/webinar
 
Description If Oxford Science and Ideas festival 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Helena Webb participated in the IF Oxford Science and Ideas festival. She joined other members of the Human Centred Computing group to run a stand in a central Oxford shopping centre. She spent the afternoon telling interested members of the public about the UnBias and RoboTIPS projects and listening to their views on the responsible development of technologies.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Invited Keynote by Marina Jirotka - ICT4S conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Marina Jirotka was invited to give a keynote presentation at the online ICT4S conference in June 2020. The conference relates to sustainability in ICT; Marina spoke about the potential for an environmentally responsible approach to AI and robotics research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.ict4s.org
 
Description Invited talk at AI@Oxford, September 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Alan Winfield gave a short (10 minute) invited talk entitled 'What could possibly go wrong? Why we need Robot Accident Investigations', presenting the RoboTIPS project, on Tuesday 17 September 2019 at AI@Oxford (billed as Oxford's first major international conference on Artificial Intelligence).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL http://alanwinfield.blogspot.com/2019/09/whats-worst-that-could-happen-why-we.html
 
Description Joint talk at event 'The Future of Care: how can robots and autonomous systems change frontline healthcare', January 2020. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Marina Jirotka and Alan Winfield gave a joint presentation entitled 'Towards Responsible Robotics in Healthcare' at the workshop on The Future of Care, organised by the West of England Academic Health Science Network, held in Bristol on 30 January 2020. The talk defined responsible robotics and outlined the RoboTIPS project, within the context of robotics for assisted living.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.weahsn.net/event/robotics/
 
Description Marina Jirotka invited panel member at Industry Forum discussion 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact The independent organisation for policy debate, the Industry Forum, ran an online event to discuss opportunities and challenges for the development of the digital environment, with regard to education, work, manufacturing logistics etc. Marina Jirotka was an invited expert panellist on the session.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL http://www.industry-forum.org/event/shaping-our-digital-future/
 
Description Marina Jirotka: St Cross College talk 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Marina Jirotka gave a presentation at St Cross College Oxford about the aims and plans for the RoboTIPS study.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Mentoring in FAccT Doctoral Consortium 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Helena Webb was invited to be a mentor in the 2021 FAccT conference Doctoral Consortium. This was an online event attended by PG researchers from across the world interested in issues around ethics and responsibility in Machine Learning. As one of the mentors Helena engaged in discussion with attendees on key questions arising in their research - such as how to measure fairness and how to engage with stakeholders - as well providing advice on the doctoral process.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://facctconference.org/2021/callfordc.html
 
Description Oxford Ethics and AI seminar on Responsible Research and Publication 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Helena Webb was invited to be a speaker in an online seminar organised by the Institute for Ethics in AI at Oxford. She spoke about the value of viewing responsibility as a forward looking and collective activity, and how this can foster better outcomes in AI research. The seminar was hosted live on You Tube with viewers able to submit questions and comments. It also remains on You Tube for viewing.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Flr1wgCn7tk&list=PLbPH9ZxV_xgypPWDp9i8oKhM9SYJiKTjf&index=10&ab_chan...
 
Description Participation in workshop on The politics of Autonomous Vehicles, December 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Marina Jirotka, Alan Winfield and Helena Webb participated in a workshop organised by ESRC project Driverless Futures? on The politics of Autonomous Vehicles, held at the Royal Academy of Engineering and UCL, 16-17 December 2019. During the workshop Marina Jirotka gave a presentation entitled 'Towards Responsible Innovation in Autonomous Vehicles', in which the aims of RoboTIPS were outlined.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://driverless-futures.com/events/the-politics-of-autonomous-vehicles/
 
Description Responsible Innovation in ICT 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Helena Webb attended a one day workshop on the role of Responsible Innovation in ICT held as part of the CHI 2019 conference. As part of the workshop she described the work of the RoboTIPS project and joined in discussions about embedding responsibility into processes of design and development. The workshop was attended by a number of professional practitioners in design and development as well as researchers and research students. It led to ongoing discussions and ideas for future collaborations.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Responsible Innovation panel AI@Oxford conference 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Marina Jirotka was invited to talk on an expert panel at the AI@Oxford conference 2019. The panel discussed opportunities to embed responsible innovation into the development of AI supported technologies. Marina Jirotka spoke about the RoboTIPS project as an instance of a project that seeks to foster responsibility in technology across phases of design, development and implementation.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://innovation.ox.ac.uk/innovation-news/events/aioxford-conference/conference-agenda/
 
Description RoboTIPS project website 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact We have set up a project website to provide accessible information about the study for all interested audiences. This will be updated regularly.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019,2020
URL https://www.robotips.co.uk/
 
Description Schools outreach: March2020 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Helena Webb participated in a schools outreach session organised by St Anne's College at the University of Oxford. The session brought over 60 school students (aged 10-11 years old) from a school in South London to spend the day in Oxford. The school was from an economically disadvantaged area and the students were from backgrounds with little familial experience of Oxbridge. Helena gave a taster session to two groups of 15 students to introduce them to her work.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Talk at Robosoft: Software Engineering for Robotics, RAEng, London, November 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Alan Winfield gave an invited talk entitled 'Ethical Standards in robotics and AI: Responsible Robotics' at the 2 day meeting RoboSoft: Software Engineering for Robotics, organised by the University of York and hosted at the Royal Academy of Engineering. The talk presented RoboTIPS and the ethical black box; Autonomous Vehicles were also used as an illustrative example.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.cs.york.ac.uk/robostar/robosoft/
 
Description UK Winter School on Cyber Security 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Marina Jirotka was invited to give a presentation about the RoboTIPS study at this winter school for doctoral researchers.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description University of Oxford TORCH blog post on RoboTIPS and Neon Dance collaboration 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Helena Webb prepared a blog post with collaborator Adrienne Hart (Neon Dance) to discuss synergies between the RoboTIPS project and Adrienne's dance piece, Prehension Blooms. This was posted on the website of TORCH the Oxford research centre for the humanities and the funder of our collaboration. The post was also reposted on Helena's own research group blog.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.torch.ox.ac.uk/article/prehension-blooms-and-robotips
 
Description University of Oxford student open day 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Helena Webb attended an open day held by the Department of Computer Science at Oxford. She participated in an open session during which we spoke to prospective students and their parents about working and studying at Oxford, and described the RoboTIPS study as an example of work that is conducted here.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Workshop on Responsible Innovation and Ethics 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact RoboTIPS team member Anouk Van Maris led a 2-half-day workshop on responsible innovation and ethics for the new cohort of PhD students of the FARCOPE CDT at the University of Bristol and the University of West of England. It included a focus on the RoboTIPS project and the work being performed in this project. The materials for this workshop were provided by RoboTIPS team member Alan Winfield.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021