SPRITE+: The Security, Privacy, Identity, and Trust Engagement NetworkPlus

Lead Research Organisation: University of Manchester
Department Name: Social Sciences

Abstract

SPRITE+ is a NetworkPlus that will deliver a step change in engagement between people involved in research, practice, and policy relevant to trust, identity, privacy, and security (TIPS) with a focus on digital contexts. SPRITE+ will deliver a coherent, coordinated, multi-disciplinary approach, with strong stakeholder relationships at the centre. Collectively, we will identify and address key research challenges.

Our activities will be centred around 'Challenge Themes', which will be broad, future-focused, and important to a wide range of stakeholders, where issues of security, privacy, identity, and trust are all relevant, and where an interdisciplinary approach is essential to fully addressing the Challenge. Examples might be Responsible innovation; Automation, autonomy, acceptability; Usable Security; 'Super-connectivity'; Risk, resilience, and recovery; Digital Identities.

Over the lifetime of SPRITE+, Working Groups will explore each Theme, producing comprehensive, cross-disciplinary understanding of key themes and making recommendations for future research priorities. Members will have the opportunity to bid to our £400K research fund via sandpits at which they will co-create proposals with users, e.g., for events, feasibility studies, and sprint reviews.

SPRITE+ is led by a Management Team (the PI, 4 co-Is), working closely with Project Partners from across industry, government, third sector and academia. A cadre of Expert Fellows will complement the Management Team's expertise and will help SPRITE+ develop a multidisciplinary approach to realising its vision. Fellows will provide intellectual leadership, take a leading role in Working Groups, and help bridge the gaps between diverse cognate groups and networks. A Strategic Advisory Board will review and develop SPRITE+'s performance. Membership will be open to all with an interest in research on security, privacy, identity, and trust. Members will receive a newsletter, access to online resources, and opportunities to attend events and bid for funds.

The outcomes of our activities will be (a) a vibrant collaborative community, with strong collaborative relationships and increased industry investment in new research; (b) an expanded academic TIPS community, that includes researchers from humanities, behavioural and social sciences, and from other areas of 'security science'; (c) a community of Early Career Researchers who understand users and have the skills and knowledge to deliver high quality impactful research in their future careers; (d) mutual support and understanding between cognate groups and networks; and e) a set of roadmaps that shape future research investment priorities.

Planned Impact

Research on issues of security, privacy, identity, and trust have the potential for broad-ranging impact, with benefits to academia, companies, the critical national infrastructure, security and law enforcement professionals, government, civil society organisations, and citizens. The enormous potential economic and social benefits of technological advances will only be realised if security vulnerabilities are well-understood and addressed, and if public confidence and trust in new technologies is built and maintained. SPRITE+ will explore these challenges, synthesise existing knowledge and stimulate new approaches to addressing gaps in our understanding, delivery and engagement. Collaborative relationships that address end user concerns are the core of SPRITE+ activities, and we will include stakeholders in shaping our activities from the outset.

In addition to academic impact, SPRITE+ activities will seek economic and societal impact via the following mechanisms:

(a) Deep understanding of user concerns through close collaborative working with Project Partners and other users to establish their key concerns and challenges relating to security, privacy, identity, and trust.

(b) Research focused on end users. Our non-academic stakeholders will advise on priority research gaps. Feasibility studies and short research projects funded from the SPRITE+ Research Fund will be co-created with end users via sandpits and the Dragons' Den selection panel will draw on diverse viewpoints. Project Partners will also play a crucial role in evaluating the outcomes of funded research and, where appropriate, will fund follow-on research. We believe these steps will maximise the likelihood of research take-up.

(c) Prioritised research translation and communication. We will develop a website (SPRITEHub) that will host on ramping training materials, research outputs (including reports of events), and a comprehensive set of links to cognate groups and organisations. We will provide training for ECRs to help them translate and apply their research to make it usable by stakeholders, and create opportunities for researchers at all levels to talk with Project Partners at 'round table' meetings.

(d) Public Engagement. We will encourage involvement in public science events (e.g., Festivals and university open days), media engagement (e.g., via The Conversation), and public debates (e.g., evidence to Parliamentary committees).

(e) Outreach to Enterprise and SMEs. We will engage businesses beyond Project Partners through an outreach programme.

Organisations

 
Description SPRITE+ brings together people involved in research, practice, and policy with a focus on digital contexts. We are a 'one stop shop' for engagement between academic and non-academic communities - a way for these communities to connect and a platform for building collaborations across the spectrum of issues relating to trust, identity, privacy and security (TIPS). In the 2.5 years since SPRITE+ launched, progress towards the following has been achieved:

Build and develop the research community.

Membership: Our aim is to expand the research community beyond the 'traditional' engineering-focused TIPS disciplines. We have gained 738 members, of whom 72% are academics. We have achieved a 50:50 split between tech/social disciplines.

Early Career Researchers (ECRs): We pledged to provide meaningful support to the next generation of researchers and foster inclusive participation. We have delivered ECR-focused events including an annual conference, a Top Tips seminar series, workshops, and weekly online socials. We have amplified ECR voices via the Rising Stars blog, the ECR Working Group, and two ECR appointments to the Advisory Board.

Newsletter and social media: Our monthly newsletter has >610 subscribers and we have >600 Twitter and ~200 LinkedIn followers. We use these platforms to highlight funding calls, career opportunities, events and publications.

Learning materials and TIPS resources: Recognising that it can be difficult for those new to the community to navigate TIPS concepts, frameworks and language, we have curated a range of online open access education and awareness resources hosted on our website. We developed an inclusive TIPS glossary and host a library of papers, and databases of TIPS courses, conferences, and journals.

Linking and supporting other networks: We have worked with and supported other networks/groups to share and exploit research, minimize duplication of activity, and maximise impact. We have promoted other networks' activities via funder town hall meetings (with Home Office/ACE, REPHRAIN, Discribe), collaborative events (with PETRAS, RISCS, Alan Turing Institute), and via social media/newsletters.

Engaging stakeholder communities.

Project Partners: We have worked with non-academic Partners to identify core research challenges. Our Partners have participated in our activities and co-creation of research projects and provided in-kind and financial support for our activities. We currently have 18 Project Partners, of which four are new in 2021. Four are government and police organisations, seven large companies, four SMEs, one civil society organisation, one university and one special interest group.

Highlighting user concerns: Our Partners have influenced research requirements and funding decisions as participants, mentors, and funding panellists in our research calls and sandpits. All our events feature speakers from industry, Government, regulators and other stakeholders.

Joint activities: We have collaborated with Project Partners in thematic workshops and events. For example: (1) Trusted Research, with CSA National Security and Wilton Park. Our work is influencing guidance and policies from UKRI, Universities UK, and HMG; (2) Digital Identity and Age Assurance, with the Age Check Certification Scheme and Yoti (in partnership with the Alan Turing Institute). This resulted in the launch of a problem book and working group on Age Assurance and Digital identity; (3) Cyber start-ups, with LORCA; and (4) Greater Manchester Cyber Ecosystem networking event, with GM Combined Authority. These networks are part of the groundwork for future work on responsible and collaborative digital TIPS ecosystem development.

Draw up roadmaps for research.

We have funded activities that explore and test new ideas related to our TIPS challenge themes, and that create new collaborations between academic disciplines and non-academic partners. So far we have funded two challenge working groups and ten pilot projects via sandpits. These 12 research projects are led by 12 Principal Investigators (6 male/6 female), involving 60 people (54 academic, 6 non-academic, 21 ECRs) with over 30 higher education institutions represented. Impacts of our funded project teams include: (1) publications (white papers, trade publications, peer reviewed journal articles); (2) presentations at industry focused conferences and workshops; (3) submissions to UK and EU Government consultations; and (4) development and award of follow-on funds from UKRI and PETRAS. We intend to use the outputs of these projects to support discussions at our upcoming Expert Fellows meeting to examine the digital TIPS landscape, identify research gaps and explore promising new directions in order to make recommendations for future funding priorities.
Exploitation Route SPRITE+ activities seek economic and social impact. We have achieved translation of our outcomes via the following mechanisms:

(a) We have developed a deep understanding of end user concerns through close collaborative working with our Project Partners to understand their areas of focus in relation to digital TIPS challenges. Through the organisation of events and workshops, we have facilitated the building of relationships between academic experts and stakeholders to create communities of interest and new collaborations, which seek to address these challenges.
(b) We have funded research projects co-created by academics and end users via sandpits and a dragon's den style selection panel. Our non-academic Partners have played a key role in evaluating the outcomes of these projects to maximise the likelihood of research take-up.
(c) We have developed our online collaboration portal, events programme and communications hub to facilitate research translation and communication. This has enabled researchers to apply their work to make it usable by stakeholders and opened up opportunities for early career researchers to engage with non-academic organisations.
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Education,Financial Services, and Management Consultancy,Government, Democracy and Justice,Security and Diplomacy

URL https://spritehub.org/
 
Description SPRITE+ brings together people involved in research, practice, and policy with a focus on digital contexts. We are a 'one stop shop' for engagement between academic and non-academic communities - a way for these communities to connect and a platform for building collaborations across the spectrum of issues relating to security, privacy, identity and trust. Building relationships with non-academic Project Partners is integral to our work to engage stakeholder communities and to highlight user concerns. We have collaborated with several Partners to deliver thematic workshops and events that have led to non-academic impacts such as influence on policy and practice. For example, we worked with the Centre for the Protection of National Infrastructure (CPNI), the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) and the Office for the Chief Scientific Advisor for National Security to host a workshop focussed on 'Trusted Research' and implications of the current guidance. The outputs of this workshop: (1) influenced guidance and policies made by UKRI, Universities UK and CPNI/NSCS; and (2) were used by Wilton Park (UK Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office) to support their 'Enhancing security to support international collaboration' workshop. We worked with the Age Check Certification Scheme to host a workshop on digital identity and age assurance. This work resulted in: (1) the creation of a community of interest made up of academic experts and representatives from stakeholder organisations. The Age Check Certification Scheme have since engaged with the Alan Turing Institute digital identity group for a follow-up workshop; (2) SPRITE+ Director Professor Emma Barrett joined the Age Check Certification oversight panel to support the review of their certification activities and verify that they are performed impartially without undue influences that might affect the impartiality of services offered; and (3) the Age Check Certification Scheme opened their labs for academic placements. In her role as SPRITE+ Director, Professor Emma Barrett sits on the Greater Manchester Cyber Security Advisory Group. This has resulted in: (1) influenced the development of the Greater Manchester cyber strategy and related policies; (2) SPRITE+ has supported the Group to secure an exhibition space at Cyber UK in collaboration with other non-academic organisations to showcase the capabilities of the Greater Manchester cyber ecosystem; and (3) SPRITE+ has supported the Group to host a panel discussion at the Digital City Festival in collaboration with Plexal, BAE Systems, Greater Manchester Combined Authority and the North West Cyber Resilience Centre to discuss the steps being taken by Greater Manchester to position itself at the epicentre of cyber security in the UK and internationally.
First Year Of Impact 2021
Sector Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Education,Government, Democracy and Justice,Security and Diplomacy,Other
Impact Types Economic,Policy & public services

 
Description Advice to HMG and Universities on Trusted Research
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Contribution to new or Improved professional practice
URL https://spritehub.org/resources/trusted-research/
 
Description Participation in the Greater Manchester Cyber Strategy Working Group: Professor Emma Barrett
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
URL https://greatermanchester-ca.gov.uk/what-we-do/digital/global-digital-influencer/greater-manchester-...
 
Description AI-COSA: trustworthiness of data and AI tools in COvid Safe workplace Apps 
Organisation Mobi Publishing Ltd.
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The SPRITE+ network funded the 'AI-COSA: trustworthiness of data and AI tools in COvid Safe workplace Apps' project via a sandpit and provided guidance, assistance with logistics and promotion. Following project completion, SPRITE+ will provide support to enable the team to secure follow-on funds. This project is a collaboration between Dr Jacob Johanssen (St. Mary's University, Twickenham), Dr Lamiece Hassan (University of Manchester), Dr Iman Naja (University of Aberdeen), Dr Mistale Taylor (Trilateral Research) and Dr Carl Adams (Mobi Publishing Ltd).
Collaborator Contribution The COVID-19 pandemic has caused major disruptions for workplaces, creating legal and practical challenges around working safely. An increasing number of tools (both web-based and smartphone applications) are emerging to help employers address these changing expectations and move towards a 'new normal'. These tools capture and analyse data in new ways to monitor employees and processes, some using more sophisticated artificial intelligence (AI) techniques. This presented an opportunity to interrogate the potentials and risks of using such applications in a wider context of decreasing public trust in digital and AI technology. In this case study the team focussed on the Hygieia app as an example of such data-driven tools. Blending theory and methods from different academic disciplines, the project involved a rapid literature review on the ethical and lawful use of workplace monitoring tools, qualitative interviews with the app's developers, and a critical analysis of app features. The team also held a focus group discussion with four firefighters based in Sweden about their thoughts on potentially using the app in the future. The team aimed to deepen understanding of how to maximise opportunities and minimise risks of using such tools, while building towards developing guidance and theory over the long-term.
Impact This project was run by a multidisciplinary team which draws on expertise in communication studies, computer science, informatics and data science. The team conducted qualitative interviews with the Hygieia app's developers, and performed critical analysis of app features. The team also held a focus group discussion with four firefighters based in Sweden to understand their thoughts on using the app in the future. The team will use their results to: 1. Securing follow-on funding 2. Publish an academic article 3. Publish blogs/lay publications 4. Provide guidance and feedback for developers, employers and employees who use AI-based tracking apps for the workplace
Start Year 2020
 
Description AI-COSA: trustworthiness of data and AI tools in COvid Safe workplace Apps 
Organisation St Mary's University, Twickenham
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The SPRITE+ network funded the 'AI-COSA: trustworthiness of data and AI tools in COvid Safe workplace Apps' project via a sandpit and provided guidance, assistance with logistics and promotion. Following project completion, SPRITE+ will provide support to enable the team to secure follow-on funds. This project is a collaboration between Dr Jacob Johanssen (St. Mary's University, Twickenham), Dr Lamiece Hassan (University of Manchester), Dr Iman Naja (University of Aberdeen), Dr Mistale Taylor (Trilateral Research) and Dr Carl Adams (Mobi Publishing Ltd).
Collaborator Contribution The COVID-19 pandemic has caused major disruptions for workplaces, creating legal and practical challenges around working safely. An increasing number of tools (both web-based and smartphone applications) are emerging to help employers address these changing expectations and move towards a 'new normal'. These tools capture and analyse data in new ways to monitor employees and processes, some using more sophisticated artificial intelligence (AI) techniques. This presented an opportunity to interrogate the potentials and risks of using such applications in a wider context of decreasing public trust in digital and AI technology. In this case study the team focussed on the Hygieia app as an example of such data-driven tools. Blending theory and methods from different academic disciplines, the project involved a rapid literature review on the ethical and lawful use of workplace monitoring tools, qualitative interviews with the app's developers, and a critical analysis of app features. The team also held a focus group discussion with four firefighters based in Sweden about their thoughts on potentially using the app in the future. The team aimed to deepen understanding of how to maximise opportunities and minimise risks of using such tools, while building towards developing guidance and theory over the long-term.
Impact This project was run by a multidisciplinary team which draws on expertise in communication studies, computer science, informatics and data science. The team conducted qualitative interviews with the Hygieia app's developers, and performed critical analysis of app features. The team also held a focus group discussion with four firefighters based in Sweden to understand their thoughts on using the app in the future. The team will use their results to: 1. Securing follow-on funding 2. Publish an academic article 3. Publish blogs/lay publications 4. Provide guidance and feedback for developers, employers and employees who use AI-based tracking apps for the workplace
Start Year 2020
 
Description AI-COSA: trustworthiness of data and AI tools in COvid Safe workplace Apps 
Organisation Trilateral Research and Consulting LLP
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The SPRITE+ network funded the 'AI-COSA: trustworthiness of data and AI tools in COvid Safe workplace Apps' project via a sandpit and provided guidance, assistance with logistics and promotion. Following project completion, SPRITE+ will provide support to enable the team to secure follow-on funds. This project is a collaboration between Dr Jacob Johanssen (St. Mary's University, Twickenham), Dr Lamiece Hassan (University of Manchester), Dr Iman Naja (University of Aberdeen), Dr Mistale Taylor (Trilateral Research) and Dr Carl Adams (Mobi Publishing Ltd).
Collaborator Contribution The COVID-19 pandemic has caused major disruptions for workplaces, creating legal and practical challenges around working safely. An increasing number of tools (both web-based and smartphone applications) are emerging to help employers address these changing expectations and move towards a 'new normal'. These tools capture and analyse data in new ways to monitor employees and processes, some using more sophisticated artificial intelligence (AI) techniques. This presented an opportunity to interrogate the potentials and risks of using such applications in a wider context of decreasing public trust in digital and AI technology. In this case study the team focussed on the Hygieia app as an example of such data-driven tools. Blending theory and methods from different academic disciplines, the project involved a rapid literature review on the ethical and lawful use of workplace monitoring tools, qualitative interviews with the app's developers, and a critical analysis of app features. The team also held a focus group discussion with four firefighters based in Sweden about their thoughts on potentially using the app in the future. The team aimed to deepen understanding of how to maximise opportunities and minimise risks of using such tools, while building towards developing guidance and theory over the long-term.
Impact This project was run by a multidisciplinary team which draws on expertise in communication studies, computer science, informatics and data science. The team conducted qualitative interviews with the Hygieia app's developers, and performed critical analysis of app features. The team also held a focus group discussion with four firefighters based in Sweden to understand their thoughts on using the app in the future. The team will use their results to: 1. Securing follow-on funding 2. Publish an academic article 3. Publish blogs/lay publications 4. Provide guidance and feedback for developers, employers and employees who use AI-based tracking apps for the workplace
Start Year 2020
 
Description AI-COSA: trustworthiness of data and AI tools in COvid Safe workplace Apps 
Organisation University of Aberdeen
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The SPRITE+ network funded the 'AI-COSA: trustworthiness of data and AI tools in COvid Safe workplace Apps' project via a sandpit and provided guidance, assistance with logistics and promotion. Following project completion, SPRITE+ will provide support to enable the team to secure follow-on funds. This project is a collaboration between Dr Jacob Johanssen (St. Mary's University, Twickenham), Dr Lamiece Hassan (University of Manchester), Dr Iman Naja (University of Aberdeen), Dr Mistale Taylor (Trilateral Research) and Dr Carl Adams (Mobi Publishing Ltd).
Collaborator Contribution The COVID-19 pandemic has caused major disruptions for workplaces, creating legal and practical challenges around working safely. An increasing number of tools (both web-based and smartphone applications) are emerging to help employers address these changing expectations and move towards a 'new normal'. These tools capture and analyse data in new ways to monitor employees and processes, some using more sophisticated artificial intelligence (AI) techniques. This presented an opportunity to interrogate the potentials and risks of using such applications in a wider context of decreasing public trust in digital and AI technology. In this case study the team focussed on the Hygieia app as an example of such data-driven tools. Blending theory and methods from different academic disciplines, the project involved a rapid literature review on the ethical and lawful use of workplace monitoring tools, qualitative interviews with the app's developers, and a critical analysis of app features. The team also held a focus group discussion with four firefighters based in Sweden about their thoughts on potentially using the app in the future. The team aimed to deepen understanding of how to maximise opportunities and minimise risks of using such tools, while building towards developing guidance and theory over the long-term.
Impact This project was run by a multidisciplinary team which draws on expertise in communication studies, computer science, informatics and data science. The team conducted qualitative interviews with the Hygieia app's developers, and performed critical analysis of app features. The team also held a focus group discussion with four firefighters based in Sweden to understand their thoughts on using the app in the future. The team will use their results to: 1. Securing follow-on funding 2. Publish an academic article 3. Publish blogs/lay publications 4. Provide guidance and feedback for developers, employers and employees who use AI-based tracking apps for the workplace
Start Year 2020
 
Description AI-COSA: trustworthiness of data and AI tools in COvid Safe workplace Apps 
Organisation University of Manchester
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The SPRITE+ network funded the 'AI-COSA: trustworthiness of data and AI tools in COvid Safe workplace Apps' project via a sandpit and provided guidance, assistance with logistics and promotion. Following project completion, SPRITE+ will provide support to enable the team to secure follow-on funds. This project is a collaboration between Dr Jacob Johanssen (St. Mary's University, Twickenham), Dr Lamiece Hassan (University of Manchester), Dr Iman Naja (University of Aberdeen), Dr Mistale Taylor (Trilateral Research) and Dr Carl Adams (Mobi Publishing Ltd).
Collaborator Contribution The COVID-19 pandemic has caused major disruptions for workplaces, creating legal and practical challenges around working safely. An increasing number of tools (both web-based and smartphone applications) are emerging to help employers address these changing expectations and move towards a 'new normal'. These tools capture and analyse data in new ways to monitor employees and processes, some using more sophisticated artificial intelligence (AI) techniques. This presented an opportunity to interrogate the potentials and risks of using such applications in a wider context of decreasing public trust in digital and AI technology. In this case study the team focussed on the Hygieia app as an example of such data-driven tools. Blending theory and methods from different academic disciplines, the project involved a rapid literature review on the ethical and lawful use of workplace monitoring tools, qualitative interviews with the app's developers, and a critical analysis of app features. The team also held a focus group discussion with four firefighters based in Sweden about their thoughts on potentially using the app in the future. The team aimed to deepen understanding of how to maximise opportunities and minimise risks of using such tools, while building towards developing guidance and theory over the long-term.
Impact This project was run by a multidisciplinary team which draws on expertise in communication studies, computer science, informatics and data science. The team conducted qualitative interviews with the Hygieia app's developers, and performed critical analysis of app features. The team also held a focus group discussion with four firefighters based in Sweden to understand their thoughts on using the app in the future. The team will use their results to: 1. Securing follow-on funding 2. Publish an academic article 3. Publish blogs/lay publications 4. Provide guidance and feedback for developers, employers and employees who use AI-based tracking apps for the workplace
Start Year 2020
 
Description Accountability & Ethics in a Digital Ecosystem Challenge Working Group 
Organisation Birkbeck, University of London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The SPRITE+ network funded the 'Accountability & Ethics in a Digital Ecosystem' Challenge Working Group and provides guidance, assistance with logistics and promotion of its activities. In addition, SPRITE+ connects the project team with various non-academics to enable their stakeholder engagement strategy. This Challenge Working Group is led by Dr Jonathan Foster (PI, University of Sheffield) and Dr Julie Gore (Birkbeck University of London).
Collaborator Contribution The emergence of digital ecosystems presents both opportunities and challenges. Their existence provides managers and organisations with the opportunity to conduct research about their end-users and to create new products and services. End-users can also personalise and even co-create value via their interactions with the services they receive. At the same time, the digital platforms, data flows, technical and social systems that constitute a digital ecosystem, raise a host of accountability and ethical challenges arising from the diversity of stakeholders and perspectives involved. These include managers responsible for the development and implementation of data-driven services, academic researchers, software and solutions providers, platform owners, government law-makers and regulators, the public and end-users. The Accountability and Ethics Challenge Working Group (ACCEDE) is working with key stakeholder groups to: - Advance knowledge and understanding of the accountability and ethical challenges that arise when working with data in real-world practical contexts of application. - Assess how these challenges are currently being addressed. - Provide suggestions for how stakeholder responses to the accountability and ethics arising from the emergence of digital ecosystems can be improved and governed more effectively.
Impact This multidisciplinary project team draws on expertise from information management, law and organisational psychology. The project team has engaged the stakeholder community in the following ways: - Stakeholder workshop to identify areas for exploration under the accountability and ethics theme. This meeting was attended by 25 participants drawn from both academia and professional practice including representation from Nasdaq, NCSC, Birmingham City Council, and various digital consultancies. Both social science and STEM disciplines were also represented. Workshop participants worked together in breakout groups to identify broad challenges, which were subsequently analysed and distilled into distinct sub themes: 1) Digital Ecosystems: Context (in)-dependent Structures, Rules and Normative principles; 2) Accountable and Ethics-Driven (Responsible) Data Sharing in Digital Ecosystems; and 3) Agency, Empowerment and Education in Digital Ecosystems. Following this workshop, Dr Jonathan Foster and Dr Julie Gore used these themes to inform the drafting of an initial ethics orientated position paper. - Participation in a panel discussion at the annual Peepsec conference, an industry focussed event attended by 1,000 top professionals from the UK's cyber security and tech industries. As part of this event, Dr Jonathan Foster, Dr Julie Gore and SPRITE+ Project Partner, Julie Dawson (Director of Regulatory & Policy, Yoti) participated in an expert panel hosted by SPRITE+ Project Partner Dr John Blythe (Head of Behavioural Science, Cybsafe). This discussion provided an opportunity for the Accountability & Ethics Group to share their findings and plans for future work with the stakeholder community. The stakeholder perspectives gained through these activities will inform the future work for this group, including the organisation of a second practitioner oriented workshop.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Accountability & Ethics in a Digital Ecosystem Challenge Working Group 
Organisation University of Sheffield
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The SPRITE+ network funded the 'Accountability & Ethics in a Digital Ecosystem' Challenge Working Group and provides guidance, assistance with logistics and promotion of its activities. In addition, SPRITE+ connects the project team with various non-academics to enable their stakeholder engagement strategy. This Challenge Working Group is led by Dr Jonathan Foster (PI, University of Sheffield) and Dr Julie Gore (Birkbeck University of London).
Collaborator Contribution The emergence of digital ecosystems presents both opportunities and challenges. Their existence provides managers and organisations with the opportunity to conduct research about their end-users and to create new products and services. End-users can also personalise and even co-create value via their interactions with the services they receive. At the same time, the digital platforms, data flows, technical and social systems that constitute a digital ecosystem, raise a host of accountability and ethical challenges arising from the diversity of stakeholders and perspectives involved. These include managers responsible for the development and implementation of data-driven services, academic researchers, software and solutions providers, platform owners, government law-makers and regulators, the public and end-users. The Accountability and Ethics Challenge Working Group (ACCEDE) is working with key stakeholder groups to: - Advance knowledge and understanding of the accountability and ethical challenges that arise when working with data in real-world practical contexts of application. - Assess how these challenges are currently being addressed. - Provide suggestions for how stakeholder responses to the accountability and ethics arising from the emergence of digital ecosystems can be improved and governed more effectively.
Impact This multidisciplinary project team draws on expertise from information management, law and organisational psychology. The project team has engaged the stakeholder community in the following ways: - Stakeholder workshop to identify areas for exploration under the accountability and ethics theme. This meeting was attended by 25 participants drawn from both academia and professional practice including representation from Nasdaq, NCSC, Birmingham City Council, and various digital consultancies. Both social science and STEM disciplines were also represented. Workshop participants worked together in breakout groups to identify broad challenges, which were subsequently analysed and distilled into distinct sub themes: 1) Digital Ecosystems: Context (in)-dependent Structures, Rules and Normative principles; 2) Accountable and Ethics-Driven (Responsible) Data Sharing in Digital Ecosystems; and 3) Agency, Empowerment and Education in Digital Ecosystems. Following this workshop, Dr Jonathan Foster and Dr Julie Gore used these themes to inform the drafting of an initial ethics orientated position paper. - Participation in a panel discussion at the annual Peepsec conference, an industry focussed event attended by 1,000 top professionals from the UK's cyber security and tech industries. As part of this event, Dr Jonathan Foster, Dr Julie Gore and SPRITE+ Project Partner, Julie Dawson (Director of Regulatory & Policy, Yoti) participated in an expert panel hosted by SPRITE+ Project Partner Dr John Blythe (Head of Behavioural Science, Cybsafe). This discussion provided an opportunity for the Accountability & Ethics Group to share their findings and plans for future work with the stakeholder community. The stakeholder perspectives gained through these activities will inform the future work for this group, including the organisation of a second practitioner oriented workshop.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Buy Now Pay Later in the UK: Current and emergent digital vulnerabilities 
Organisation Coventry
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution SPRITE+ funded the 'Buy Now Pay Later in the UK: Current and emergent digital vulnerabilities' project via a sandpit, and provides support, guidance and assistance with logistics and promotion. This project is a collaboration between Dr Lindsey Appleyard (Coventry University), Dr Jo Briggs (Northumbria University), Dr Lucia Cervi (Lancaster University), Dr Deepak Padmanabhan (Queen's University Belfast), Dr Gauri Sinha (Royal Holloway University of London) and Dr Tahir Abbas Syed (University of Manchester).
Collaborator Contribution Buy Now, Pay Later, also known as BNPL, is a fast and easy or 'frictionless' or 'slick' credit instalment payment service which has been enabled by FinTech. BNPL is typically accessed through trusted e-commerce platforms at no obvious cost to the consumer. However, many consumers do not realise that BNPL is a form of credit and the implications of not repaying their 'debt'. This research explores the different digital vulnerabilities of BNPL products in terms of: the consumer vulnerabilities (understanding of product and use of credit, risk of fraud, the speed/ease of frictionless or 'slick' access to credit which is embedded in other familiar and/or trusted brands/services, risk of money laundering, data-related privacy, security and fairness) and organisational vulnerabilities (the brand and how BNPL products are marketed and advertised, risk to merchants in the event of non-payments, corporate irresponsibility and unethical behaviours, commercial business value and models). The Team's interdisciplinary approach will develop new insights to inform current and emerging understandings of digital vulnerability to reduce vulnerability around BNPL products.
Impact This is a multidisciplinary collaboration that draws on expertise from business studies, design, management ethics and sustainability, computer science, law and management sciences. The outputs/outcomes of this work will be reported once the project is complete.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Buy Now Pay Later in the UK: Current and emergent digital vulnerabilities 
Organisation Lancaster University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution SPRITE+ funded the 'Buy Now Pay Later in the UK: Current and emergent digital vulnerabilities' project via a sandpit, and provides support, guidance and assistance with logistics and promotion. This project is a collaboration between Dr Lindsey Appleyard (Coventry University), Dr Jo Briggs (Northumbria University), Dr Lucia Cervi (Lancaster University), Dr Deepak Padmanabhan (Queen's University Belfast), Dr Gauri Sinha (Royal Holloway University of London) and Dr Tahir Abbas Syed (University of Manchester).
Collaborator Contribution Buy Now, Pay Later, also known as BNPL, is a fast and easy or 'frictionless' or 'slick' credit instalment payment service which has been enabled by FinTech. BNPL is typically accessed through trusted e-commerce platforms at no obvious cost to the consumer. However, many consumers do not realise that BNPL is a form of credit and the implications of not repaying their 'debt'. This research explores the different digital vulnerabilities of BNPL products in terms of: the consumer vulnerabilities (understanding of product and use of credit, risk of fraud, the speed/ease of frictionless or 'slick' access to credit which is embedded in other familiar and/or trusted brands/services, risk of money laundering, data-related privacy, security and fairness) and organisational vulnerabilities (the brand and how BNPL products are marketed and advertised, risk to merchants in the event of non-payments, corporate irresponsibility and unethical behaviours, commercial business value and models). The Team's interdisciplinary approach will develop new insights to inform current and emerging understandings of digital vulnerability to reduce vulnerability around BNPL products.
Impact This is a multidisciplinary collaboration that draws on expertise from business studies, design, management ethics and sustainability, computer science, law and management sciences. The outputs/outcomes of this work will be reported once the project is complete.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Buy Now Pay Later in the UK: Current and emergent digital vulnerabilities 
Organisation Northumbria University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution SPRITE+ funded the 'Buy Now Pay Later in the UK: Current and emergent digital vulnerabilities' project via a sandpit, and provides support, guidance and assistance with logistics and promotion. This project is a collaboration between Dr Lindsey Appleyard (Coventry University), Dr Jo Briggs (Northumbria University), Dr Lucia Cervi (Lancaster University), Dr Deepak Padmanabhan (Queen's University Belfast), Dr Gauri Sinha (Royal Holloway University of London) and Dr Tahir Abbas Syed (University of Manchester).
Collaborator Contribution Buy Now, Pay Later, also known as BNPL, is a fast and easy or 'frictionless' or 'slick' credit instalment payment service which has been enabled by FinTech. BNPL is typically accessed through trusted e-commerce platforms at no obvious cost to the consumer. However, many consumers do not realise that BNPL is a form of credit and the implications of not repaying their 'debt'. This research explores the different digital vulnerabilities of BNPL products in terms of: the consumer vulnerabilities (understanding of product and use of credit, risk of fraud, the speed/ease of frictionless or 'slick' access to credit which is embedded in other familiar and/or trusted brands/services, risk of money laundering, data-related privacy, security and fairness) and organisational vulnerabilities (the brand and how BNPL products are marketed and advertised, risk to merchants in the event of non-payments, corporate irresponsibility and unethical behaviours, commercial business value and models). The Team's interdisciplinary approach will develop new insights to inform current and emerging understandings of digital vulnerability to reduce vulnerability around BNPL products.
Impact This is a multidisciplinary collaboration that draws on expertise from business studies, design, management ethics and sustainability, computer science, law and management sciences. The outputs/outcomes of this work will be reported once the project is complete.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Buy Now Pay Later in the UK: Current and emergent digital vulnerabilities 
Organisation Queen's University Belfast
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution SPRITE+ funded the 'Buy Now Pay Later in the UK: Current and emergent digital vulnerabilities' project via a sandpit, and provides support, guidance and assistance with logistics and promotion. This project is a collaboration between Dr Lindsey Appleyard (Coventry University), Dr Jo Briggs (Northumbria University), Dr Lucia Cervi (Lancaster University), Dr Deepak Padmanabhan (Queen's University Belfast), Dr Gauri Sinha (Royal Holloway University of London) and Dr Tahir Abbas Syed (University of Manchester).
Collaborator Contribution Buy Now, Pay Later, also known as BNPL, is a fast and easy or 'frictionless' or 'slick' credit instalment payment service which has been enabled by FinTech. BNPL is typically accessed through trusted e-commerce platforms at no obvious cost to the consumer. However, many consumers do not realise that BNPL is a form of credit and the implications of not repaying their 'debt'. This research explores the different digital vulnerabilities of BNPL products in terms of: the consumer vulnerabilities (understanding of product and use of credit, risk of fraud, the speed/ease of frictionless or 'slick' access to credit which is embedded in other familiar and/or trusted brands/services, risk of money laundering, data-related privacy, security and fairness) and organisational vulnerabilities (the brand and how BNPL products are marketed and advertised, risk to merchants in the event of non-payments, corporate irresponsibility and unethical behaviours, commercial business value and models). The Team's interdisciplinary approach will develop new insights to inform current and emerging understandings of digital vulnerability to reduce vulnerability around BNPL products.
Impact This is a multidisciplinary collaboration that draws on expertise from business studies, design, management ethics and sustainability, computer science, law and management sciences. The outputs/outcomes of this work will be reported once the project is complete.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Buy Now Pay Later in the UK: Current and emergent digital vulnerabilities 
Organisation Royal Holloway, University of London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution SPRITE+ funded the 'Buy Now Pay Later in the UK: Current and emergent digital vulnerabilities' project via a sandpit, and provides support, guidance and assistance with logistics and promotion. This project is a collaboration between Dr Lindsey Appleyard (Coventry University), Dr Jo Briggs (Northumbria University), Dr Lucia Cervi (Lancaster University), Dr Deepak Padmanabhan (Queen's University Belfast), Dr Gauri Sinha (Royal Holloway University of London) and Dr Tahir Abbas Syed (University of Manchester).
Collaborator Contribution Buy Now, Pay Later, also known as BNPL, is a fast and easy or 'frictionless' or 'slick' credit instalment payment service which has been enabled by FinTech. BNPL is typically accessed through trusted e-commerce platforms at no obvious cost to the consumer. However, many consumers do not realise that BNPL is a form of credit and the implications of not repaying their 'debt'. This research explores the different digital vulnerabilities of BNPL products in terms of: the consumer vulnerabilities (understanding of product and use of credit, risk of fraud, the speed/ease of frictionless or 'slick' access to credit which is embedded in other familiar and/or trusted brands/services, risk of money laundering, data-related privacy, security and fairness) and organisational vulnerabilities (the brand and how BNPL products are marketed and advertised, risk to merchants in the event of non-payments, corporate irresponsibility and unethical behaviours, commercial business value and models). The Team's interdisciplinary approach will develop new insights to inform current and emerging understandings of digital vulnerability to reduce vulnerability around BNPL products.
Impact This is a multidisciplinary collaboration that draws on expertise from business studies, design, management ethics and sustainability, computer science, law and management sciences. The outputs/outcomes of this work will be reported once the project is complete.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Buy Now Pay Later in the UK: Current and emergent digital vulnerabilities 
Organisation University of Manchester
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution SPRITE+ funded the 'Buy Now Pay Later in the UK: Current and emergent digital vulnerabilities' project via a sandpit, and provides support, guidance and assistance with logistics and promotion. This project is a collaboration between Dr Lindsey Appleyard (Coventry University), Dr Jo Briggs (Northumbria University), Dr Lucia Cervi (Lancaster University), Dr Deepak Padmanabhan (Queen's University Belfast), Dr Gauri Sinha (Royal Holloway University of London) and Dr Tahir Abbas Syed (University of Manchester).
Collaborator Contribution Buy Now, Pay Later, also known as BNPL, is a fast and easy or 'frictionless' or 'slick' credit instalment payment service which has been enabled by FinTech. BNPL is typically accessed through trusted e-commerce platforms at no obvious cost to the consumer. However, many consumers do not realise that BNPL is a form of credit and the implications of not repaying their 'debt'. This research explores the different digital vulnerabilities of BNPL products in terms of: the consumer vulnerabilities (understanding of product and use of credit, risk of fraud, the speed/ease of frictionless or 'slick' access to credit which is embedded in other familiar and/or trusted brands/services, risk of money laundering, data-related privacy, security and fairness) and organisational vulnerabilities (the brand and how BNPL products are marketed and advertised, risk to merchants in the event of non-payments, corporate irresponsibility and unethical behaviours, commercial business value and models). The Team's interdisciplinary approach will develop new insights to inform current and emerging understandings of digital vulnerability to reduce vulnerability around BNPL products.
Impact This is a multidisciplinary collaboration that draws on expertise from business studies, design, management ethics and sustainability, computer science, law and management sciences. The outputs/outcomes of this work will be reported once the project is complete.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Digital Technologies, Power & Control Challenge Working Group 
Organisation Birmingham City University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The SPRITE+ network funded the 'Digital Technologies, Power & Control' Challenge Working Group and provides, guidance, assistance with logistics and promotion of their activities. In addition, SPRITE+ connects the project team with various non-academics to enable their stakeholder engagement strategy. This project is led by Dr Lara Frumkin (PI, The Open University), Dr Kovila Coopamootoo (Newcastle University), Dr Sabine Little (University of Sheffield) and Dr Vitor Jesus (Birmingham City University).
Collaborator Contribution This project brings together a diverse, cross-disciplinary group of academics, stakeholders and non-academic communities to address pressing needs in security, privacy, identity and trust. The work employs an action research model to solicit wide participation in societal decisions around Digital Technologies, Power and Control relying on theory, research and current practice from multiple academic and non-academic perspectives. The project aims to address these in three ways. First, stakeholders and non-academics serve as advisers and active working group members with researchers in specialist areas to map how empowered and disempowered groups engage with technology. This work will look at how technology is and should be developed to lessen the digital divide attempting to balance power and control across communities. Marginalised communities using technology will be sought to investigate how, why and where technology is useful for their purposes. Sharing this information with industry can help develop a dialogue between groups and provide avenues for industry to better support marginalised communities. Second, a body of work will be developed to understand how individual communities, businesses, corporations and governments address concerns around trust and privacy. Engaging with civil servants and other non-academics will be crucial for a dynamic paradigm, identifying current issues and anticipating future developments. Benefits to industry will be gained through working with people from marginalised communities around how digital technology may lessen existing uneven power structures. Finally, addressing current uncertainties about how enabling (and disabling) technology influences online and physical identity, the working group will offer suggestions addressing this at community, corporate and state levels assisting stakeholders to better understand perspectives of broad groups of people.
Impact This project team is highly multidisciplinary and draws on expertise from psychology and counselling, education and computer science. The team held a stakeholder engagement workshop with over 25 attendees from various organisations including industry, small business, local government, charities, trusts and other civil society organisations. The stakeholders were all interested in identifying challenges and good practice around working with marginalised communities. At the event, attendees discussed how marginalised voices are being heard (or are not being heard) and identified ways to empower communities with knowledge to make informed choices about future technologies. The Challenge Working Group have reported the outcomes of this workshop via their blog (https://digitaltechpowerandcontrol.com/home/) and plan to host a follow-up stakeholder engagement meeting to further explore the knowledge gaps in the current research landscape.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Digital Technologies, Power & Control Challenge Working Group 
Organisation Newcastle University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The SPRITE+ network funded the 'Digital Technologies, Power & Control' Challenge Working Group and provides, guidance, assistance with logistics and promotion of their activities. In addition, SPRITE+ connects the project team with various non-academics to enable their stakeholder engagement strategy. This project is led by Dr Lara Frumkin (PI, The Open University), Dr Kovila Coopamootoo (Newcastle University), Dr Sabine Little (University of Sheffield) and Dr Vitor Jesus (Birmingham City University).
Collaborator Contribution This project brings together a diverse, cross-disciplinary group of academics, stakeholders and non-academic communities to address pressing needs in security, privacy, identity and trust. The work employs an action research model to solicit wide participation in societal decisions around Digital Technologies, Power and Control relying on theory, research and current practice from multiple academic and non-academic perspectives. The project aims to address these in three ways. First, stakeholders and non-academics serve as advisers and active working group members with researchers in specialist areas to map how empowered and disempowered groups engage with technology. This work will look at how technology is and should be developed to lessen the digital divide attempting to balance power and control across communities. Marginalised communities using technology will be sought to investigate how, why and where technology is useful for their purposes. Sharing this information with industry can help develop a dialogue between groups and provide avenues for industry to better support marginalised communities. Second, a body of work will be developed to understand how individual communities, businesses, corporations and governments address concerns around trust and privacy. Engaging with civil servants and other non-academics will be crucial for a dynamic paradigm, identifying current issues and anticipating future developments. Benefits to industry will be gained through working with people from marginalised communities around how digital technology may lessen existing uneven power structures. Finally, addressing current uncertainties about how enabling (and disabling) technology influences online and physical identity, the working group will offer suggestions addressing this at community, corporate and state levels assisting stakeholders to better understand perspectives of broad groups of people.
Impact This project team is highly multidisciplinary and draws on expertise from psychology and counselling, education and computer science. The team held a stakeholder engagement workshop with over 25 attendees from various organisations including industry, small business, local government, charities, trusts and other civil society organisations. The stakeholders were all interested in identifying challenges and good practice around working with marginalised communities. At the event, attendees discussed how marginalised voices are being heard (or are not being heard) and identified ways to empower communities with knowledge to make informed choices about future technologies. The Challenge Working Group have reported the outcomes of this workshop via their blog (https://digitaltechpowerandcontrol.com/home/) and plan to host a follow-up stakeholder engagement meeting to further explore the knowledge gaps in the current research landscape.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Digital Technologies, Power & Control Challenge Working Group 
Organisation Open University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The SPRITE+ network funded the 'Digital Technologies, Power & Control' Challenge Working Group and provides, guidance, assistance with logistics and promotion of their activities. In addition, SPRITE+ connects the project team with various non-academics to enable their stakeholder engagement strategy. This project is led by Dr Lara Frumkin (PI, The Open University), Dr Kovila Coopamootoo (Newcastle University), Dr Sabine Little (University of Sheffield) and Dr Vitor Jesus (Birmingham City University).
Collaborator Contribution This project brings together a diverse, cross-disciplinary group of academics, stakeholders and non-academic communities to address pressing needs in security, privacy, identity and trust. The work employs an action research model to solicit wide participation in societal decisions around Digital Technologies, Power and Control relying on theory, research and current practice from multiple academic and non-academic perspectives. The project aims to address these in three ways. First, stakeholders and non-academics serve as advisers and active working group members with researchers in specialist areas to map how empowered and disempowered groups engage with technology. This work will look at how technology is and should be developed to lessen the digital divide attempting to balance power and control across communities. Marginalised communities using technology will be sought to investigate how, why and where technology is useful for their purposes. Sharing this information with industry can help develop a dialogue between groups and provide avenues for industry to better support marginalised communities. Second, a body of work will be developed to understand how individual communities, businesses, corporations and governments address concerns around trust and privacy. Engaging with civil servants and other non-academics will be crucial for a dynamic paradigm, identifying current issues and anticipating future developments. Benefits to industry will be gained through working with people from marginalised communities around how digital technology may lessen existing uneven power structures. Finally, addressing current uncertainties about how enabling (and disabling) technology influences online and physical identity, the working group will offer suggestions addressing this at community, corporate and state levels assisting stakeholders to better understand perspectives of broad groups of people.
Impact This project team is highly multidisciplinary and draws on expertise from psychology and counselling, education and computer science. The team held a stakeholder engagement workshop with over 25 attendees from various organisations including industry, small business, local government, charities, trusts and other civil society organisations. The stakeholders were all interested in identifying challenges and good practice around working with marginalised communities. At the event, attendees discussed how marginalised voices are being heard (or are not being heard) and identified ways to empower communities with knowledge to make informed choices about future technologies. The Challenge Working Group have reported the outcomes of this workshop via their blog (https://digitaltechpowerandcontrol.com/home/) and plan to host a follow-up stakeholder engagement meeting to further explore the knowledge gaps in the current research landscape.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Digital Technologies, Power & Control Challenge Working Group 
Organisation University of Sheffield
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The SPRITE+ network funded the 'Digital Technologies, Power & Control' Challenge Working Group and provides, guidance, assistance with logistics and promotion of their activities. In addition, SPRITE+ connects the project team with various non-academics to enable their stakeholder engagement strategy. This project is led by Dr Lara Frumkin (PI, The Open University), Dr Kovila Coopamootoo (Newcastle University), Dr Sabine Little (University of Sheffield) and Dr Vitor Jesus (Birmingham City University).
Collaborator Contribution This project brings together a diverse, cross-disciplinary group of academics, stakeholders and non-academic communities to address pressing needs in security, privacy, identity and trust. The work employs an action research model to solicit wide participation in societal decisions around Digital Technologies, Power and Control relying on theory, research and current practice from multiple academic and non-academic perspectives. The project aims to address these in three ways. First, stakeholders and non-academics serve as advisers and active working group members with researchers in specialist areas to map how empowered and disempowered groups engage with technology. This work will look at how technology is and should be developed to lessen the digital divide attempting to balance power and control across communities. Marginalised communities using technology will be sought to investigate how, why and where technology is useful for their purposes. Sharing this information with industry can help develop a dialogue between groups and provide avenues for industry to better support marginalised communities. Second, a body of work will be developed to understand how individual communities, businesses, corporations and governments address concerns around trust and privacy. Engaging with civil servants and other non-academics will be crucial for a dynamic paradigm, identifying current issues and anticipating future developments. Benefits to industry will be gained through working with people from marginalised communities around how digital technology may lessen existing uneven power structures. Finally, addressing current uncertainties about how enabling (and disabling) technology influences online and physical identity, the working group will offer suggestions addressing this at community, corporate and state levels assisting stakeholders to better understand perspectives of broad groups of people.
Impact This project team is highly multidisciplinary and draws on expertise from psychology and counselling, education and computer science. The team held a stakeholder engagement workshop with over 25 attendees from various organisations including industry, small business, local government, charities, trusts and other civil society organisations. The stakeholders were all interested in identifying challenges and good practice around working with marginalised communities. At the event, attendees discussed how marginalised voices are being heard (or are not being heard) and identified ways to empower communities with knowledge to make informed choices about future technologies. The Challenge Working Group have reported the outcomes of this workshop via their blog (https://digitaltechpowerandcontrol.com/home/) and plan to host a follow-up stakeholder engagement meeting to further explore the knowledge gaps in the current research landscape.
Start Year 2020
 
Description FiVu: Using Design Fiction to Identify Future Vulnerabilities in Bio-IOT 
Organisation Imperial College London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution SPRITE+ funded the 'FiVu: Using Design Fiction to Identify Future Vulnerabilities in Bio-IOT' project via a sandpit, and provides support, guidance and assistance with logistics and promotion. This project is a collaboration between Dr Charles Weir (PI, Lancaster University), Dr José-Rodrigo Córdoba-Pachón (Royal Holloway University of London), Professor Lynne Coventry (Northumbria University) and Dr Soteris Demetriou (Imperial College London).
Collaborator Contribution This project explores using creative fiction - stories, fantasy and speculation - to help software developers and product owners to identify threats and vulnerabilities in BIO-IOT. Following an initial literature survey on creative fiction, the team plan to start by surveying experts and fans of fiction for example text; they will then build it into a format for a workshop, and trial that workshop with a team of health software application builders. As outcomes, the team plan to share fiction examples/scenarios, process followed and conclusions from the workshops.
Impact This is a multi-disciplinary collaboration which draws on expertise from human and digital design, computing, technology and information management, systems and software security. Outcomes are expected to be communicated once the project is complete.
Start Year 2021
 
Description FiVu: Using Design Fiction to Identify Future Vulnerabilities in Bio-IOT 
Organisation Lancaster University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution SPRITE+ funded the 'FiVu: Using Design Fiction to Identify Future Vulnerabilities in Bio-IOT' project via a sandpit, and provides support, guidance and assistance with logistics and promotion. This project is a collaboration between Dr Charles Weir (PI, Lancaster University), Dr José-Rodrigo Córdoba-Pachón (Royal Holloway University of London), Professor Lynne Coventry (Northumbria University) and Dr Soteris Demetriou (Imperial College London).
Collaborator Contribution This project explores using creative fiction - stories, fantasy and speculation - to help software developers and product owners to identify threats and vulnerabilities in BIO-IOT. Following an initial literature survey on creative fiction, the team plan to start by surveying experts and fans of fiction for example text; they will then build it into a format for a workshop, and trial that workshop with a team of health software application builders. As outcomes, the team plan to share fiction examples/scenarios, process followed and conclusions from the workshops.
Impact This is a multi-disciplinary collaboration which draws on expertise from human and digital design, computing, technology and information management, systems and software security. Outcomes are expected to be communicated once the project is complete.
Start Year 2021
 
Description FiVu: Using Design Fiction to Identify Future Vulnerabilities in Bio-IOT 
Organisation Northumbria University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution SPRITE+ funded the 'FiVu: Using Design Fiction to Identify Future Vulnerabilities in Bio-IOT' project via a sandpit, and provides support, guidance and assistance with logistics and promotion. This project is a collaboration between Dr Charles Weir (PI, Lancaster University), Dr José-Rodrigo Córdoba-Pachón (Royal Holloway University of London), Professor Lynne Coventry (Northumbria University) and Dr Soteris Demetriou (Imperial College London).
Collaborator Contribution This project explores using creative fiction - stories, fantasy and speculation - to help software developers and product owners to identify threats and vulnerabilities in BIO-IOT. Following an initial literature survey on creative fiction, the team plan to start by surveying experts and fans of fiction for example text; they will then build it into a format for a workshop, and trial that workshop with a team of health software application builders. As outcomes, the team plan to share fiction examples/scenarios, process followed and conclusions from the workshops.
Impact This is a multi-disciplinary collaboration which draws on expertise from human and digital design, computing, technology and information management, systems and software security. Outcomes are expected to be communicated once the project is complete.
Start Year 2021
 
Description FiVu: Using Design Fiction to Identify Future Vulnerabilities in Bio-IOT 
Organisation Royal Holloway, University of London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution SPRITE+ funded the 'FiVu: Using Design Fiction to Identify Future Vulnerabilities in Bio-IOT' project via a sandpit, and provides support, guidance and assistance with logistics and promotion. This project is a collaboration between Dr Charles Weir (PI, Lancaster University), Dr José-Rodrigo Córdoba-Pachón (Royal Holloway University of London), Professor Lynne Coventry (Northumbria University) and Dr Soteris Demetriou (Imperial College London).
Collaborator Contribution This project explores using creative fiction - stories, fantasy and speculation - to help software developers and product owners to identify threats and vulnerabilities in BIO-IOT. Following an initial literature survey on creative fiction, the team plan to start by surveying experts and fans of fiction for example text; they will then build it into a format for a workshop, and trial that workshop with a team of health software application builders. As outcomes, the team plan to share fiction examples/scenarios, process followed and conclusions from the workshops.
Impact This is a multi-disciplinary collaboration which draws on expertise from human and digital design, computing, technology and information management, systems and software security. Outcomes are expected to be communicated once the project is complete.
Start Year 2021
 
Description First RespondXR: Digital vulnerability of immersive training for first responders 
Organisation Coventry University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution SPRITE+ funded the 'First RespondXR: Digital vulnerability of immersive training for first responders' project via a sandpit, and provides support, guidance and assistance with logistics and promotion. This project is a collaboration between Dr Leonie Tanczer (University College London), Professor David McIlhatton (Coventry University), Professor Jill Marshall (Royal Holloway University of London), Dr Mark McGill (University of Glasgow) and Dr Lena Podoletz (University of Edinburgh).
Collaborator Contribution In their role as first responders, police services in England provide immediate assistance to individuals at a scene of emergency and/or potential criminal event. However, the significant reduction in policing resources since 2010 has demanded officers to work more broadly in response to the diverse range of incidents. Therefore, training needs and settings must be not only varied, but efficient as well as effective. Extended Reality (XR), including both virtual and augmented reality, is becoming prominent in many sectors for training and operations. Yet, in the rush to exploit the benefits of XR for immersive training, the potential digital vulnerabilities that may be exposed have yet to be properly examined. RespondXR will consequently, for the first time, map the vulnerability space (i.e., its social, technical, legal, ethical risks and impacts), from the perspective of (a) those delivering the training, (b) the first responders who will be undertaking this training, and (c) the technical teams bringing forward new training methodologies in XR. The project will explore the socio-technical challenges posed by the adoption of this technology, providing the foundations for further research on the safe, secure, and ethical use of immersive training technology for enhancing the response of policing in England.
Impact This is a multidisciplinary collaboration which draws on expertise from computer science, law, human-computer interaction, security and resilience, international security and emerging technologies. The outputs/outcomes of this work will be reported once the project is complete.
Start Year 2021
 
Description First RespondXR: Digital vulnerability of immersive training for first responders 
Organisation Royal Holloway, University of London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution SPRITE+ funded the 'First RespondXR: Digital vulnerability of immersive training for first responders' project via a sandpit, and provides support, guidance and assistance with logistics and promotion. This project is a collaboration between Dr Leonie Tanczer (University College London), Professor David McIlhatton (Coventry University), Professor Jill Marshall (Royal Holloway University of London), Dr Mark McGill (University of Glasgow) and Dr Lena Podoletz (University of Edinburgh).
Collaborator Contribution In their role as first responders, police services in England provide immediate assistance to individuals at a scene of emergency and/or potential criminal event. However, the significant reduction in policing resources since 2010 has demanded officers to work more broadly in response to the diverse range of incidents. Therefore, training needs and settings must be not only varied, but efficient as well as effective. Extended Reality (XR), including both virtual and augmented reality, is becoming prominent in many sectors for training and operations. Yet, in the rush to exploit the benefits of XR for immersive training, the potential digital vulnerabilities that may be exposed have yet to be properly examined. RespondXR will consequently, for the first time, map the vulnerability space (i.e., its social, technical, legal, ethical risks and impacts), from the perspective of (a) those delivering the training, (b) the first responders who will be undertaking this training, and (c) the technical teams bringing forward new training methodologies in XR. The project will explore the socio-technical challenges posed by the adoption of this technology, providing the foundations for further research on the safe, secure, and ethical use of immersive training technology for enhancing the response of policing in England.
Impact This is a multidisciplinary collaboration which draws on expertise from computer science, law, human-computer interaction, security and resilience, international security and emerging technologies. The outputs/outcomes of this work will be reported once the project is complete.
Start Year 2021
 
Description First RespondXR: Digital vulnerability of immersive training for first responders 
Organisation University College London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution SPRITE+ funded the 'First RespondXR: Digital vulnerability of immersive training for first responders' project via a sandpit, and provides support, guidance and assistance with logistics and promotion. This project is a collaboration between Dr Leonie Tanczer (University College London), Professor David McIlhatton (Coventry University), Professor Jill Marshall (Royal Holloway University of London), Dr Mark McGill (University of Glasgow) and Dr Lena Podoletz (University of Edinburgh).
Collaborator Contribution In their role as first responders, police services in England provide immediate assistance to individuals at a scene of emergency and/or potential criminal event. However, the significant reduction in policing resources since 2010 has demanded officers to work more broadly in response to the diverse range of incidents. Therefore, training needs and settings must be not only varied, but efficient as well as effective. Extended Reality (XR), including both virtual and augmented reality, is becoming prominent in many sectors for training and operations. Yet, in the rush to exploit the benefits of XR for immersive training, the potential digital vulnerabilities that may be exposed have yet to be properly examined. RespondXR will consequently, for the first time, map the vulnerability space (i.e., its social, technical, legal, ethical risks and impacts), from the perspective of (a) those delivering the training, (b) the first responders who will be undertaking this training, and (c) the technical teams bringing forward new training methodologies in XR. The project will explore the socio-technical challenges posed by the adoption of this technology, providing the foundations for further research on the safe, secure, and ethical use of immersive training technology for enhancing the response of policing in England.
Impact This is a multidisciplinary collaboration which draws on expertise from computer science, law, human-computer interaction, security and resilience, international security and emerging technologies. The outputs/outcomes of this work will be reported once the project is complete.
Start Year 2021
 
Description First RespondXR: Digital vulnerability of immersive training for first responders 
Organisation University of Edinburgh
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution SPRITE+ funded the 'First RespondXR: Digital vulnerability of immersive training for first responders' project via a sandpit, and provides support, guidance and assistance with logistics and promotion. This project is a collaboration between Dr Leonie Tanczer (University College London), Professor David McIlhatton (Coventry University), Professor Jill Marshall (Royal Holloway University of London), Dr Mark McGill (University of Glasgow) and Dr Lena Podoletz (University of Edinburgh).
Collaborator Contribution In their role as first responders, police services in England provide immediate assistance to individuals at a scene of emergency and/or potential criminal event. However, the significant reduction in policing resources since 2010 has demanded officers to work more broadly in response to the diverse range of incidents. Therefore, training needs and settings must be not only varied, but efficient as well as effective. Extended Reality (XR), including both virtual and augmented reality, is becoming prominent in many sectors for training and operations. Yet, in the rush to exploit the benefits of XR for immersive training, the potential digital vulnerabilities that may be exposed have yet to be properly examined. RespondXR will consequently, for the first time, map the vulnerability space (i.e., its social, technical, legal, ethical risks and impacts), from the perspective of (a) those delivering the training, (b) the first responders who will be undertaking this training, and (c) the technical teams bringing forward new training methodologies in XR. The project will explore the socio-technical challenges posed by the adoption of this technology, providing the foundations for further research on the safe, secure, and ethical use of immersive training technology for enhancing the response of policing in England.
Impact This is a multidisciplinary collaboration which draws on expertise from computer science, law, human-computer interaction, security and resilience, international security and emerging technologies. The outputs/outcomes of this work will be reported once the project is complete.
Start Year 2021
 
Description First RespondXR: Digital vulnerability of immersive training for first responders 
Organisation University of Glasgow
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution SPRITE+ funded the 'First RespondXR: Digital vulnerability of immersive training for first responders' project via a sandpit, and provides support, guidance and assistance with logistics and promotion. This project is a collaboration between Dr Leonie Tanczer (University College London), Professor David McIlhatton (Coventry University), Professor Jill Marshall (Royal Holloway University of London), Dr Mark McGill (University of Glasgow) and Dr Lena Podoletz (University of Edinburgh).
Collaborator Contribution In their role as first responders, police services in England provide immediate assistance to individuals at a scene of emergency and/or potential criminal event. However, the significant reduction in policing resources since 2010 has demanded officers to work more broadly in response to the diverse range of incidents. Therefore, training needs and settings must be not only varied, but efficient as well as effective. Extended Reality (XR), including both virtual and augmented reality, is becoming prominent in many sectors for training and operations. Yet, in the rush to exploit the benefits of XR for immersive training, the potential digital vulnerabilities that may be exposed have yet to be properly examined. RespondXR will consequently, for the first time, map the vulnerability space (i.e., its social, technical, legal, ethical risks and impacts), from the perspective of (a) those delivering the training, (b) the first responders who will be undertaking this training, and (c) the technical teams bringing forward new training methodologies in XR. The project will explore the socio-technical challenges posed by the adoption of this technology, providing the foundations for further research on the safe, secure, and ethical use of immersive training technology for enhancing the response of policing in England.
Impact This is a multidisciplinary collaboration which draws on expertise from computer science, law, human-computer interaction, security and resilience, international security and emerging technologies. The outputs/outcomes of this work will be reported once the project is complete.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Footprints to emissions: Exploring near-future digital vulnerabilities with creative methodologies 
Organisation Ofcom
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution SPRITE+ funded the 'Footprints to emissions: Exploring near-future digital vulnerabilities with creative methodologies' project via a sandpit, and provides support, guidance and assistance with logistics and promotion. This project is a collaboration between Dr David Ellis (University of Bath), Dr Iain Reid (University of Portsmouth), Dr Philip Wu (Royal Holloway University of London) and Dr Asad Ali (Ofcom).
Collaborator Contribution Digital emissions are traces of seemingly innocuous data that reflect everyday activities (e.g., liking a Tweet). However, they are also essential for the modern economy (e.g., financial transactions). Like greenhouse gasses, digital emissions are invisible and appear harmless, but can make individuals, groups, and society vulnerable. As more systems become interconnected and new devices enter the digital ecosystem, the problem of digital emissions and how to manage pollution will become of paramount importance in the next 5-10 years. For citizens to become proactive rather than reactionary in protecting their data, we need to first understand how people understand digital emissions and associated vulnerabilities. Building on innovative developments within speculative design, we will explore how probe-based methods can elicit reactions and reflections about current and near-future vulnerabilities from digital emissions. Specifically, some participants will talk aloud as they use their smartphone while others will discuss how new technology that might evolve from science fiction could impact them in the future. The results of this project will act as a first step towards a larger body of research that develops future-oriented technical solutions and policy recommendations to reduce the risks of digital emissions, increase trust, and enhance individual and collective privacy.
Impact This is a multi-disciplinary collaboration which draws on expertise from cybercrime, technology and information and information systems with in put from Ofcom as a supporting partner. The outcomes/outputs of this work will be reported once the project is complete.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Footprints to emissions: Exploring near-future digital vulnerabilities with creative methodologies 
Organisation Royal Holloway, University of London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution SPRITE+ funded the 'Footprints to emissions: Exploring near-future digital vulnerabilities with creative methodologies' project via a sandpit, and provides support, guidance and assistance with logistics and promotion. This project is a collaboration between Dr David Ellis (University of Bath), Dr Iain Reid (University of Portsmouth), Dr Philip Wu (Royal Holloway University of London) and Dr Asad Ali (Ofcom).
Collaborator Contribution Digital emissions are traces of seemingly innocuous data that reflect everyday activities (e.g., liking a Tweet). However, they are also essential for the modern economy (e.g., financial transactions). Like greenhouse gasses, digital emissions are invisible and appear harmless, but can make individuals, groups, and society vulnerable. As more systems become interconnected and new devices enter the digital ecosystem, the problem of digital emissions and how to manage pollution will become of paramount importance in the next 5-10 years. For citizens to become proactive rather than reactionary in protecting their data, we need to first understand how people understand digital emissions and associated vulnerabilities. Building on innovative developments within speculative design, we will explore how probe-based methods can elicit reactions and reflections about current and near-future vulnerabilities from digital emissions. Specifically, some participants will talk aloud as they use their smartphone while others will discuss how new technology that might evolve from science fiction could impact them in the future. The results of this project will act as a first step towards a larger body of research that develops future-oriented technical solutions and policy recommendations to reduce the risks of digital emissions, increase trust, and enhance individual and collective privacy.
Impact This is a multi-disciplinary collaboration which draws on expertise from cybercrime, technology and information and information systems with in put from Ofcom as a supporting partner. The outcomes/outputs of this work will be reported once the project is complete.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Footprints to emissions: Exploring near-future digital vulnerabilities with creative methodologies 
Organisation University of Bath
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution SPRITE+ funded the 'Footprints to emissions: Exploring near-future digital vulnerabilities with creative methodologies' project via a sandpit, and provides support, guidance and assistance with logistics and promotion. This project is a collaboration between Dr David Ellis (University of Bath), Dr Iain Reid (University of Portsmouth), Dr Philip Wu (Royal Holloway University of London) and Dr Asad Ali (Ofcom).
Collaborator Contribution Digital emissions are traces of seemingly innocuous data that reflect everyday activities (e.g., liking a Tweet). However, they are also essential for the modern economy (e.g., financial transactions). Like greenhouse gasses, digital emissions are invisible and appear harmless, but can make individuals, groups, and society vulnerable. As more systems become interconnected and new devices enter the digital ecosystem, the problem of digital emissions and how to manage pollution will become of paramount importance in the next 5-10 years. For citizens to become proactive rather than reactionary in protecting their data, we need to first understand how people understand digital emissions and associated vulnerabilities. Building on innovative developments within speculative design, we will explore how probe-based methods can elicit reactions and reflections about current and near-future vulnerabilities from digital emissions. Specifically, some participants will talk aloud as they use their smartphone while others will discuss how new technology that might evolve from science fiction could impact them in the future. The results of this project will act as a first step towards a larger body of research that develops future-oriented technical solutions and policy recommendations to reduce the risks of digital emissions, increase trust, and enhance individual and collective privacy.
Impact This is a multi-disciplinary collaboration which draws on expertise from cybercrime, technology and information and information systems with in put from Ofcom as a supporting partner. The outcomes/outputs of this work will be reported once the project is complete.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Footprints to emissions: Exploring near-future digital vulnerabilities with creative methodologies 
Organisation University of Portsmouth
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution SPRITE+ funded the 'Footprints to emissions: Exploring near-future digital vulnerabilities with creative methodologies' project via a sandpit, and provides support, guidance and assistance with logistics and promotion. This project is a collaboration between Dr David Ellis (University of Bath), Dr Iain Reid (University of Portsmouth), Dr Philip Wu (Royal Holloway University of London) and Dr Asad Ali (Ofcom).
Collaborator Contribution Digital emissions are traces of seemingly innocuous data that reflect everyday activities (e.g., liking a Tweet). However, they are also essential for the modern economy (e.g., financial transactions). Like greenhouse gasses, digital emissions are invisible and appear harmless, but can make individuals, groups, and society vulnerable. As more systems become interconnected and new devices enter the digital ecosystem, the problem of digital emissions and how to manage pollution will become of paramount importance in the next 5-10 years. For citizens to become proactive rather than reactionary in protecting their data, we need to first understand how people understand digital emissions and associated vulnerabilities. Building on innovative developments within speculative design, we will explore how probe-based methods can elicit reactions and reflections about current and near-future vulnerabilities from digital emissions. Specifically, some participants will talk aloud as they use their smartphone while others will discuss how new technology that might evolve from science fiction could impact them in the future. The results of this project will act as a first step towards a larger body of research that develops future-oriented technical solutions and policy recommendations to reduce the risks of digital emissions, increase trust, and enhance individual and collective privacy.
Impact This is a multi-disciplinary collaboration which draws on expertise from cybercrime, technology and information and information systems with in put from Ofcom as a supporting partner. The outcomes/outputs of this work will be reported once the project is complete.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Future Payment Systems: Data, Technology and Privacy after Covid 
Organisation Alan Turing Institute
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The SPRITE+ network funded the 'Future Payment Systems: Data, Technology and Privacy after Covid' project via a sandpit and provided guidance, assistance with logistics and promotion of its activities. In addition, SPRITE+ connected the project team with various non-academics to enable their stakeholder engagement strategy. Following project completion, SPRITE+ will provide support to enable the team to secure follow-on funds. This project is a collaboration between Dr Geoff Goodell (PI, University College London), Dr Andrea Bracciali (University of Stirling), Dr Jiahong Chen (University of Nottingham), Dr Duncan Greaves (CU Scarborough), Dr Chris Hicks (The Alan Turing Institute), Dr Yang Lu (University of Kent), Dr Okechukwu Okorie (University of Exeter) and Dr Robin Renwick (Trilateral Research).
Collaborator Contribution Cash affords both privacy and universal market access. Digital payment systems and the management of associated digital information have implications for trust, identity, privacy, and security (TIPS). This project investigated future digital payment systems with respect to TIPS, contributing to the identification of policies and technologies that best serve the public interest. The team used a multidisciplinary approach to investigate pre and post Covid-19 financial information, analyse legal, policy and regulatory aspects, assess innovative technologies for digital payments, proposed simulations of future scenarios, and engaged stakeholders and user-groups to understand perspectives, opinions, and concerns. The project also aimed to further advance this line of enquiry by identifying suitable pathways for future research.
Impact This project team is highly multidisciplinary and draws on expertise from financial computing and analytics, law, cyber security, computer science, and business studies. With the help of regulators and other stakeholders, the group digested the landscape of future payment methods. The team responded to several government consultations, engaged in follow-up discussions with the regulatory groups, and presented their findings at stakeholder focussed conferences and workshops. The team characterised the salient features of cash. They confirmed that cash is singular and important (and is an endangered species!) and also identified some undesirable properties of cash that might be significant drivers of the migration to digital payments. The specific areas in which they have impacted stakeholders are: (1) Influence on policy from presentations and consultation responses (2) Direct conversations and engagement with regulators including: Payment Systems Regulator (PSR); Financial Conduct Authority (FCA); and HM Treasury (3) Direct conversations and engagement with stakeholder groups including: Age Friendly Nottingham; Age UK; Law Society; Which?; and Open Rights Group (4) Pathways to impact, including follow-up applications for future research and activities
Start Year 2020
 
Description Future Payment Systems: Data, Technology and Privacy after Covid 
Organisation Coventry University
Department CU Scarborough
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The SPRITE+ network funded the 'Future Payment Systems: Data, Technology and Privacy after Covid' project via a sandpit and provided guidance, assistance with logistics and promotion of its activities. In addition, SPRITE+ connected the project team with various non-academics to enable their stakeholder engagement strategy. Following project completion, SPRITE+ will provide support to enable the team to secure follow-on funds. This project is a collaboration between Dr Geoff Goodell (PI, University College London), Dr Andrea Bracciali (University of Stirling), Dr Jiahong Chen (University of Nottingham), Dr Duncan Greaves (CU Scarborough), Dr Chris Hicks (The Alan Turing Institute), Dr Yang Lu (University of Kent), Dr Okechukwu Okorie (University of Exeter) and Dr Robin Renwick (Trilateral Research).
Collaborator Contribution Cash affords both privacy and universal market access. Digital payment systems and the management of associated digital information have implications for trust, identity, privacy, and security (TIPS). This project investigated future digital payment systems with respect to TIPS, contributing to the identification of policies and technologies that best serve the public interest. The team used a multidisciplinary approach to investigate pre and post Covid-19 financial information, analyse legal, policy and regulatory aspects, assess innovative technologies for digital payments, proposed simulations of future scenarios, and engaged stakeholders and user-groups to understand perspectives, opinions, and concerns. The project also aimed to further advance this line of enquiry by identifying suitable pathways for future research.
Impact This project team is highly multidisciplinary and draws on expertise from financial computing and analytics, law, cyber security, computer science, and business studies. With the help of regulators and other stakeholders, the group digested the landscape of future payment methods. The team responded to several government consultations, engaged in follow-up discussions with the regulatory groups, and presented their findings at stakeholder focussed conferences and workshops. The team characterised the salient features of cash. They confirmed that cash is singular and important (and is an endangered species!) and also identified some undesirable properties of cash that might be significant drivers of the migration to digital payments. The specific areas in which they have impacted stakeholders are: (1) Influence on policy from presentations and consultation responses (2) Direct conversations and engagement with regulators including: Payment Systems Regulator (PSR); Financial Conduct Authority (FCA); and HM Treasury (3) Direct conversations and engagement with stakeholder groups including: Age Friendly Nottingham; Age UK; Law Society; Which?; and Open Rights Group (4) Pathways to impact, including follow-up applications for future research and activities
Start Year 2020
 
Description Future Payment Systems: Data, Technology and Privacy after Covid 
Organisation Trilateral Research and Consulting LLP
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The SPRITE+ network funded the 'Future Payment Systems: Data, Technology and Privacy after Covid' project via a sandpit and provided guidance, assistance with logistics and promotion of its activities. In addition, SPRITE+ connected the project team with various non-academics to enable their stakeholder engagement strategy. Following project completion, SPRITE+ will provide support to enable the team to secure follow-on funds. This project is a collaboration between Dr Geoff Goodell (PI, University College London), Dr Andrea Bracciali (University of Stirling), Dr Jiahong Chen (University of Nottingham), Dr Duncan Greaves (CU Scarborough), Dr Chris Hicks (The Alan Turing Institute), Dr Yang Lu (University of Kent), Dr Okechukwu Okorie (University of Exeter) and Dr Robin Renwick (Trilateral Research).
Collaborator Contribution Cash affords both privacy and universal market access. Digital payment systems and the management of associated digital information have implications for trust, identity, privacy, and security (TIPS). This project investigated future digital payment systems with respect to TIPS, contributing to the identification of policies and technologies that best serve the public interest. The team used a multidisciplinary approach to investigate pre and post Covid-19 financial information, analyse legal, policy and regulatory aspects, assess innovative technologies for digital payments, proposed simulations of future scenarios, and engaged stakeholders and user-groups to understand perspectives, opinions, and concerns. The project also aimed to further advance this line of enquiry by identifying suitable pathways for future research.
Impact This project team is highly multidisciplinary and draws on expertise from financial computing and analytics, law, cyber security, computer science, and business studies. With the help of regulators and other stakeholders, the group digested the landscape of future payment methods. The team responded to several government consultations, engaged in follow-up discussions with the regulatory groups, and presented their findings at stakeholder focussed conferences and workshops. The team characterised the salient features of cash. They confirmed that cash is singular and important (and is an endangered species!) and also identified some undesirable properties of cash that might be significant drivers of the migration to digital payments. The specific areas in which they have impacted stakeholders are: (1) Influence on policy from presentations and consultation responses (2) Direct conversations and engagement with regulators including: Payment Systems Regulator (PSR); Financial Conduct Authority (FCA); and HM Treasury (3) Direct conversations and engagement with stakeholder groups including: Age Friendly Nottingham; Age UK; Law Society; Which?; and Open Rights Group (4) Pathways to impact, including follow-up applications for future research and activities
Start Year 2020
 
Description Future Payment Systems: Data, Technology and Privacy after Covid 
Organisation University College London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The SPRITE+ network funded the 'Future Payment Systems: Data, Technology and Privacy after Covid' project via a sandpit and provided guidance, assistance with logistics and promotion of its activities. In addition, SPRITE+ connected the project team with various non-academics to enable their stakeholder engagement strategy. Following project completion, SPRITE+ will provide support to enable the team to secure follow-on funds. This project is a collaboration between Dr Geoff Goodell (PI, University College London), Dr Andrea Bracciali (University of Stirling), Dr Jiahong Chen (University of Nottingham), Dr Duncan Greaves (CU Scarborough), Dr Chris Hicks (The Alan Turing Institute), Dr Yang Lu (University of Kent), Dr Okechukwu Okorie (University of Exeter) and Dr Robin Renwick (Trilateral Research).
Collaborator Contribution Cash affords both privacy and universal market access. Digital payment systems and the management of associated digital information have implications for trust, identity, privacy, and security (TIPS). This project investigated future digital payment systems with respect to TIPS, contributing to the identification of policies and technologies that best serve the public interest. The team used a multidisciplinary approach to investigate pre and post Covid-19 financial information, analyse legal, policy and regulatory aspects, assess innovative technologies for digital payments, proposed simulations of future scenarios, and engaged stakeholders and user-groups to understand perspectives, opinions, and concerns. The project also aimed to further advance this line of enquiry by identifying suitable pathways for future research.
Impact This project team is highly multidisciplinary and draws on expertise from financial computing and analytics, law, cyber security, computer science, and business studies. With the help of regulators and other stakeholders, the group digested the landscape of future payment methods. The team responded to several government consultations, engaged in follow-up discussions with the regulatory groups, and presented their findings at stakeholder focussed conferences and workshops. The team characterised the salient features of cash. They confirmed that cash is singular and important (and is an endangered species!) and also identified some undesirable properties of cash that might be significant drivers of the migration to digital payments. The specific areas in which they have impacted stakeholders are: (1) Influence on policy from presentations and consultation responses (2) Direct conversations and engagement with regulators including: Payment Systems Regulator (PSR); Financial Conduct Authority (FCA); and HM Treasury (3) Direct conversations and engagement with stakeholder groups including: Age Friendly Nottingham; Age UK; Law Society; Which?; and Open Rights Group (4) Pathways to impact, including follow-up applications for future research and activities
Start Year 2020
 
Description Future Payment Systems: Data, Technology and Privacy after Covid 
Organisation University of Exeter
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The SPRITE+ network funded the 'Future Payment Systems: Data, Technology and Privacy after Covid' project via a sandpit and provided guidance, assistance with logistics and promotion of its activities. In addition, SPRITE+ connected the project team with various non-academics to enable their stakeholder engagement strategy. Following project completion, SPRITE+ will provide support to enable the team to secure follow-on funds. This project is a collaboration between Dr Geoff Goodell (PI, University College London), Dr Andrea Bracciali (University of Stirling), Dr Jiahong Chen (University of Nottingham), Dr Duncan Greaves (CU Scarborough), Dr Chris Hicks (The Alan Turing Institute), Dr Yang Lu (University of Kent), Dr Okechukwu Okorie (University of Exeter) and Dr Robin Renwick (Trilateral Research).
Collaborator Contribution Cash affords both privacy and universal market access. Digital payment systems and the management of associated digital information have implications for trust, identity, privacy, and security (TIPS). This project investigated future digital payment systems with respect to TIPS, contributing to the identification of policies and technologies that best serve the public interest. The team used a multidisciplinary approach to investigate pre and post Covid-19 financial information, analyse legal, policy and regulatory aspects, assess innovative technologies for digital payments, proposed simulations of future scenarios, and engaged stakeholders and user-groups to understand perspectives, opinions, and concerns. The project also aimed to further advance this line of enquiry by identifying suitable pathways for future research.
Impact This project team is highly multidisciplinary and draws on expertise from financial computing and analytics, law, cyber security, computer science, and business studies. With the help of regulators and other stakeholders, the group digested the landscape of future payment methods. The team responded to several government consultations, engaged in follow-up discussions with the regulatory groups, and presented their findings at stakeholder focussed conferences and workshops. The team characterised the salient features of cash. They confirmed that cash is singular and important (and is an endangered species!) and also identified some undesirable properties of cash that might be significant drivers of the migration to digital payments. The specific areas in which they have impacted stakeholders are: (1) Influence on policy from presentations and consultation responses (2) Direct conversations and engagement with regulators including: Payment Systems Regulator (PSR); Financial Conduct Authority (FCA); and HM Treasury (3) Direct conversations and engagement with stakeholder groups including: Age Friendly Nottingham; Age UK; Law Society; Which?; and Open Rights Group (4) Pathways to impact, including follow-up applications for future research and activities
Start Year 2020
 
Description Future Payment Systems: Data, Technology and Privacy after Covid 
Organisation University of Kent
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The SPRITE+ network funded the 'Future Payment Systems: Data, Technology and Privacy after Covid' project via a sandpit and provided guidance, assistance with logistics and promotion of its activities. In addition, SPRITE+ connected the project team with various non-academics to enable their stakeholder engagement strategy. Following project completion, SPRITE+ will provide support to enable the team to secure follow-on funds. This project is a collaboration between Dr Geoff Goodell (PI, University College London), Dr Andrea Bracciali (University of Stirling), Dr Jiahong Chen (University of Nottingham), Dr Duncan Greaves (CU Scarborough), Dr Chris Hicks (The Alan Turing Institute), Dr Yang Lu (University of Kent), Dr Okechukwu Okorie (University of Exeter) and Dr Robin Renwick (Trilateral Research).
Collaborator Contribution Cash affords both privacy and universal market access. Digital payment systems and the management of associated digital information have implications for trust, identity, privacy, and security (TIPS). This project investigated future digital payment systems with respect to TIPS, contributing to the identification of policies and technologies that best serve the public interest. The team used a multidisciplinary approach to investigate pre and post Covid-19 financial information, analyse legal, policy and regulatory aspects, assess innovative technologies for digital payments, proposed simulations of future scenarios, and engaged stakeholders and user-groups to understand perspectives, opinions, and concerns. The project also aimed to further advance this line of enquiry by identifying suitable pathways for future research.
Impact This project team is highly multidisciplinary and draws on expertise from financial computing and analytics, law, cyber security, computer science, and business studies. With the help of regulators and other stakeholders, the group digested the landscape of future payment methods. The team responded to several government consultations, engaged in follow-up discussions with the regulatory groups, and presented their findings at stakeholder focussed conferences and workshops. The team characterised the salient features of cash. They confirmed that cash is singular and important (and is an endangered species!) and also identified some undesirable properties of cash that might be significant drivers of the migration to digital payments. The specific areas in which they have impacted stakeholders are: (1) Influence on policy from presentations and consultation responses (2) Direct conversations and engagement with regulators including: Payment Systems Regulator (PSR); Financial Conduct Authority (FCA); and HM Treasury (3) Direct conversations and engagement with stakeholder groups including: Age Friendly Nottingham; Age UK; Law Society; Which?; and Open Rights Group (4) Pathways to impact, including follow-up applications for future research and activities
Start Year 2020
 
Description Future Payment Systems: Data, Technology and Privacy after Covid 
Organisation University of Nottingham
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The SPRITE+ network funded the 'Future Payment Systems: Data, Technology and Privacy after Covid' project via a sandpit and provided guidance, assistance with logistics and promotion of its activities. In addition, SPRITE+ connected the project team with various non-academics to enable their stakeholder engagement strategy. Following project completion, SPRITE+ will provide support to enable the team to secure follow-on funds. This project is a collaboration between Dr Geoff Goodell (PI, University College London), Dr Andrea Bracciali (University of Stirling), Dr Jiahong Chen (University of Nottingham), Dr Duncan Greaves (CU Scarborough), Dr Chris Hicks (The Alan Turing Institute), Dr Yang Lu (University of Kent), Dr Okechukwu Okorie (University of Exeter) and Dr Robin Renwick (Trilateral Research).
Collaborator Contribution Cash affords both privacy and universal market access. Digital payment systems and the management of associated digital information have implications for trust, identity, privacy, and security (TIPS). This project investigated future digital payment systems with respect to TIPS, contributing to the identification of policies and technologies that best serve the public interest. The team used a multidisciplinary approach to investigate pre and post Covid-19 financial information, analyse legal, policy and regulatory aspects, assess innovative technologies for digital payments, proposed simulations of future scenarios, and engaged stakeholders and user-groups to understand perspectives, opinions, and concerns. The project also aimed to further advance this line of enquiry by identifying suitable pathways for future research.
Impact This project team is highly multidisciplinary and draws on expertise from financial computing and analytics, law, cyber security, computer science, and business studies. With the help of regulators and other stakeholders, the group digested the landscape of future payment methods. The team responded to several government consultations, engaged in follow-up discussions with the regulatory groups, and presented their findings at stakeholder focussed conferences and workshops. The team characterised the salient features of cash. They confirmed that cash is singular and important (and is an endangered species!) and also identified some undesirable properties of cash that might be significant drivers of the migration to digital payments. The specific areas in which they have impacted stakeholders are: (1) Influence on policy from presentations and consultation responses (2) Direct conversations and engagement with regulators including: Payment Systems Regulator (PSR); Financial Conduct Authority (FCA); and HM Treasury (3) Direct conversations and engagement with stakeholder groups including: Age Friendly Nottingham; Age UK; Law Society; Which?; and Open Rights Group (4) Pathways to impact, including follow-up applications for future research and activities
Start Year 2020
 
Description Future Payment Systems: Data, Technology and Privacy after Covid 
Organisation University of Stirling
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The SPRITE+ network funded the 'Future Payment Systems: Data, Technology and Privacy after Covid' project via a sandpit and provided guidance, assistance with logistics and promotion of its activities. In addition, SPRITE+ connected the project team with various non-academics to enable their stakeholder engagement strategy. Following project completion, SPRITE+ will provide support to enable the team to secure follow-on funds. This project is a collaboration between Dr Geoff Goodell (PI, University College London), Dr Andrea Bracciali (University of Stirling), Dr Jiahong Chen (University of Nottingham), Dr Duncan Greaves (CU Scarborough), Dr Chris Hicks (The Alan Turing Institute), Dr Yang Lu (University of Kent), Dr Okechukwu Okorie (University of Exeter) and Dr Robin Renwick (Trilateral Research).
Collaborator Contribution Cash affords both privacy and universal market access. Digital payment systems and the management of associated digital information have implications for trust, identity, privacy, and security (TIPS). This project investigated future digital payment systems with respect to TIPS, contributing to the identification of policies and technologies that best serve the public interest. The team used a multidisciplinary approach to investigate pre and post Covid-19 financial information, analyse legal, policy and regulatory aspects, assess innovative technologies for digital payments, proposed simulations of future scenarios, and engaged stakeholders and user-groups to understand perspectives, opinions, and concerns. The project also aimed to further advance this line of enquiry by identifying suitable pathways for future research.
Impact This project team is highly multidisciplinary and draws on expertise from financial computing and analytics, law, cyber security, computer science, and business studies. With the help of regulators and other stakeholders, the group digested the landscape of future payment methods. The team responded to several government consultations, engaged in follow-up discussions with the regulatory groups, and presented their findings at stakeholder focussed conferences and workshops. The team characterised the salient features of cash. They confirmed that cash is singular and important (and is an endangered species!) and also identified some undesirable properties of cash that might be significant drivers of the migration to digital payments. The specific areas in which they have impacted stakeholders are: (1) Influence on policy from presentations and consultation responses (2) Direct conversations and engagement with regulators including: Payment Systems Regulator (PSR); Financial Conduct Authority (FCA); and HM Treasury (3) Direct conversations and engagement with stakeholder groups including: Age Friendly Nottingham; Age UK; Law Society; Which?; and Open Rights Group (4) Pathways to impact, including follow-up applications for future research and activities
Start Year 2020
 
Description God, the Oracle, and the Nightclub Bouncer: Can human dignity be modelled in an AI-based decision support system for post-Covid health certification? 
Organisation Birmingham City University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution SPRITE+ funded the 'God, the Oracle, and the Nightclub Bouncer: Can human dignity be modelled in an AI-based decision support system for post-Covid health certification?' project via a sandpit, and provided support, guidance and assistance with logistics and promotion. This project is a collaboration between Dr Ozlem Ulgen (PI, Birmingham City University), Dr Kai Xu (Middlesex University), Dr Ghita Berrada (King's College London), Dr Carolina Fuentes (Cardiff University), Dr Okechukwu Okorie (University of Exeter) and Dr Robin Renwick (Trilateral Research).
Collaborator Contribution This project explored how human dignity may be impacted by an AI-based decision support system for post-Covid health certification. Drawing from law and moral philosophy, the team related the definition and substantive content of human dignity to two aspects: (1) recognition of the status of human beings as agents with autonomy and rational capacity to exercise judgement, reasoning, and choice; and (2) respectful treatment of human agents so that their capacity is not diminished or lost through interaction with or use of the technology.
Impact This project was run by a multidisciplinary team which draws on expertise in law, data analytics, health informatics and computer science. The project has identified several legal-philosophical components that constitute human dignity, primarily the status of human beings as autonomous agents with rational capacity. A respectful treatment which does not diminish these capacities, where the decisions are made in a way which put person's interests first would constitute a system which treats human dignity fairly. The team has developed an algorithmic design of a human dignity-aware decision support system (DSS), together with pre-conditions simulation for a human dignity-aware DSS, based on agent-based modelling. Three use case scenarios were developed to represent real-life contexts of an individual interacting with a human dignity- aware DSS to access a vaccine and obtain a vaccine credential. This project's impact is that this is the first ever attempt at designing and developing a human dignity-aware AI system that relies on source expertise on human dignity based on law and moral philosophy, and combines with AI expertise in algorithm mapping and design, and simulation modelling. It creates a "human dignity-aware AI design" method that connects source expert knowledge on human dignity with guidelines to inform development of future human dignity-aware AI systems. The team will collate, evaluate, and write up the research findings in a high impact peer-reviewed journal. The team also aims to seek further funding to develop the existing basis of the research, and expand it to other domains.
Start Year 2020
 
Description God, the Oracle, and the Nightclub Bouncer: Can human dignity be modelled in an AI-based decision support system for post-Covid health certification? 
Organisation Cardiff University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution SPRITE+ funded the 'God, the Oracle, and the Nightclub Bouncer: Can human dignity be modelled in an AI-based decision support system for post-Covid health certification?' project via a sandpit, and provided support, guidance and assistance with logistics and promotion. This project is a collaboration between Dr Ozlem Ulgen (PI, Birmingham City University), Dr Kai Xu (Middlesex University), Dr Ghita Berrada (King's College London), Dr Carolina Fuentes (Cardiff University), Dr Okechukwu Okorie (University of Exeter) and Dr Robin Renwick (Trilateral Research).
Collaborator Contribution This project explored how human dignity may be impacted by an AI-based decision support system for post-Covid health certification. Drawing from law and moral philosophy, the team related the definition and substantive content of human dignity to two aspects: (1) recognition of the status of human beings as agents with autonomy and rational capacity to exercise judgement, reasoning, and choice; and (2) respectful treatment of human agents so that their capacity is not diminished or lost through interaction with or use of the technology.
Impact This project was run by a multidisciplinary team which draws on expertise in law, data analytics, health informatics and computer science. The project has identified several legal-philosophical components that constitute human dignity, primarily the status of human beings as autonomous agents with rational capacity. A respectful treatment which does not diminish these capacities, where the decisions are made in a way which put person's interests first would constitute a system which treats human dignity fairly. The team has developed an algorithmic design of a human dignity-aware decision support system (DSS), together with pre-conditions simulation for a human dignity-aware DSS, based on agent-based modelling. Three use case scenarios were developed to represent real-life contexts of an individual interacting with a human dignity- aware DSS to access a vaccine and obtain a vaccine credential. This project's impact is that this is the first ever attempt at designing and developing a human dignity-aware AI system that relies on source expertise on human dignity based on law and moral philosophy, and combines with AI expertise in algorithm mapping and design, and simulation modelling. It creates a "human dignity-aware AI design" method that connects source expert knowledge on human dignity with guidelines to inform development of future human dignity-aware AI systems. The team will collate, evaluate, and write up the research findings in a high impact peer-reviewed journal. The team also aims to seek further funding to develop the existing basis of the research, and expand it to other domains.
Start Year 2020
 
Description God, the Oracle, and the Nightclub Bouncer: Can human dignity be modelled in an AI-based decision support system for post-Covid health certification? 
Organisation King's College London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution SPRITE+ funded the 'God, the Oracle, and the Nightclub Bouncer: Can human dignity be modelled in an AI-based decision support system for post-Covid health certification?' project via a sandpit, and provided support, guidance and assistance with logistics and promotion. This project is a collaboration between Dr Ozlem Ulgen (PI, Birmingham City University), Dr Kai Xu (Middlesex University), Dr Ghita Berrada (King's College London), Dr Carolina Fuentes (Cardiff University), Dr Okechukwu Okorie (University of Exeter) and Dr Robin Renwick (Trilateral Research).
Collaborator Contribution This project explored how human dignity may be impacted by an AI-based decision support system for post-Covid health certification. Drawing from law and moral philosophy, the team related the definition and substantive content of human dignity to two aspects: (1) recognition of the status of human beings as agents with autonomy and rational capacity to exercise judgement, reasoning, and choice; and (2) respectful treatment of human agents so that their capacity is not diminished or lost through interaction with or use of the technology.
Impact This project was run by a multidisciplinary team which draws on expertise in law, data analytics, health informatics and computer science. The project has identified several legal-philosophical components that constitute human dignity, primarily the status of human beings as autonomous agents with rational capacity. A respectful treatment which does not diminish these capacities, where the decisions are made in a way which put person's interests first would constitute a system which treats human dignity fairly. The team has developed an algorithmic design of a human dignity-aware decision support system (DSS), together with pre-conditions simulation for a human dignity-aware DSS, based on agent-based modelling. Three use case scenarios were developed to represent real-life contexts of an individual interacting with a human dignity- aware DSS to access a vaccine and obtain a vaccine credential. This project's impact is that this is the first ever attempt at designing and developing a human dignity-aware AI system that relies on source expertise on human dignity based on law and moral philosophy, and combines with AI expertise in algorithm mapping and design, and simulation modelling. It creates a "human dignity-aware AI design" method that connects source expert knowledge on human dignity with guidelines to inform development of future human dignity-aware AI systems. The team will collate, evaluate, and write up the research findings in a high impact peer-reviewed journal. The team also aims to seek further funding to develop the existing basis of the research, and expand it to other domains.
Start Year 2020
 
Description God, the Oracle, and the Nightclub Bouncer: Can human dignity be modelled in an AI-based decision support system for post-Covid health certification? 
Organisation Middlesex University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution SPRITE+ funded the 'God, the Oracle, and the Nightclub Bouncer: Can human dignity be modelled in an AI-based decision support system for post-Covid health certification?' project via a sandpit, and provided support, guidance and assistance with logistics and promotion. This project is a collaboration between Dr Ozlem Ulgen (PI, Birmingham City University), Dr Kai Xu (Middlesex University), Dr Ghita Berrada (King's College London), Dr Carolina Fuentes (Cardiff University), Dr Okechukwu Okorie (University of Exeter) and Dr Robin Renwick (Trilateral Research).
Collaborator Contribution This project explored how human dignity may be impacted by an AI-based decision support system for post-Covid health certification. Drawing from law and moral philosophy, the team related the definition and substantive content of human dignity to two aspects: (1) recognition of the status of human beings as agents with autonomy and rational capacity to exercise judgement, reasoning, and choice; and (2) respectful treatment of human agents so that their capacity is not diminished or lost through interaction with or use of the technology.
Impact This project was run by a multidisciplinary team which draws on expertise in law, data analytics, health informatics and computer science. The project has identified several legal-philosophical components that constitute human dignity, primarily the status of human beings as autonomous agents with rational capacity. A respectful treatment which does not diminish these capacities, where the decisions are made in a way which put person's interests first would constitute a system which treats human dignity fairly. The team has developed an algorithmic design of a human dignity-aware decision support system (DSS), together with pre-conditions simulation for a human dignity-aware DSS, based on agent-based modelling. Three use case scenarios were developed to represent real-life contexts of an individual interacting with a human dignity- aware DSS to access a vaccine and obtain a vaccine credential. This project's impact is that this is the first ever attempt at designing and developing a human dignity-aware AI system that relies on source expertise on human dignity based on law and moral philosophy, and combines with AI expertise in algorithm mapping and design, and simulation modelling. It creates a "human dignity-aware AI design" method that connects source expert knowledge on human dignity with guidelines to inform development of future human dignity-aware AI systems. The team will collate, evaluate, and write up the research findings in a high impact peer-reviewed journal. The team also aims to seek further funding to develop the existing basis of the research, and expand it to other domains.
Start Year 2020
 
Description God, the Oracle, and the Nightclub Bouncer: Can human dignity be modelled in an AI-based decision support system for post-Covid health certification? 
Organisation Trilateral Research and Consulting LLP
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution SPRITE+ funded the 'God, the Oracle, and the Nightclub Bouncer: Can human dignity be modelled in an AI-based decision support system for post-Covid health certification?' project via a sandpit, and provided support, guidance and assistance with logistics and promotion. This project is a collaboration between Dr Ozlem Ulgen (PI, Birmingham City University), Dr Kai Xu (Middlesex University), Dr Ghita Berrada (King's College London), Dr Carolina Fuentes (Cardiff University), Dr Okechukwu Okorie (University of Exeter) and Dr Robin Renwick (Trilateral Research).
Collaborator Contribution This project explored how human dignity may be impacted by an AI-based decision support system for post-Covid health certification. Drawing from law and moral philosophy, the team related the definition and substantive content of human dignity to two aspects: (1) recognition of the status of human beings as agents with autonomy and rational capacity to exercise judgement, reasoning, and choice; and (2) respectful treatment of human agents so that their capacity is not diminished or lost through interaction with or use of the technology.
Impact This project was run by a multidisciplinary team which draws on expertise in law, data analytics, health informatics and computer science. The project has identified several legal-philosophical components that constitute human dignity, primarily the status of human beings as autonomous agents with rational capacity. A respectful treatment which does not diminish these capacities, where the decisions are made in a way which put person's interests first would constitute a system which treats human dignity fairly. The team has developed an algorithmic design of a human dignity-aware decision support system (DSS), together with pre-conditions simulation for a human dignity-aware DSS, based on agent-based modelling. Three use case scenarios were developed to represent real-life contexts of an individual interacting with a human dignity- aware DSS to access a vaccine and obtain a vaccine credential. This project's impact is that this is the first ever attempt at designing and developing a human dignity-aware AI system that relies on source expertise on human dignity based on law and moral philosophy, and combines with AI expertise in algorithm mapping and design, and simulation modelling. It creates a "human dignity-aware AI design" method that connects source expert knowledge on human dignity with guidelines to inform development of future human dignity-aware AI systems. The team will collate, evaluate, and write up the research findings in a high impact peer-reviewed journal. The team also aims to seek further funding to develop the existing basis of the research, and expand it to other domains.
Start Year 2020
 
Description God, the Oracle, and the Nightclub Bouncer: Can human dignity be modelled in an AI-based decision support system for post-Covid health certification? 
Organisation University of Exeter
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution SPRITE+ funded the 'God, the Oracle, and the Nightclub Bouncer: Can human dignity be modelled in an AI-based decision support system for post-Covid health certification?' project via a sandpit, and provided support, guidance and assistance with logistics and promotion. This project is a collaboration between Dr Ozlem Ulgen (PI, Birmingham City University), Dr Kai Xu (Middlesex University), Dr Ghita Berrada (King's College London), Dr Carolina Fuentes (Cardiff University), Dr Okechukwu Okorie (University of Exeter) and Dr Robin Renwick (Trilateral Research).
Collaborator Contribution This project explored how human dignity may be impacted by an AI-based decision support system for post-Covid health certification. Drawing from law and moral philosophy, the team related the definition and substantive content of human dignity to two aspects: (1) recognition of the status of human beings as agents with autonomy and rational capacity to exercise judgement, reasoning, and choice; and (2) respectful treatment of human agents so that their capacity is not diminished or lost through interaction with or use of the technology.
Impact This project was run by a multidisciplinary team which draws on expertise in law, data analytics, health informatics and computer science. The project has identified several legal-philosophical components that constitute human dignity, primarily the status of human beings as autonomous agents with rational capacity. A respectful treatment which does not diminish these capacities, where the decisions are made in a way which put person's interests first would constitute a system which treats human dignity fairly. The team has developed an algorithmic design of a human dignity-aware decision support system (DSS), together with pre-conditions simulation for a human dignity-aware DSS, based on agent-based modelling. Three use case scenarios were developed to represent real-life contexts of an individual interacting with a human dignity- aware DSS to access a vaccine and obtain a vaccine credential. This project's impact is that this is the first ever attempt at designing and developing a human dignity-aware AI system that relies on source expertise on human dignity based on law and moral philosophy, and combines with AI expertise in algorithm mapping and design, and simulation modelling. It creates a "human dignity-aware AI design" method that connects source expert knowledge on human dignity with guidelines to inform development of future human dignity-aware AI systems. The team will collate, evaluate, and write up the research findings in a high impact peer-reviewed journal. The team also aims to seek further funding to develop the existing basis of the research, and expand it to other domains.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Revealing Young Learners' Mental Models of Online Sludge 
Organisation Bournemouth University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution SPRITE+ funded the 'Revealing Young Learners' Mental Models of Online Sludge' project via a sandpit, and provides support, guidance and assistance with logistics and promotion. This project is a collaboration between Dr Karen Renaud (PI, University of Strathclyde), Dr Bryan Clift (University of Bath), Dr Ben Morrison (Northumbria University), Dr Kovila Coopamootoo (Newcastle University), Dr Cigdem Sengul (Brunel University), Dr Mark Springett (Middlesex University), and Dr Jacqui Taylor (Bournemouth University).
Collaborator Contribution Bad/unethical actors on the Internet increasingly use techniques which we can refer to as "dark patterns". Such patterns seek to manipulate users to purchase goods or subscriptions, spend more time on a site, or mindlessly accept the harvesting of their personal data. Computer users are often unaware of the manipulative techniques they are likely to encounter as they often operate under the human conscious radar to exert their influence. Young learners are also being targeted by these techniques, and they are especially vulnerable to these tactics as they enter adolescence (before they develop the skills to protect and defend themselves). Awareness raising interventions forewarn and forearm but work best when they start from a sound understanding of existing mental models. This project aims to reveal young learners' existing mental models of dark patterns. The team will then design an intervention grounded in and informed by these mental models, which will aim to raise awareness and forearm young learners to help them to resist online manipulative techniques.
Impact This is a multi-disciplinary collaboration which draws on expertise from computer science, usable privacy and security, psychology, development studies and human-centred security. The project team have published a white paper: Mental Models of Dark Patterns (https://spritehub.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/SPRITE_Lit_Review8.pdf). Further outcomes/outputs will be reported once the project is complete.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Revealing Young Learners' Mental Models of Online Sludge 
Organisation Brunel University London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution SPRITE+ funded the 'Revealing Young Learners' Mental Models of Online Sludge' project via a sandpit, and provides support, guidance and assistance with logistics and promotion. This project is a collaboration between Dr Karen Renaud (PI, University of Strathclyde), Dr Bryan Clift (University of Bath), Dr Ben Morrison (Northumbria University), Dr Kovila Coopamootoo (Newcastle University), Dr Cigdem Sengul (Brunel University), Dr Mark Springett (Middlesex University), and Dr Jacqui Taylor (Bournemouth University).
Collaborator Contribution Bad/unethical actors on the Internet increasingly use techniques which we can refer to as "dark patterns". Such patterns seek to manipulate users to purchase goods or subscriptions, spend more time on a site, or mindlessly accept the harvesting of their personal data. Computer users are often unaware of the manipulative techniques they are likely to encounter as they often operate under the human conscious radar to exert their influence. Young learners are also being targeted by these techniques, and they are especially vulnerable to these tactics as they enter adolescence (before they develop the skills to protect and defend themselves). Awareness raising interventions forewarn and forearm but work best when they start from a sound understanding of existing mental models. This project aims to reveal young learners' existing mental models of dark patterns. The team will then design an intervention grounded in and informed by these mental models, which will aim to raise awareness and forearm young learners to help them to resist online manipulative techniques.
Impact This is a multi-disciplinary collaboration which draws on expertise from computer science, usable privacy and security, psychology, development studies and human-centred security. The project team have published a white paper: Mental Models of Dark Patterns (https://spritehub.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/SPRITE_Lit_Review8.pdf). Further outcomes/outputs will be reported once the project is complete.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Revealing Young Learners' Mental Models of Online Sludge 
Organisation Middlesex University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution SPRITE+ funded the 'Revealing Young Learners' Mental Models of Online Sludge' project via a sandpit, and provides support, guidance and assistance with logistics and promotion. This project is a collaboration between Dr Karen Renaud (PI, University of Strathclyde), Dr Bryan Clift (University of Bath), Dr Ben Morrison (Northumbria University), Dr Kovila Coopamootoo (Newcastle University), Dr Cigdem Sengul (Brunel University), Dr Mark Springett (Middlesex University), and Dr Jacqui Taylor (Bournemouth University).
Collaborator Contribution Bad/unethical actors on the Internet increasingly use techniques which we can refer to as "dark patterns". Such patterns seek to manipulate users to purchase goods or subscriptions, spend more time on a site, or mindlessly accept the harvesting of their personal data. Computer users are often unaware of the manipulative techniques they are likely to encounter as they often operate under the human conscious radar to exert their influence. Young learners are also being targeted by these techniques, and they are especially vulnerable to these tactics as they enter adolescence (before they develop the skills to protect and defend themselves). Awareness raising interventions forewarn and forearm but work best when they start from a sound understanding of existing mental models. This project aims to reveal young learners' existing mental models of dark patterns. The team will then design an intervention grounded in and informed by these mental models, which will aim to raise awareness and forearm young learners to help them to resist online manipulative techniques.
Impact This is a multi-disciplinary collaboration which draws on expertise from computer science, usable privacy and security, psychology, development studies and human-centred security. The project team have published a white paper: Mental Models of Dark Patterns (https://spritehub.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/SPRITE_Lit_Review8.pdf). Further outcomes/outputs will be reported once the project is complete.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Revealing Young Learners' Mental Models of Online Sludge 
Organisation Newcastle University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution SPRITE+ funded the 'Revealing Young Learners' Mental Models of Online Sludge' project via a sandpit, and provides support, guidance and assistance with logistics and promotion. This project is a collaboration between Dr Karen Renaud (PI, University of Strathclyde), Dr Bryan Clift (University of Bath), Dr Ben Morrison (Northumbria University), Dr Kovila Coopamootoo (Newcastle University), Dr Cigdem Sengul (Brunel University), Dr Mark Springett (Middlesex University), and Dr Jacqui Taylor (Bournemouth University).
Collaborator Contribution Bad/unethical actors on the Internet increasingly use techniques which we can refer to as "dark patterns". Such patterns seek to manipulate users to purchase goods or subscriptions, spend more time on a site, or mindlessly accept the harvesting of their personal data. Computer users are often unaware of the manipulative techniques they are likely to encounter as they often operate under the human conscious radar to exert their influence. Young learners are also being targeted by these techniques, and they are especially vulnerable to these tactics as they enter adolescence (before they develop the skills to protect and defend themselves). Awareness raising interventions forewarn and forearm but work best when they start from a sound understanding of existing mental models. This project aims to reveal young learners' existing mental models of dark patterns. The team will then design an intervention grounded in and informed by these mental models, which will aim to raise awareness and forearm young learners to help them to resist online manipulative techniques.
Impact This is a multi-disciplinary collaboration which draws on expertise from computer science, usable privacy and security, psychology, development studies and human-centred security. The project team have published a white paper: Mental Models of Dark Patterns (https://spritehub.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/SPRITE_Lit_Review8.pdf). Further outcomes/outputs will be reported once the project is complete.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Revealing Young Learners' Mental Models of Online Sludge 
Organisation Northumbria University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution SPRITE+ funded the 'Revealing Young Learners' Mental Models of Online Sludge' project via a sandpit, and provides support, guidance and assistance with logistics and promotion. This project is a collaboration between Dr Karen Renaud (PI, University of Strathclyde), Dr Bryan Clift (University of Bath), Dr Ben Morrison (Northumbria University), Dr Kovila Coopamootoo (Newcastle University), Dr Cigdem Sengul (Brunel University), Dr Mark Springett (Middlesex University), and Dr Jacqui Taylor (Bournemouth University).
Collaborator Contribution Bad/unethical actors on the Internet increasingly use techniques which we can refer to as "dark patterns". Such patterns seek to manipulate users to purchase goods or subscriptions, spend more time on a site, or mindlessly accept the harvesting of their personal data. Computer users are often unaware of the manipulative techniques they are likely to encounter as they often operate under the human conscious radar to exert their influence. Young learners are also being targeted by these techniques, and they are especially vulnerable to these tactics as they enter adolescence (before they develop the skills to protect and defend themselves). Awareness raising interventions forewarn and forearm but work best when they start from a sound understanding of existing mental models. This project aims to reveal young learners' existing mental models of dark patterns. The team will then design an intervention grounded in and informed by these mental models, which will aim to raise awareness and forearm young learners to help them to resist online manipulative techniques.
Impact This is a multi-disciplinary collaboration which draws on expertise from computer science, usable privacy and security, psychology, development studies and human-centred security. The project team have published a white paper: Mental Models of Dark Patterns (https://spritehub.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/SPRITE_Lit_Review8.pdf). Further outcomes/outputs will be reported once the project is complete.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Revealing Young Learners' Mental Models of Online Sludge 
Organisation University of Bath
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution SPRITE+ funded the 'Revealing Young Learners' Mental Models of Online Sludge' project via a sandpit, and provides support, guidance and assistance with logistics and promotion. This project is a collaboration between Dr Karen Renaud (PI, University of Strathclyde), Dr Bryan Clift (University of Bath), Dr Ben Morrison (Northumbria University), Dr Kovila Coopamootoo (Newcastle University), Dr Cigdem Sengul (Brunel University), Dr Mark Springett (Middlesex University), and Dr Jacqui Taylor (Bournemouth University).
Collaborator Contribution Bad/unethical actors on the Internet increasingly use techniques which we can refer to as "dark patterns". Such patterns seek to manipulate users to purchase goods or subscriptions, spend more time on a site, or mindlessly accept the harvesting of their personal data. Computer users are often unaware of the manipulative techniques they are likely to encounter as they often operate under the human conscious radar to exert their influence. Young learners are also being targeted by these techniques, and they are especially vulnerable to these tactics as they enter adolescence (before they develop the skills to protect and defend themselves). Awareness raising interventions forewarn and forearm but work best when they start from a sound understanding of existing mental models. This project aims to reveal young learners' existing mental models of dark patterns. The team will then design an intervention grounded in and informed by these mental models, which will aim to raise awareness and forearm young learners to help them to resist online manipulative techniques.
Impact This is a multi-disciplinary collaboration which draws on expertise from computer science, usable privacy and security, psychology, development studies and human-centred security. The project team have published a white paper: Mental Models of Dark Patterns (https://spritehub.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/SPRITE_Lit_Review8.pdf). Further outcomes/outputs will be reported once the project is complete.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Revealing Young Learners' Mental Models of Online Sludge 
Organisation University of Strathclyde
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution SPRITE+ funded the 'Revealing Young Learners' Mental Models of Online Sludge' project via a sandpit, and provides support, guidance and assistance with logistics and promotion. This project is a collaboration between Dr Karen Renaud (PI, University of Strathclyde), Dr Bryan Clift (University of Bath), Dr Ben Morrison (Northumbria University), Dr Kovila Coopamootoo (Newcastle University), Dr Cigdem Sengul (Brunel University), Dr Mark Springett (Middlesex University), and Dr Jacqui Taylor (Bournemouth University).
Collaborator Contribution Bad/unethical actors on the Internet increasingly use techniques which we can refer to as "dark patterns". Such patterns seek to manipulate users to purchase goods or subscriptions, spend more time on a site, or mindlessly accept the harvesting of their personal data. Computer users are often unaware of the manipulative techniques they are likely to encounter as they often operate under the human conscious radar to exert their influence. Young learners are also being targeted by these techniques, and they are especially vulnerable to these tactics as they enter adolescence (before they develop the skills to protect and defend themselves). Awareness raising interventions forewarn and forearm but work best when they start from a sound understanding of existing mental models. This project aims to reveal young learners' existing mental models of dark patterns. The team will then design an intervention grounded in and informed by these mental models, which will aim to raise awareness and forearm young learners to help them to resist online manipulative techniques.
Impact This is a multi-disciplinary collaboration which draws on expertise from computer science, usable privacy and security, psychology, development studies and human-centred security. The project team have published a white paper: Mental Models of Dark Patterns (https://spritehub.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/SPRITE_Lit_Review8.pdf). Further outcomes/outputs will be reported once the project is complete.
Start Year 2021
 
Description TIPS in blended home-work environments: A socio-technical perspective 
Organisation Cardiff University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution SPRITE+ funded the 'TIPS in blended home-work environments: A socio-technical perspective' project via a sandpit, and provided support, guidance and assistance with logistics and promotion. This project is a collaboration between Dr Emily Collins (PI, Cardiff University), Dr Jason Nurse (University of Kent), Professor Niki Pantelli (Royal Holloway University of London), Dr Nikki Williams (Cranfield University), Dr John Blythe (Cybsafe) and Ben Koppelman (Cybersmart).
Collaborator Contribution As a result of COVID-19, many workplaces had to suddenly transition to remote working, despite a lack of training, remote-working policies, or in some cases, work devices. Coupled with the pressures of working from home in this context (e.g. childcare, impaired work-life balance), this new way of working has changed the risks and challenges surrounding workplace Trust, Identity, Privacy and Security (TIPS). This is exacerbated even further with the increase in cyberattacks specifically targeting remote workers. This project team aimed to explore and identify these issues, taking a socio-technical approach and focusing on small and large organisations. Their goal was to provide key, novel insights into the new challenges and tensions in relation to TIPS in these environments, and thereby provide the much-need foundation for approaches to address these issues.
Impact Despite some similarities with previous ways of working, the sudden transition to working from home has introduced unique challenges. This project team's research has found that often difficult balances need to be made, e.g., the balance between trusting employees, the need to maintain (and monitor) productivity, and the need for employee autonomy. The working from home context that includes co-located families or housemates, shared spaces, and caring responsibilities introduces complexities around these conflicting identities, and the ability to keep work-life separate from home-life. This blurring of work and home also means privacy is difficult to maintain, with greater opportunities for accidental disclosures in both directions. However, many also failed to appreciate the risks these possible invasions of privacy may introduce. Finally, whilst some workplaces have been able to support heightened security measures while working from home, for many there remains a chasm between best practice and actual behaviour afforded by the more relaxed working environment. Overall, this work showcases an improved understanding of what risks remote working has brought about. The project's findings could influence policy advice on remote working. Businesses could use the project outputs to inform their innovation work, test their business strategy in the light of new working normals, and consider what new advice they could provide internally, and to their customers. Outputs: - Panteli et al (2021). Rethinking trust within the COVID-19 work-from-home context. Organisational Learning and Epistemic Ambiguity (OLKC2021), May 24-26, 2021. - Webinar: The office of the future: What has remote working taught us about people and security? - Nurse J.R.C., Williams N., Collins E., Panteli N., Blythe J., Koppelman B. (2021) Remote Working Pre- and Post-COVID-19: An Analysis of New Threats and Risks to Security and Privacy. In: Stephanidis C., Antona M., Ntoa S. (eds) HCI International 2021. HCII 2021. Communications in Computer and Information Science, vol 1421. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-78645-8_74
Start Year 2020
 
Description TIPS in blended home-work environments: A socio-technical perspective 
Organisation Cranfield University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution SPRITE+ funded the 'TIPS in blended home-work environments: A socio-technical perspective' project via a sandpit, and provided support, guidance and assistance with logistics and promotion. This project is a collaboration between Dr Emily Collins (PI, Cardiff University), Dr Jason Nurse (University of Kent), Professor Niki Pantelli (Royal Holloway University of London), Dr Nikki Williams (Cranfield University), Dr John Blythe (Cybsafe) and Ben Koppelman (Cybersmart).
Collaborator Contribution As a result of COVID-19, many workplaces had to suddenly transition to remote working, despite a lack of training, remote-working policies, or in some cases, work devices. Coupled with the pressures of working from home in this context (e.g. childcare, impaired work-life balance), this new way of working has changed the risks and challenges surrounding workplace Trust, Identity, Privacy and Security (TIPS). This is exacerbated even further with the increase in cyberattacks specifically targeting remote workers. This project team aimed to explore and identify these issues, taking a socio-technical approach and focusing on small and large organisations. Their goal was to provide key, novel insights into the new challenges and tensions in relation to TIPS in these environments, and thereby provide the much-need foundation for approaches to address these issues.
Impact Despite some similarities with previous ways of working, the sudden transition to working from home has introduced unique challenges. This project team's research has found that often difficult balances need to be made, e.g., the balance between trusting employees, the need to maintain (and monitor) productivity, and the need for employee autonomy. The working from home context that includes co-located families or housemates, shared spaces, and caring responsibilities introduces complexities around these conflicting identities, and the ability to keep work-life separate from home-life. This blurring of work and home also means privacy is difficult to maintain, with greater opportunities for accidental disclosures in both directions. However, many also failed to appreciate the risks these possible invasions of privacy may introduce. Finally, whilst some workplaces have been able to support heightened security measures while working from home, for many there remains a chasm between best practice and actual behaviour afforded by the more relaxed working environment. Overall, this work showcases an improved understanding of what risks remote working has brought about. The project's findings could influence policy advice on remote working. Businesses could use the project outputs to inform their innovation work, test their business strategy in the light of new working normals, and consider what new advice they could provide internally, and to their customers. Outputs: - Panteli et al (2021). Rethinking trust within the COVID-19 work-from-home context. Organisational Learning and Epistemic Ambiguity (OLKC2021), May 24-26, 2021. - Webinar: The office of the future: What has remote working taught us about people and security? - Nurse J.R.C., Williams N., Collins E., Panteli N., Blythe J., Koppelman B. (2021) Remote Working Pre- and Post-COVID-19: An Analysis of New Threats and Risks to Security and Privacy. In: Stephanidis C., Antona M., Ntoa S. (eds) HCI International 2021. HCII 2021. Communications in Computer and Information Science, vol 1421. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-78645-8_74
Start Year 2020
 
Description TIPS in blended home-work environments: A socio-technical perspective 
Organisation CybSafe
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution SPRITE+ funded the 'TIPS in blended home-work environments: A socio-technical perspective' project via a sandpit, and provided support, guidance and assistance with logistics and promotion. This project is a collaboration between Dr Emily Collins (PI, Cardiff University), Dr Jason Nurse (University of Kent), Professor Niki Pantelli (Royal Holloway University of London), Dr Nikki Williams (Cranfield University), Dr John Blythe (Cybsafe) and Ben Koppelman (Cybersmart).
Collaborator Contribution As a result of COVID-19, many workplaces had to suddenly transition to remote working, despite a lack of training, remote-working policies, or in some cases, work devices. Coupled with the pressures of working from home in this context (e.g. childcare, impaired work-life balance), this new way of working has changed the risks and challenges surrounding workplace Trust, Identity, Privacy and Security (TIPS). This is exacerbated even further with the increase in cyberattacks specifically targeting remote workers. This project team aimed to explore and identify these issues, taking a socio-technical approach and focusing on small and large organisations. Their goal was to provide key, novel insights into the new challenges and tensions in relation to TIPS in these environments, and thereby provide the much-need foundation for approaches to address these issues.
Impact Despite some similarities with previous ways of working, the sudden transition to working from home has introduced unique challenges. This project team's research has found that often difficult balances need to be made, e.g., the balance between trusting employees, the need to maintain (and monitor) productivity, and the need for employee autonomy. The working from home context that includes co-located families or housemates, shared spaces, and caring responsibilities introduces complexities around these conflicting identities, and the ability to keep work-life separate from home-life. This blurring of work and home also means privacy is difficult to maintain, with greater opportunities for accidental disclosures in both directions. However, many also failed to appreciate the risks these possible invasions of privacy may introduce. Finally, whilst some workplaces have been able to support heightened security measures while working from home, for many there remains a chasm between best practice and actual behaviour afforded by the more relaxed working environment. Overall, this work showcases an improved understanding of what risks remote working has brought about. The project's findings could influence policy advice on remote working. Businesses could use the project outputs to inform their innovation work, test their business strategy in the light of new working normals, and consider what new advice they could provide internally, and to their customers. Outputs: - Panteli et al (2021). Rethinking trust within the COVID-19 work-from-home context. Organisational Learning and Epistemic Ambiguity (OLKC2021), May 24-26, 2021. - Webinar: The office of the future: What has remote working taught us about people and security? - Nurse J.R.C., Williams N., Collins E., Panteli N., Blythe J., Koppelman B. (2021) Remote Working Pre- and Post-COVID-19: An Analysis of New Threats and Risks to Security and Privacy. In: Stephanidis C., Antona M., Ntoa S. (eds) HCI International 2021. HCII 2021. Communications in Computer and Information Science, vol 1421. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-78645-8_74
Start Year 2020
 
Description TIPS in blended home-work environments: A socio-technical perspective 
Organisation Royal Holloway, University of London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution SPRITE+ funded the 'TIPS in blended home-work environments: A socio-technical perspective' project via a sandpit, and provided support, guidance and assistance with logistics and promotion. This project is a collaboration between Dr Emily Collins (PI, Cardiff University), Dr Jason Nurse (University of Kent), Professor Niki Pantelli (Royal Holloway University of London), Dr Nikki Williams (Cranfield University), Dr John Blythe (Cybsafe) and Ben Koppelman (Cybersmart).
Collaborator Contribution As a result of COVID-19, many workplaces had to suddenly transition to remote working, despite a lack of training, remote-working policies, or in some cases, work devices. Coupled with the pressures of working from home in this context (e.g. childcare, impaired work-life balance), this new way of working has changed the risks and challenges surrounding workplace Trust, Identity, Privacy and Security (TIPS). This is exacerbated even further with the increase in cyberattacks specifically targeting remote workers. This project team aimed to explore and identify these issues, taking a socio-technical approach and focusing on small and large organisations. Their goal was to provide key, novel insights into the new challenges and tensions in relation to TIPS in these environments, and thereby provide the much-need foundation for approaches to address these issues.
Impact Despite some similarities with previous ways of working, the sudden transition to working from home has introduced unique challenges. This project team's research has found that often difficult balances need to be made, e.g., the balance between trusting employees, the need to maintain (and monitor) productivity, and the need for employee autonomy. The working from home context that includes co-located families or housemates, shared spaces, and caring responsibilities introduces complexities around these conflicting identities, and the ability to keep work-life separate from home-life. This blurring of work and home also means privacy is difficult to maintain, with greater opportunities for accidental disclosures in both directions. However, many also failed to appreciate the risks these possible invasions of privacy may introduce. Finally, whilst some workplaces have been able to support heightened security measures while working from home, for many there remains a chasm between best practice and actual behaviour afforded by the more relaxed working environment. Overall, this work showcases an improved understanding of what risks remote working has brought about. The project's findings could influence policy advice on remote working. Businesses could use the project outputs to inform their innovation work, test their business strategy in the light of new working normals, and consider what new advice they could provide internally, and to their customers. Outputs: - Panteli et al (2021). Rethinking trust within the COVID-19 work-from-home context. Organisational Learning and Epistemic Ambiguity (OLKC2021), May 24-26, 2021. - Webinar: The office of the future: What has remote working taught us about people and security? - Nurse J.R.C., Williams N., Collins E., Panteli N., Blythe J., Koppelman B. (2021) Remote Working Pre- and Post-COVID-19: An Analysis of New Threats and Risks to Security and Privacy. In: Stephanidis C., Antona M., Ntoa S. (eds) HCI International 2021. HCII 2021. Communications in Computer and Information Science, vol 1421. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-78645-8_74
Start Year 2020
 
Description TIPS in blended home-work environments: A socio-technical perspective 
Organisation University of Kent
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution SPRITE+ funded the 'TIPS in blended home-work environments: A socio-technical perspective' project via a sandpit, and provided support, guidance and assistance with logistics and promotion. This project is a collaboration between Dr Emily Collins (PI, Cardiff University), Dr Jason Nurse (University of Kent), Professor Niki Pantelli (Royal Holloway University of London), Dr Nikki Williams (Cranfield University), Dr John Blythe (Cybsafe) and Ben Koppelman (Cybersmart).
Collaborator Contribution As a result of COVID-19, many workplaces had to suddenly transition to remote working, despite a lack of training, remote-working policies, or in some cases, work devices. Coupled with the pressures of working from home in this context (e.g. childcare, impaired work-life balance), this new way of working has changed the risks and challenges surrounding workplace Trust, Identity, Privacy and Security (TIPS). This is exacerbated even further with the increase in cyberattacks specifically targeting remote workers. This project team aimed to explore and identify these issues, taking a socio-technical approach and focusing on small and large organisations. Their goal was to provide key, novel insights into the new challenges and tensions in relation to TIPS in these environments, and thereby provide the much-need foundation for approaches to address these issues.
Impact Despite some similarities with previous ways of working, the sudden transition to working from home has introduced unique challenges. This project team's research has found that often difficult balances need to be made, e.g., the balance between trusting employees, the need to maintain (and monitor) productivity, and the need for employee autonomy. The working from home context that includes co-located families or housemates, shared spaces, and caring responsibilities introduces complexities around these conflicting identities, and the ability to keep work-life separate from home-life. This blurring of work and home also means privacy is difficult to maintain, with greater opportunities for accidental disclosures in both directions. However, many also failed to appreciate the risks these possible invasions of privacy may introduce. Finally, whilst some workplaces have been able to support heightened security measures while working from home, for many there remains a chasm between best practice and actual behaviour afforded by the more relaxed working environment. Overall, this work showcases an improved understanding of what risks remote working has brought about. The project's findings could influence policy advice on remote working. Businesses could use the project outputs to inform their innovation work, test their business strategy in the light of new working normals, and consider what new advice they could provide internally, and to their customers. Outputs: - Panteli et al (2021). Rethinking trust within the COVID-19 work-from-home context. Organisational Learning and Epistemic Ambiguity (OLKC2021), May 24-26, 2021. - Webinar: The office of the future: What has remote working taught us about people and security? - Nurse J.R.C., Williams N., Collins E., Panteli N., Blythe J., Koppelman B. (2021) Remote Working Pre- and Post-COVID-19: An Analysis of New Threats and Risks to Security and Privacy. In: Stephanidis C., Antona M., Ntoa S. (eds) HCI International 2021. HCII 2021. Communications in Computer and Information Science, vol 1421. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-78645-8_74
Start Year 2020
 
Description Understanding and mapping shadow infrastructures and TIPS in Covid and post-Covid times 
Organisation IT University of Copenhagen
Country Denmark 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution SPRITE+ funded the 'Understanding and mapping shadow infrastructures and TIPS in Covid and post-Covid times' project via a sandpit, and provided support, guidance, assistance with logistics and promotion of their activities. This project is a collaboration between Dr Chris Foster (PI, University of Manchester), Professor Washington Yotto Ochieng (Imperial College London), Dr Stefanie Kuenzel (Royal Holloway University of London), Dr Jessamy Perriam (IT University Copenhagen) and Superintendent Martin Gallagher (Police Scotland).
Collaborator Contribution Infrastructure supports many of the activities we do on a daily basis and most of the time we take it for granted that it will work as and when we need it. However, Covid-19 has meant some key infrastructures have come under pressure with unexpected increased use, while others have become inaccessible. When infrastructure is disrupted, there are often workarounds that spring up to allow people to achieve what they set out to do, whether that be using the internet to communicate, finding transport options under lockdown or accessing and using supply chains. In this project, we call these ad-hoc workarounds 'shadow infrastructures'. Shadow infrastructures have the potential to be beneficial and drive innovation but they can also provide security risks and opportunities for increased criminal activities. The project team aimed to better define the concept of 'shadow infrastructures' by using case studies about shadow criminal networks, transport networks, power infrastructure and post-COVID supply chains. By involving SPRITE+ Project Partners and industry stakeholders, this project has allowed trust, identity, privacy and security (TIPS) considerations around shadow infrastructures to gain a broader awareness in real-life settings.
Impact This is collaborative project is led by a highly multidisciplinary team, which draws on expertise from engineering, transport studies, global development, sociology, and policing. The project team conducted a number of activities to engage the stakeholder community, including a dissemination and interactive workshop and a follow-on research development meeting. These meetings were attended by representatives from academia and professional practice in the areas of national infrastructure policy/planning, IT & engineering research and cybersecurity. Feedback collected from these events indicated that the discussion provided attendees with new understanding on an emerging area of research. As a result of this work, and as clearly identified within the workshops undertaken, the project team were able to highlight several key implications of shadow infrastructure (SI) for policy and practice including: - Considering SI within management of critical national infrastructure - Adapting organisational management and planning of IT and IoT resources for resilience as SI use expands - Building better models of cyber-physical behaviours and criminal risks linked to SI The project team has developed these findings in the form of a roadmap for future research, leading to potential future collaborations, with a view to securing additional funding. In addition, the project team have published their findings in 'Policing Insight' with a readership of >100K, which is targeted at Police Officers, staff in partner agencies and academics with policing interests.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Understanding and mapping shadow infrastructures and TIPS in Covid and post-Covid times 
Organisation Imperial College London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution SPRITE+ funded the 'Understanding and mapping shadow infrastructures and TIPS in Covid and post-Covid times' project via a sandpit, and provided support, guidance, assistance with logistics and promotion of their activities. This project is a collaboration between Dr Chris Foster (PI, University of Manchester), Professor Washington Yotto Ochieng (Imperial College London), Dr Stefanie Kuenzel (Royal Holloway University of London), Dr Jessamy Perriam (IT University Copenhagen) and Superintendent Martin Gallagher (Police Scotland).
Collaborator Contribution Infrastructure supports many of the activities we do on a daily basis and most of the time we take it for granted that it will work as and when we need it. However, Covid-19 has meant some key infrastructures have come under pressure with unexpected increased use, while others have become inaccessible. When infrastructure is disrupted, there are often workarounds that spring up to allow people to achieve what they set out to do, whether that be using the internet to communicate, finding transport options under lockdown or accessing and using supply chains. In this project, we call these ad-hoc workarounds 'shadow infrastructures'. Shadow infrastructures have the potential to be beneficial and drive innovation but they can also provide security risks and opportunities for increased criminal activities. The project team aimed to better define the concept of 'shadow infrastructures' by using case studies about shadow criminal networks, transport networks, power infrastructure and post-COVID supply chains. By involving SPRITE+ Project Partners and industry stakeholders, this project has allowed trust, identity, privacy and security (TIPS) considerations around shadow infrastructures to gain a broader awareness in real-life settings.
Impact This is collaborative project is led by a highly multidisciplinary team, which draws on expertise from engineering, transport studies, global development, sociology, and policing. The project team conducted a number of activities to engage the stakeholder community, including a dissemination and interactive workshop and a follow-on research development meeting. These meetings were attended by representatives from academia and professional practice in the areas of national infrastructure policy/planning, IT & engineering research and cybersecurity. Feedback collected from these events indicated that the discussion provided attendees with new understanding on an emerging area of research. As a result of this work, and as clearly identified within the workshops undertaken, the project team were able to highlight several key implications of shadow infrastructure (SI) for policy and practice including: - Considering SI within management of critical national infrastructure - Adapting organisational management and planning of IT and IoT resources for resilience as SI use expands - Building better models of cyber-physical behaviours and criminal risks linked to SI The project team has developed these findings in the form of a roadmap for future research, leading to potential future collaborations, with a view to securing additional funding. In addition, the project team have published their findings in 'Policing Insight' with a readership of >100K, which is targeted at Police Officers, staff in partner agencies and academics with policing interests.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Understanding and mapping shadow infrastructures and TIPS in Covid and post-Covid times 
Organisation Police Scotland
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution SPRITE+ funded the 'Understanding and mapping shadow infrastructures and TIPS in Covid and post-Covid times' project via a sandpit, and provided support, guidance, assistance with logistics and promotion of their activities. This project is a collaboration between Dr Chris Foster (PI, University of Manchester), Professor Washington Yotto Ochieng (Imperial College London), Dr Stefanie Kuenzel (Royal Holloway University of London), Dr Jessamy Perriam (IT University Copenhagen) and Superintendent Martin Gallagher (Police Scotland).
Collaborator Contribution Infrastructure supports many of the activities we do on a daily basis and most of the time we take it for granted that it will work as and when we need it. However, Covid-19 has meant some key infrastructures have come under pressure with unexpected increased use, while others have become inaccessible. When infrastructure is disrupted, there are often workarounds that spring up to allow people to achieve what they set out to do, whether that be using the internet to communicate, finding transport options under lockdown or accessing and using supply chains. In this project, we call these ad-hoc workarounds 'shadow infrastructures'. Shadow infrastructures have the potential to be beneficial and drive innovation but they can also provide security risks and opportunities for increased criminal activities. The project team aimed to better define the concept of 'shadow infrastructures' by using case studies about shadow criminal networks, transport networks, power infrastructure and post-COVID supply chains. By involving SPRITE+ Project Partners and industry stakeholders, this project has allowed trust, identity, privacy and security (TIPS) considerations around shadow infrastructures to gain a broader awareness in real-life settings.
Impact This is collaborative project is led by a highly multidisciplinary team, which draws on expertise from engineering, transport studies, global development, sociology, and policing. The project team conducted a number of activities to engage the stakeholder community, including a dissemination and interactive workshop and a follow-on research development meeting. These meetings were attended by representatives from academia and professional practice in the areas of national infrastructure policy/planning, IT & engineering research and cybersecurity. Feedback collected from these events indicated that the discussion provided attendees with new understanding on an emerging area of research. As a result of this work, and as clearly identified within the workshops undertaken, the project team were able to highlight several key implications of shadow infrastructure (SI) for policy and practice including: - Considering SI within management of critical national infrastructure - Adapting organisational management and planning of IT and IoT resources for resilience as SI use expands - Building better models of cyber-physical behaviours and criminal risks linked to SI The project team has developed these findings in the form of a roadmap for future research, leading to potential future collaborations, with a view to securing additional funding. In addition, the project team have published their findings in 'Policing Insight' with a readership of >100K, which is targeted at Police Officers, staff in partner agencies and academics with policing interests.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Understanding and mapping shadow infrastructures and TIPS in Covid and post-Covid times 
Organisation Royal Holloway, University of London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution SPRITE+ funded the 'Understanding and mapping shadow infrastructures and TIPS in Covid and post-Covid times' project via a sandpit, and provided support, guidance, assistance with logistics and promotion of their activities. This project is a collaboration between Dr Chris Foster (PI, University of Manchester), Professor Washington Yotto Ochieng (Imperial College London), Dr Stefanie Kuenzel (Royal Holloway University of London), Dr Jessamy Perriam (IT University Copenhagen) and Superintendent Martin Gallagher (Police Scotland).
Collaborator Contribution Infrastructure supports many of the activities we do on a daily basis and most of the time we take it for granted that it will work as and when we need it. However, Covid-19 has meant some key infrastructures have come under pressure with unexpected increased use, while others have become inaccessible. When infrastructure is disrupted, there are often workarounds that spring up to allow people to achieve what they set out to do, whether that be using the internet to communicate, finding transport options under lockdown or accessing and using supply chains. In this project, we call these ad-hoc workarounds 'shadow infrastructures'. Shadow infrastructures have the potential to be beneficial and drive innovation but they can also provide security risks and opportunities for increased criminal activities. The project team aimed to better define the concept of 'shadow infrastructures' by using case studies about shadow criminal networks, transport networks, power infrastructure and post-COVID supply chains. By involving SPRITE+ Project Partners and industry stakeholders, this project has allowed trust, identity, privacy and security (TIPS) considerations around shadow infrastructures to gain a broader awareness in real-life settings.
Impact This is collaborative project is led by a highly multidisciplinary team, which draws on expertise from engineering, transport studies, global development, sociology, and policing. The project team conducted a number of activities to engage the stakeholder community, including a dissemination and interactive workshop and a follow-on research development meeting. These meetings were attended by representatives from academia and professional practice in the areas of national infrastructure policy/planning, IT & engineering research and cybersecurity. Feedback collected from these events indicated that the discussion provided attendees with new understanding on an emerging area of research. As a result of this work, and as clearly identified within the workshops undertaken, the project team were able to highlight several key implications of shadow infrastructure (SI) for policy and practice including: - Considering SI within management of critical national infrastructure - Adapting organisational management and planning of IT and IoT resources for resilience as SI use expands - Building better models of cyber-physical behaviours and criminal risks linked to SI The project team has developed these findings in the form of a roadmap for future research, leading to potential future collaborations, with a view to securing additional funding. In addition, the project team have published their findings in 'Policing Insight' with a readership of >100K, which is targeted at Police Officers, staff in partner agencies and academics with policing interests.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Understanding and mapping shadow infrastructures and TIPS in Covid and post-Covid times 
Organisation University of Manchester
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution SPRITE+ funded the 'Understanding and mapping shadow infrastructures and TIPS in Covid and post-Covid times' project via a sandpit, and provided support, guidance, assistance with logistics and promotion of their activities. This project is a collaboration between Dr Chris Foster (PI, University of Manchester), Professor Washington Yotto Ochieng (Imperial College London), Dr Stefanie Kuenzel (Royal Holloway University of London), Dr Jessamy Perriam (IT University Copenhagen) and Superintendent Martin Gallagher (Police Scotland).
Collaborator Contribution Infrastructure supports many of the activities we do on a daily basis and most of the time we take it for granted that it will work as and when we need it. However, Covid-19 has meant some key infrastructures have come under pressure with unexpected increased use, while others have become inaccessible. When infrastructure is disrupted, there are often workarounds that spring up to allow people to achieve what they set out to do, whether that be using the internet to communicate, finding transport options under lockdown or accessing and using supply chains. In this project, we call these ad-hoc workarounds 'shadow infrastructures'. Shadow infrastructures have the potential to be beneficial and drive innovation but they can also provide security risks and opportunities for increased criminal activities. The project team aimed to better define the concept of 'shadow infrastructures' by using case studies about shadow criminal networks, transport networks, power infrastructure and post-COVID supply chains. By involving SPRITE+ Project Partners and industry stakeholders, this project has allowed trust, identity, privacy and security (TIPS) considerations around shadow infrastructures to gain a broader awareness in real-life settings.
Impact This is collaborative project is led by a highly multidisciplinary team, which draws on expertise from engineering, transport studies, global development, sociology, and policing. The project team conducted a number of activities to engage the stakeholder community, including a dissemination and interactive workshop and a follow-on research development meeting. These meetings were attended by representatives from academia and professional practice in the areas of national infrastructure policy/planning, IT & engineering research and cybersecurity. Feedback collected from these events indicated that the discussion provided attendees with new understanding on an emerging area of research. As a result of this work, and as clearly identified within the workshops undertaken, the project team were able to highlight several key implications of shadow infrastructure (SI) for policy and practice including: - Considering SI within management of critical national infrastructure - Adapting organisational management and planning of IT and IoT resources for resilience as SI use expands - Building better models of cyber-physical behaviours and criminal risks linked to SI The project team has developed these findings in the form of a roadmap for future research, leading to potential future collaborations, with a view to securing additional funding. In addition, the project team have published their findings in 'Policing Insight' with a readership of >100K, which is targeted at Police Officers, staff in partner agencies and academics with policing interests.
Start Year 2020
 
Description 'AI-COSA: trustworthiness of data and AI tools in COvid Safe workplace App's SPRITE+ funded project - Focus groups and interviews 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This project is led by Dr Jacob Johanssen (St. Mary's University, Twickenham), Dr Lamiece Hassan (University of Manchester), Dr Iman Naja (University of Aberdeen), Dr Mistale Taylor (Trilateral Research) and Dr Carl Adams (Mobi Publishing Ltd).

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused major disruptions for workplaces, creating legal and practical challenges around working safely. An increasing number of tools (both web-based and smartphone applications) are emerging to help employers address these changing expectations and move towards a 'new normal'. These tools capture and analyse data in new ways to monitor employees and processes, some using more sophisticated artificial intelligence (AI) techniques. This presented an opportunity for the project team to interrogate the potentials and risks of using such applications in a wider context of decreasing public trust in digital and AI technology.

In this case study the project team focussed on the Hygieia app as an example of such data-driven tools. Blending theory and methods from different academic disciplines, the project involved a rapid literature review on the ethical and lawful use of workplace monitoring tools and qualitative interviews with the app's developers to enable a critical analysis of the app's features. The team also conducted a focus group discussion with four firefighters based in Sweden about their thoughts on potentially using the app in the
future. This work will help to deepen conceptual and practical understanding of how to maximise opportunities and minimise risks associated with using data-driven and AI-based tools for enabling COVID safe workplaces. Future work will focus on providing critical, independent evaluation to the app developer. In addition, the team will deliver an academic journal article to summarise their findings and a public facing blog post to provide guidance and feedback for developers, employers and employees who use AI-based
tracking apps for the workplace.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://spritehub.org/2020/08/20/investigating-the-trustworthiness-of-ai%e2%80%90based-and-data%e2%8...
 
Description 'COVID and the growth of shadow infrastructures' SPRITE+ funded project - Dissemination and interactive workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This project is funded by SPRITE+ and led by Dr Chris Foster (PI, University of Manchester), Professor Washington Yotto Ochieng (Imperial College London), Dr Stefanie Kuenzel (Royal Holloway University of London), Dr Jessamy Perriam (IT University Copenhagen) and Martin Gallagher (Police Scotland).

Infrastructure supports many of the activities we do on a daily basis and most of the time we take it for granted that it will work as and when we need it. However, Covid-19 has meant some key infrastructures have come under pressure with unexpected increased use, while others have become inaccessible.

When infrastructure is disrupted, there are often workarounds that spring up to allow people to achieve what they set out to do, whether that be using the internet to communicate, finding transport options under lockdown or accessing and using supply chains. In this project, we call these ad-hoc workarounds 'shadow infrastructures'. Shadow infrastructures have the potential to be beneficial and drive innovation, but they can also provide security risks and opportunities for increased criminal activities.

This project aims to better define the concept of 'shadow infrastructures' by using case studies about shadow criminal networks, transport networks, power infrastructure and post-COVID supply chains. By involving SPRITE+ Project Partners and industry stakeholders, this project has allowed trust, identity, privacy and security (TIPS) considerations around shadow infrastructures to gain a broader awareness in real-life settings. The project team draws on expertise from engineering, transport studies, global development, sociology, and policing.

The project team hosted a dissemination and interactive workshop event, which was attended by 35 individuals from academia and professional practice in the areas of cyber security, policing, infrastructure and the digital economy. This workshop involved the identification of key themes which emerged from the group's pilot studies. Feedback collected from this event indicated that the discussion provided attendees with new understanding on an emerging area of research. New collaborative relationships were developed through this workshop, which were further explored in a subsequent research development workshop.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://spritehub.org/2020/08/20/understanding-and-mapping-shadow-infrastructures-and-tips-in-covid-...
 
Description 'COVID and the growth of shadow infrastructures' SPRITE+ funded project - Research development workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This project is funded by SPRITE+ and led by Dr Chris Foster (University of Manchester), Professor Washington Yotto Ochieng (Imperial College London), Dr Stefanie Kuenzel (Royal Holloway University of London), Dr Jessamy Perriam (IT University Copenhagen) and Martin Gallagher (Police Scotland).

Infrastructure supports many of the activities we do on a daily basis and most of the time we take it for granted that it will work as and when we need it. However, Covid-19 has meant some key infrastructures have come under pressure with unexpected increased use, while others have become inaccessible.

When infrastructure is disrupted, there are often workarounds that spring up to allow people to achieve what they set out to do, whether that be using the internet to communicate, finding transport options under lockdown or accessing and using supply chains. In this project, we call these ad-hoc workarounds 'shadow infrastructures'. Shadow infrastructures have the potential to be beneficial and drive innovation, but they can also provide security risks and opportunities for increased criminal activities.

This project aims to better define the concept of 'shadow infrastructures' by using case studies about shadow criminal networks, transport networks, power infrastructure and post-COVID supply chains. By involving SPRITE+ Project Partners and industry stakeholders, this project has allowed trust, identity, privacy and security (TIPS) considerations around shadow infrastructures to gain a broader awareness in real-life settings. Our project team draws on expertise from engineering, transport studies, global development, sociology, and policing.

The project team hosted a research development workshop, which was attended by 13 individuals from academia and professional practice interested in developing and collaborating to create concrete research plans linked to the topic of shadow infrastructure. Attendees joined this meeting as a direct result of attending the Shadow Infrastructure Group's previous event. Workshop attendees worked together to identify three key themes for the future research agenda as well as a set of proposals with initial discussion of research goals, questions and activities. A number of academics and professional practitioners from broad disciplines registered their interest in collaborating on a future research call to develop this work following the SPRITE+ funding period. In addition, the project team are working on the publication of their findings in academic journals and via a website with a readership of >100K, which is targeted at Police Officers, staff in partner agencies and academics with policing interests.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://spritehub.org/2020/08/20/understanding-and-mapping-shadow-infrastructures-and-tips-in-covid-...
 
Description 'Future payment systems: data, technology and privacy after Covid' SPRITE+ funded project - Workshop Presentation by Dr Geoff Goodell 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The 'Future payment systems: data, technology and privacy after Covid' SPRITE+ funded project is led by Dr Geoff Goodell (University College London), Dr Andrea Bracciali (University of Stirling), Dr Jiahong Chen (University of Nottingham), Dr Duncan Greaves (CU Scarborough), Dr Chris Hicks (The Alan Turing Institute), Dr Yang Lu (University of Kent), Dr Okechukwu Okorie (University of Exeter) and Dr Robin Renwick (Trilateral Research).

Cash affords both privacy and universal market access. Digital payment systems and the management of associated digital information have implications for trust, identity, privacy, and security (TIPS). This project investigates future digital payment systems with respect to TIPS, contributing to the identification of policies and technologies that best serve the public interest. The team's multidisciplinary approach investigates pre and post Covid-19 financial information, analyses legal, policy and regulatory aspects, assesses innovative technologies for digital payments, proposes simulations of future scenarios, and engages stakeholders and user-groups to understand perspectives, opinions, and concerns. The project also aims to further advance this line of enquiry by identifying suitable pathways for future research.

Project team lead Dr Geoff Goodell presented a talk entitled 'Digital Currency and Economic Crises: Helping States Respond' at the Sixth International Workshop on Peer-to-Peer Financial Systems. Geoff provided thought leadership on digital alternatives to cash and their limitations.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description 'Future payment systems: data, technology and privacy after Covid' SPRITE+ funded project - Contribution to a government consultation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The 'Future payment systems: data, technology and privacy after Covid' SPRITE+ funded project is led by Dr Geoff Goodell (University College London), Dr Andrea Bracciali (University of Stirling), Dr Jiahong Chen (University of Nottingham), Dr Duncan Greaves (CU Scarborough), Dr Chris Hicks (The Alan Turing Institute), Dr Yang Lu (University of Kent), Dr Okechukwu Okorie (University of Exeter) and Dr Robin Renwick (Trilateral Research).

Cash affords both privacy and universal market access. Digital payment systems and the management of associated digital information have implications for trust, identity, privacy, and security (TIPS). This project investigates future digital payment systems with respect to TIPS, contributing to the identification of policies and technologies that best serve the public interest. The team's multidisciplinary approach investigates pre and post Covid-19 financial information, analyses legal, policy and regulatory aspects, assesses innovative technologies for digital payments, proposes simulations of future scenarios, and engages stakeholders and user-groups to understand perspectives, opinions, and concerns. The project also aims to further advance this line of enquiry by identifying suitable pathways for future research.

The project team provided consultation responses on on European Central Bank proposals for a Digital Euro requirement.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://spritehub.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/your-views-on-a-digital-euro-434111.pdf
 
Description 'Future payment systems: data, technology and privacy after Covid' SPRITE+ funded project - Pre Conference Workshop Presentation by Duncan Greaves 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The 'Future payment systems: data, technology and privacy after Covid' SPRITE+ funded project is led by Dr Geoff Goodell (University College London), Dr Andrea Bracciali (University of Stirling), Dr Jiahong Chen (University of Nottingham), Dr Duncan Greaves (CU Scarborough), Dr Chris Hicks (The Alan Turing Institute), Dr Yang Lu (University of Kent), Dr Okechukwu Okorie (University of Exeter) and Dr Robin Renwick (Trilateral Research).

Cash affords both privacy and universal market access. Digital payment systems and the management of associated digital information have implications for trust, identity, privacy, and security (TIPS). This project investigates future digital payment systems with respect to TIPS, contributing to the identification of policies and technologies that best serve the public interest. The team's multidisciplinary approach investigates pre and post Covid-19 financial information, analyses legal, policy and regulatory aspects, assesses innovative technologies for digital payments, proposes simulations of future scenarios, and engages stakeholders and user-groups to understand perspectives, opinions, and concerns. The project also aims to further advance this line of enquiry by identifying suitable pathways for future research.

Project team member Duncan Greaves provided a pre conference workshop presentation for the 21st European Conference on Knowledge Management. Duncan communicated thought leadership on emerging issues in cash.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description 'Future payment systems: data, technology and privacy after Covid' SPRITE+ funded project - Provided evidence for a government review 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The 'Future payment systems: data, technology and privacy after Covid' SPRITE+ funded project is led by Dr Geoff Goodell (University College London), Dr Andrea Bracciali (University of Stirling), Dr Jiahong Chen (University of Nottingham), Dr Duncan Greaves (CU Scarborough), Dr Chris Hicks (The Alan Turing Institute), Dr Yang Lu (University of Kent), Dr Okechukwu Okorie (University of Exeter) and Dr Robin Renwick (Trilateral Research).

Cash affords both privacy and universal market access. Digital payment systems and the management of associated digital information have implications for trust, identity, privacy, and security (TIPS). This project investigates future digital payment systems with respect to TIPS, contributing to the identification of policies and technologies that best serve the public interest. The team's multidisciplinary approach investigates pre and post Covid-19 financial information, analyses legal, policy and regulatory aspects, assesses innovative technologies for digital payments, proposes simulations of future scenarios, and engages stakeholders and user-groups to understand perspectives, opinions, and concerns. The project also aims to further advance this line of enquiry by identifying suitable pathways for future research.

The project team provided a response to the Financial Conduct Authority's Call for Inputs: Open Finance.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://spritehub.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/Response-to-FCA-Call-for-Input-Open-Finance-final.d...
 
Description 'Future payment systems: data, technology and privacy after Covid' SPRITE+ funded project - Provided evidence for a government review 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The 'Future payment systems: data, technology and privacy after Covid' SPRITE+ funded project is led by Dr Geoff Goodell (University College London), Dr Andrea Bracciali (University of Stirling), Dr Jiahong Chen (University of Nottingham), Dr Duncan Greaves (CU Scarborough), Dr Chris Hicks (The Alan Turing Institute), Dr Yang Lu (University of Kent), Dr Okechukwu Okorie (University of Exeter) and Dr Robin Renwick (Trilateral Research).

Cash affords both privacy and universal market access. Digital payment systems and the management of associated digital information have implications for trust, identity, privacy, and security (TIPS). This project investigates future digital payment systems with respect to TIPS, contributing to the identification of policies and technologies that best serve the public interest. The team's multidisciplinary approach investigates pre and post Covid-19 financial information, analyses legal, policy and regulatory aspects, assesses innovative technologies for digital payments, proposes simulations of future scenarios, and engages stakeholders and user-groups to understand perspectives, opinions, and concerns. The project also aims to further advance this line of enquiry by identifying suitable pathways for future research.

The project team provided a response to HM Treasury's Call for Evidence: Access to Cash.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://spritehub.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/Response-to-HMT-Call-for-Evidence-Access-to-Cash-fi...
 
Description 'Future payment systems: data, technology and privacy after Covid' SPRITE+ funded project - Provided evidence for a government review 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The 'Future payment systems: data, technology and privacy after Covid' SPRITE+ funded project is led by Dr Geoff Goodell (University College London), Dr Andrea Bracciali (University of Stirling), Dr Jiahong Chen (University of Nottingham), Dr Duncan Greaves (CU Scarborough), Dr Chris Hicks (The Alan Turing Institute), Dr Yang Lu (University of Kent), Dr Okechukwu Okorie (University of Exeter) and Dr Robin Renwick (Trilateral Research).

Cash affords both privacy and universal market access. Digital payment systems and the management of associated digital information have implications for trust, identity, privacy, and security (TIPS). This project investigates future digital payment systems with respect to TIPS, contributing to the identification of policies and technologies that best serve the public interest. The team's multidisciplinary approach investigates pre and post Covid-19 financial information, analyses legal, policy and regulatory aspects, assesses innovative technologies for digital payments, proposes simulations of future scenarios, and engages stakeholders and user-groups to understand perspectives, opinions, and concerns. The project also aims to further advance this line of enquiry by identifying suitable pathways for future research.

The project team provided consultation responses on HM Treasury Payment Landscape Review: call for evidence.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://spritehub.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/sprite-hmt-response-2020-10-20.docx
 
Description 'Future payment systems: data, technology and privacy after Covid' SPRITE+ funded project: Provided evidence to a European-wide consultation on emerging policy and regulatory interplay 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The 'Future payment systems: data, technology and privacy after Covid' SPRITE+ funded project is led by Dr Geoff Goodell (University College London), Dr Andrea Bracciali (University of Stirling), Dr Jiahong Chen (University of Nottingham), Dr Duncan Greaves (CU Scarborough), Dr Chris Hicks (The Alan Turing Institute), Dr Yang Lu (University of Kent), Dr Okechukwu Okorie (University of Exeter) and Dr Robin Renwick (Trilateral Research).

Cash affords both privacy and universal market access. Digital payment systems and the management of associated digital information have implications for trust, identity, privacy, and security (TIPS). This project investigates future digital payment systems with respect to TIPS, contributing to the identification of policies and technologies that best serve the public interest. The team's multidisciplinary approach investigates pre and post Covid-19 financial information, analyses legal, policy and regulatory aspects, assesses innovative technologies for digital payments, proposes simulations of future scenarios, and engages stakeholders and user-groups to understand perspectives, opinions, and concerns. The project also aims to further advance this line of enquiry by identifying suitable pathways for future research.

The project team provided comments on the European Data Protection Board's Guidelines 06/2020 on the interplay of the Second Payment Services Directive and GDPR. This is European-wide consultation on emerging policy and regulatory interplay.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://edpb.europa.eu/sites/edpb/files/webform/public_consultation_reply/comments_on_edpb_guideline...
 
Description 'TIPS in blended home-work environments': A socio-technical perspective' SPRITE+ funded project: Webinar - The office of the future 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact The SPRITE+ funded project team 'TIPS in blended home-work environments': A socio-technical perspective', represented by Dr Nikki Williams (Lecturer in Human Aspects of Cyber, Cranfield University) presented a talk at an industry focussed webinar hosted by SPRITE+ Project Partners Cybsafe and Cybersmart (both organisations were collaborating partners on this project). The webinar was titled 'The office of the future: What has remote working taught us about people and security?' The team shared their findings on an improved understanding of what risks remote working has brought about. The webinar also included an industry panel which discussed the concept of the 'office of the future' and what this means for organisations post-Covid.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://www.cybsafe.com/office-of-the-future-webinar/
 
Description Cyber 9/12 Strategy Challenge: Coaching a Team - Dr Dmitry Dereshev 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact The UK Cyber 9/12 Strategy Challenge is designed to identify and foster the next generation of policy and strategy leaders for the cyber security challenges of the future.

SPRITE+ Research Associate Dr Dmitry Dereshev coached the Crackchester Team, a group of 4 undergraduate students (University of Manchester) during this competition. Dmitry guided the team to provide responses to challenge questions related to cybersecurity, including providing links to useful resources, fostering discussion, and setting deadlines, as well as reviewing drafts and providing constructive feedback. The team made it through to the next round of the Challenge in which they were provided with an intelligence pack and invited to create a recommendation brief addressed to the "Prime Minister's Office". The team did not progress into the final round of the competition but did win the award for the 'best decision document'.

The coaching provided by Dmitry enabled the students to gain a better understanding of the strategy and policy challenges associated with cyber conflict and incident and to develop their communication, research and analytical skills. Through participating in this Challenge, the students had the opportunity to interact with expert mentors, judges, and cyber professionals while developing valuable skills in policy analysis, presentation and networking.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://www.cyber912uk.org/en/
 
Description Democracy@Risk Policy Workshop - Professor Emma Barrett 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact This workshop brought together academic experts and policy-makers to explore the nature and the extent of online harms to democracy, and to facilitate connections and collaboration on this issue. The audience heard from two keynote speakers (Prof Philip Howard from the Oxford Internet Institute and Dr Vladimir Barash from Graphika) and then reflected on these presentations in groups, before hearing from a panel of academic experts, chaired by SPRITE+ Director, Professor Emma Barrett. The panel discussion featured Dr Katharine Dommett (University of Sheffield), Professor Philip Howard (Oxford Internet Institute), Professor Martin Innes (Cardiff University), and Professor Rob Procter (University of Warwick). Subsequently, in group discussion, participants identified five major challenge areas for democracy: data access, digital micro-targeting, digital information operations, digital information literacy, and online hate/harassment.

Following the workshop, a initial summary report was produced and circulated amongst the participants. In addition, this workshop played a pivotal role in determining the next steps for the Democracy@Risk project, which proceeded to carry out a review of the extant literature on the most pressing challenges identified by participants during the workshop: digital micro-targeting, digital information operations and digital information literacy. Current work is focused on finalising the Democracy@Risk report, which aims to summarise the outcomes of this review for policy-makers. This report will be made publicly available and will be shared with workshop participants in Spring 2021. The workshop has also enabled the creation of a community of interest that will be valuable for the further dissemination of research findings amongst policy-makers.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Digital City Festival 2022 - Professor Emma Barrett participated in a panel discussion 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact In her role as Director of SPRITE+, Professor Emma Barrett participated in a panel discussion entitled 'Greater Manchester - a global digital influence in cyber' as part of the Digital City Festival 2022. Emma joined a panel of industry speakers including:

- Detective Superintendent Neil Jones, Managing Director at North West Cyber Resilience Centre
- Ruby Motabhoy, Innovation Lead at Plexal
- Beverly Craig. GMCA Lead for Digital, Education, Skills, Work and Apprenticeships (Leader of Manchester City Council)
- Victoria Knight, Strategic Campaigns Director at BAE Systems

This session explored the steps taken by Greater Manchester to be recognised internationally as a centre of digital innovation, research and practice in the cyber security sector. This event was hosted in collaboration with the Greater Manchester Cyber Security Advisory Group.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2022
URL https://www.digitalcityfestival.com/expo-agenda
 
Description Digital Responsibility Stakeholder Workshop with Professor Lizzie Coles-Kemp 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact SPRITE+ worked with Professor Lizzie Coles-Kemp (Royal Holloway, University of London) to organise a workshop on the theme of digital responsibility as part of the Research Institute for Sociotechnical Cyber Security (RISCS)'s Fellowship programme. The aim of the programme is to develop our understanding of what digital responsibility means and how, as a concept, we can operationalise it to build a positive and healthy relationship with digital technology.

This two hour workshop included a keynote talk from Hilary Sutcliffe (who runs not-for-profit SocietyInside) who presented the findings of a new project on Trust and the Governance of Technology (www.TIGTech.org). Participants then took part in short engagement sessions to explore and develop further the ideas of digital responsibility put forward in Hilary's talk and identified how the benefits of digital responsibility might be realised.

Attendees were security practitioners working in compliance, risk, audit and training and awareness as well as those designing and deploying digital transformation programmes. The workshop also included participants who work on the development and roll out of digital policy. In total, ~50 individuals attended including representation from SPRITE+ Project Partners and stakeholders from BT, Police Scotland, the Open Date Institute, Trilateral Research, Yoti, Cybersmart, Arm, Ernst & Young and Cybsafe.

Following the workshop, Professor Lizzie Coles-Kemp shared an interim report on digital responsibility with those who took part in the scoping activities conducted as part of the workshop. These activities then enabled the formation of a formal working group and a follow-up workshop in which the group will explore how to make digital responsibility central to digital service and product design.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.riscs.org.uk/digital-responsibility/
 
Description Expert Fellows meeting 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact SPRITE+ hosted a highly interactive two day workshop in Manchester in which the SPRITE+ Expert Fellows and Project Partners came together to share ideas related to the biggest challenges in trust, identity, privacy and security (TIPS) in digital contexts. The workshop involved group work, debate and feedback with the wider group and a non-academic panel discussion with the SPRITE+ Project Partners.

The SPRITE+ Expert Fellows community is made up of a diverse group of expert scholars and professional practitioners, each bringing deep expertise and creating thinking to SPRITE+ activities. During the Expert Fellows meeting, the group provided a broad, challenging and informed range of viewpoints on digital TIPS to ultimately identify the SPRITE+ Challenge Themes, upon which the network's activities are based. These themes are relevant to a wide range of industrial and societal concerns and each theme has technical and non-technical aspects, where an interdisciplinary approach is essential to fully addressing the challenge. The themes are:

- Digital Vulnerabilities
- Digital Technologies, Power & Control
- Accountability & Ethics in a Digital Ecosystem
- Digital Technologies & Change

The event also featured an introduction to the SPRITE+ Research Fund and subsequent call for Challenge Working Groups to work on a programme of activities under each Challenge Theme.

Feedback collected from the attendees indicated that 97% of respondents made connections with other attendees that they otherwise would not have made. Many attendees went on to engage in further discussion with their new contacts to share papers, views and new ways to collaborate. A number of the academic attendees noted that they benefitted from hearing an industry perspective. Following the meeting, some attendees went on to submit collaborative proposals to lead the SPRITE+ Challenge Working Groups.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://spritehub.org/2019/12/06/first-expert-fellows-meeting/
 
Description Greater Manchester Combined Authority's Digital Discussion - Professor Emma Barrett 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact In her role as SPRITE+ Director and member of the Greater Manchester Cyber Security Advisory Group, Professor Emma Barrett joined Barny Dathan, Head of Employability at Code Your Future and Jared Thompson, Marketing Manager at the North West Cyber Resilience Centre to discuss what makes Greater Manchester's cyber ecosystem so different. This discussion was recorded as part of Greater Manchester Combined Authority's series of digital discussion videos. The video was uploaded to YouTube and is the most viewed video in this series (112 views as of 11/02/22).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PXX8Gt1nUis&t=1s
 
Description Interview for the annual Peepsec conference - Professor Emma Barrett 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The annual Peepsec online summit is an official London Tech Week event, with the goal of getting people thinking about and discuss the human aspects of cyber security. The summit is an industry focussed event attended by 1,000 top professionals from the UK's cyber security and tech industries.

The theme of the 2020 summit (8-12 June) was 'Beyond 2020: The Age of Trust'. As part of this event, Professor Emma Barrett took part in an interview with SPRITE+ Project Partner, Dr John Blythe (Head of Behavioural Science at Cybsafe) to discuss her work in the field of digital trust and security and to introduce the SPRITE+ network and programme of activities. Following Emma's contributions at Peepsec, a number of professional practitioners registered as members of SPRITE+.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://peepsec.com/
 
Description Member of the Greater Manchester Cyber Security Advisory Group - Professor Emma Barrett 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact In her role as SPRITE+ Director, Professor Emma Barrett sits on the Greater Manchester Cyber Security Advisory Group, which reflects the cyber security capabilities of Greater Manchester and drives forward inclusive economic growth for the city-region and the North. The group provides strategic oversight and a force for inclusive economic growth, taking an ecosystem approach to building that capability and economic resilience. The group guides and informs the activities within the Greater Manchester Cyber portfolio, identifies new opportunities and progress, and ensures relevant connections are made across to the other activities within the Greater Manchester digital sector and beyond. The role of the group is to bring together representatives of the city-region's cyber ecosystem in Greater Manchester to guide and inform the GM Cyber strategy and work streams.

Membership of the Cyber Security Advisory Group is diverse and includes around 50 organisations from industry, regional and local government, healthcare, third sector, academia, and policing.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019,2020,2021,2022
URL https://www.greatermanchester-ca.gov.uk/what-we-do/digital/global-digital-influencer/greater-manches...
 
Description Official SPRITE+ Launch 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact SPRITE+ hosted an event in Manchester to mark the launch of the SPRITE+ project. This event brought together people involved in research, practice and policy with a focus on digital contexts. Attendees were introduced to the SPRITE+ programme and its importance within the context of issues related to digital security, privacy, identity and trust.

The event featured keynote presentations from Professor Colette Fagan, the University of Manchester's Vice-President for Research, and SPRITE+ Director, Professor Emma Barrett. External speakers included Steve Wood, Deputy Commissioner at the Information Commissioner's Office (ICO), and Lee Smith, Arm Fellow. Following the presentations, attendees were encouraged to think about the biggest challenges for digital security, privacy, identity and trust. Ideas were captured and fed into the identification of the SPRITE+ Challenge Themes during the SPRITE+ Expert Fellows meeting, which took place the following day.

Attendees included a mix of academic researchers and professional practitioners from business, government, police and civil society, with over 70 different organisations represented in total.

The event generated interest, energy and enthusiasm around the SPRITE+ programme, with many attendees going on to register as members of SPRITE+, joining the Expert Fellows community, and/or signing up as a Project Partner.

The event was sponsored by Arm in their capacity as a SPRITE+ Project Partner.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://spritehub.org/2019/11/27/launch/
 
Description Participation in Chief Information Security Officer Forum - Professor Emma Barrett 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact SPRITE+ Director, Professor Emma Barrett participated in a forum for Chief Information Security Officers hosted by Inogesis and Unilever over a number of sessions in 2020. This forum was attended by Chief Security Officers for a number of large UK based organisations.

Emma contributed to discussion by highlighting academic research relevant to practical concerns in relation to issues of organisational cyber security.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Participation in Operational Technology Roundtable discussion - Dr Natalie Theodoulou 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact SPRITE+ Project Manager, Natalie Theodoulou participated in an operational roundtable forum on cybersecurity hosted by Inogesis and Unilever over a number of sessions in 2020. This forum was attended by operations leaders for a number of large UK based organisations.

Natalie contributed to discussion by highlighting the work of SPRITE+ in relation to academic research relevant to issues of organisational cyber security. For example, Natalie was able to share information on an academic study led by a SPRITE+ Member which focussed on the topic of security convergence. This led to the participation of an operational leader (from John Lewis) in an interview with the academic.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Participation in expert panel discussion at the PeepSec conference - Dr Jonathan Foster and Dr Julie Gore 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The annual Peepsec online summit is an official London Tech Week event, with the goal of getting people thinking about and discuss the human aspects of cyber security. The summit is an industry focussed event attended by 1,000 top professionals from the UK's cyber security and tech industries.

The theme of the 2020 summit (8-12 June) was 'Beyond 2020: The Age of Trust'. As part of this event, investigators for the SPRITE+ funded 'Accountability & Ethics in a Digital Ecosystem' Challenge Working Group, Dr Jonathan Foster (University of Sheffield) and Dr Julie Gore (University of Bath), along with SPRITE+ Project Partner, Julie Dawson (Director of Regulatory & Policy, Yoti) participated in a panel discussion led by SPRITE+ Project Partner Dr John Blythe (Head of Behavioural Science, Cybsafe). The panel discussion provided an opportunity for the Accountability & Ethics Group to share their findings and plans for future work.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.peepsec.com/live/
 
Description Participation in the Greater Manchester Cyber Strategy Working Group: Professor Emma Barrett 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact In her role as SPRITE+ Director, Professor Emma Barrett joined the Greater Manchester Cyber Strategy Working Group for a one day workshop with 15 other participants to perform an initial scoping exercise to help identify the key areas of focus for the Greater Manchester Cyber Strategy. Professor Barrett worked with the group which included representation from Greater Manchester Combined Authority, BAE Systems, MIDAS, GCHQ and other academic institutions to produce a draft strategy, which was subsequently submitted for consultation and further development.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://greatermanchester-ca.gov.uk/what-we-do/digital/global-digital-influencer/greater-manchester-...
 
Description Participation in the Responsible Tech Collective: Professor Emma Barrett 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact In her capacity as SPRITE+ Director, Professor Emma Barrett participates in the Responsible Tech Collective, which is led by the Co-op Foundation, Luminate and Noisy Cricket. This group explores how Greater Manchester might be established as an exemplar for ethical tech with particular focus on putting people first when it comes to the creation and deployment of technology, and thinking holistically about the impact of the tech digital solutions created and used in communities, society and the environment. This group also brings together key stakeholders such as Greater Manchester Combined Authority, Co-op, BBC, Department for Education, Manchester City Council, Thoughtworks, Code Computerlove, Open Data Manchester and Reason Digital. The aim of the Collective is to leverage the collective power of those involved to embed and evolve responsible tech practice in processes and policy.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://medium.com/responsible-tech-collective/bringing-home-the-humanity-to-tech-the-journey-so-far...
 
Description SPRITE+ Event: Connecting the Greater Manchester Cyber Ecosystem 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact SPRITE+ partnered with the Greater Manchester Cyber Security Advisory Group to host an in person event to bring together representatives of the city-region's cyber ecosystem in Greater Manchester. A total of 65 individuals attended representing academia, industry, SMEs, regional and national Government and civil society organisations. This event provided an opportunity for attendees to learn more about the SPRITE+ programme and its role with the GM Cyber Ecosystem and for academics to connect with research end users from a wide range of sectors.

The event featured talks from:

Emma Barrett, Professor of Psychology, Security & Trust and Director of SPRITE+ at the University of Manchester
Andrew Elliot, Deputy Director for Cyber Skills and Innovation at the Department for Culture, Media and Sport
Vic Knight, Strategic Pursuits Director for Applied Intelligence at BAE
Phil Swan, Director for Digital at Greater Manchester Combined Authority

Following the talks, attendees gathered for networking over drinks. This event was sponsored by Bruntwood SciTech and hosted at the Manchester Technology Centre.

Following this event, ~30 individuals from non-academic organisations registered for membership of SPRITE+.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://spritehub.org/2021/11/12/connecting-the-greater-manchester-cyber-ecosystem/
 
Description SPRITE+ Sandpit (2020) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact SPRITE+ hosted its first sandpit, entirely online on the theme of 'Trust, Identity, Privacy, and Security in the post-Covid Digital Economy'. Applications to attend the sandpit were opened to both academic and non-academic participants. A total of 32 diverse participants were invited and included representation from academia and professional practice (28 different organisations), different career stages and a range of research expertise from social science and STEM subjects. In addition, contributions from stakeholders from Greater Manchester Police, Nasdaq, Cybsafe, Police Scotland, Yoti, and Inogesis were included.

Over the course of five sessions spread over three weeks, seven interdisciplinary research teams were formed. These teams co-created ideas for research proposals with non-academic partners under the theme of 'Trust, Identity, Privacy, and Security in the post-Covid Digital Economy'. During the final session, the teams pitched their proposals to a Funding Panel, which included representation from Unilever to ensure that the projects considered stakeholder perspectives. The Panel awarded funding to five projects. Each project team is highly multidisciplinary and includes non-academic partners:

- 'Understanding and mapping shadow infrastructures and TIPS in Covid and post-Covid times' - led by Dr Chris Foster (University of Manchester)
- 'Future Payment Systems: Data, Technology and Privacy after Covid' - led by Dr Geoff Goodell (University College London)
- 'Trust, Identity, Privacy and Security in blended home-work environments: A socio-technical perspective' - led by Dr Emily Collins (Cardiff University)
- 'Trustworthiness of data and AI tools in Covid Safe workplace Apps' - Led by Dr Jacob Johanssen (St. Mary's University, Twickenham)
- 'Can human dignity be modelled in an AI-based decision support system for post-Covid health certification?' - led by Dr Ozlem Ulgen (Birmingham City University)

The funded projects went on to deliver a 4 month programme of research with their results showcased on the SPRITE+ website and via knowledge dissemination events. Feedback was provided to the projects that were not funded, which enabled the teams to go on to explore alternative funding opportunities.

Feedback collected from participants indicated that the sandpit brought people together who would not have met otherwise. Many commented that they had a much greater network of potential collaborators as a result of attending this event.

To the best of our knowledge, this event was the first UKRI sandpit hosted entirely online. The SPRITE+ team went on to publish a detailed how-to guide to help other networks/funders in the organisation and delivery of virtual sandpits. The guide was published on the SPRITE+ website.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://spritehub.org/2020/09/16/sprite-sandpit-projects-announced/
 
Description SPRITE+ Sandpit (2021) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact SPRITE+ hosted its second sandpit, entirely online on the theme of 'Digital Vulnerabilities'. Applications to attend the sandpit were opened to both academic and non-academic participants. A total of 35 diverse participants were invited and included representation from academia and professional practice (25 different organisations), different career stages and a range of research expertise from social science and STEM subjects. In addition, contributions from stakeholders from the NCSC, Arm and Cybsafe were included.

Over the course of five sessions spread over three weeks, nine interdisciplinary research teams were formed. These teams co-created ideas for research proposals with non-academic partners under the theme of 'Digital Vulnerabilities'. During the final session, the teams pitched their proposals to a Funding Panel, which included representation from Arm, PA Consulting, Cybsafe and SERENE-RISC to ensure that the projects considered stakeholder perspectives. The Panel awarded funding to five projects. Each project team is highly multidisciplinary and includes non-academic partners:

- 'FiVu: Using Design Fiction to Identify Future Vulnerabilities in Bio-IOT' led by Dr Charles Weir (Lancaster University)
- 'Revealing Young Learners' Mental Models of Online Sludge' led by Dr Karen Renaud (University of Strathclyde)
- 'Footprints to emissions: Exploring near-future digital vulnerabilities with creative methodologies' led by Dr David Ellis (University of Bath)
- 'Buy Now Pay Later in the UK: Current and emergent digital vulnerabilities' led by Dr Lindsey Appleyard (Coventry University)
- 'First RespondXR: Digital vulnerability of immersive training for first responders' led by Dr Leonie Tanczer (University College London)

The funded projects went on to deliver a 4 month programme of research with their results showcased on the SPRITE+ website and via knowledge dissemination events. Feedback was provided to the projects that were not funded, which enabled the teams to go on to explore further funding opportunities.

Feedback collected from participants indicated that the sandpit brought people together who would never have met otherwise. Many commented that they had a much greater network of potential collaborators as a result of attending this event.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://spritehub.org/2021/08/20/sprite-hosts-a-second-online-sandpit/
 
Description SPRITE+ Showcase (2021) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact SPRITE+ hosted a virtual showcase event to provide an opportunity for the SPRITE+ funded Challenge Working Groups and Short Project Teams to share findings from their research with the digital TIPS community. The event featured presentations from:

- 'Digital Technoloies, Power & Control' Working Group - led by Dr Lara Frumkin (The Open University)
- 'Accountability & Ethics in a Digotal Ecosysem' Working Group - led by Dr Jonathan Foster (University of Sheffield)
- 'Understanding and mapping shadow infrastructures and TIPS in Covid and post-Covid times' - led by Dr Chris Foster (University of Manchester)
- 'Future Payment Systems: Data, Technology and Privacy after Covid' - led by Dr Geoff Goodell (University College London)
- 'Trust, Identity, Privacy and Security in blended home-work environments: A socio-technical perspective' - led by Dr Emily Collins (Cardiff University)
- 'Trustworthiness of data and AI tools in Covid Safe workplace Apps' - led by Dr Jacob Johanssen (St. Mary's University, Twickenham)
- 'Can human dignity be modelled in an AI-based decision support system for post-Covid health certification?' - led by Dr Ozlem Ulgen (Birmingham City University)

In addition to presenting their findings and plans for future work, each project hosted their own breakout room in which showcase attendees could engage in discussion and provide feedback and ideas for future research and collaboration.

The event also included the presentation of 'Research Snapshots' in which presenters delivered lightning talks and virtual posters. A total of 17 Research Snapshots were delivered by a diverse group of presenters including individuals from academia and professional practice, a range of career stages (including several PhD students) and disciplines. Showcase attendees had the opportunity to view the Research Snapshots in advance and join the presenters in their own breakout rooms to ask questions, learn more about their work and provide feedback and ideas for future work. A panel of judges was convened to select a best poster prize winner.

The showcase was attended by close to 100 individuals throughout the day, including academic researchers and professional practitioners from industry, government, law enforcement and civil society organisations. This event provided a platform for academic and non-academic communities to discuss research findings, follow on activities and impact generation.

Feedback collected from Research Snapshot presenters indicated that 100% of respondents made connections with attendees that they otherwise would not have made. In addition, some presenters noted that they had engaged in follow-up conversations with other attendees from industry as well as discussions with other academic groups to explore potential collaborations. Another presenter (PhD student) subsequently engaged in a meeting with a showcase attendee to discuss career development opportunities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://spritehub.org/2021/01/21/sprite-showcase/
 
Description SPRITE+ Town Hall: Introducing the Accelerated Capability Environment (ACE) Research Network and commissioning process 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact The SPRITE+ network worked with the team delivering the Home Office's Accelerated Capability Environment (ACE) programme (see https://www.gov.uk/government/groups/accelerated-capability-environment-ace) to host a virtual event for SPRITE+ members to highlight potential funding opportunities for research and knowledge transfer in digital security, privacy, identity and trust.

The ACE team used this event as an opportunity to introduce their capability to academics across the country and provide information on upcoming collaborative opportunities, initially within the 5G security landscape. The event included presentations delivered by the ACE team as well as interactive discussion. Attendees included ~55 academic experts representing over 25 individual research organisations.

Following this event, there was a huge surge in interest to the ACE Research Network, with academics contacting the ACE team to request more information on upcoming collaborative opportunities. The ACE Team went on to collaborate with some of the academics from this event, who provided subject matter expertise on critical commissions at pace to deliver mission impact.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
 
Description SPRITE+ Town Hall: Introducing the Digital Security by Design Social Science Hub+ and commissioning process 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact The SPRITE+ network worked with the team leading the Digital Security by Design Social Science Hub+ (Discribe) to host a virtual event to highlight potential funding opportunities for research and knowledge transfer in digital security, privacy, identity and trust.

The Discribe team used this event as an opportunity to introduce their programme and to provide information on upcoming collaborative opportunities, and in particular, their strategic funding call, in which £800K was available to commission research projects that relate to Discribe's mission and challenges. The event included presentations delivered by the Discribe team as well as interactive discussion. A total of 53 individuals representing 42 different organisations attended this event, including academic researchers and those from professional practice.

Following this event, the Discribe team reported that 75% of the funded projects were awarded to individuals who attended this event.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://spritehub.org/2021/11/17/funder-webinar-with-the-discribe-hub-team/
 
Description SPRITE+ Town Hall: Introducing the REPHRAIN Centre and commissioning process 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact The SPRITE+ network worked with the team leading the National Research Centre on Privacy, Harm Reduction and Adversarial Influence Online (REPHRAIN) to host a virtual event to highlight potential funding opportunities for research and knowledge transfer in digital security, privacy, identity and trust.

The REPHRAIN team used this event as an opportunity to introduce their programme and to provide information on upcoming collaborative opportunities, and in particular, their strategic funding call, in which £500K was available to commission research projects that relate to REPHRAIN's mission and challenges. The event included presentations delivered by the REPHRAIN team as well as interactive discussion. Over 50 individuals representing 48 organisations attended this event, including academic researchers and those from professional practice.

Following this event, the REPHRAIN team reported that 38% of funding applications received were from attendees of this meeting.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
 
Description SPRITE+ Virtual Showcase (2020) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact SPRITE+ hosted a virtual Showcase event to provide an opportunity for academic and non-academic communities to connect and a platform for building collaborations across the spectrum of issues relating to security, privacy, identity and trust.

SPRITE+ Director, Professor Emma Barrett provided an introduction to SPRITE+ and the benefits of membership. Following Emma's talk, SPRITE+ Project Partner, Professor Eul Gy Im from Hanyang University discussed data sharing and collaboration in South Korea. Professor, and SERENE-RISC (Smart Cybersecurity Network) Scientific Director Benoît DuPont from Université de Montréal then provided an introduction to the triple helix model and the SERENE-RISC experience of engaging with industry and government.

Following the presentations, a series of themed breakout rooms were used as an opportunity for attendees to engage in discussions focused on themes of their choice. A total of eight breakout rooms on the following themes were offered:

- Professor Benoit DuPont - Director, SERENE-RISC, Université de Montréal
- Professor Eul Gyu Im, Professor of Computer Science, Hanyang University
- JP Buckley, Head of Data Protection, DWF Law
- Dr Ben Marshall, Behavioural Scientist, Nasdaq
- Julie Dawson, Director of Regulatory & Policy, Yoti
- Dr John Blythe, Head of Behavioural Science, Cybsafe
- Dr Dmitry Dereshev, SPRITE+ Research Associate
- Professor Sakir Sezer, SPRITE+ Co-Director and Head of the Networked System Security at the Centre for Secure Information Technology (CSIT), Queen's University Belfast

In total 75 participants joined the event from academia and professional practice, representing a range of organisations from industry, government, police and civil society organisations.

Following the Showcase, attendees reported that they made connections with others that they might not have made otherwise and engaged in further discussion and collaborative opportunities. Many attendees who had not been affiliated with SPRITE+ previously then went on to join the network as a Member.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://spritehub.org/2020/05/20/sprite-workshop-and-showcase-results/
 
Description SPRITE+ Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A virtual workshop took place for the SPRITE+ funded Challenge Working Groups to engage with the SPRITE+ Project Partners. The Challenge Working Groups introduced their programmes of activity and worked with the Partners to identify common areas of interest where they could work together.

The SPRITE+ Challenge Working Groups are:

- Accountability & Ethics in a Digital Ecosystem - Led by Dr Jonathan Foster (University of Sheffield) and Dr Julie Gore (University of Bath)

- Digital Technologies, Power & Control - Led by Dr Lara Frumkin (The Open University), Dr Vitor Jesus (Birmingham City University), Dr Sabine Little (University of Sheffield) and Dr Kovila Coopamootoo (Newcastle University).

The SPRITE+ Project Partners who engaged in this discussion were BT, Cybsafe, Yoti, Nasdaq, Arm and Nvidea. The Project Partners participated in breakout discussions with the Challenge Working Groups to provide feedback and ideas from a research user perspective. This discussion enabled the Challenge Working Groups to establish valuable contacts and the input from the Partners has helped to guide the direction of the groups activities moving forward.

Further discussion also focussed on future work for the SPRITE+ programme and potential themes for an upcoming sandpit. Through a series of breakout activities, around 50 topics were identified, covering the challenges of authentication, responsible innovation, ensuring trust and security in complex connected systems, and user-centric security tools and procedures. However, one theme that was particularly prominent was the way in which issues of trust, identity, privacy and security will evolve in a post-Covid era, and this was the topic that was ultimately selected for the first SPRITE+ sandpit.

Following this workshop, the Project Partners continued to engage with the Challenge Working Groups and attended their subsequent meetings/activities. In addition, members of the Challenge Working Groups went on to join the SPRITE+ Sandpit in a mentor capacity and the Project Partners joined as stakeholders, helping to influence the direction of the funded research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://spritehub.org/2020/05/20/sprite-workshop-and-showcase-results/
 
Description SPRITE+ Workshop: Building a Community of Interest in Digital Identity and Age Assurance 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact SPRITE+ hosted a community building workshop focussed on digital identity and age assurance in conjunction with the Age Check Certification Scheme (SPRITE+ Project Partner) and The Alan Turing Institute Digital Identity Interest Group.

The aim of the workshop was to facilitate the building of potential research collaborations in anticipation of opportunities that may arise as a result of government initiatives such as the UK digital identity and attributes trust framework and online safety legislation. In particular we explored opportunities for academics to partner with non-academic organisations and businesses to identify and scope the challenges of digital identification and age assurance from multiple disciplinary perspectives.

The workshop features context-setting talks from Tony Allen (CEO of Age Check Certification Scheme), Julie Dawson (Director of Regulatory & Policy at Yoti), Professor Carsten Maple (Alan Turing Institute Trustworthy Digital Identity Interest Group Lead and Professor of Cyber Systems Engineering at the University of Warwick), Almudena Lara (Global Lead for Child Safety Online at Google), Jordan Moodie (Head of Legislation and Evidence, Digital Identity at DCMS) and Antonia Bayly (Safety by Design, Online Harms at DCMS). John Baird (Joint Head Business Engagement & Cybersecurity at the EPSRC) discussed the UKRI research funding landscape and opportunities for academic-industry collaborations. In between the presentations, participants were placed in breakout groups at random for interactive discussion.

A total of 40 SPRITE+ members (plus speakers) attended representing researchers from STEM, humanities, arts and social science disciplines and non-academic members from regulators, government departments, businesses and third sector organisations. At least 33 individual organisations were represented.

This workshop has resulted in the launch of a problem book and working group on Age Assurance and Digital identity. A follow-up event will be hosted by the Alan Turing Institute in Q2 2022.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://spritehub.org/resources/building-a-community-of-interest-in-digital-identity-and-age-assuran...
 
Description SPRITE+ Workshop: Communicating Cybersecurity 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact In January 2022, SPRITE+ held an online community-building workshop focused on communicating cyber security. The aim of this workshop was to facilitate the building of potential collaborations and to explore opportunities for academics to partner with non-academic organisations to identify and explore the challenges of communicating cybersecurity from multiple disciplinary perspectives. The workshop featured the following context-setting talks:

- 'Communicating cyber threats: problems, responses, recommendations' - Emma Moreton, Lecturer of Applied Linguistics at the University of Liverpool
- 'A Morphology of the Cyber Security Tale' - Genevieve Lively, Professor of Classics at the University of Bristol
- 'Hoping for the best but expecting the worst: how can we talk about security of emerging technologies?' - Ola Michalec, Social Scientist at the University of Bristol

Following the presentations, participants were placed in breakout groups at random for interactive discussion. A total of 45 SPRITE+ members attended including researchers from STEM, humanities, arts and social science disciplines and non-academic members from regulators, government departments, businesses and third sector organisations. At least 32 individual organisations were represented.

The outcomes of this workshop were communicated to attendees and plans were made for a follow-up seminar series to further explore aspects of communicating cybersecurity (and more broadly, issues of digital trust, security, privacy and identity) for different stakeholder audiences.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2022
URL https://spritehub.org/2022/02/17/sprite-community-building-event-communicating-cybersecurity/
 
Description SPRITE+ Workshop: Trusted Research 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact SPRITE+ hosted a workshop on the theme of 'Trusted Research', which was part funded by the Office of the Chief Scientific Advisor for National Security. The workshop aimed to improve researcher awareness of issues related to 'Trusted Research', an umbrella term that includes issues related to:

• Regulatory compliance (e.g., Export Controls, the Academic TA Scheme, GDPR, partner-country regulations)
• Protecting IP (including cyber security and data protection issues)
• Conflicts of interest with other research partners
• Risk of foreign interference in research/teaching and academic freedom
• Protecting staff and students overseas
• Reputational risk and ethical issues (including potential misuse/abuse/dual use of research knowledge)

The workshop explored the implications of current guidance for 'coal face' PIs and their teams, examining the barriers to awareness and implementation, and suggesting ways to improve the situation. Participants included higher education professional practitioners (from information governance, international and research support offices) and colleagues from Centre for the Protection of National Infrastructure (CPNI), as well as 37 academic researchers (representing 21 individual research organisations) from a range of career stages and research disciplines.

The workshop featured context-setting short talks from Professor Sir Peter Gregson (VC of Cranfield University and Universities UK lead for Trusted Research), Professor Emma Barrett (Director SPRITE+), and Professor Anthony Finkelstein (Chief Scientific Advisor for National Security), but most of the workshop time was spent in breakout group discussions.

Participants identified a series of issues and recommendations, which were used by Wilton Park (UK Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office) to support their 'Enhancing security to support international collaboration' workshop. These findings are also influencing guidance and policies from UKRI, Universities UK, and HMG.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://spritehub.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/2021-SPRITE-TR-Workshop-summary-FINAL.pdf
 
Description SPRITE+ event with the London Office for Rapid Cybersecurity Advancement (LORCA) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact SPRITE+ collaborated with our Project Partner, the London Office for Rapid Cybersecurity Advancement (LORCA) to host a cybersecurity community building event at their offices. This event aimed to bring together individuals from academia, large business, SMEs and the start-up community to discuss emerging research challenges and opportunities to strengthen networks and collaborative activities. This event featured:
- A key note talk from Dr John Hurley, Senior Staff Engineer at Nvidia discussing emerging cybersecurity related challenges faced by corporate R&D teams and his perspective on emerging research opportunities.
- Elevator pitches (x16) delivered by SPRITE+ Expert Fellows from academia and industry to introduce their expertise, research focus and cybersecurity related challenges that they target through innovation, services and products.
- Networking sessions to facilitate the creation of new connections and collaborative partnerships.

We welcomed 35 attendees, representing 34 individual organisations. Following this event, SPRITE+ saw >20 new membership registrations from the SME community and many attendees reported making new connections with individuals they would never have met otherwise. The format of this event will be replicated in future activities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://spritehub.org/2021/11/29/sprite-meet-up-with-the-london-office-for-rapid-cybersecurity-advan...
 
Description SPRITE+ feature in the PaCCS blog - Professor Emma Barrett and Dr Dmitry Dereshev 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact To mark the official launch of SPRITE+ Dr Dmitry Dereshev (SPRITE+ Research Associate) and Professor Emma Barrett (Director, SPRITE+) wrote an article for the Partnership for Conflict, Crime and Security Research (PaCCS) blog. This article introduced SPRITE+ and its key challenge themes to the broader audience of Conflict, Crime and Security Research (https://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/about/).

Following the publication of the blog, SPRITE+ has secured a collaboration with PaCCS to host a copy of their data on Conflict, Crime and Security Research Centres in the United Kingdom list (https://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/research-map/). In time, this will be expanded into a map-like interactive service for SPRITE+ audience and beyond.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/blog/sprite-tackling-challenges-in-the-future-of-digital-security-p...
 
Description SPRITE+ funded Challenge Working Group Stakeholder Workshop: Accountability and Ethics in a Digital Ecosystem 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The SPRITE+ funded Accountability and Ethics in a Digital Ecosystem Challenge Working Group led by Dr Jonathan Foster (University of Sheffield) and Dr Julie Gore (University of Bath) hosted their first stakeholder workshop to identify areas for exploration under their Challenge Theme.

The workshop was attended by 25 participants drawn from both academia and professional practice including representations from Nasdaq, NCSC, Birmingham City Council, and various digital consultancies. Both social science and STEM disciplines were represented.

Workshop participants worked together in breakout groups to identify broad challenges e.g. ethics and the law; local, global and national ethics; and fashion and fads of privacy. These challenge areas were subsequently analysed and distilled into distinct sub themes: 1) Digital Ecosystems: Context (in)-dependent Structures, Rules and Normative principles; 2) Accountable and Ethics-Driven (Responsible) Data Sharing in Digital Ecosystems; and 3) Agency, Empowerment and Education in Digital Ecosystems.

Following the workshop, Dr Jonathan Foster and Dr Julie Gore used these themes to inform the drafting of an initial ethics orientated position paper.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://spritehub.org/2020/06/16/accountability-ethics-in-a-digital-ecosystem-workshop/
 
Description SPRITE+ funded Challenge Working Group stakeholder workshop: Digital Technologies, Power & Control 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The 'Digital Technologies, Power & Control' Challenge Working Group is funded by SPRITE+ and is led by Dr Lara Frumkin (The Open University), Dr Kovila Coopamootoo (Newcastle University), Dr Sabine Little (University of Sheffield) and Dr Vitor Jesus (Birmingham City University). This project brings together a diverse, cross-disciplinary group of academics, stakeholders and non-academic communities to address pressing needs in security, privacy, identity and trust. The work employs an action research model to solicit wide participation in societal decisions around Digital Technologies, Power and Control relying on theory, research and current practice from multiple academic and non-academic perspectives.

The Challenge Working Group hosted their first stakeholder workshop which was attended by 25 individuals representing a range of organisations from industry/business, local government, charities and trusts, who were all interested in identifying challenges and good practice around working with marginalised communities. At the event, they discussed how marginalised voices are being heard (or are not being heard) and about ways to empower communities with knowledge to make informed choices about future technologies.

The group considered several topical challenges and innovative ways to address these challenges. The challenges identified were:
- illiteracy while more and more requiring the use of secure technologies
- communities in developing countries where, for example, access to performing technology is challenging
- communities for which basic instruments such as an official identity or a bank account do not exist
- or simple cases of digital exclusion

The meeting yielded an engaging discussion across a range of areas and provided the Challenge Working Group with several avenues to investigate related to research knowledge gaps. The Working Group went on to publicly share summaries of these discussions on their blog (https://digitaltechpowerandcontrol.com/blog/) in preparation for a follow-up workshop.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://digitaltechpowerandcontrol.com/2021/01/30/notes-on-the-dtpc-wg-workshop-i/
 
Description SPRITE+ funded Challenge Working Group stakeholder workshop: Digital Technologies, Power & Control 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The SPRITE+ funded 'Digital Technologies, Power and Control' (DTPC) Challenge Working Group (CWG) met with corporate stakeholders to consider the role of trust, identity, privacy and security (TIPS) in its work. Attendees included representatives from large business, SMEs, Government and civil society organisations. There was a lively discussion around what the TIPS concepts mean within digital technology and especially for marginalised groups of people. The 'why' people are concerned about TIPS and the 'how' they address these issues were considered at this meeting. Comments from stakeholders were used by the CWG to inform a white paper and future research directions.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://digitaltechpowerandcontrol.com/2021/06/21/notes-from-the-sprite-stakeholders-and-dtpc-workin...
 
Description SPRITE+ funded Challenge Working Group website: Digital Technologies, Power & Control 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The 'Digital Technologies, Power & Control' Challenge Working Group is funded by SPRITE+ and is led by Dr Lara Frumkin (The Open University), Dr Kovila Coopamootoo (Newcastle University), Dr Sabine Little (University of Sheffield) and Dr Vitor Jesus (Birmingham City University). This project brings together a diverse, cross-disciplinary group of academics, stakeholders and non-academic communities to address pressing needs in security, privacy, identity and trust. The work employs an action research model to solicit wide participation in societal decisions around Digital Technologies, Power and Control relying on theory, research and current practice from multiple academic and non-academic perspectives.

The Working Group have created their own website to promote their research. The site includes a blog, which they use to share their news, views and information about their activities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://digitaltechpowerandcontrol.com/home/
 
Description SPRITE+ monthly newsletter and mailing list 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact SPRITE+ publishes a monthly newsletter via its mailing list (>400 individuals registered as of February 2021) and website. The newsletter contains a variety of information of interest to the digital TIPS community, including:

- Highlights on events, blog posts and upcoming opportunities as well as our spotlight series which showcases the work of SPRITE+ Members/Expert Fellows/Project Partners.
- SPRITE+ Members news and recent publications.
- Upcoming funding calls and events.
- Job opportunities, PhD studentships and career development opportunities.

The SPRITE+ mailing list is also used to share information with Members and/or Expert fellows on an ad-hoc basis on behalf of its stakeholders, project partners and cognate networks. For example, the SPRITE+ Expert Fellows mailing list was used to recruit experts for a government workshop on 'ethics and values in emerging technology.' 65% of selected participants were SPRITE+ Expert Fellows.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019,2020,2021
 
Description SPRITE+ social media 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact SPRITE+ hosts Twitter and LinkedIn accounts to promote the work and activities of our members and cognate organisations. We share information such as papers, journal articles, events, funding calls and other opportunities relevant to digital trust, security, privacy and identity.

As of February 2022, SPRITE+ has 632 twitter and 210 LinkedIn followers. Many of our members have listed SPRITE+ social media as the place they were first notified about the existence of the network as well the go to place to find information on our events and funding calls.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019,2020,2021
URL https://twitter.com/spriteplus
 
Description SPRITE+ website and collaboration portal 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The SPRITE+ website was created at the start of the project and is used advertise the network and to disseminate information. The website hosts a range of resources of interest to the digital TIPS community:

- The SPRITE+ blog and news features.
- A library of carefully curated free online education and awareness resources - some of these materials are targeted at 'first timers' and offer a general introduction to relevant areas, and others provide a deep dive into more advanced topics for established stakeholders.
- Information on centres for doctoral training relevant to digital TIPS.
- A curated glossary of common terms across digital TIPS. From FinTech to cybersecurity, the list contains over 300 terms, definitions, and links to sources where you can learn more about each term.
- A searchable library of top journals, conferences and papers for digital TIPS.
- A searchable library of papers submitted by Members of the SPRITE+ community.
- A searchable table of related organisations with significant interest and publications in the area of digital TIPS.
- Career journey interviews with SPRITE+ Members, Expert Fellows and Project Partners (academics and professional practitioners) to provide inspiration for those looking to enter careers in digital TIPS.
- Rising stars series which showcases research by Early Career Researchers.
- An up to date list of funding calls by SPRITE+ and external funders.
- An up to date list of job opportunities and PhD studentships relevant to digital TIPS.

The website is used to showcase the research activities and outcomes from the SPRITE+ funded project teams and offers opportunities for interested parties to collaborate and input into the direction of these groups.

The SPRITE+ website allows people to sign-up as a member of the network and to create a profile to provide information on their area of expertise, interest, publications and social media. Like LinkedIn, the SPRITE+ collaboration portal allows members to search and view each other's profiles and make connections. In addition, members can sign up to the SPRITE+ mailing list (JISCMail), which is used to send information about upcoming opportunities, events, funding calls and activities as well as the monthly SPRITE+ newsletter. As of February 2020, SPRITE+ has >650 registered members and >700 JISCMail subscribers. The SPRITE+ membership (>750 individuals) is made up of diverse individuals from academia (>90 high education institutions represented) industry, SMEs, government, law enforcement and civil society organisations. A broad mix of research expertise is represented including technical, scientific, and social science disciplines.

The SPRITE+ website also provides links to the Twitter and LinkedIn pages which are used to share information of interest to the digital TIPS community.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019,2020,2021
URL https://spritehub.org/