Self-recovery housing for development: scaling up crisis preparedness and humanitarian shelter response

Lead Research Organisation: Oxford Brookes University
Department Name: Faculty of Tech, Design and Environment

Abstract

This project builds directly upon two previous GCRF awards:
1 NERC Resilience Foundation Award: Promoting Safer Building - Using science, technology, communication and humanitarian practice to support family and community self-recovery.
2 British Academy Cities and Infrastructure: Safer self-recovery: promoting resilient urban reconstruction after disasters.
The key findings of both these projects are described in the Business Case. For more on the findings of previous GCRF awards see: https://www.odi.org/publications/10963-self-recovery-disasters-interdisciplinary-perspective

Earthquakes, storms, floods, and conflict cause untold damage to infrastructure, services, agriculture and livelihoods. The destruction of housing is often most visible, and the most devastating to the families, with often hundreds of thousands of homes destroyed. Householders themselves are invariably the first to respond; they are never passive, and signs of shelter recovery are very apparent from the first days after a disaster. The majority - as many as 80 or 90% - receive little or no assistance from the international community and are the main drivers of their own recovery process. This process has been termed 'self-recovery'.

The previous GCRF awards supported interdisciplinary teams led by ODI in collaboration with CARE International UK, BGS, UCL and Loughborough University. They developed the understanding of the self-recovery process and advanced the theoretical basis for humanitarian assistance to the process of supporting self-recovery in practice . In large part as a result of this work, self-recovery is now a strategic element of the humanitarian shelter sector discourse with many disaster responses purporting to support this inevitable process.

In recognition of the value of a people-centred approach that moves away from the convention product-based modalities, the CARE Philippines post-cyclone self-recovery project won the 2018 World Habitat Award in acknowledgment of its self-recovery focus. Sixteen thousand houses were built, each one unique and reflecting the priorities and means of each family. https://www.world-habitat.org/world-habitat-awards/winners-and-finalists/post-haiyan-self-recovery-housing-programme/

The self-recovery approach that respects the primacy of agency and choice aligns well with current humanitarian and development concerns such as the 'humanitarian development nexus', the Grand Bargain's emphasis on localisation, participation and cash-based responses, the Sendai Framework on Disaster Risk Reduction, the Sustainable Development Goals and the Global Shelter Cluster strategy. This is further explained in the Business Case.

However, very little has been done to develop guidance for practice. With the exception of the protocol 'Informing Choice for Better Shelter' that delivers a guide for the development of technical educational material, there are no published tools nor guidelines that provide an implementation framework for self-recovery in shelter projects.

This project addresses this gap. The protocol will be adapted to become a preparedness tool. A methodology for 'context analysis' will be designed to incorporate the adaptability and diversity essential to a self-recovery approach. Monitoring and evaluation tools will be developed that focus on survivor-led indicators and that include a broad definition of good shelter programming that includes health, livelihoods, sanitation, protection and gender-based violence as well as the conventional focus on structural safety and construction quality.

The methodology will include field-work and case studies as well as action research, or real time research, that will directly support rapid-onset disaster responses contributing directly to development of strategies in the immediate aftermath of a disaster. All outputs will be thoroughly scrutinised by the humanitarian sector and incorporated directly into practice.

Planned Impact

Summarised here is the impact this project will have 1) for survivors of disaster and conflict and 2) for the humanitarian sector charged with responding to the vast need for shelter after major catastrophes.
Frequently, loss of housing is not only the most visible sign of destruction after a major disaster or conflict, it can also be the single factor that has the greatest impact on people's lives, livelihoods, wellbeing and recovery. The word 'shelter' sums it up poorly: families lose their dignity, their sense of place in a community, their home-based livelihood, their biggest asset and the place where they are born and die. In fact, everything that describes a home. The scale of destruction can be huge:
1. Cyclone Idai, Mozambique, 2019, 250,000 houses destroyed or damaged
2. Typhoon Haiyan, Philippines, 2013, 550,000 completely destroyed
3. Nepal earthquakes, 2015, almost one million destroyed or damaged
4. Haiti earthquake, 2010, 1.5 million homeless
Data shows that the international community meets a small percentage of this need, normally between 10 and 20% . The majority, as many as 90%, 'self-recover'. Any project that can effectively and appropriately support this self-recovery process, has the potential for immense impact. Recent post-disaster shelter projects that have supported self-recovery have done so, at scale, with materials and a modest amount of cash - less than £50 per family in some cases. By comparison, the 'whole house' approach reaches far fewer at a cost of between £1,000 and £5,000 per family.
Clearly the effectiveness and cost-efficiency of a self-recovery project results in a very large number of beneficiaries. However, the impact goes well beyond scale. Each family builds their home according to needs and means, so that the house is tailored to their wishes and requirements. The family livelihood activities are considered: a patio to repair fishing nets, or dry coffee or rice; a convenience store to supplement income; a room for a sewing machine or loom. Improvements can be made by incorporating a latrine or rainwater harvesting.
Where a 'one-size-fits-all' approach of conventional shelter projects fails to respond to the complex needs of different families, a self-recovery approach responds to these shortcomings by allowing choice and agency to be front and centre.
The potential impact of a self-recovery approach is well accepted, but there is little in the way of guidance, tools and methodological approaches. This project will fill this gap and the impact on effectiveness and quality of the humanitarian response has the potential to be very great indeed. The partnership of previous GCRF grants has been maintained and key actors, both organisations and individuals, have been involved in the development of 'self-recovery' since it was first identified as a powerful force for recovery.
Key stakeholders are international agencies that deliver the majority of post-disaster shelter projects. All these agencies are active members of the Global Shelter Cluster (GSC) and engagement with this coordination mechanism ensures the work of this project reaches the widest possible audience. CARE International UK is one of the few aid agencies that is committed to working in the shelter sector with a permanent team of professionals. Along with the Centre for Emergency and Development Practice (CENDEP - Oxford Brookes University) and other partners, it has been instrumental in pioneering the work on self-recovery. It co-leads the Supporting Self-recovery Working Group, embedded within the GSC, and this guarantees that the work is scrutinised by peer agencies and has an immediate pathway to practice, policy and strategy. CENDEP has a long history of engagement with the humanitarian shelter sector and is one of the few university centres running masters level education on Shelter after Disaster and many of its alumni are working in the sector.

Publications

10 25 50
 
Description The activities and outputs of this project, in collaboration with partners, has had significant impact on both the thinking and practice of the global humanitarian Shelter and Settlements Sector. This success has been in large part due to a strong practice-academia collaboration that has delivered multiple outputs under the somewhat restrictive circumstances of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Self-recovery and wider impacts of adequate housing
This project continued to develop previous research into how households and communities self-recover, and how best to support that process. That this is an effective modality for post-crisis response is now well-established; less accepted is the opportunity to improve the adequacy of housing on many fronts: health; well-being, protection, livelihoods. The work of the project partnership has contributed to our understanding of these 'wider impacts', published in several chapters of InterAction's Roadmap for Research (2021, https://www.interaction.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/Roadmap-for-Research_96ppi.pdf)

Health, mental health and well-being
Perhaps the most evident, but regularly overlooked, consequence of inadequate housing is the detrimental effect on physical and mental health and well-being. The project hosted two events, and subsequently published two reports, that firmly establish the importance of these issues. The willingness of health and psychosocial support experts to engage with these events greatly enhanced the rigour and credibility of these important inter-related topics.
Shelter and Health Learning Event, May 2020. Workshop report: Towards Healthier Homes in Humanitarian Settings (https://insights.careinternational.org.uk/publications/towards-healthier-homes-in-humanitarian-settings)

Shelter and Mental Health Learning Event, May 2021. Workshop report Mindful Sheltering (https://sheltercluster.s3.eu-central-1.amazonaws.com/public/Mindful%20Sheltering_0.pdf)

Fieldwork
COVID-19 effectively halted all international travel. Nonetheless, fieldwork (supported remotely by project staff) was successfully carried out in Malawi (CARE and CRS), Vanuatu (CARE), Beirut (Habitat for Humanity with the American University of Beirut). Final reports of these pieces of fieldwork can be found on the self-recovery project website (https://self-recovery.org), a 'live' repository of completed and ongoing work.

Work in progress
The analysis of the fieldwork is informing the writing of the Self-recovery Guidance Note. A first draft of the Guidance Note has been written and the final version will be completed with the support of CARE UK and Oxford Brookes University in Spring 2022.
CARE UK is committed to further developing the work on health and CRAterre is working on further Shelter Response Profiles and context analysis methodologies. Again it is important to note the strength of the practice and academic partnership in giving rigour and continuity to the work of improving post-crisis humanitarian shelter responses.

The outputs and continuing work of the partnership include the work of the Malawi Technical Working Group in developing the protocol for 'Informing Choice for Better Shelter protocol' (https://sheltercluster.org/promoting-safer-building-working-group/protocol-informing-choice-better-shelter) and influencing future shelter responses, the work of British Geological Survey in promoting the links between geoscientist and humanitarian expertise, and much more that is described in the body of this report. The structure of the rest of this report follows the three work streams initially proposed to the funder: refining the Protocol, the Guidance Note and Wider Impacts.
Exploitation Route These outcomes are, as explained above, taken forward by a number of humanitarian organisations as well as the global shelter community.
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Construction,Other

URL https://self-recovery.org
 
Description The activities and outputs of this project, in collaboration with partners, has had significant impact on both the thinking and practice of the global humanitarian Shelter and Settlements Sector. This success has been in large part due to a strong practice-academia collaboration that has delivered multiple outputs under the somewhat restrictive circumstances of the COVID-19 pandemic. Self-recovery and wider impacts of adequate housing This project continued to develop previous research into how households and communities self-recover, and how best to support that process. That this is an effective modality for post-crisis response is now well-established; less accepted is the opportunity to improve the adequacy of housing on many fronts: health; well-being, protection, livelihoods. The work of the project partnership has contributed to our understanding of these 'wider impacts', published in several chapters of InterAction's Roadmap for Research (https://www.interaction.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/Roadmap-for-Research_96ppi.pdf, 2021). Health, mental health and well-being Perhaps the most evident, but regularly overlooked, consequence of inadequate housing is the detrimental effect on physical and mental health and well-being. The project hosted two events, and subsequently published two reports, that firmly establish the importance of these issues. The willingness of health and psychosocial support experts to engage with these events greatly enhanced the rigour and credibility of these important inter-related topics. Shelter and Health Learning Event, May 2020. Workshop report: Towards Healthier Homes in Humanitarian Settings (https://insights.careinternational.org.uk/publications/towards-healthier-homes-in-humanitarian-settings) Shelter and Mental Health Learning Event, May 2021. Workshop report Mindful Sheltering (https://sheltercluster.s3.eu-central-1.amazonaws.com/public/Mindful%20Sheltering_0.pdf) Fieldwork COVID-19 effectively halted all international travel. Nonetheless, fieldwork (supported remotely by project staff) was successfully carried out in Malawi (CARE and CRS), Vanuatu (CARE), Beirut (Habitat for Humanity with the American University of Beirut). Final reports of these pieces of fieldwork can be found on the self-recovery project website (https://self-recovery.org), a 'live' repository of completed and ongoing work. Work in progress The analysis of the fieldwork is informing the writing of the Self-recovery Guidance Note. A first draft of the Guidance Note has been written and the final version will be completed with the support of CARE UK and Oxford Brookes University in Spring 2022. CARE UK is committed to further developing the work on health and CRAterre is working on further Shelter Response Profiles and context analysis methodologies. Again it is important to note the strength of the practice and academic partnership in giving rigour and continuity to the work of improving post-crisis humanitarian shelter responses. The outputs and continuing work of the partnership include the work of the Malawi Technical Working Group in developing the protocol for 'Informing Choice for Better Shelter protocol' (https://sheltercluster.org/promoting-safer-building-working-group/protocol-informing-choice-better-shelter) and influencing future shelter responses, the work of British Geological Survey in promoting the links between geoscientist and humanitarian expertise, and much more that is described in the body of this report. The structure of the rest of this report follows the three work streams initially proposed to the funder: refining the Protocol, the Guidance Note and Wider Impacts. WS1 Informing Choice for Better Shelter protocol One of the three objectives of the project was to adapt the 'Informing Choice for Better Shelter protocol' ('the Protocol', https://sheltercluster.org/promoting-safer-building-working-group/protocol-informing-choice-better-shelter). The Protocol was originally developed in 2019 by the Promoting Safer Building Working Group (PSBWG) of the Global Shelter Cluster (GSC) to guide country Shelter and NFI (non-food items) clusters through a process of developing the relevant technical messages to promote building back better and safer after disaster. The initial Protocol consisted of a set of simple tools for use in the immediate emergency phase in post-disaster contexts; WS1 set out to pilot the process of the Protocol in a 'peacetime setting' with less time pressure than in an active emergency, and test its potential for contributing to disaster risk reduction (DRR). In a setting with an ongoing response, steps 1-4 would be undertaken in parallel, as the different analyses are very much interconnected and even interdependent. This analysis then informs steps 5-7. Malawi was selected as an appropriate context to roll out this programme of testing and refining the eight steps, due to project partners' existing knowledge of and contacts in the country. A technical working group (TWiG) was formed within the then-dormant Malawi Shelter Cluster, the humanitarian coordination system co-led by the Malawi Red Cross and the Ministry of Land, Housing and Urban Development (MLHUD). The TWiG brought together interested shelter actors and formed a point of contact with the government serving as a mechanism for influencing humanitarian practice in Malawi. The TWiG could therefore have direct influence on policy related to self-recovery approaches to disaster responses The impact of WS1 An important goal of engaging the TWiG in the process of testing and refining the Protocol was to raise awareness and facilitate consensus amongst humanitarian agencies in Malawi regarding the approach to supporting self-recovery and contributing to preparedness and DRR and then to develop the tools and IEC materials that would best support this approach. Previously in Malawi (and elsewhere in Southern Africa) national and local officials have promoted rebuilding which meets building codes and uses modern materials (e.g. burnt brick, cement and CGI roofing sheets), which are unaffordable to many people. Officials in the Ministry of Land, Housing and Urban Development have been hesitant about supporting self-recovery and promoting local building practices and traditional materials. As a consequence, CRS had previously found it challenging to get its self-recovery approach to scale and CARE Malawi had similarly felt ill-equipped to implement a self-recovery approach in its shelter programming. The active involvement of a wide group of shelter/housing/humanitarian and government stakeholders with the TWiG in Malawi is testament to the steady impact of this project on attitudes and expertise towards a self-recovery approach. The TWiG has been much appreciated by humanitarians and the government (Ministry of Land Housing and Urban Development) as a forum to exchange experience and knowledge, coordinate agencies' activities and harmonize approaches to leverage capacities. There are early signs that the series of workshops and discussion groups held through the TWiG have changed government and humanitarian agencies' knowledge and attitudes regarding housing recovery after disaster. The chair of the TWiG, the Chief Housing officer of the MLHUD, has called for the participants to continue the meetings on a regular basis, and both Malawi Red Cross as well as CRS have committed to co-chairing the meetings. Malawi government officials from MLHUD and DODMA as well as from district level authorities have shown increasing openness to discussing self-recovery approaches as demonstrated by good attendance and productive discussions at the Malawi National Shelter Learning Event on 28th September 2021, including the Chief Housing Officer from the Ministry of Land, Housing and Urban Development, who made opening remarks. This event was conceived and hosted by Catholic Relief Services (CRS), one of the key shelter response organisations in Malawi. The event was held in Lilongwe, attended in person by 39 participants from a wide range of national and local government, NGO, UN and donor organisations and another 22 participants online. An entire section was devoted to the work of the TWiG, including the results of refining the Protocol and the context analysis tools. This Learning Event and its ongoing significance in terms of this project's impact are discussed further in the overall project impact section below. The tested and refined Protocol (https://sheltercluster.org/promoting-safer-building-working-group/protocol-informing-choice-better-shelter) will continue to be hosted and championed by the Global Shelter Cluster and its use promoted through disseminated to national clusters. WS2 Best-practice guidance The best-practice guidance for self-recovery "Guidance Note on Supporting Shelter Self-Recovery" (the Guidance Note) has been drafted. It is a shelter practitioner focused guide for implementation of shelter programmes that aim to support self-recovery. ? Part A is a short overview of self-recovery - its principles, enablers and barriers illustrated by case studies ? Part B provides practical guidance for agencies on how to support shelter self-recovery including illustrative case studies. Field research in Vanuatu, Lebanon and Malawi has been conducted, which is informing the development of the Guidance Note (and also WS3): The impact of WS2 The impact of COVID-19 has caused unavoidable delays in the development and completion of the Guidance Note. Fieldwork was at first delayed because of COVID-19 restrictions in the countries as well as travel restrictions and finally had to be conducted to large extent with remote guidance without core project staff in the field. Nonetheless, we end this project with a final draft that is under peer review by external experts. Moreover, there is a commitment from CIUK to continue the process of reviewing, editing and finalising the Guidance Note. An unintended benefit is that we will be able to incorporate the findings of the delayed fieldwork into the Guidance Note. The development of the Guidance Note has been achieved through a process of engagement with the Shelter and Settlements sector. Practically this has been through the three PSBWG workshops mentioned above and through work with partners at the global level (Global Shelter Cluster, IFRC, UNHCR, InterAction) and nationally through CARE and CRS in Malawi and Vanuatu. The composition of the research team as well as the peer reviewers, including practitioners from different agencies involved in Shelter and Settlements is highly likely to result in uptake and dissemination of the guidance. Chances are high we will also get feedback from practitioners implementing these approaches so that we can continue to build the knowledge about self-recovery. WS3 Broader measure of shelter impact Good progress has been made on developing understanding of the impacts of housing on recovery and of the potential wider impacts of shelter assistance. This work stream of the project has been in step with a growing trend within the global humanitarian Shelter and Settlements sector (steered by the 2018-2022 strategic priorities of the Global Shelter Cluster) to focus on wider impacts and co-benefits of good shelter programming. Significant progress has been made in developing networks and research partnerships relevant to the understanding of wider impacts of shelter, specifically health, mental health, livelihoods, protection, home and recovery and also how geoscience can support recovery from, and preparation for, disasters. At the end of this project we have made particular progress on health that will be taken forward by CENDEP and CIUK. Publications on research needs, home and recovery, health, mental health, livelihoods, protection, and geoscience have been produced. The impact of WS3 It is in this Workstream that we can perhaps demonstrate the greatest diversity of impact and potentially the greatest overall impact. This is well-illustrated by the fact that the team was involved in seven separate chapters of the Roadmap for Research (https://www.interaction.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/Roadmap-for-Research_96ppi.pdf), each developing a different topic relating to post-crisis housing. The project followed on the research by Aaron Opdyke and Charles Parrack that identified a number of research priorities, but placed health as one of the most urgent. More recently, the Global Shelter Cluster has identified the relationship between shelter and Mental Health and Psychosocial Support (MHPSS) as a key area of future advocacy. This is a direct consequence of the work of the research team in highlighting the importance of these two related issues. These two areas of Health and Mental Health are the most advanced within this Workstream and prior to the work of CARE and Oxford Brookes they were neither discussed nor understood in the shelter sector. In similar fashion, the other areas of wider impact identified by the research - livelihoods, protection, home and community, the involvement of geoscience - are innovative topics recognised as deserving further attention. In particular the team has engaged in a sector-wide debate about the importance of place-attachment and the value of 'home' as an elemental part of recovery. A study into The Wider Impacts of Humanitarian and Settlements assistance (2020) was commissioned by InterAction in 2019. This identified similar topics but showed that there was a general lack of research and evidence of impacts within the humanitarian sector. This report, and the work of Opdyke and Parrack, demonstrate recognition within the sector of the need for further evidence-based research on the connections between adequate housing and a wide array of impacts and co-benefits; and that post-disaster reconstruction presents an opportunity to better people's homes and lives that should not be ignored. Ongoing impact and future plans Beyond the end of this project, long-standing and evolving partnerships between practitioner and academic organisations and individuals will be maintained and further developed, as future funding allows. The Global Shelter Cluster intends to make some changes to the Working Groups and Communities of Practice. In part due to the success of this project in raising awareness of the potential for a self-recovery approach, the Promoting Safer Building Working Group has been renamed the Self-recovery Working Group, and will soon be transformed into a broader Community of Practice. CIUK and CRAterre will continue to steer research on self-recovery and its dissemination through Working Group / Community of Practice meetings and connections with other Working Groups and Communities of Practice. Through the additional funding gained during the course of this project, research will continue at least for the next 12 months, with capacity at CIUK and CENDEP to develop the work on shelter and health, disseminate the Guidance Note and develop other themes related to self-recovery. When published in early 2022, the Guidance Note will be disseminated widely. A separate, shorter infographic style document is also planned for donors and government stakeholders to explain the principles and implications of supporting self-recovery approaches. It is planned to follow up closely with agencies implementing self-recovery approaches in order to build further knowledge of self-recovery. As this project's work streams 2 and 3 were pursued concurrently, the connections between the so-called 'wider impacts' of shelter and guidance for humanitarian agencies supporting self-recovery were continuously explored. The core project team at CIUK and CENDEP, partner organisations and the wider Shelter and Settlements sector (via the Self-recovery WG and the Global Shelter Cluster) widened and deepened a community of practice committed to finding new ways to support people recovering from crises, at scale. Publications and a large number of 'engagement activities', mostly online, have enabled the research to reach a wide audience within and beyond the Shelter and Settlements sector, causing invitations to participate in further events. Academic and practical impact of the current project can be measured, in part, by the project publications the numerous 'engagement' activities undertaken by project partners. The theme of shelter and health has been particularly well developed, in part due to the COVID-19 pandemic raising global awareness of the connections between homes, living conditions and health inequalities. The understanding that rebuilding after disasters and conflict should be both safer and healthier has hit home and will influence practice. The fact that the Global Shelter Cluster has adopted Health as one of its priority areas, allocating a page on its website to the topic of Shelter and Health (https://sheltercluster.org/resources/shelter-and-health), also a topic chosen as an advocacy priority, demonstrates the impact of the ongoing work of project partners. As an example, it has been reported that the Norwegian Refugee Council, not a direct project partner, but a key INGO in the field of humanitarian shelter, has been disseminating the key findings of Mindful Sheltering at Head Office level. Evidence of some of the key impacts of the project was seen at the Malawi National Shelter Learning Event in September 2021. As stated above under WS1, key shelter and housing stakeholders were present from the Government of Malawi, the NGO community, UN organisations and donor representatives. CRS Malawi, the event organiser, reported that its programming has changed and is still changing as a result of this project. CRS Malawi is now actively promoting the self-recovery approach in its shelter messages. CRS Malawi also has a significant grant from CRS Global to implement a 'Homes and Communities' strategy which takes up a key part of the self-recovery approach and is actively using the evidence gathered from its Replication Study to support the self-recovery approach. It is encouraging for the sustainability of the self-recovery approach in Malawi that CRS were confident enough to convene the National Shelter Learning Event. It is very likely that the self-recovery approach will become a central part of CRS programming in Malawi which means the results of the self-recovery research will directly impact on recovery after disaster in Malawi on a sustainable basis. It is further support for the sustainability of the self-recovery approach that government officials featured prominently in the shelter learning day. It was widely agreed during the event that the institutionalisation of policies to promote safer building practices was critical to support self-recovery and there is reasonable hope that such policies will be taken up by Malawi Government's housing advice and disaster recovery organisation. CRS will continue to advocate for supporting self-recovery in Malawi and elsewhere. This initiative and the TWiG forums will be continued on a regular basis, chaired by the Chief Housing officer of the MLHUD, with Malawi Red Cross and CRS as co-chairs. The main topic for the upcoming meetings will be national and district level contingency planning for shelter response. The research findings, report and recommendations that emerged from the fieldwork in Vanuatu will be used by CARE Vanuatu, with support from CARE UK, to develop and improve practice. Working in collaboration with other stakeholders, the report will be used in practice to support improving strategies for response and recovery. Through continued collaboration with the CIUK CARE Vanuatu will also continue to take this forward with shelter practitioners in the National Cluster as well as regionally and globally.
First Year Of Impact 2020
Sector Other
Impact Types Societal

 
Description Incorporation of research funbdings into policy document Save the Children
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Contribution to new or Improved professional practice
Impact Policy guidance globally for all Save The Children post-crisis shelter and settlements (housing) activities.
 
Description British Geological Survey 
Organisation British Geological Survey
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Collaboration on research into self-recovery housing after humanitarian crises
Collaborator Contribution BGS are contributing their expertise to collaborate on research to co-develop best-practice guidance for the support of the self-recovery process that allows families to exercise the primacy of their own agency and choice in the pursuance of their own self-recovery pathway. The BGS team contributes expertise on geoscience and its relationship to shelter and housing recovery after disasters.
Impact Ongoing research partnership which will lead to outputs and outcomes for disaster resilient housing
Start Year 2020
 
Description CADECOM Malawi 
Organisation CADECOM
Country Malawi 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Collaboration on research on disaster resilient housing in Malawi
Collaborator Contribution CADECOM Malawi are contributing their expertise to collaborate on research to co-develop best-practice guidance for the support of the self-recovery process that allows families to exercise the primacy of their own agency and choice in the pursuance of their own self-recovery pathway. The CADECOM Malawi team contribute their knowledge and experience of delivering humanitarian assistance and their comprehensive local knowledge of the country
Impact Ongoing research partnership which will lead to outputs and outcomes for disaster resilient housing in Malawi
Start Year 2020
 
Description CARE International 
Organisation Care International UK
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Collaboration on research on self recovery shelter and housing
Collaborator Contribution CARE International UK are contributing their expertise to collaborate on research to co-develop best-practice guidance for the support of the self-recovery process that allows families to exercise the primacy of their own agency and choice in the pursuance of their own self-recovery pathway. The CARE team contributes expertise on shelter and housing recovery after disasters from many humanitarian crises in different regions. They are able to make links for specific in country research using their local offices and implementation partners. Finally they are able to disseminate best practice throughout their network of country offices and proposal global guidelines for humanitarian shelter response and housing reconstruction.
Impact Webb S C, Weinstein Sheffield E, Flinn W. (2020). Towards Healthier Homes Humanitarian Settings. Proceedings of the Multi-sectoral Shelter & Health Learning Day 14th May 2020 .
Start Year 2019
 
Description CARE Malawi 
Organisation Care
Department Care, Malawi
Country Malawi 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Collaboration on research on disaster resilient housing in Malawi
Collaborator Contribution CARE Malawi are contributing their expertise to collaborate on research to co-develop best-practice guidance for the support of the self-recovery process that allows families to exercise the primacy of their own agency and choice in the pursuance of their own self-recovery pathway. The CARE team contribute their knowledge and experience of delivering humanitarian assistance and their comprehensive local knowledge of the country.
Impact Ongoing research partnership which will lead to outputs and outcomes for disaster resilient housing
Start Year 2021
 
Description CARE Vanuatu 
Organisation Care
Department Care, Vanuatu
Country Vanuatu 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Collaboration on research on disaster resilient housing in Vanuatu
Collaborator Contribution CARE Vanuatu are contributing their expertise to collaborate on research to co-develop best-practice guidance for the support of the self-recovery process that allows families to exercise the primacy of their own agency and choice in the pursuance of their own self-recovery pathway. The CARE team contribute their knowledge and experience of delivering humanitarian assistance and their comprehensive local knowledge of the country
Impact Ongoing research partnership which will lead to outputs and outcomes for disaster resilient housing
Start Year 2021
 
Description CRAterre 
Organisation National School of Architecture of Grenoble
Department CRAterre, International Center for Earth Construction
Country France 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Collaboration on research into self-recovery housing after humanitarian crises
Collaborator Contribution CRAterre are contributing their expertise to collaborate on research to co-develop best-practice guidance for the support of the self-recovery process that allows families to exercise the primacy of their own agency and choice in the pursuance of their own self-recovery pathway. The CRAterre team contribute their knowledge and experience of local construction techniques and their ability to apply this knowledge to inform shelter and housing reconstruction after disasters.
Impact Sevillano Gutierrez E, Moles, O. (2020). "Facilitate post-disaster reconstruction processes Malawi, 2020-2021". Elsa Cauderay Philippe Garnier Thierry Joffroy Eugénie Crété Aysegul Cankat Olivier Moles Enrique Sevillano Gutierrez Shelter response profiles (SRP): Impact study: Real Impact, limits and food for thoughts for the future CRAterre - CRAterre, AE&CC - Architecture, Environnement & Cultures Constructive, Grenoble University
Start Year 2020
 
Description Catholic Relief Services 
Organisation Catholic Relief Services
Country United States 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Collaboration on research on disaster resilient housing in Malawi
Collaborator Contribution Catholic Relief Services (CRS) global technology team are contributing their expertise to collaborate on research to co-develop best-practice guidance for the support of the self-recovery process that allows families to exercise the primacy of their own agency and choice in the pursuance of their own self-recovery pathway. The CRS global team contributes expertise on shelter and housing recovery after disasters from many humanitarian crises in different regions. They are able to make links for specific on country research using their local offices and implementation partners. Finally they are able to disseminate best practice throughout their network of country offices and proposal global guidelines for humanitarian shelter response and housing reconstruction.
Impact Ongoing research partnership which will lead to outputs and outcomes for disaster resilient housing in Malawi
Start Year 2020
 
Description Catholic Relief Services Malawi 
Organisation Catholic Relief Services
Department Catholic Relief Services, Malawi
Country Malawi 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Collaboration on research on disaster resilient housing in Malawi
Collaborator Contribution Catholic Relief Services Malawi are contributing their expertise to collaborate on research to co-develop best-practice guidance for the support of the self-recovery process that allows families to exercise the primacy of their own agency and choice in the pursuance of their own self-recovery pathway. The CRS Malawi team contribute their knowledge and experience of delivering humanitarian assistance and their comprehensive local knowledge of the country.
Impact Ongoing research partnership which will lead to outputs and outcomes for disaster resilient housing in Malawi
Start Year 2020
 
Description Collaboration with Open University 
Organisation Open University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Assistance with literature review.
Collaborator Contribution Expertise in needs analysis. Strategic input into development of research methodologies for this research project. Expert input into development of a capacity led needs assessment strategy.
Impact Outcome is the development of a focus on a specific self-recovery approach to needs assessment as a central part of the research methodology for this project.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies 
Organisation International Federation of Red Cross and Crescents
Country Switzerland 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Collaboration on research into self-recovery housing after humanitarian crises
Collaborator Contribution IFRC are contributing their expertise to collaborate on research to co-develop best-practice guidance for the support of the self-recovery process that allows families to exercise the primacy of their own agency and choice in the pursuance of their own self-recovery pathway. The IFRC team contributes expertise on shelter and housing recovery after disasters from many humanitarian crises in different regions. They are able to make links for specific on country research using their local offices and implementation partners. Finally they are able to disseminate best practice throughout their network of country offices and proposal global guidelines for humanitarian shelter response and housing reconstruction
Impact Ongoing research partnership which will lead to outputs and outcomes for disaster resilient housing
Start Year 2020
 
Description German Red Cross 
Organisation German Red Cross
Country Germany 
Sector Hospitals 
PI Contribution Collaboration on research into self-recovery housing after humanitarian crises
Collaborator Contribution Greman Red Cross are contributing their expertise to collaborate on research to co-develop best-practice guidance for the support of the self-recovery process that allows families to exercise the primacy of their own agency and choice in the pursuance of their own self-recovery pathway. The German Red Cross team contributes expertise on shelter and housing recovery after disasters from many humanitarian crises in different regions. They are able to make links for specific on country research using their local offices and implementation partners. Finally they are able to disseminate best practice throughout their network of country offices and proposal global guidelines for humanitarian shelter response and housing reconstruction
Impact Ongoing research partnership which will lead to outputs and outcomes for disaster resilient housing
Start Year 2020
 
Description German Red Cross 
Organisation German Red Cross
Country Germany 
Sector Hospitals 
PI Contribution Collaboration on research on disaster resilient housing in Malawi
Collaborator Contribution German Red Cross are contributing their expertise to collaborate on research to co-develop best-practice guidance for the support of the self-recovery process that allows families to exercise the primacy of their own agency and choice in the pursuance of their own self-recovery pathway. The German Red Cross team contribute their knowledge and experience of delivering humanitarian assistance and their comprehensive knowledge of self-recovery programming.
Impact Linkages made with German Red Cross who are a humanitarian operational agency. The impact of this project depends on making links with operational agencies to make them aware of self recovery and its benefits and the encourage them to take up self recovery procedures. German Red Cross are very interested in applying self recovery ideasto urban shelter resonses.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Habitat for Humanity 
Organisation Habitat for Humanity
Country United States 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Collaboration on research into self-recovery housing after humanitarian crises
Collaborator Contribution Habitat for Humanity are contributing their expertise to collaborate on research to co-develop best-practice guidance for the support of the self-recovery process that allows families to exercise the primacy of their own agency and choice in the pursuance of their own self-recovery pathway. The Hfh team contributes expertise on shelter and housing recovery after disasters from many humanitarian crises in different regions. They are able to make links for specific on country research using their local offices and implementation partners. Finally they are able to disseminate best practice throughout their network of country offices and proposal global guidelines for humanitarian shelter response and housing reconstruction
Impact Ongoing research partnership which will lead to outputs and outcomes for disaster resilient housing
Start Year 2020
 
Description IEC shelter materials Project IOM 
Organisation International Organization for Migration
Country Switzerland 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Members of the Self-recovery research team have contributed time to engaging in the IOM IEC (Information, Education and Communication) shelter materials project. The IEC shelter materials project sets out to categorise and describe existing shelter IEC materials to make them relevant and useful for humanitarian shelter response.
Collaborator Contribution iEC materials are an essential part of support to self-recovery. The IOM IEC shelter materials project will contribute to the dissemination of the self-recovery approach amongst shelter practitioners.
Impact Wider dissemination of the self-recovery approach amongst shelter practitioners
Start Year 2019
 
Description Overseas Development Institute 
Organisation Overseas Development Institute (ODI)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Collaboration on research into self-recovery housing after humanitarian crises
Collaborator Contribution ODI are contributing their expertise to collaborate on research to co-develop best-practice guidance for the support of the self-recovery process that allows families to exercise the primacy of their own agency and choice in the pursuance of their own self-recovery pathway. The ODI team contributes expertise on understanding the policy and institutional landscape for disaster risk management in Malawi and identifying entry points/influencing opportunities for supporting self-recovery and sustainable solutions for affordable safe housing post-disaster
Impact Ongoing research partnership which will lead to outputs and outcomes for disaster resilient housing
Start Year 2020
 
Description ALNAP annual general meeting, October 2019, Berlin 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This was the ALNAP learning platform annual meeting. Bill Flinn presented on a panel discussion and participated in several. The theme of the Meeting was "making humanitarian aid more relevant". Our participation was on supporting shelter self-recovery and the wider impacts of humanitarian shelter responses, especially shelter and health.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.alnap.org/upcoming-events/annual-meetings/alnap-32nd-annual-meeting
 
Description Blog post on Shelter and Health 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Blog post emphasising links between shelter and health and publicising Health report as it was being launched on World Humanitarian Day, accompanied by Twitter, Facebook activity. The blog and associated report of the Shelter and Health Learning Day Towards Healthier Homes in Humanitarian Settings (in Publications) resulted in some requests for more information and collaboration in future research. Blog posted on CENDEP website and also CARE Insights site to reach a wider audience
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://insights.careinternational.org.uk/development-blog/why-humanitarian-action-must-promote-heal...
 
Description Blog post on Shelter and Mental Health 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The blog post highlights the publication 'Mindful Sheltering' in September 2021. It describes the learning Event which formed the basis of the report on Shelter and Mental Health. The Learning event was built around the scaffold of three themes 3 main themes for the evolving Learning Event emerged: 1/ need for shelter practitioners to understand better the world of mental health, well-being and MHPSS, 2/ the connections between living conditions, physical and mental health, and 3/ the ways that S&S activities can affect MH and well-being. The blog explores those themes and summarises the resulting publication https://www.sheltercluster.org/sites/default/files/Mindful%20Sheltering_0.pdf
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://cendep.blogspot.com/2021/09/mindful-sheltering-how-can-shelter-and.html
 
Description Blog post on implications of COVID-19 for humanitarian shelter 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Blog post on the implications of COVID for Shelter humanitarian responses. Highlighting the relationships between housing/humanitarian shelter and mental and physical health. Public, academics and humanitarian/development practitioners follow the CENDEP blog - it has a varied readership. Blog pointed out that COVID pandemic has highlighted existing inadequacies of shelter/housing which affect health. The blog post was also shared on the Humanitarian Shelter Facebook page.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL http://cendep.blogspot.com/2020/04/covid-19-what-are-implications-for.html
 
Description Blog post on shelter self-recovery 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Blog on improving understanding of Self-Recovery. CARE insights site is a widely-read channel of communication with wider CARE International and public explaining humanitarian shelter SR approaches. CARE has over 50 country offices and the blogs therefore have a global audience reaching humanitarian and development practitioners and donors. Tweets linking to blog. Linkedin Shared on Twitter and RT'd by UK Shelter Forum & people working in housing at the World Bank.
.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://insights.careinternational.org.uk/in-depth/shelter
 
Description Blog post to publicise project 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Blog post to let the community of practice in humanitarian shelter know about the project and encourage participation and engagement with the ideas.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL http://cendep.blogspot.com/2019/10/cendep-wins-research-award-for.html
 
Description CARITAS International bi-annual global Shelter and Settlements Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Project staff were involved in several events at the at the online "Shelter and Settlements Workshop" for the Global CARITAS network event, the Shelter and Settlement Community of Practice (CoP) bi-annual conference, with global participants and facilitators. The CoP is convened by Catholic Relief Services, one of the largest international NGOs, along with their network of international partners and their peer partner agencies CRAterre, Habitat for Humanity (HfH) and Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC). CARE International and CENDEP (co-leads of this GCRF project) were also invited.
Charles Parrack chaired a breakout session on Community Based Approaches to Post Disaster Housing
Sue Webb presented the priorities of the connections between shelter and health in a session on COVID-19's impact on shelter practice. This fits with the GCRF's objective of exploring and promoting the wider impacts of shelter programming
The main bulk of the 150+ participants were Shelter practitioners from CRS, CARITAS, HfH and NRC. These organisations are the major implementing organisations of emergency and transitional shelter outside UNHCR and IOM, so the audience is potentially very influential in changing attitudes towards shelter practice.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
 
Description CENDEP newsletter piece to announce launch of Healthier Homes report 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact CENDEP Newsletter with a wide circulation including to CENDEP alumni as well as present post-graduate students and prospective students. Online newsletter also included link to the Healthier Homes report.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.brookes.ac.uk/architecture/research/cendep/#publications
 
Description Establishment and ongoing and engagement with a Shelter Technical Working Group in Malawi 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact One of the GCRF project's three work streams is to test and refine the 'Informing Choice for Better Shelter protocol' ( the Protocol), a set of tools and procedures for developing effective and context-appropriate Information, Education and Communication (IEC) materials that will allow people recovering from disaster to rebuild their homes safely and in a way that supports overall recovery and preparedness for future disasters. The Protocol has 7 steps. This record relates particularly to Steps 2-7.

Malawi has been the setting of this Protocol testing and refinement activity. A prerequisite for rolling out the Protocol was the establishment of a Technical Working Group (TWiG) within the Malawi Shelter Cluster. The Malawi Shelter Cluster is the humanitarian coordination system co-led by the Malawi Red Cross and the Ministry of Land, Housing and Urban Development (MLHUD). As such, it is a key point of contact with the government and a mechanism for influencing humanitarian practice in Malawi. An important goal of engaging the TWiG in the Protocol process is to facilitate consensus amongst humanitarian agencies in Malawi regarding the approach to self-recovery and then to develop the tools and Information Education and Communication (IEC) materials that would best support this approach. The TWiG includes participants from NGOs active in Malawi in emergency shelter and safer house reconstruction, as well as other stakeholders with the necessary mix of expertise. The TWiG was first established in June/July 2020.

Initial online meetings of the TWiG were used to inform a wide range of stakeholders in Malawi of the purpose, benefits and methodologies of all the steps of the Protocol (from July to December 2020). The activities related specifically to Step 1 of the Protocol (Understanding the Context) are reported separately as are the training webinars designed and delivered to a range of practitioners and other stakeholders on all the steps of the Protocol.

The establishment of the TWiG, remotely identifying and motivating relevant individuals to commit time and expertise to this effort, was was facilitated by Cecilia Schmölzer, IFRC's Global Shelter Cluster Focal Point for Technical Coordination, in her role as consultant to the project, together with her Malawi Red Cross counterpart. As the TWiG could be created as part of the Malawi Shelter Cluster, the humanitarian coordination system co-led by Malawi Red Cross and the Ministry of Land, Housing and Urban Development (MLHUD) it is in a position to have direct influence on government policy related to self-recovery. There has been regular participation by at least 6 Humanitarian Agencies (Cadecom, Card, CARE, CRS, HfH, Malawi Red Cross) and occasional participation by 3 UN agencies (UNHabitat, IOM, UNHCR) as well as the Association of Environmental Journalists and the Technical, Entrepreneurial and Vocational Education and Training Authority (TEVETA).

During the first conversations with the MLHUD the officials expressed a rather hesitant attitude towards supporting self-recovery and promoting local building practices. Previously in Malawi (and elsewhere in Southern Africa) CRS has found it challenging to get its self-recovery approach to scale because governments and local officials have wanted to promote rebuilding which meets building codes and uses modern materials, which are unaffordable to many people. Now the Malawi officials have expressed openness to discuss self-recovery approaches as well as to include relevant input into their safer house construction guidelines. The director of the Department of Housing has become increasingly invested in the process.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Follow-up meetings to Shelter and Health Learning Day 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A series of informal meetings to further develop ideas and next steps arising from the May Shelter and Health Learning Day and to develop collaborations that can build evidence on the impacts of humanitarian shelter on health. Including researchers at LSHTM, Bath University, UCL, Liverpool University as well as CRS, IFRC.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Global Shelter Cluster Annual meeting 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A working group meeting was held of the 'Promoting Safer Building' working group at the Global Shelter Cluster annual meeting 9-10 October 2019. This working group is constituted as an official working group as part of the Global Shelter Cluster, and its mandate is to bring issued of self-recovery to the attention of Global Shelter Cluster partner agencies and shelter sector policy makers. The discussion included how this research project can be integrated into global shelter practice.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.sheltercluster.org/global/events/global-shelter-cluster-annual-meeting-2019
 
Description Launch event for project publication, Mindful Sheltering 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Over 40 academic and practitioners from Shelter and Mental health and psychosocial support (MHPSS) fields attended an online event to launch and discuss Mindful Sheltering: [subtitle] Recognising and Enhancing the Impact of Humanitarian Shelter and Settlements on Mental Health and Psychosocial Well-Being Proceedings of the Shelter and Mental Health Learning Event, May 2021
There was significant interest in taking the recommendations in the report further and plans discussed to disseminate the findings in the report further and to build closer collaboration between Shelter and Settlements and MHPSS sectors.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://self-recovery.org/health-and-shelter
 
Description Meeting with Catholic Relief Services (project partner) and Medicins Sans Frontiers (Doctors without Borders) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Meeting to discuss shelter self-recovery (a new concept for MSF) and MHPSS self-recovery to see if there are common themes . A new audience for self-recovery. MSF is expert in delivery of healthcare in emergency settings but does not consider living conditions (shelter) as part of the public health arena.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description New webpage created on Global Shelter Cluster website 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Due to the interest generated in the sector on Shelter and Health by previous project activities and outputs, the Global Shelter Cluster asked the project to populate a new page on the resources section of their website. The page hosts two of the project outputs: Towards Healthier Homes in Humanitarian Settings and Mindful Sheltering.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://www.sheltercluster.org/resources/shelter-and-health
 
Description Online Workshop (Learning Day) on Shelter and Health 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The Shelter and Health Multi-sectoral Learning Day was hosted online by Oxford Brookes University's Centre for Development and Emergency Practice (CENDEP) and CARE International UK, on 14th May 2020. Instigated and led by the 'Self-recovery from Humanitarian Crisis' research group, the Learning Day aimed to facilitate the sharing of knowledge about the connections between housing and health, in order to inform humanitarian action and enhance the wellbeing of crisis-affected populations.

Over 100 academics and practitioners from the fields of development housing, health, humanitarian shelter and WaSH came together to exchange and develop knowledge about the connections between housing and health and to discuss opportunities and challenges around adopting a wider environmental health lens in humanitarian action. This aligns with the humanitarian Shelter and Settlements Sector's increasing focus on the need to better understand the wider impacts of shelter assistance, including its health impacts.
Twenty speakers presented on a variety of themes related to housing, emergency shelter and mental and physical health, sharing practical experience and academic research from development and humanitarian settings. Speakers also addressed the compounding issues of the climate emergency, protracted conflict displacement and the COVID-19 pandemic. These potentially 'game-changing crises' are shining a light on the increasing need to harness the co-benefits of improved housing for all.

Following speaker presentations, the participants had the opportunity to discuss the topics raised and the extent to which best practice from development fields and from different humanitarian sectors is applicable for the humanitarian Shelter Sector. Comments, questions and written contributions were collected, coded and analysed by the organisers. The recommendations arising from the Shelter and Health Learning Day include:

An 'Environmental Health' inter-cluster Working Group should be formed, including Health, Shelter and WaSH experts.
The Shelter Sector, working in collaboration with other humanitarian and development actors and academics, should develop evidence of the beneficial impacts of improved shelter on mental and physical health. This report identifies a non-exhaustive list of further research that can inform practice.
A priority list of health-related standards and/or indicators should be developed, along with the means to allow it to be context-specific.
Context analyses should incorporate prevailing health risks and their relationship to housing, including community perceptions, plans and priorities.
The Shelter and Settlements Sector should use the current public interest in global health generated by COVID-19 to reinforce an understanding of the impacts of living conditions on mental and physical health.

Following the Learning Day there have been several follow-up meetings, with Shelter practitioners furthering links with health and other academics. The recommendations are being tracked as part of the project. The report of the Learning Day published August 2020 and reported as a written publication
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL http://www.self-recovery.org
 
Description Online workshop on Geoscience and Humanitarian collaboration in Malawi 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Geoscientists and Humanitarian practitioners met to discuss potential synergies between their interests and research. Instigated and led by project partner British Geological Survey, the workshop brought together practitioners and academics from UK and Malawi to share knowledge of geo hazards that affect preparation for and recovery from disasters such as floods and earthquakes. Several opportunities for the sharing of research data and findings were discovered and next steps to operationalise these opportunities discussed.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
 
Description Online workshop to contribute to Self-recovery Guidance (Promoting Safer Building Working Group) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The workshop (January 21st 2021) was held as the major part of a Promoting Safer Building Working Group (PSBWG) meeting. This was one of a series of online practitioner workshops held in order to elicit experts' knowledge of shelter self-recovery approaches, in order to inform the Guidance document. The Guidance will be a shelter practitioner focussed guide for implementation of shelter self-recovery programmes. This workshopping process has allowed the collation of a 'bank' of best-practice examples and engagement with a larger than anticipated group of practitioners and academic researchers.The PSBWG is supported by the Global Shelter Cluster.
GCRF Project updates were given to keep all participants informed of related project activities relevant to the WG's mandate. The Guidance workshop then followed to inform the implementation part of the guidance. This workshop focused on Monitoring, Evaluation and Learning (MEAL) specifically. A CARE International UK MEAL expert joined the workshop in order to share innovative MEAL good-practice from non-shelter CARE programmes, such as 'Women Lead in Emergencies'. Breakout Group small discussions covered particular aspects of MEAL, such as participatory approaches and evaluating wider impacts of shelter programming. The discussion points were collected on interactive virtual 'whiteboards'.
Audience (30) largely shelter practitioners, with some academics and one donor who was very interested to learn about the self-recovery approach to shelter programming. Representatives of organisations working in Nepal and Malawi were present. The workshop report is uploaded to the Global Shelter Cluster website (PSBWG pages).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://www.sheltercluster.org/promoting-safer-building-working-group/library/working-group-workshop...
 
Description Online workshop to contribute to development of Self-recovery Guidance. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Online all-day workshop held as part of promoting Safer Building Working Group of Global Shelter Cluster. Focus of the workshop was Needs assessment/context analysis. Interactive meeting with 'breakout room' moderated discussions around pre-prepared questions. Plenary discussion drew out findings and next steps. Self-recovery approach needs to develop more flexible, participatory methods of context analysis at the start of a shelter response. Desire to find out about plans, priorities and capacities, rather than just 'needs'. Exchange of ideas about how to enable that process in the field. Findings will be fed into the self-recovery practitioner Guidance (an ongoing project deliverable). Rerpot of this workshop circulated to participants and added to PSB WG pages of GSC website.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.sheltercluster.org/promoting-safer-building-working-group/library/working-group-workshop...
 
Description Online workshops (Learning Event) on Shelter and Mental Health 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Over 80 people attended two online half-day events held to bring together practitioners and researchers from the fields of housing, humanitarian Shelter and Settlements and Mental Health and Psychosocial Support (MHPSS). The agenda was designed to explore three main interconnected themes: 1/ need for shelter practitioners to understand better the world of mental health, well-being and MHPSS, 2/ the connections between living conditions, physical and mental health, and 3/ the ways that S&S activities can affect MH and well-being. The 2-session Learning event was built around the scaffold of those 3 themes. Presenters shared case studies from around the world, including the Philippines, Sudan, Nigeria, Syria, Vanuatu, Haiti, Bangladesh and Sierra Leone, to explore how humanitarian shelter, housing, physical and mental health ARE connected.
It was emphasised that a person's MH and psychosocial well-being is affected as much - or even more- by their living conditions than it is by their experiences of crisis and disaster. The S&S sector can therefore protect and promote good MH and wellbeing not only by the services it provides, but also HOW it provides those services.

Mindful Sheltering (published in September 2021) contains the proceedings of this multi-sectoral Shelter and Mental Health Learning Event. Mindful Sheltering explores the connections between living conditions and mental health and psychosocial well-being includes summaries of presentations by experts in Shelter and Settlements programming, MHPSS and development. It also examines how humanitarian Shelter and Settlements assistance impacts mental health and well-being and the importance of healthy shelter for long-term recovery. Mindful Sheltering highlights that a person's mental health and psychosocial well-being is affected as much - or even more - by their living conditions as it is by their experiences of crisis and disaster. Shelter is a determinant of mental health and well-being in all emergencies; inadequate shelter is among the 'daily stressors' that contribute to mental distress for individuals and communities and is detrimental to early recovery and eventual development. Collaboration between Shelter and Settlements and Mental Health and Psychosocial Support (MHPSS) as well as other humanitarian sectors is necessary to ensure positive outcomes for people recovering from humanitarian crises. The report contains recommendations to inform holistic humanitarian responses and ensure wide positive impacts of post-crisis rebuilding. It is available to download here on the Global Shelter Cluster website.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://self-recovery.org/health-and-shelter
 
Description Organisation and hosting of online Global Shelter Cluster Annual Meeting 'Thematic Session' on Shelter and Health with high-level panel discussion 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Project team member Susannah Webb was asked by the Global Shelter Cluster to organise and lead a one hour online meeting including a high-level panel. This session was the first 'Thematic Session' in the annual meeting, open to all organisations connected to the GSC. Over 70 people joined the online meeting and more have watched the video of the event which is on the Global Shelter Cluster website,
The first half of the meeting consisted of an update of the project's work on Shelter and Health connections and particularly highlighted the recent Shelter and mental Health Learning Event and upcoming report [also outputs of this project].
One of the two Global Shelter Cluster co-leads hosted the panel part of the meeting, including the Leads of Global Health and WaSH Clusters, an expert on MHPSS and another representative of GCRF Project to discuss Shelter & Health and next steps for further Cluster cooperation. Significantly, the panel discussion came to conclusion that establishing a global level working group between shelter, health and wash clusters was the best way to take the topic forward.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://youtu.be/8dc8olBzOqU
 
Description Organisation and moderation of webinar of Global Shelter Cluster Coordinators on COVID-19 and Shelter 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Cecilia Schmölzer, IFRC's Global Shelter Cluster Focal Point for Technical Coordination, (a consultant to the project), organised a session on COVID-19 and shelter as part of the annual Global Shelter Cluster (GSC) Coordinators' meeting. The GSC is the global coordination mechanism, led by IFRC and UNHCR, that supports people affected and displaced by disaster and conflict with the means to live in safe, dignified and appropriate shelter. This meeting focussed on how GSC Coordinators in many settings around the world have adapted their practice to mitigate the spread and impacts of COVID-19. In addition, it was a chance to emphasise the wider ways that humanitarian shelter support can affect both mental and physical health (in alignment with one of the GCRF project's aims of investigating the wider impacts of shelter).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.sheltercluster.org/global-shelter-cluster-coordination-workshop-2020/sept-24-covid-19-re...
 
Description Panelist on Strategic Roundtable at World Humanitarian Forum- Improving Housing Resilience with Homeowner-Driven Approaches 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Project team leader (Bill Flinn CARE International UK) was invited to be part of a four-person panel at the World Humanitarian Forum: Strategic Roundtable - Improving Housing Resilience with Homeowner-Driven Approaches. The not-for-profit organisation Build Change was the 'host' and moderator. The parameters and nature of inhabitant-driven housing recovery approaches, which can also enable housing which is resilient to future shocks was debated. Opportunities, limitations, finance and case studies were discussed in front of an (online) global audience.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://www.whf.london/whf-new-york-2021-hybrid
 
Description Participation in State of Humanitarian Profession workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This was one of a series of workshops being help globally as part of a review of the "State of Humanitarian Professionals" (led by Bioforce). It followed an extensive methodology of surveys of humanitarian professionals. The purpose of these workshops is to allow an examination of the initial findings by an expert group. The results will inform the final report and an international conference in April. It was an opportunity to introduce many of the challenges to humanitarian practice that this GCRF project explores to an audience outside the shelter sector.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Podcast Engineering Matters 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Podcast by podcast series 'Engineering Matters' reporting on a number of issues in humanitarian shelter, one of which is self-recovery. The podcast contextualises self-recovery as one important factor in humanitarian shelter response to crisis.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://engineeringmatters.reby.media/2019/10/31/34-crisis-shelter-for-mass-displacement/
 
Description Presentation at Africa Shelter Forum 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Salome Mhango (CARE Malawi) presented on "Cash, choice & building back safer: market-based response and resilience after Cyclone Idai". A self-recovery project. Presentation to African country shelter practitioners and global practitioners and policy makers. Explained concept of self-recovery. Shared project website link. At the same meeting, CRS presented their 'strength-based approach. Also Olivier Moles, CRAterre ( a project partner) presented CRATerre's Shelter Response Profile and localised context analysis work. Also linked that to the Self-recovery project. Awareness rasing on the scope of self-recovery approaches on the first online Africa Shelter Forum which reached an unusually high audience (170 participants worldwide)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL http://www.shelterforum.info/africa/
 
Description Presentation at Asia Shelter Forum 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation by team member (Susannah Webb) as part of COVID-19 session at Asia Shelter Forum. Event hosted by Government of Nepal NRA and Ministry of Urban Development. Over 150 attendees especially from Philippines, Indonesia, Nepal and Bangladesh + others globally. The theme of the overall session was COVID-19. and the response of shelter practitioners in Asia. The session was co-hosted by Habitat for Humanity and CRS, plus ARUP, Nepal Red Cross, IFRC Philippines. The specific part of the session was an opportunity to point out the many ways that inadequate shelter affects health (mental and physical) way beyond COVID.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL http://nra.gov.np/en/news/details/kdYmSM9A2HErUyHJo4k-dz2aj40uUzZYYVcYzVAzpnA
 
Description Presentation at Disability Inclusion Working Group update session at Global Shelter Forum annual meeting (online) Oct 2020 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation as part of a Global Shelter Cluster annual conference event (online). invitation from Disability Inclusion Working Group for contribution to their annual update session. Sue Webb (core project team member) invited to outline intersections between shelter and health work and Disability Inclusion Working Group themes. Emphasis on mental health as well as the disproportionate impact of unhealthy homes on those with disabilities of all types. Helped to grow emphasis of the group from considering just physical access for people living with disabilities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.sheltercluster.org/global-shelter-cluster-annual-meeting/events/gsc-online-meeting-2020-...
 
Description Presentation at GSC Disability Inclusion Working Group meeting 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation to GSC Disability Inclusion Working Group. Aiming to make contact with wider group of practitioners and make stronger link between health, shelter and the need for inclusion. Opportunity to share the Healthier Homes report during the presentation and also via the Working Group website
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.sheltercluster.org/working-group/inclusion-persons-disabilities-shelter-programming
 
Description Presentation at GSC annual meeting COVID-19 thematic session meeting 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Core project team member (Emma Weinstein Sheffield) invited to contribute to GSC annual conference - a thematic session on COVID and shelter and the cluster's ongoing response strategy. Reinforced the impact of living conditions on mental and physical heath (not just COVID) and discussed how project is responding to the recommendations made in the Health report. As an outcome of the meeting, a request was made also to contribute to the Asia Shelter Forum due to interest generated on the connections between shelter and health.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.sheltercluster.org/global-shelter-cluster-annual-meeting-2020/events/gsc-online-meeting-...
 
Description Presentation at GSC annual meeting Promoting Safer Building Working Group session 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Project update included in Promoting Safer Building Working Group update presentation to annual Global Shelter Cluster meeting (online). Open event to update any GSC member of PSB WG activities. Included info on the process of workshops to inform the Guidance for self-recovery programming and also the ongoing process of testing and refining the Protocol in Malawi.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.sheltercluster.org/global-shelter-cluster-annual-meeting/events/gsc-online-meeting-2020-...
 
Description Presentation on the project to a group of Masters-level students at the dept of engineering, University of Bristol. Their module is on Disaster Risk Reduction 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact This is a taught session in the Disaster Risk Reduction module of an engineering Masters postgraduate degree, It was an interactive and discursive session combining some presentation, student groups work, discussion and question & answer.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Presentation to CARE International UK as part of their internal 'learning week' 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Hour long session to 40+ professionals working at CARE International UK. Participants self-selected the session. The audience was CARE development and humanitarian practitioners working across several sectors. Awareness building of shelter and health connections and intersections between emergency response and long term development
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Presentation to University of Exeter geology & mining department 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact Core project team member (shelter researcher at CARE UK) made a presentation at her previous university department about careers in humanitarian shelter. She referred to the research project. There was interest from academics on use of remote sensing in humanitarian response. Good questions from students about community capacities and community management of resources. Otherwise an information providing exercise.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Project information in CRAterre's newsletter 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Project partners within CRAterre wrote an article within CRAterre's Newsletter: "Facilitate post-disaster reconstruction processes Malawi, 2020-2021". Page 8. The newsletter, disseminated by email and via the CRAterre website, has an audience of Academics, policy makers, humanitarian and development practitioners, NGOs, agencies...
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://craterre.hypotheses.org/3932
 
Description Project website for wider engagement 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Project website set up to gather all external facing documentation and ongoing project outputs. This is being disseminated to all partner stakeholder groups.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://self-recovery.org/
 
Description Promoting Safer Building Working Group meeting - workshop to inform the self-recovery Guidance 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Promoting Safer Building Working Group meeting - the second of a series of 3 or 4 to develop the self-recovery Guidance, a key output of the project. Audience (approx. 25) largely shelter practitioners, with some academics. Report uploaded to the Global Shelter Cluster website. Presentations and breakout room discussions to gather ideas and feedback on implementing self-recovery shelter projects. Will all be fed into the Guidance document/training.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.sheltercluster.org/promoting-safer-building-working-group/documents/selfrecoveryprojects...
 
Description Radio interview JackFM Oxford 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Radio interview with local radio station on the scope and relevance of the research project, explained to an audience of the general public
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Seminar at the AE&CC Research Unit, University of Grenoble, France 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Internal scientific seminar on three different research projects in progress in CRAterre Laboratory, AE&CC Research Unit (University of Grenoble, France). GCRF project partners in CRAterre made a presentation of their work on testing and refining the self-recovery Protocol, specifically on Testing Step 1 "Understanding the Context" of the Protocol "Informing choice for better shelter") and results, difficulties and questions in order to share with all members of the CRAterre laboratory and the AE&CC research unit. Opportunities for further research were identified as a result of this seminar and exchange between different research themes.
Equality is promoted within CRAterre and AE&CC teams. An internal seminar on the subject of gender equality in the team is under preparation as a result of this concern
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Series of meetings with shelter and housing stakeholders in Malawi to increase engagement with self-recovery approaches and tools including the 'Informing Choice for Better Shelter protocol' ( the Protocol) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact One of the GCRF project's three work streams is to test and refine the 'Informing Choice for Better Shelter protocol' ( the Protocol), a set of tools and procedures for developing effective and context-appropriate Information, Education and Communication (IEC) materials that will allow people recovering from disaster to rebuild their homes safely and in a way that supports overall recovery and preparedness for future disasters.

Malawi has been the setting of this Protocol testing and refinement activity. The first stage of this was the establishment of a Technical Working Group (TWiG) as part of the Malawi Shelter Cluster. Initial online meetings of the TWiG were used to inform a wide range of stakeholders in Malawi of the purpose, benefits and methodologies of all the steps of the Protocol (initially from July to December 2020). The TWiG meetings have continued throughout 2021, being held every three weeks as a forum for discussion for Shelter humanitarian organisations and other stakeholders in Malawi.
In order to identify entry points for maximising the uptake and impact of the project, Emma Lovell, Research Fellow at ODI (in her role as a consultant to the project) and Charles Parrack (CENDEP) are conducting interviews with the Government of Malawi, UN Agencies, civil society organisations and donors. The aim of these interviews is to understand the institutional arrangements for supporting household recovery and reconstruction after disasters in Malawi, and key entry points/influencing opportunities for supporting self-recovery and sustainable solutions for affordable safe housing post-disaster. This will be a useful input for the TWiG and the Malawi Shelter Cluster in future disaster responses and in Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR). The findings from these engagement activities will be written up and shared with the project partners to inform the remaining activities in Malawi, thus ensuring the project enhances its influence and impact. Meetings have already been held with
Government: Department of Disaster Management Affairs (DoDMA), Ministry of Local Government and District Commissioners, Ministry of Lands, Housing and Urban Development;
UN Agencies / donors based in Malawi: UNHABITAT, UNDP, World Bank;
Civil Society based in Malawi: Oxfam, Catholic Relief Services (CRS) and Habitat for Humanity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020,2021
 
Description Series of training and engagement webinars on Context Analysis for 'Informing Choice for Better Shelter protocol' (the Protocol) in Malawi 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact One of the GCRF project's three work streams is to test and refine the 'Informing Choice for Better Shelter protocol' ( the Protocol), a set of tools and procedures for developing effective and context-appropriate Information, Education and Communication (IEC) materials that will allow people recovering from disaster to rebuild their homes safely and in a way that supports overall recovery and preparedness for future disasters. The Protocol has 7 steps. This record relates particularly to Step 1 'Understanding the Context'.

Malawi has been the setting of this Protocol testing and refinement activity. The first stage of this was the establishment of a Technical Working Group (TWiG) as part of the Malawi Shelter Cluster (reported as a separate, although related, engagement activity). Initial online meetings of the TWiG were used to inform a wide range of stakeholders in Malawi of the purpose, benefits and methodologies of all the steps of the Protocol (from July to December 2020).

CRAterre has coordinated the test of Step 1 "Understanding the Context" of the Protocol through two activities: the production of a Shelter Response Profile (SRP) and the training (and remote support) of operational agencies in Malawi on how to analyse local construction methods to inform reconstruction plans (the context analysis).
The Shelter Response Profiles are a set of documents aiming at providing an understanding of the national context and the relevant key issues for post crisis housing related operations. In particular, they aim to support humanitarian housing projects through making the best use of existing good practices offered by local building cultures and Building Back Better/Safer activities. These documents are endorsed by the Global Shelter Cluster which is the global coordination mechanism, led by IFRC and UNHCR, that supports people affected and displaced by disaster and conflict with the means to live in safe, dignified and appropriate shelter. Consequently, the SRPs can constitute an important baseline document for the sector working within a specific country, either in post-disaster response or disaster preparedness activities. Malawian partners have also contributed to the document thanks to the collection of data during contextualised analyses of local construction. GCRF project partners contributed to revisions of the documents and the new Malawi SRP scope has broadened to include new themes such as the link between habitat and health. The project has been able to be flexible since its inception and has increasingly adopted health as an important theme. The Malawi SRP is in the final stages of production, awaiting feedback and validation, particularly from the TWiG.
The Malawi SRP will be reported as a publication, in due course and its impacts tracked.

The context analysis methodology and tools identify strengths and weaknesses of local building practices as well as gaps in knowledge, skills and other resources with regard to housing recovery (e.g. market analysis). The context analysis methodology and tools developed by CRAterre have been tested with CRS Malawi (the Malawi country office of GCRF project partner CRS) and Cadecom (a CRS partner organisation in Malawi) in two regions in Malawi. The methodology is participatory, including focus group discussions (e.g. with women, disabled persons and artisans), individual household interviews, and observation. This participatory approach has made it possible to work closely with communities in the identification of a holistic view about their habitat and their priorities for housing, and enables the housing to be related to wider issues including, the local environment, culture, health, livelihoods, and governance.

7th and 11th of August 2020 Training on the different tools for the "contextualised analysis of local construction"
9th of September 2020 Webinar "Pilot phase context analysis" to present the results of the pilot phase assessments undertaken in Nsanje and Phalombe Districts by CRS and CADECOM and study of further steps regarding consolidation phase
1st of October 2020 Webinar "From pilot phase to consolidation"

The context analysis training has also had a first impact, raising awareness of NGO staff and communities about safe local construction practices. After CRAterre trained CRS and CADECOM field staff remotely, CRS and CADECOM have subsequently replicated the training for other NGOs' staff as well as some local government officials.

These training and capacity-building webinars demonstrate the success of the project at engaging a wide range of influential stakeholders in Malawi and from there to other disaster-prone countries. For example, CRS has already replicated the participatory context analysis methodologies in Bangladesh; this international transfer of ideas is very likely to accelerate throughout 2021 and beyond
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Series of training and engagement webinars on the 'Informing Choice for Better Shelter protocol' ( the Protocol) in Malawi. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact One of the GCRF project's three work streams is to test and refine the 'Informing Choice for Better Shelter protocol' ( the Protocol), a set of tools and procedures for developing effective and context-appropriate Information, Education and Communication (IEC) materials that will allow people recovering from disaster to rebuild their homes safely and in a way that supports overall recovery and preparedness for future disasters. The Protocol has 7 steps. This record relates particularly to Steps 2-7.

Malawi has been the setting of this Protocol testing and refinement activity. The first stage of this was the establishment of a Technical Working Group (TWiG) as part of the Malawi Shelter Cluster (reported as a separate, although related, engagement activity). Initial online meetings of the TWiG were used to inform a wide range of stakeholders in Malawi of the purpose, benefits and methodologies of all the steps of the Protocol (from July to December 2020). The activities related specifically to Step 1 of the Protocol (Understanding the Context) are reported separately.

This record of activities relates to a series of webinars developed to train a wide group of stakeholders in all the Steps of the Protocol. This group includes members of the TWiG and other NGOs and interested parties in Malawi.
A full package of webinars has been developed by CRAterre and Sonia Molina of the German Red Cross, in her role as consultant to the project. The webinars include all steps of the protocol starting with the context analysis, analysis of existing IEC materials and experiences to define preliminary objectives and key messages. Furthermore, analysis of stakeholders and engagement pathways, development of the necessary IEC materials and the communication strategy for their dissemination. All these steps of the protocol including the developed tools will be presented through webinars to a larger group of practitioners who will be able to use these tools to improve their programming.
These training and capacity-building webinars demonstrate the success of the project at engaging a wide and potentially influential 'audience' of stakeholders within a specific disaster-prone low income country.

27th of January 2021
1st Webinar "General Introduction; overall understanding, access to available materials"
17th of February 2021
2nd Webinar "Methods and tools for context analysis"
3rd of March 2021
3rd Webinar "Reporting for context analysis"
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
 
Description Shelter/Geoscience workshop and report 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Over 30 participants met online to explore how geoscience can be a resource in the humanitarian shelter practice. Led by CARE and BGS with other project partners. Attended by representatives of the Global Shelter Cluster, academia and humanitarian shelter practice - a deliberate mix of academics and practitioners in Geoscience and Humanitarian sectors who do not usually meet. Aim to inform self-recovery Guidance and potentially foster future collaborations. The report of the event was circulated. The two lead participants (Beth Simons from CARE and Susanne Sargeant from BGS) subsequently co-authored a chapter on the ways that Geoscience can contribute to humanitarian shelter responses (InterAction Roadmap for Research publication, a separate project output). Also there has been an application for future funding
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description UK Shelter forum breakout session October 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Breakout group of UK Shelter Forum dedicated to wider impacts of shelter and chaired by Charles Parrack. Wider impacts of shelter is one of the main work packages of this project. The session allowed participants to share information on this topic.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL http://www.shelterforum.info/category/united-kingdom/
 
Description Work in Progress Seminar 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Presentation of work in progress for the 'Self Recovery-Housing' project. The presentation covered project structure, research methodology and initial findings. The postgraduate students and staff engaged in discussion on these issues, and it was remarked afterwards by one of the participants that the presentation had offered a new way of understanding post crisis recovery.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description conference presentation on shelter and health 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation by member of research team at Building Research Establishment Trust (BRE) conference 25th February 2020 titled 'Improving lives through a better built environment' at The British Library Knowledge Centre 96 Euston Rd, London NW1 2DB. Jamie Richardson - Shelter and Settlements Technical Advisor, Catholic Relief Services presented a paper on Improving Informal Settlements in Myanmar.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.bretrust.org.uk/events/bre-trust-conference-2020/