How ainst contacsimple plastic surfaces can be recruited to the fight agt transmission of SARS-CoV-2

Lead Research Organisation: University of Nottingham
Department Name: Sch of Pharmacy

Abstract

To date, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) appears to spread easily in droplets in the air and via surfaces. Early work indicates that viruses appear to remain infectious longer on some surfaces compared to others. However, it is currently unclear what role the surface chemistry plays in the survival, infectivity and denaturation process of the virus outside a host on surfaces.

Simple polymers, on which the surface chemistry reduces the transfer of infectious viruses in the ambient environment, would have the advantage over the currently available active-loaded and protein-coated products which deplete and degrade over time. The aims of this project are to identify the effect on the virus adsorption, infectivity and denaturation behaviours of; 1) a range of commercially available gloves and other PPE surfaces, e.g. visors, to enable a recommendation of which existing polymers should be employed for optimal PPE, and 2) screen novel polymer surfaces using high throughput methodologies for selection of virucidal performance recently developed at the University of Nottingham, to develop new polymers for PPE and contact transmission control.

Objectives:
1. Quantify viral binding and inactivation under ambient conditions to existing PPE plastics.
2. Quantify the magnitude and specificity of SARS-CoV-2 virus-like particle (VLP) or SARS2 spike-containing pseudovirus (PV) binding to polymers using libraries presented on micro arrays.
3. Quantify the adsorption, infectivity and denaturation of SARS-CoV-2 viruses bound to the scaled up 'top 10' polymers of interest on slide or multiwell-plate and other PPE materials (using new facility in Nottingham).
4. Develop anti-SARS-CoV-2 polymers for PPE and more widely for infection protection control surfaces.

Publications

10 25 50
 
Description We tested the ability of existing personal protective equipment to bind and inactivate SARS-CoV2 virus. In particular 4 types of commonly used gloves were considered. In our tests, none were found to be more or less effective than another. This suggests that the choice of one of the existing glove materials over another is not a factor that could be be used to reducing the spread of the virus clinically.
Exploitation Route We tested the ability of existing personal protective equipment to bind and inactivate SARS-CoV2 virus. In particular 4 types of commonly used gloves were considered. In our tests, none were found to be more or less effective than another. This suggests that the choice of one of the existing glove materials over another is not a factor that could be be used to reducing the spread of the virus clinically.
Sectors Healthcare

 
Description Identification of SARS-CoV-2 spike protein denaturation process at antiviral polymer surface using cryo-OrbiSIMS for data acquisition and NBToolbox for PCA analysis 
Organisation University of Washington
Department Department of Bioengineering
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution In Xue's research, simple polymers, which strongly bind SARS-CoV-2 virus particles and speed the inactivation of adsorbed viruses, have been discovered using virus like particles (VLPs) and are being validated with live virus. However, there is limited information regarding the mechanism of virion surface inactivation. The aim of this project is to prepare "proof-of-concept" data for an external funding application which is to 1) investigate the mechanisms and structure activity relationship behind the inactivation processes of viruses on surfaces; 2) develop novel broad-spectrum antiviral materials for fomite transmission control. The first step of host infection is virus attachment to host tissue by recognizing and binding to cell surface receptors with their externally displayed proteins. It is, therefore, anticipated that the viral surface proteins also play a role when viruses interact with human-made substrates outside a host. This proposed research will focus on identifying the denaturation of virus structural protein: 1) SARS-CoV-2 spike protein monomers and 2) spike protein trimer on "hit' polymers screened from Xue's research, using the combination of a time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometer with an Orbitrap analyser (OrbiSIMS) in nmRC and the NBToolbox developed at the University of Washington for principal component analysis (PCA).
Collaborator Contribution The National ESCA and Surface Analysis Centre for Biomedical Problems (NESAC/BIO) at the University of Washington (U.S.A.) has been focusing on the development and application of new surface analysis technologies for biomedical research. Their surface analysis expertise combined with state-of-the-art instrumentation and data analysis methods gains them high reputation in biomedical surface analysis where they help provide a detailed and comprehensive understanding of the interactions of biomolecules with surfaces. The NESCA/BiO has a long history of developing and applying multivariate analysis (MVA) methods for biomedical surface analysis applications with particular expertise in the application of MVA to SIMS data. Dr. Graham has over 24 years of experience in SIMS data analysis and is the developer of the NBToolbox. This experience will be critical to processing and interpreting the complex data expected from the proposed work.
Impact This research is still being initialised and no outputs come out yet.
Start Year 2022
 
Description ""Polymer Therapeutics - from Oncology to Vaccines"" - Center for Research in Molecular Medicine and Chronic Diseases (CIMUS), Santiago de Compostela Online Seminar - April 15th 2021. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact International collaborative talk to a academic-industry cluster in Santiago di Compostela, Spain
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
 
Description A Science Public Lecture by Professor Morgan Alexander Title: Biomaterials discovery: the journey to clinical application of a novel urinary catheter 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A Science Public Lecture
Speaker: Professor Morgan Alexander

Title: Biomaterials discovery: the journey to clinical application of a novel urinary catheter

Abstract: In this talk Professor Alexander will tell the story of his teams discovery of a novel class of biomaterials resistant to bacterial colonisation and biofilm formation from the conception of the initial idea, through to them reaching the clinic and very recent generation of early efficacy results. In the talk Professor Alexander will aim to highlight aspects of the high throughput discovery approach they took, the lessons that can be learned about the many challenges of taking candidate biomaterials from the lab to the clinic.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://mediaspace.nottingham.ac.uk/media/Professor+Morgan+Alexander+-+Biomaterials+discoveryA+the+j...
 
Description Media activity 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact J Ball had a daily 'Listeners' Questions Answered' spot on BBC Radio Nottingham (which included internet listeners from as far afield as Australia), which focussed on various SARS-CoV2 related issues. Numerous questions were related to environmental survival of SARS-CoV2, and he was able to draw from project findings as well as the wider literature to answer these. This included a local transport company who used this is a source of information to develop driver and passenger safety advice.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://www.nottinghampost.com/news/nottingham-news/nottingham-professors-image-place-bus-5458134
 
Description Morgan Alexander was an invited speaker at the 10th French-speaking TOF-SIMS users meeting 2021 (Online) 23 - 25 MARCH 2021 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Morgan Alexander was an invited speaker at the 10th French-speaking TOF-SIMS users meeting 2021 (Online)
23 - 25 MARCH 2021
Title: Introduction to the 3D Orbi SIMS with application examples from an academic lab
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
 
Description Morgan Alexander was an invited speaker at the HENRY ROYCE INSTITUTE CONFERENCE 2021 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Morgan Alexander was an invited speaker at the
HENRY ROYCE INSTITUTE CONFERENCE 2021
22 - 23 MARCH 2021
Session: Biomaterials for Medical Devices
Title: Cell instructive materials for next generation medical devices
With a panel discussion afterwards
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://www.royce.ac.uk/events/royce-conference-2021/