REDUCE: Reshaping Energy Demand of Users by Communication Technology and Economic Incentives (Part 2 of the call)

Lead Research Organisation: University of Surrey
Department Name: Communications Systems Res CCSR

Abstract

Extensive work has been carried out on the technological, economic and societal potential for better management of energy demand. Huge potential of demand side management can only be exploited by exploring new ways to induce shifts of demand during peaks and hence reduce marginal costs. Digital communication technology can play a vital role in inducing this shift by enabling communication between the devices and the users. A holistic view of the interaction of all key-players - energy devices, energy supplier and energy users - is missing and this project aims at investigating this interaction using a multidisciplinary research team. The overall objective of this research is to evaluate the feasibility of using network technologies and sensor devices now being used in telecommunications, to create a Persuasive Energy-conscious Network (PEN) in a real life pilot setting and then study the potential impact on user behaviour leading to reductions in, and shifts in patterns of, loads of electricity. The project will aim to quantify the savings in carbon footprint (and operational energy cost) of the pilot test-bed when digital technologies (PEN) are deployed. It will also study the response of the users of the proposed monitoring and control system. As part of this research project, we will establish an autonomous self learning network of the sensors, energy consuming devices and users of energy. Self descriptive devices will be enabled to send meta-data describing relevant details of their energy consumption and context (time, task urgency etc.). The network will collect the data and create an energy consumption knowledge-base. The novel middleware will be incorporated that will run the modules of self learning and decision making to trigger actions that will shape the energy demand using specified goals. For this purpose, we will use the University of Surrey campus as initial test-bed.Technological interventions are more likely to achieve the intended energy savings if the interventions are designed with an understanding of how users view and interact with their energy systems. Within psychology, a wealth of research is available which shows that the type and format of information given to users can have a strong influence on their response. We know very little about how individuals may respond to flexible intelligent systems. We aim to examine the behavioural responses to the implementation of intelligent technologies that aim to reduce energy use in buildings.There are various ways of incentivising consumers to change load patterns. One of them is through financial models aimed at fostering the demand responsiveness of consumers. Those consumers who proactively engage in reducing or shifting their loads and significantly react to price signals should be rewarded by paying less for their electricity consumption. Part of this research will focus on the development of a financial model for an incentive/payment scheme and testing such financial models on the campus test-bed.As an outcome of the research we will deliver a pilot test bed for the autonomous and self learning Persuasive Energy-conscious Network. The psychological studies will be reported on likely expected behavioural responses of the users to the proposed technologies. A financial model will be implemented and its impact on energy demand transformation will be provided with quantified results of savings in terms of energy cost and CO2 emissions.The research will have targeted collaboration with the users of research such as the industrial researchers (e.g. Thales Research and Technologies), individual energy users (University students and staff) and corporate users of energy (University of Surrey's Estates and Facilities) and government bodies (Woking Borough Council) to highlight the potential of using the digital technology in meeting the requirements of these players in this research.

Planned Impact

The impacts of REDUCE will fall into four areas; - General public as consumers of energy who will benefit via reduced energy bills and a feeling of more personalised control over their energy usage. - Energy supply companies who will increase the efficiency of their operations and thus costs and overheads aiding reduced energy costs. - The environmental lobby and hence Government Policy who will benefit by reduced national carbon footprints aiding compliance with international protocols. - Specific recommendations for the HE sector which is currently consuming 5.2 billion kWh of energy at a cost of more than 200 million pa. The benefits will be captured in terms of; - Reduction of energy usage by measurements from trials in the University and the community. - Generation of innovative applications of sensor networks to increase their penetration in everyday life. - User perceptions, reactions and potential institutional responses to incentives evaluated from the trails. - National models of carbon savings validated by the trials and national roll out guidelines for implementation. The management of impact will be via the Surrey Knowledge Transfer Account (KTA) and the details are provided in the attached Impact Plan. Engagement mechanisms have commenced in other specific areas under KTA from which REDUCE will benefit. For example; - Platform advisory boards - formation of sector/community groups - show cases to sectors-'show and tell' events - follow-up's on a one-to one basis to discuss involvement - regional SME events - sector needs analyses - flexible inward and outbound secondments For REDUCE we will set up a dedicated impact board and a community group with whom we will consult regularly. This will comprise technologists, economists, psychologists, economists and policy makers. Engagement will be focussed on; - users and the energy managers- University of Surrey's Estates and Facilities department has pledged its support. - energy companies and distributers via the trials and community groups. - industry, telecoms operators, manufacturers and software producers via existing KTA platform. Thales Research and Technology has pledged support. - local authorities via the trail with Woking Borough Council (WBC) and hence the association of local authorities - Government via the appropriate Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) committees. Awareness for REDUCE outcomes will be created more generally in the press, trade literature and in policy arena. This will be managed within the KTA by the dedicated communications with the personnel associated with the Platforms. One important role of the KTA is exploitation and the knowledge exchange Directors act as discoverers of Intellectual Property (IP) and connectors to the external needs and requirements. They match the needs of industry to the research outputs in the University and shape research accordingly-open innovation. An important outcome of REDUCE will be its take up and roll out in the community. We see this being done via local authority housing institutions as well as the private sector in terms of the workplaces. Higher education institutes and their campuses can benefit in particular from the University of Surrey's pilot example. Partnerships with the researchers in industry and energy companies and distributors will be essential in generating a business model. For specific elements we see exploitation in the communications networks and sensor/equipment manufacture as well as the middleware production. These will be handled by the existing KTA platform in Communication and Signal Processing (CSP). The KTA will use mechanisms to accelerate exploitation including; - flexible inwards and outwards personnel exchange/consultancy - funding early stage prototypes - funding demonstrators for use by industry to develop and test products - connecting researchers with key external partners. - management of IP issues within the networ
 
Description Aim:
The overall objective of this research was to Reshape Energy Demand Using ICT (REDUCE). We approached this aim by evaluating the feasibility of using network technologies and sensor devices to study the potential impact on user behaviour in terms of reductions in, and shifts in patterns of electricity consumption. Additionally, the project aimed to quantify the reduction in carbon footprint (and operational energy cost) when such digital technologies are deployed.

Methodology:
Data was obtained through a number of methods. Questionnaires and interviews were used to capture qualitative/quantitative data. To study the use of communications technology as part of the project's aims, we developed a sensor network testbed which was constructed and deployed at the University's Centre for Communications Systems Research, which consisted of a number of Persuasive Energy Network (PEN) units. These units are capable of measuring the energy consumed, presence, light levels, noise & temperature at each desk where a PEN unit was installed.

Case-study:
Two distinct case studies were undertaken as part of the REDUCE project. The first was a trial conducted in an office setting with more than 150 PEN's being installed at individual office desks. The goal was to study the participant's energy usage behaviour, with some of the participants given the opportunity to receive feedback through a widget installed on their desk computer.

The second was a trial conducted in a residential setting consisting of ten households. During this trial, we explored financial incentive approaches to reducing peak electricity demand in the home. This was the first study on the use of specific financial incentives for load-shifting (as opposed to the introduction of new tariffs) in the residential sector.

Findings:
We found that at least half of the electricity consumed by office PCs is when people are not at their desks. As much as 73% of electricity consumption by office PCs could be saved and, if all were switched off when the trial participants head home for the evening, an estimated £60,000 could be saved annually.

For the residential trial, peak reductions as large as 27% were observed when reductions in energy use are also taken into account. As a result, the proportion of off-peak usage rose from an average of 30% to more than 40%. Although this was only a small-scale study, and further research is needed, this suggests that this incentives-based study was able to overcome some of the barriers to participation and response seen in Time-of-Use studies, although this was not solely due to the payments on offer.

The project has now been concluded. Following is a list of its key findings and outcomes:

+ The recognition of individual appliance energy consumption from the aggregated consumption data can be significantly improved, especially for the low-power devices, making use of additional audio features as inputs in combination with energy features.

+ Anomalies (e.g. in energy consumption patterns) can be detected with an improved accuracy using an algorithm that is capable of constructing optimal dynamic models for a training set that minimizes the detection error on the classification set.

+ A novel distributed anomaly detection algorithm is developed that detects anomalous data in the measurements collected by the wireless sensor nodes. It achieves higher detection accuracy with a significant reduction in communication overhead in the network compared to centralised and existing schemes.

+ The synthesis work of Centre for Environmantal Strategy indicates that a positive economic case exists for most of the key types of demand response, however the positive economic case relies upon at least a modest participation (including response) by energy consumers. A challenge will be to ensure the right environment to maximise participation (including response).

+ Evidence that people's interest in technology may be more important than their interest in environmentalism in determining their likelihood of using technology such as smart meter displays which can aid 'green' behaviours

+ Evidence that self-determined or internal motivation is related to energy use at work, that is, that psychological factors play a role in how much energy people use in offices

+ Evidence that both personal mental frameworks and social contexts influence whether people decide to switch off equipment such as computers in shared spaces

+ Evidence that the physical context can guide people's energy use, specifically if lights are off in a shared space, people are more likely to leave them off

As an outcome of the research we delivered a pilot test bed for the autonomous and self learning Persuasive Energy-conscious Network. This testbed was deployed on 100 desks in CCSR building in University of Surrey. This had impact on many other research projects involving IoT and smart city related research themes. The psychological studies were reported on the behavioural responses of the users to the proposed technologies. A paper in Energy Policy journal was published. Economic analysis investigated the framework models for demand response and energy demand transformations. Costs and benefits and CO2 reductions associated with different forms of demand response were also investigated and published in top quartile leading journals.
Exploitation Route In future products designed for persuasive energy demand reshaping.

In future policy making for new incentives for persuasive energy demand reshaping techniques. Published work has been used to inform policy makers.

A range of unpublished methodological outputs have potential to be used by businesses.

Guidlines for the development of future products keeping the psychological aspects of end users in mind. - development of products and devices using sensors and communication technology, that can be effective in persuading users of energy to reshape their energy use patterns

- development of eceonomic incentives and models to understand how we can reshape user energy use and then providing a quantified potential of these incentives

- developing papers and disseminating findings to policy makers where relevant. Types of papers developed are as follows: Working papers, journal papers.

- evaluation of impediments and positive incentives and social implications for adaptation of such devices and techniques in office and residential settings
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Electronics,Energy,Environment

URL http://info.ee.surrey.ac.uk/CCSR/REDUCE/
 
Description Overall, this project has generated more than 60 research outputs which are listed on the Researchfish website (www.researchfish.com). In particular, we have published 6 journal articles (and several more are under review and will be updated when accepted/published), 10 conference proceedings, three of which won the 'Best Paper Award' for their respective conference. See website/researchfish for a list of most pertinent publications. REDUCE impact on Green Impact Awards Compaign - University of Surrey: The research findings from REDUCE, outlined in the White Paper on Energy Use in Offices at the University of Surrey UK, were used in the Green Impact Awards campaign at the University of Surrey. This campaign for energy reduction targeted at university staff was launched in Autumn 2013. Energy savings from the campaign will be further evaluated. Specific findings on actual energy behaviours and barriers to reducing energy in the university have been incorporated into the communications of the Green Awareness campaign. Beneficiaries: Sustainability Campaign Officer; University staff Contribution Method: Specific findings on actual energy behaviours and barriers to reducing energy in the university have been incorporated into the communications of the Green Awareness campaign. Highlights of Academic Impact: The project has successfully published several high quality journal articles (many of them with multidisciplinary authors teams) in order to create impact in wider academic community. This includes a paper in Energy Policy with multidisciplinary co-authors. We expect that these findings will be used by general public to change the energy consumption of users in office environments as well the development of related technologies. Three conference papers also won best paper awards in their respective conferences which demonstrates the quality of the work presented as well as the interest of the academic audience in this research.
First Year Of Impact 2013
Sector Communities and Social Services/Policy,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Electronics,Energy,Environment
Impact Types Societal,Economic

 
Description Smart Santander experimentation on REDUCE testbed
Amount £200,000 (GBP)
Organisation European Commission 
Sector Public
Country European Union (EU)
Start 03/2012 
End 08/2012
 
Title REDUCE Energy Use and Energy Context Data Set 
Description A data-base is continually being populated for research capturing at a very high granularity of time, the data usage and context of the users. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact The data has been used as a data source for other projects such as EyeHub (TSB funded) project to demonstrate IoT capabilities 
 
Description Collaboration with Thameswey UK (working with Woking Borough Council) 
Organisation Thameswey Energy
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Joint work to assess the multidisciplinary implications for using ICT and incentives to reshape energy behaviour of users in social housing.
Start Year 2012
 
Description Eco-Island, the Isle of Wight sustainability project 
Organisation IBM
Department IBM UK Ltd
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Discussions at an advanced stage with Eco-Island, the Isle of Wight sustainability project, to conduct behavioural research with island residents.
Start Year 2012
 
Description Student Switch Off Program Discussion 
Organisation Student Switch Off
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Dr Neil Jennings, coordinator of the nationwide project, 'Student Switch Off' was invited to a REDUCE meeting to discuss his findings as well as our own. Dr Jennings has a considerable amount of experience in promoting energy reduction/efficiency in university residences and so it is highly applicable to the aims of the REDUCE project. The discussion was mutually beneficial as the team was able to provide him insight on the outcomes of our project which may be of use in tailoring his campaign as it expands to encompass other universities as well as incorporating other sources of energy consumption that are not currently considered (e.g. water, heating).
Start Year 2013
 
Title Development and Fabrication of a Sensor Suite for Developing an Environmental Context of an Office Environment 
Description The goal of the project was to develop and build a suite of sensors (sound, temperature, light, motion and humidity) which can transmit its data wirelessly using the IEEE802.15.4 (Zigbee protocol) standard. This sensor suite will allow for applications that promote energy efficiency to analyse the environment that they have been installed in so that their measurements can aid in defining certain attributes of that environment. This sensor suite is battery operated so that The student also developed the necessary wireless communication link between the sensors and the ICS' wireless sensor network. 
Type Of Technology Physical Model/Kit 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact The student successfully completed the project and was awarded a distinction for his efforts. 
 
Title Development and Fabrication of a Weight Measurement System for an Industrial Waste Bin 
Description The goal of this final year electronics engineering project was to develop and build a weight measurement system that can be incorporated into an industrial rubbish bin, and also which can transmit its data wirelessly using a suitable wireless protocol standard. This weight measurement system allows for the real time monitoring of a bin's weight so as to assist in determining when the bin needs to be emptied. This system suite will function and be powered autonomously. The student was also responsible for developing the necessary wireless communication link between the system and a local wireless access point. 
Type Of Technology Physical Model/Kit 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact The student successfully completed the project and was awarded a dissertation for his efforts. The resulting system is currently under evaluation for commercialisation. 
 
Title Development and Fabrication of a Wirelessly Actuated Light Switch 
Description The goal of this final year undergraduate project is to realize a light switch that can be added on top of an existing light switch so that it can be remotely actuated through a wireless sensor network. The student was successful in creating such a device while incorporating some innovative actuating methods. 
Type Of Technology Physical Model/Kit 
Year Produced 2013 
Impact The student received a distinction for his work on this project 
 
Title Development and Fabrication of a Wirelessly Actuated Multisocket 
Description The goal of this final year undergraduate project was to design and build a multi-socket power strip where each socket could be turned on/off remotely as part of a wireless sensor network. Such a device would allow for improved flexibility in energy consumption research and therefore relevant to the REDUCE project. 
Type Of Technology Physical Model/Kit 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact The student successfully completed the project and was able to demonstrate the key functionality of the device. 
 
Title Development and Fabrication of a Wirelessly Actuated Multisocket 
Description The goal of this final year undergraduate project was to design and build a multi-socket power strip where each socket could be turned on/off remotely as part of a wireless sensor network. Such a device would allow for improved flexibility in energy consumption research and therefore relevant to the REDUCE project. 
Type Of Technology Physical Model/Kit 
Year Produced 2013 
Impact The student successfully completed the project and received a merit for his work. 
 
Title Development and Fabrication of a Wirelessly Actuated Multisocket With Real-time Current Measurement Capability 
Description The proposed project sought to develop and build a four socket multisocket where each one can be actuated wirelessly using the IEEE802.15.4 (Zigbee protocol) standard. This multisocket allows for applications that promote energy efficiency to turn on/off appliances connected to the mulitsocket when certain conditions are met. Furthermore, electrical characterisation hardware was added to the multisocket design so that the electrical signature of each connected appliance can be obtained. The student also developed a communication link between the multisocket and a sensor suite and also a wireless communication link between the multisocket and the ICS' wireless sensor network. 
Type Of Technology Physical Model/Kit 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact The student successfully completed the project and received a distinction for his efforts. The outcomes have been used as a demonstration of the technology for guests and visitors to the University as well. 
 
Title Hardware Development and Fabrication of a Heating Efficiency Measurement System 
Description The goal of this final year undergraduate project was to develop the necessary hardware that would allow a wireless sensor network to determine whether or not a window was left open while the heating was on. Such a system would allow researchers to consider other forms of energy wastage in their energy efficiency research. The system was successfully developed by the student and it even utilized energy harvesting techniques so that the measurement system was energy neutral. 
Type Of Technology Physical Model/Kit 
Year Produced 2013 
Impact The student received a distinction for his work. Some of the outcomes were used for follow-on student projects. 
 
Title Hardware Development of an Acoustic Event Detection Sensor 
Description The goal of this undergraduate final year project is to develop the necessary acoustic measurement hardware for an Acoustic Event Detection system for use in a wireless sensor network. Such a system would allow the network to make contextual inferences about the environment where the network is installed thereby providing researchers with more accurate analyses of the environment whilst maintaining the anonymity of those working in it. 
Type Of Technology Physical Model/Kit 
Year Produced 2013 
Impact The student was successful in developing such a system and received a distinction for his project. 
 
Title Hardware Development of an RF Ranging Sensor Circuit 
Description The goal of this undergraduate final year project is to develop a sensor that not only detects presence but also measures the distance between the user and the sensor. This measurement capability is important as it allows researchers to greatly reduce the number of false positives for presence detection that can occur using standard detectors such as passive infrared sensors. The student was successful in creating such a measurement circuit. 
Type Of Technology Physical Model/Kit 
Year Produced 2013 
Impact The measurement circuit concepts were used in a number of follow-on student projects. 
 
Title REDUCE test-bed 
Description A physical test-bed comprising above 100 nodes has been established that is now monitoring the energy use and the context of the usage in an office environment. A data-base is continually being populated for research capturing at a very high granularity of time, the data usage and context of the users. 
Type Of Technology New/Improved Technique/Technology 
Year Produced 2012 
Impact Most of the research outcomes for the REDUCE project were derived from this physical test-bed. 
 
Description A review of current and future costs and benefits of demand response for electricity 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/parliamentarians
Results and Impact Whilst attending the UK Electricity Market Reform - UKWEC workshop 20 January 2011, Peter bradley from REDUCE met a regulatory expert Michael Gibbons. Michael has been worked on behalf of Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) with respect to Electricity Market Reforms. At the UKWEC event in 2011, Michael and Peter discussed the importance of demand side response in electricity markets. From their discussions and their own review it became clear that there was a need for evidence on the economic case for demand side response in the UK. Since this time Peter has generated a working paper that explores and clearly articulates the various forms of demand response and associated costs and benefits for these different forms of demand response. A copy of this paper and key findings and recommendations have been disseminated to Michael Gibbons. In this way REDUCE has reflexively collaborated and worked in partnership with policy makers to provide policy and academic relevant research.

Information had impact on policymakers in the area of energy and climate change.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description A review of current and future costs and benefits of demand response for electricity 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/parliamentarians
Results and Impact In addition to collaboration with Michael Gibbon Peter Bradley from REDUCE has also met with Elisabeth Blunsdon at Hovan Lovells (working on behalf of DECC) to discuss the working paper and to inform forth coming research which may investigate the topic of demand response and electricity market reforms. Elisabeth indicated that it would be useful to disseminate the work to her colleagues in DECC to provide them with a better understanding of the different forms of demand response. An electronic version of the working paper was sent to Elisabeth for further dissemination on 20th January 2012.

Information had impact on policy makers in the area of energy and climate change.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description Adaptation to Climate Change and Social Sciences Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Invited to contribute to a workshop organised by the Adaptation and Resilience in a Changing Climate (ARCC) Netwrok. Contributed to Adaptation to Climate Change and the Social Sciences workshop, which issued a series of recommendations for Research Councils on how social sciences can address questions on adaptation to climate change and appropriate methodologies, and identified domains in which social scientific approach is lacking.. Awarding Body - ARCC-CN, Name of Scheme - Adaptation to Climate Change and Social Science

N/A
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Can technology reshape end user behaviour - technical, psychological and economic perspectives 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact REDUCE project's research outcomes were shared with an international audience to create impact and to identify venues of collaborative research in future.

Invited talk to present REDUCE project's recent findings and recommendations.

Possible future collaborations were discussed with the participants.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Cut power consumption with minimal thinking 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact In this article the main objectives and research vision of the project was presented. Brief summary is as follows: The penetration of ICT technology is exponentially growing and the predictions suggest that shortly each individual will have hundreds of wireless enabled devices connected together - leading to the so-called 'internet of things'. This will result in a huge increase in energy demand. Developing a means of allowing these devices to manage and minimise their own energy consumption, and help their users adapt more energy-conscious choices can start to make these devices part of the solution rather than part of the problem. The current attitude is to make ICT more efficient; we are trying to use ICT to make people adopt more energy-efficient behaviours. In order to achieve our ambitious goals, a holistic view of the interaction of all key-players - energy devices, energy supplier and energy users - is missing and this project aims at investigating this interaction using a multidisciplinary research team.



REDUCE is an EPSRC-funded (Digital Economy initiative of Transforming Energy Demand through Digital Innovation) research project led by Dr Muhammad Imran of the Centre for Communication Systems Research at the University of Surrey. We aim to identify the user as the key pressure point for consumption change and using ICT to develop a dialogue between the energy using devices and the users, creating a benevolent feedback cycle. Every user is different, so the devices must be given a 'machine intelligence" to enable them to learn user-centric and context appropriate behaviour. Gradually the system will tune in to the user, and the user will become more comfortable with the system.


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A press release type article to share the vision and research plan of the REDUCE project with the wider community of researchers and research students as well general engineers and public.

This activity increased awareness of energy consumption issues created by the Internet of Things
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2011
 
Description Internet of Things: What are the challenges and how far is the future? 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The participant was invited to join a panelist on a discussion on the future challenges of the Internet of Things and what it is expected to look like. . Awarding Body - The IEEE

An opportunity to provide professional opinions to a wider audience.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description National Energy Research Network Newsletter - 01/02/2013 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/parliamentarians
Results and Impact Research from the REDUCE project was publicised in the newsletter as follows:



A new publication from Bradley, Leach and Torriti is now available in Energy Policy which explores the economic case for demand response in the UK, via a synthesis review. This topic is of particularly high interest at the moment, given the electricity market reform and consideration of the role for the demand side. The full paper is available here.




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N/A
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Panelist for the 1st Industrial Dissemination Day organised for GREENET conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Member of the panel to provide feedback to the researchers working on the design of energy efficient systems under the GREENET project. The panel session was organised in parallel to IEEE CAMAD conference. Invited member of the panel for 1st Industrial Dissemination day for the GREENET project in Barcelona, Spain, 2012. Awarding Body - GREENET project

N/A
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description REDUCE project website 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact REDUCE project website:

http://info.ee.surrey.ac.uk/CCSR/REDUCE/

N/A
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2011
 
Description SLRG Seminar University of Surrey 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Invited speaker, presenting on: The development of commercial local area resource and emissions modelling - navigating towards new perspectives and applications.

The presentation presented a framework model to generate detailed benchmark estimates of GHGs for individual businesses and all businesses of a sector within an area. Estimates from such a framework can be used in a step-by-step approach to move businesses and local areas towards improved GHG accounting.

Engagement with commercial entities interested in resource and emissions modelling.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description Transforming Energy Demand through Digital Innovation (TEDDI) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact A poster was presented highlighting the outcomes of the REDUCE project.

Several interesting discussions were had with fellow researchers on the topic of energy reduction through the use of technology.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Westminster Energy, Environment & Transport Forum Keynote Seminar: Smart metering in the UK 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/parliamentarians
Results and Impact A discussion on smart metering in the UK and its potential impact.


N/A
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Westminster Energy, Environment & Transport Forum Keynote Seminar:Delivering Electricity Market Reform (EMR) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/parliamentarians
Results and Impact Discussion on the Electricity Capacity Market with respect to the emission performance standard

N/A
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Will technology help or hinder green behaviour? 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Invited presentation. Presented background to smart metering and results to date on the REDUCE Office Field Trial.

The presentation provoked thought on the potential dis-benefits of technology on people's behaviour toward environmental friendliness.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012