Understanding Inequality in Elderly Well-being in China and the UK

Lead Research Organisation: University of Oxford
Department Name: Population Health

Abstract

Abstracts are not currently available in GtR for all funded research. This is normally because the abstract was not required at the time of proposal submission, but may be because it included sensitive information such as personal details.
 
Title CHARLS questionnaire 
Description improvement on measures of subject well being module in CHARLS inclusion of life history questionnaire, a new module, in CHARLS 
Type Of Material Physiological assessment or outcome measure 
Year Produced 2016 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact data made publicly available in 2016, expected to generate more high quality research using subjective well being and life history questionnaires 
 
Title life history questionnaire 
Description adoption of life history questionnaire in CHARLS, 2014 follow up; similar to those used in ELSA. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2016 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact similar life history questionnaires now available in CHARLS and ELSA, expected to generate comparative analyses and also research that examines the life course perspective on health and well being. 
URL http://charls.ccer.edu.cn/zh-CN/articles/209?category=news
 
Description CHARLS ELSA 
Organisation Hong Kong University of Science and Tech
Country Hong Kong 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Please note that the original PI for the grant was Albert Park of Oxford University. This was changed to Winnie Yip of Oxford University after Park moved to Hong Kong University of Science and Technology in August 2011. Park became a consultant on the project but continued to play the leadership role on the project. This change was approved by ESRC. Yip has done prior work on inequalities and health and well being in China and was PI of a project funded by the National Science Foundation in the US, examining the effects of out migration on the health and wellbeing of the left behind elderly in rural China. During the life of this ESRC award, Yip contributed her knowledge and experience on the measurement of health, subjective well being especially as they apply to the Chinese elderly population. Also, Yip is an expert on China's health care system and she made significant contribution to CHARLS in the analysis and questionnaire design on areas related to health systems, including health insurance coverage, health services delivery, which can be used in the future to analyse how health system design may contribute to inequalities in health and well being of the older population in China. Yip played significant roles in training and capacity building, delivering lectures and reviewing proposals by junior faculty and students using CHARLS during her visits to Peking University. Finally, Yip organised seminars and discussion groups at the University of Oxford which the UK and China researchers of this award participated in to discuss analyses, progress and to present to the larger audience at Oxford and around interested in issues of aging and more broadly, the use of longitudinal data.
Collaborator Contribution Steptoe and Banks (PI of ELSA) gave helpful advice and training to the CHARLS team on technical survey measurement issues related to data imputation, the design of survey questions to measure subjective well-being, and the design of a life history questionnaire. They also contributed to training activities in China, delivered lectures and discussed research proposals of Chinese participants, improved research capacity of junior faculty and aging researchers from throughout China. Through them, their networks and activities, UK social science academic researchers and policy analysts were made aware of the availability of high quality longitudinal survey data on aging in China. For example, CHARLS PI Yaohui Zhao was invited to present at the Launch Event for Wave 5 of the England Longitudinal Study of Aging (ELSA), London, October 15, 2012, on CHARLS and on findings from this ESRC award, on the relationship between socioeconomic status and health and well being among elderlies in China and England. Steptoe also presented findings from this project at CLOSER (Cohort and Longitudinal Studies Enhancement Resources) Symposium on Functioning well in later life: What is the evidence from longitudinal studies?, Institute of Education, London. Banks also made a presentation to Chinese policy-makers on the ways in which ELSA research had impacted policy formulation in the UK.
Impact A collaborative relationship was established between leading researchers working on high quality longitudinal studies of aging in China (CHARLS) and the UK (ELSA), which increased the scientific capacities of both surveys, especially CHARLS. This collaboration is multi-disciplinary, including economics (Banks, Park, Zhao, Yip), social epidemiology and psychology (Steptoe), policy science (Yip). The collaboration has contributed to three major conference presentations, three journal papers, and a thesis. Based on advice from the ELSA PIs, the CHARLS life history questionnaire was designed and then fielded in 2014. This has been made public on June 1, 2016 via the CHARLS website.
Start Year 2011
 
Description CHARLS ELSA 
Organisation Institute for Fiscal Studies
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Please note that the original PI for the grant was Albert Park of Oxford University. This was changed to Winnie Yip of Oxford University after Park moved to Hong Kong University of Science and Technology in August 2011. Park became a consultant on the project but continued to play the leadership role on the project. This change was approved by ESRC. Yip has done prior work on inequalities and health and well being in China and was PI of a project funded by the National Science Foundation in the US, examining the effects of out migration on the health and wellbeing of the left behind elderly in rural China. During the life of this ESRC award, Yip contributed her knowledge and experience on the measurement of health, subjective well being especially as they apply to the Chinese elderly population. Also, Yip is an expert on China's health care system and she made significant contribution to CHARLS in the analysis and questionnaire design on areas related to health systems, including health insurance coverage, health services delivery, which can be used in the future to analyse how health system design may contribute to inequalities in health and well being of the older population in China. Yip played significant roles in training and capacity building, delivering lectures and reviewing proposals by junior faculty and students using CHARLS during her visits to Peking University. Finally, Yip organised seminars and discussion groups at the University of Oxford which the UK and China researchers of this award participated in to discuss analyses, progress and to present to the larger audience at Oxford and around interested in issues of aging and more broadly, the use of longitudinal data.
Collaborator Contribution Steptoe and Banks (PI of ELSA) gave helpful advice and training to the CHARLS team on technical survey measurement issues related to data imputation, the design of survey questions to measure subjective well-being, and the design of a life history questionnaire. They also contributed to training activities in China, delivered lectures and discussed research proposals of Chinese participants, improved research capacity of junior faculty and aging researchers from throughout China. Through them, their networks and activities, UK social science academic researchers and policy analysts were made aware of the availability of high quality longitudinal survey data on aging in China. For example, CHARLS PI Yaohui Zhao was invited to present at the Launch Event for Wave 5 of the England Longitudinal Study of Aging (ELSA), London, October 15, 2012, on CHARLS and on findings from this ESRC award, on the relationship between socioeconomic status and health and well being among elderlies in China and England. Steptoe also presented findings from this project at CLOSER (Cohort and Longitudinal Studies Enhancement Resources) Symposium on Functioning well in later life: What is the evidence from longitudinal studies?, Institute of Education, London. Banks also made a presentation to Chinese policy-makers on the ways in which ELSA research had impacted policy formulation in the UK.
Impact A collaborative relationship was established between leading researchers working on high quality longitudinal studies of aging in China (CHARLS) and the UK (ELSA), which increased the scientific capacities of both surveys, especially CHARLS. This collaboration is multi-disciplinary, including economics (Banks, Park, Zhao, Yip), social epidemiology and psychology (Steptoe), policy science (Yip). The collaboration has contributed to three major conference presentations, three journal papers, and a thesis. Based on advice from the ELSA PIs, the CHARLS life history questionnaire was designed and then fielded in 2014. This has been made public on June 1, 2016 via the CHARLS website.
Start Year 2011
 
Description CHARLS ELSA 
Organisation Peking University
Country China 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Please note that the original PI for the grant was Albert Park of Oxford University. This was changed to Winnie Yip of Oxford University after Park moved to Hong Kong University of Science and Technology in August 2011. Park became a consultant on the project but continued to play the leadership role on the project. This change was approved by ESRC. Yip has done prior work on inequalities and health and well being in China and was PI of a project funded by the National Science Foundation in the US, examining the effects of out migration on the health and wellbeing of the left behind elderly in rural China. During the life of this ESRC award, Yip contributed her knowledge and experience on the measurement of health, subjective well being especially as they apply to the Chinese elderly population. Also, Yip is an expert on China's health care system and she made significant contribution to CHARLS in the analysis and questionnaire design on areas related to health systems, including health insurance coverage, health services delivery, which can be used in the future to analyse how health system design may contribute to inequalities in health and well being of the older population in China. Yip played significant roles in training and capacity building, delivering lectures and reviewing proposals by junior faculty and students using CHARLS during her visits to Peking University. Finally, Yip organised seminars and discussion groups at the University of Oxford which the UK and China researchers of this award participated in to discuss analyses, progress and to present to the larger audience at Oxford and around interested in issues of aging and more broadly, the use of longitudinal data.
Collaborator Contribution Steptoe and Banks (PI of ELSA) gave helpful advice and training to the CHARLS team on technical survey measurement issues related to data imputation, the design of survey questions to measure subjective well-being, and the design of a life history questionnaire. They also contributed to training activities in China, delivered lectures and discussed research proposals of Chinese participants, improved research capacity of junior faculty and aging researchers from throughout China. Through them, their networks and activities, UK social science academic researchers and policy analysts were made aware of the availability of high quality longitudinal survey data on aging in China. For example, CHARLS PI Yaohui Zhao was invited to present at the Launch Event for Wave 5 of the England Longitudinal Study of Aging (ELSA), London, October 15, 2012, on CHARLS and on findings from this ESRC award, on the relationship between socioeconomic status and health and well being among elderlies in China and England. Steptoe also presented findings from this project at CLOSER (Cohort and Longitudinal Studies Enhancement Resources) Symposium on Functioning well in later life: What is the evidence from longitudinal studies?, Institute of Education, London. Banks also made a presentation to Chinese policy-makers on the ways in which ELSA research had impacted policy formulation in the UK.
Impact A collaborative relationship was established between leading researchers working on high quality longitudinal studies of aging in China (CHARLS) and the UK (ELSA), which increased the scientific capacities of both surveys, especially CHARLS. This collaboration is multi-disciplinary, including economics (Banks, Park, Zhao, Yip), social epidemiology and psychology (Steptoe), policy science (Yip). The collaboration has contributed to three major conference presentations, three journal papers, and a thesis. Based on advice from the ELSA PIs, the CHARLS life history questionnaire was designed and then fielded in 2014. This has been made public on June 1, 2016 via the CHARLS website.
Start Year 2011
 
Description CHARLS ELSA 
Organisation University College London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Please note that the original PI for the grant was Albert Park of Oxford University. This was changed to Winnie Yip of Oxford University after Park moved to Hong Kong University of Science and Technology in August 2011. Park became a consultant on the project but continued to play the leadership role on the project. This change was approved by ESRC. Yip has done prior work on inequalities and health and well being in China and was PI of a project funded by the National Science Foundation in the US, examining the effects of out migration on the health and wellbeing of the left behind elderly in rural China. During the life of this ESRC award, Yip contributed her knowledge and experience on the measurement of health, subjective well being especially as they apply to the Chinese elderly population. Also, Yip is an expert on China's health care system and she made significant contribution to CHARLS in the analysis and questionnaire design on areas related to health systems, including health insurance coverage, health services delivery, which can be used in the future to analyse how health system design may contribute to inequalities in health and well being of the older population in China. Yip played significant roles in training and capacity building, delivering lectures and reviewing proposals by junior faculty and students using CHARLS during her visits to Peking University. Finally, Yip organised seminars and discussion groups at the University of Oxford which the UK and China researchers of this award participated in to discuss analyses, progress and to present to the larger audience at Oxford and around interested in issues of aging and more broadly, the use of longitudinal data.
Collaborator Contribution Steptoe and Banks (PI of ELSA) gave helpful advice and training to the CHARLS team on technical survey measurement issues related to data imputation, the design of survey questions to measure subjective well-being, and the design of a life history questionnaire. They also contributed to training activities in China, delivered lectures and discussed research proposals of Chinese participants, improved research capacity of junior faculty and aging researchers from throughout China. Through them, their networks and activities, UK social science academic researchers and policy analysts were made aware of the availability of high quality longitudinal survey data on aging in China. For example, CHARLS PI Yaohui Zhao was invited to present at the Launch Event for Wave 5 of the England Longitudinal Study of Aging (ELSA), London, October 15, 2012, on CHARLS and on findings from this ESRC award, on the relationship between socioeconomic status and health and well being among elderlies in China and England. Steptoe also presented findings from this project at CLOSER (Cohort and Longitudinal Studies Enhancement Resources) Symposium on Functioning well in later life: What is the evidence from longitudinal studies?, Institute of Education, London. Banks also made a presentation to Chinese policy-makers on the ways in which ELSA research had impacted policy formulation in the UK.
Impact A collaborative relationship was established between leading researchers working on high quality longitudinal studies of aging in China (CHARLS) and the UK (ELSA), which increased the scientific capacities of both surveys, especially CHARLS. This collaboration is multi-disciplinary, including economics (Banks, Park, Zhao, Yip), social epidemiology and psychology (Steptoe), policy science (Yip). The collaboration has contributed to three major conference presentations, three journal papers, and a thesis. Based on advice from the ELSA PIs, the CHARLS life history questionnaire was designed and then fielded in 2014. This has been made public on June 1, 2016 via the CHARLS website.
Start Year 2011
 
Description China policymakers presentation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact James Banks presented and discussed how ELSA contributed to policy dialogue and heightened understanding among Chinese policymakers the value of CHARLS for analyses that can contribute to China's design and implementation of health policies and ageing policies.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Research presentation: Well-being in China and England 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentations at ELSA Wave 5 Launch Conference, Royal Society, London, October 15th 2012 led to further interest of the potential value of comparative analyses using health and retirement surveys from around the world. The comparison between UK and China is just a starting point.

Presentation at Health and ageing in low, middle and high-income countries, biannual meetings of the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population (IUSSP), Busan, Korea, August 29, 2013 reached a wide audience of researchers interested in populations and raging and the value of using publicly valuable cohort data to conduct comparative analyses.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012,2013
 
Description Subjective wellbeing in later life: an international perspective. CLOSER (Cohort and Longitudinal Studies Enhancement Resources) Symposium on Functioning well in later life: What is the evidence from longitudinal studies? 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Over 200 researchers, practitioners, funders working on longitudinal studies, including those related to health, ageing, well being attended, engaged in valuable discussions on the value and use of longitudinal and cohort data to contribute to understanding health and well being and comparative analyses.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013