Living Multiculture: the new geographies of ethnic diversity and the changing formations of multiculture in England

Lead Research Organisation: Open University
Department Name: Social Policy & Criminology

Abstract

The project asks two key questions. First, how do people live complex cultural difference and manage increasing cultural diversity in their everyday lives and second, what role does place and locality play in this. Evidence of increasingly dispersed and diverse multicultural populations and current policy concerns with community and locality mean that this is a decisive moment to study this issue. Socio- economic mobility among some black and minority ethnic (BME) populations has become more established and migration patterns from inside and outside Europe have continued. The combined impact of this has meant that in the 21st century once monocultural places have become more multicultural and greater levels of ethnic diversity are changing places once associated with particular BME groups. Demands for labour across public and private sectors, changing migration policies, and aspirations and ambitions of BME groups have driven these new geographies and complex compositions of multiculture. Despite these social and geographic changes and complexities the terms 'ethnic relations' and 'multiculture' are more often associated with 'segregation', 'crisis' and 'division'. This is not surprising given high profile public debates, media reporting and a cohesion orientated policy context based largely on the experiences of declining, post-industrial urban areas and events in London in 2007. Yet there is also growing interest in both policy circles and academic research as to the ways in which ethnically diverse populations live and interact in convivial or amicable 'rubbing along together' ways. Exploring and explaining the dynamics and limits of this 'competency' - and its relationship to places which have long and short histories of cultural diversity - is at the heart of the research. It is in a context of dispersing multiculture that this spatial requirement is emphasised given less research has been done on suburbs, large towns and small cities with little or no histories of multiculture and/or ethnic tension.

The project's core aims are to contribute both to new social and spatial understandings of multiculture and to inform appropriate policy responses. It employs an innovative methodology in three comparative case study areas chosen for the different windows they offer onto the new geographies of multiculture in Britain: Milton Keynes - a newly diverse city; the Leicestershire suburb of Oadby - newly diverse through the relocation of affluent members of BME communities and the London Borough of Hackney -experiencing newly intense levels of diversity via on-going migrations and gentrification. The methodology is innovative because it works at the interface of psychotherapeutic techniques and social science methods, which are both necessary to understand the informal, sometimes positive, sometimes not, interactions between people in places. This methodological approach combines one-to-one semi-structured interviews, repeat in-depth discussion groups and participant observation. The combination of these methods allows the research team to observe, experience and ask about the types of social relations, convivial exchanges and encounters that underpin lived multiculture and to collect different forms of data across a range of fieldwork sites in the three case study areas. These sites will include further education colleges, leisure organisations, festive public events and public parks. Alongside the investigations of everyday, lived multiculture, the project will work with key stakeholders formally involved in the management of multiculture and social cohesion in the case study areas through semi-structured interviews and advisory group meetings. Local stakeholders will be involved in the research at every stage to discuss and 'test' findings and will play an active role in informing appropriate policy responses.

Planned Impact

The project is timely. Current policy interest in the possibilities of localism and civic society for achieving social inclusion and well-being mean that the project's potential impact is significant. One of the central ambitions of this project is to highlight ways in which contemporary policy making in the field of ethnic and cultural diversity might usefully engage with geographically embedded, local, everyday practices of multicultural encounter and social interaction, rather than starting from a dichotomy between cultural difference and community cohesion that currently tends to dominate policy debates.

There are four main aspects to the way in which the research will dialogically involve and impact with policy makers and users.

The first relates to local policy actors. We will be working closely with a local advisory group drawn from the three case study sites of Oadby, Milton Keynes and Hackney, whose members will be selected from among key individuals within policy and user networks across the public and third and community sectors. This group will operate in ways that enable and encourage an active process of knowledge exchange between the group, their networks and the research team.

The second relates to the national level. At this level we will organise interim and end-of-project workshops, aimed at engaging with wider audiences drawn from public policy and third sector organisations. As well as allowing us to report on emergent findings, again the purpose will be to facilitate knowledge exchange, encouraging and enabling participants to suggest ways in which the project might fruitfully be developed. They will be an opportunity for dialogue, rather than exposition. We will also ensure that work in progress is reported to a range of other workshops and seminars during the course of the project as well as preparing interim policy briefs. This process will culminate in a major international workshop towards the end of the project, where a wide audience from across the policy/academic divide will be invited to engage with the work that is emerging from the project.

The third is centrally expressed in the project's research design. This recognises the need for an iterative, active and reflexive engagement with key stakeholders in order to feed in findings, discuss meanings, and 'test' interpretations and policy implications. Interviews with policy actors will include dialogue about the project's findings. The issues arising from the fieldwork will be discussed in a more detailed way with these actors right from the start and throughout the project. This iterative approach is not an optional extra but something that is closely integrated as an essential element in the project.

The fourth relates to the possibility and necessity of wider public engagement. We will be utilising various media to open up discussion around the project, including a project web-site (for the support of which dedicated resource has been identified), the use of a blog, pod casts through i-Tunes University and through radio programmes such as Radio 4's Thinking Allowed. A detailed communications strategy will be drawn up in the final year of the project with the help of the Open University's communications department.

For the academic impact of the research see Academic Beneficiaries section.
 
Description The project aimed to examine the importance of the everyday as the site of experiential multiculture at a time of rapid population change; develop such concepts as community and conviviality for understanding contemporary forms of cultural difference; focus on place as a way of materializing multiculture and emphasizing different multicultural formations; and contribute to local policy conversations about the possibilities of micro interactions for developing policy interventions. With this agenda the project has delivered significant theoretical and empirical findings regarding multicultural social relations in contemporary urban England.

1. One key achievement has been to develop mixed qualitative methods approaches capable of investigating complex, ethnically diverse local populations and their senses of attachment to the places in which they live. Aspects of the project's fieldwork design and mixed qualitative methods approach - namely individual and then repeated group interviews - contribute to knowledge and understanding about how to research sensitive and emotive fields of enquiry, productively working with participants and building strong relationships between research teams and research participants in localities.

2. The project has mapped the heterogeneity of multicultural formations in urban England (bringing to life the results of the 2011 Census) - super-diverse, suburban and newly experienced multiculture - through accounts and insights of people's social life and practices within those contexts. In its identification of these different forms of multiculture and their relationship to particular places the data highlights the importance of developing a socially and spatially nuanced understanding of multiculture, which was also highlighted in the Commission on Integration and Cohesion's (2007) Our Shared Future report. The data suggest that people who live in multicultural places pursue strategies of accommodation, developing what might be called diversity skills and competencies.

3. Residential affection for locality and place can become a socially cohesive experience as ethnically diverse populations demonstrated capacities and dispositions to connect to others through their affinities with where they live. Particularly important are the ways in which the 'soft infrastructure' of places - public and semi public spaces (parks, leisure centres, play areas, squares, cafes, libraries) - foster routine practices of being together which in turn generate familiar, mutually visible multicultural publics. The materialities of these spaces (greenness, benches, water, views, swings, food, books) were central to social interaction and place affection. Having such 'belonging' spaces, which are used by different populations, is a key aspect of managing cultural difference.

4. The identification of an 'urban learning process' in the social life of emplaced populations provides evidence of multiculture and diversity becoming an unexceptional norm, confirming that conflict and anxiety are not the only - or even the dominant modes - of interaction between culturally different populations. The research found that direct interaction itself was not necessary for senses of connection to exist; ethnic mixity in certain public and semi-public environments could itself be sufficient to generate positive expressions of diversity. This finding opens up new research questions regarding how affections for places are developed and reinforced among different populations.


5. The research findings highlight the importance of conviviality even in the absence of the deep roots of implied by notions of community. While community remains a core concept drawn on by participants to describe their lives and localities the data show that what is described as having a sense of community is often a series of more momentary exchanges or experiences which linger in the mind rather than 'knowing your neighbour' type social relations. The research re-excavates older sociological concepts such as Goffman's 'civil inattention' and Granovetter's 'strength of weak ties' to suggest that processes of proximate living with culturally different others is managed through thin, low demand, convivial sociality rather than the thicker structures of community.

6. The research suggests that policy interventions and local initiatives around localized urban social relations, working with everyday, micro worlds may provide ways of effectively framing and mobilizing policy approaches to increasingly complex local populations, particularly through the ways in which convivial, public space with multicultural appeal might be most effectively designed, developed and maintained.
Exploitation Route The findings are being disseminated through a combined strategy of engagement with academic and non-academic audiences.

In relation to academic audiences papers have been presented to a wide range of national and international conferences and invited workshops (as indicated elsewhere in Researchfish); papers have been and are being prepared for publication in academic journals (one is in press with Population, Space and Place, one due for publication in The Sociological Review, subject to minor corrections, two are under review and three currently in development); a book proposal is being prepared and interest has been expressed by publishers (the plan is for the manuscript to be complete by December 2015).

In terms of wider impact three distinct aspects to the strategy can be identified: first, we have been committed to engaging and disseminating to locally based, practitioner-professional audiences (for example, the interactive interviews with policy figures, the three Advisory Groups which met three times in each locality); second, we have made presentations to mixed professional-practitioner-participant audiences and organised seminars and workshops involving them (for example, the project launch, interim findings and end of project workshops held in September 2013, September 2014 and October 2015); third, we have prepared and will further develop a series of policy-orientated briefing papers available from the project web-site and also sent to key local and national organisations who have been involved in the project or who are working in social cohesion and related fields.
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Education,Environment,Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism,Government, Democracy and Justice

URL http://www8.open.ac.uk/researchprojects/living-multiculture/
 
Description Context and overview of the project The research was completed in October 2014 at a time when debates about migration, community and cultural difference and social interaction have been pressing. As the ethnic diversity of the UK's population increases, becomes more complex and geographically dispersed the project investigated the social and spatial nature of contemporary urban multiculture. The findings from this two year, mixed qualitative methods study of multicultural social relations in three different areas of England engage directly with one of the most important aspects of everyday life in urban environments today. Our research starts from the profound understanding that contemporary Britain is defined through the experience of multiculture. As the 2011 Census confirms, there are very few places that have been unaffected by the shifts in population associated with longer term and more recent patterns of migration within and from beyond the UK. Britain is experiencing significant shifts in the geography of its multiculture. Some places are becoming more ethnically and culturally diverse while others are experiencing diversity for the first time. At the same time new migration settlements and the social mobility of older migrant communities mean that minority ethnic communities are becoming more diverse and socially differentiated. Such changes - often rapid - present major challenges for policy-makers and service provision at both national and local levels. Dominant interpretations of and policy responses to this process have often been trapped between a celebration of what has been called multiculturalism, a concern about challenges to community cohesion, and a fear of the emergence of forms of social and ethnic segregation as different ethnic groups have defined themselves in opposition to others. Sometimes, this is expressed as a concern about the extent to which 'Britishness' itself may be under challenge. Our work steps back from these debates to explore some of the meanings of urban multiculture in practice - neither celebrating nor bemoaning its social impact, but seeking to understand how people manage and live with ethnic diversity and cultural difference in everyday, mundane and even banal ways, as a fact of life. As part of this the findings suggest that residential affection for locality and place can become a socially cohesive experience as ethnically diverse populations demonstrated capacities and dispositions to connect to others through their affinities with where they live. Particularly important are the ways in which the 'soft infrastructure' of places - public and semi public spaces (parks, leisure centres, play areas, squares, cafes, libraries) - foster routine practices of being together which in turn generate familiar, mutually visible multicultural publics. The materialities of these spaces (plants and trees, benches, water, views, swings, food, books) were central to social interaction and place affection. Having such 'belonging' spaces, which are used by different populations, is a key aspect of navigating cultural difference. The identification of 'urban craft' or 'competencies' in the social life of 'placed' populations provides evidence of multiculture and diversity becoming an unexceptional norm, confirming that conflict and anxiety are not the only - or even the dominant modes - of interaction between culturally different populations. As a result not only are our findings directly relevant to the development of policy around the new realities of life in Britain today, but they build on activity that is already taking place, both within communities and in some of the prosaic work of local policy practice. Project Impacts: networking and engagement routes The research process (as discussed in a paper published in Qualitative Research in 2015 see RF entry) was one that was understood to be a collaborative, co-productive process between researcher and researched - as we sought to have impact through what we describe as an on-going process of embedded practice in line with our broader commitment to recognising the significance of the everyday and the importance of the apparently slight. This embedded practice has involved us in thinking differently about 'policy', moving away from a focus on 'from above' policy models and decision making and instead highlighting those quotidian practices that shape how people negotiate and accommodate difference in different places which have distinct identities and migration histories. In this way the project engaged with the ways in which policy imaginations and interventions might recognize the impact of the everyday, the experiential and the emotional aspects of living diversity and find ways of mobilising this recognition into policy thinking. Making places liveable and cohesive for very diverse, complex local populations alongside addressing social exclusion, social strain and racism in wider contexts of anti-migration and diversity anxiety are a key challenges for local policy makers and those with responsibilities for community well-being responsibilities. The individual interviews and repeated focus groups with participants in the three geographies were constructed and pursued in ways that involved learning and dialogue between all of those involved. Throughout the process, our conceptual work and our field work was informed by discussion and engagement with a series of locally based project advisory groups (PAGs) which were established at the beginning of the project. The research team met with each PAG on a twice-yearly basis during the lifetime of the project to report on the project's progress and on our emergent findings and from whom we received feedback, advice and suggestions and with whom we maintained contact. In each project locality, these project advisory groups were made up of a variety of actors drawn from a diverse range of local community and third sector organisations such as Parks Trusts, libraries, refugee groups and intercultural groups, FE and 6th form colleges and local authorities, as well as locally based, experienced community 'experts' and academics. In the context of the 6th form and further education colleges with which we worked, these relationships were expressed in feedback sessions and other forms of engagement both to the students with whom we worked and the managers with whom we collaborated. In one case the project and their participation and engagement with it fed directly into the work being undertaken in preparation for an OFSTED inspection and an international observational visit from Scandinavian Educational Group aiming to learn from and develop strategies for ethnic diversity in education. In this particular college setting the project also invited to attend the management board meetings and presented findings from the project to the Governors and College Management Committee. In another of the project's FE colleges the project's findings informed college thinking and policy on the internal architecture and student use of social spaces. The final phase of the project involved a series of what we describe as 'iterative interviews' and extensive discussions with national and local policy actors, involved in community organisations, third sector organisations and local government within the three geographical areas and at a national level. This iterative process involved the research team in providing summaries of our findings prior to the interview and then using these as the basis of questions and conversation as we sought to both disseminate and to learn from their responses, which fed into the policy brief we prepared summing up our policy relevant findings and setting out policy lessons, which has been made available both on-line and in hard copy (and circulated to a wider policy audience). Societal impacts: wider audiences and on-going project engagement We have consistently sought to take the work of the project to a wider set of audiences. We organised a series of project public encounters at the beginning of the project; mid point when we organised a well attended interim findings workshop to ensure that wider audiences could have an opportunity to respond to our work and make suggestions for its next stages; and end of project workshop to encourage a debate around the issues we raised. All of these workshops drew in audiences, research participants and included presentations from beyond the academy (including the Equalities and Human Rights Council and the Runnymede Trust). Locally one member of the research team developed work from the project to contribute to a series of workshops organised by the Fred Roche Foundation which focused on the future of Milton Keynes. Throughout the project we also maintained a well-used project web site, where we provided key project information, discussed progress, developed blogs and provided access to findings, publications and policy briefs. Our work has also attracted media interest on which we aim to build. For example, an academic (Royal Geographic Society) conference presentation (see RF for details) on the extent to which particular places (such as the London Borough of Hackney) become the subject of 'over-research' by social researchers led to reports about the project and its scope in the Times Higher Education (https://timeshighereducation.com/news/hackney -has-become-focus-of-academic-study/2015471.article) and, with our work on brand café spaces, we have been invited to contribute to the Radio 4 programme 'Thinking Allowed' in December 2015. Research team members have continued to build networks and present the project and its findings at conferences and a variety of multi-audience workshops - for example, we participated in a landscape design workshop hosted by University of Sheffield which consisted of landscape planners, local authority service providers and academics. The project has also had some transnational policy reach. In 2014, we were invited to contribute to wider European audiences through a participation in a Warsaw based conference, sponsored by the Mayor of Gdansk, on the theme of Smart Cities, where we highlighted the importance of cosmopolitan understanding in the construction of Smart Cities, moving beyond a simple emphasis on technology in contemporary urban space. This presentation was selected for further development and translated into Polish for inclusion in the official publication that arose from the conference (see RF for details). We have agreed a book contract with Routledge to develop the arguments and present the evidence arising from the project. The aim of the book is not only to contribute to academic debates, but (equally important) also to engage with the wider policy initiatives about and popular experience of everyday life, rapidly changing places, place identities and the social connections between and across culturally different urban populations.
First Year Of Impact 2013
Sector Communities and Social Services/Policy,Education,Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism
Impact Types Cultural,Societal

 
Description Mapping Multiculture: Disrupting representations of an ethnically diverse city
Amount £101,000 (GBP)
Organisation The Leverhulme Trust 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2019 
End 08/2021
 
Description 6th Form College Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The research team were invited to take part in a workshop organised by the 6th form college as part of a series of events for a team of international visitors from Scandinavia who were engaged in a best diversity practice information gathering exercise. The project team were invited to present about the research and participate in round table discussions with the colleges staff, college students and the international visitors.

None specifically - the key impact was being present for the 6th form college as a way of evidencing their own commitment to diversity work and development.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description 6th Form college visit 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact I presented findings from the project to the Board of Governors of the 6th form college which had participated in the project. The presentation prompted questions and discussion about diversity approach within the college.

On-going engagement with the college about policy approaches to diversity and the appeal of the college's diversity to students applying to study at it.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Advisory Group Liaison 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact In each geographical case study area the project had an Advisory Group made up of local professionals, community activists and experts. We met with the Advisory Groups in each area on three different occasions. The meetings were designed to share information about the research and to hear views, perspectives and experiences as well as to listen to local feedback and receive advice and guidance from locally embedded actors.

The impacts were mostly for the research team in thinking about discussions and processes sing locally sourced information and contacts.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013,2014
 
Description Advisory Groups and Participants Dissemination Events 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact In each of the three case study areas we organised a two hour workshop/dissemination event for the members of our local advisory groups and for participants in the research. The presentations and findings briefings prompted lively debate and conversation about the project and the localities and the nature of social change.

No definitive or immediate impacts although on going conversations with policy makers/professionals about diversity policy approaches in localities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Conference presentation - 'Listening' 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact The paper prompted a series of methods questions and discussions.

None specifically - informal networking and contact building around research practices and reflection.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Conference presentation - 'You can't move in Hackney without bumping into an anthropologist' : Why certain places attract research attention 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact The presentation was part of a special panel I organised to explore the theme of over-researched areas. This was very well attended and the presentation by the team and the the presentations by other contributors led to lively and engaged discussions.

Informal networking and contact building. The panel and my presentation did lead to some media interest and it received coverage in the Times Higher.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Conference presentation - Comforting urban spaces and super-diverse communities 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact This was a presentation as part of end of project event for the Future of Social Relations conference at Sheffield University. The presentation received lots of interested discussion and prompted exchanges of ideas.

Involvement led to an invitation to develop a paper for a special journal issue and to present a further paper to the Department of Geography at Sheffield University.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Conference presentation - Community versus conviviality: rethinking key concepts for understanding the social relations of contemporary multiculture 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact This was a presentation to the British Sociological Association's Annual Conference. The paper addressing conceptual understandings of contemporary urban populations prompted questions and discussion.

Informal networking and exchange of research experience, information and ideas.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Conference presentation - Multiculture, place and belonging: green materialities and urban parks 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact This presentation was part of a conference roundtable on urban environments and sociality. The interactive and small scale format is designed for interaction and discussion and the conversation between international researchers working in related areas was lively and engaged.

None specifically. Informal network and international contact building and data sharing.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Conference presentation - Rethinking public policy for a diverse society 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact The presentation was part of specialist conference panel on policy making at the first conference (Superdiversity, Theory, Method and Practice in an Era of Change) of the newly established IRiS Centre at Birmingham University and prompted networking, dialogue and ideas exchange.

None specifically but created networking and exchange opportunities and a profile for the project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description End of Project Event 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact The event was organised around a mix of invited national and international keynote speakers and presentations from the project's research team reporting on key findings. The audience was mainly but not solely academic. We invited a number of practitioners and participants and members of the project's Advisory Groups. The keynote speakers included a national policy think tank representative. This mix gave rise to some rich and thoughtful discussions, questions and networking.

No definitive impacts as such but contacts made and information shared.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description International Super-Diversity Methods Workshop (Max Planck Institute) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact I was an invited (all expenses paid) contributor to this methods workshop organised by the Max Planck Institute which aimed to explore ethnographic approaches to the study of super diversity. This was an invite only two day workshop which led to productive and rich discussion on concepts refinement and research practice sharing.

Informal networking and international contact building and information exchange. I contributed to a podcast interview about the project for the Max Planck website.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Interview for global science journal 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact I was interviewed by one of the Editors of the science journal 'Nature' about the project's work in the London Borough of Hackney and the related article we published exploring the concept of over-research in geographical places and amongst certain groups and communities. The interview and the project were cited in the journal's editorial 'Research Fatigue' (Nature, Vol 551, Issue 7679. 9th November 2017: 141-142).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v551/n7679/index.html#ed
 
Description Invited international workshop presentation - Living with difference: making sense of the contemporary city 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This invited, all expenses paid, presentation was part of a two day workshop organised and funded by the Mayor Gdansk. The presentation generated lots of comparative dialogue and discussion about diversity in cities.

Involvement in this event has led to a follow-up invitation to speak at a conference organised by the City of Warsaw on governing diversity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Migration Museum Project exhibition on migration 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Professor Mohan is on the steering committee for a forthcoming exhibition in London. Provisionally entitled No Turning Back: Seven migration moments that changed Britain, it will deal with questions of multiculturalism, identity, urban living and popular culture. It will aimed at the general public but have a strong educational component for schools and individuals interested in these issues. Professor Mohan will lead the Open University team contributing to these learning resources and engagement events. It is due to take place in September 2017-February 2018 and so no actual impact has yet been recorded.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://migrationmuseum.org
 
Description Migration Museum project 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Giles Mohan was invited to become part of the Migration Museums Project set up to celebrate Leicester's identity and history as a multicultural city. The project will presenta rnage of events and spaces which document migrant settlement in the city and its surrounding suburbs (one of which we worked in as part of the Living Multiculture project)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Multiculture , difference and solidarity amongst young people in education' 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact This was a presentation given to an international workshop in Belgium exploring solidarity in times of transiotion and migration.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Project Launch Event 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This was a two hour event aimed at publicising the project and its research aims, rationale and design. The event included an invited keynote speaker and academic and policy and practitioner audiences. The event generated discussion and interest.

None specifically - network building with organisations and think tanks as well as other academics working in directly related fields.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description Research Centre presentation - IRiS (University of Birmingham) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact This was an invited, expenses paid, presentation to the newly established Institute of Research in Super-Diversity. The presentation discussed older and newer concepts for understanding diversity and prompted rich and engaged discussion from early career and experienced researchers.

Network building and ideas exchange.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Research centre presentation - CoDE (University of Manchester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact This was an invited, all expenses paid, presentation to the Centre of Dynamics of Ethnicity based at the University of Manchester. The invitation cam from the networks established at the AAG conference in 2013.

The presentation generated lively discussion among researchers working in directly related fields.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Visits to 6th form colleges 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact In the 6th form colleges that participated in the study the research team organised findings dissemination visits and prepared findings briefings or documents. The events were for students, participants and teaching staff. The events prompted questions and productive discussion.

No definitive or specific impact but events generated debate and interest and helped give team access to interviews with Heads/Senior teaching staff in the 6th Form colleges.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Workshop presentation Belgium 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Katy Bennett presented findings from the project on the theme of 'Multiculture , difference and solidarity amongst young people in education' at a workshop meeting of the International Scientific Committee on Solidarity in Diversity in Brussels Nov 23 2016.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Workshop presentation, Designing for Diversity - intercultural outdoor places, Department of Landscape, University of Sheffield 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact All the workshop presentations were each followed by intensive round table discussions based on the presentation and organised thinking and policy development activities. The Living Multiculture presentation was included in the policy focus on designing inclusive outdoor spaces and led to detailed discussion and networking.

The workshop was attended by a variety of policy makers working in diverse fields of service provision, architecture and landscape planning as well as academics and researchers. Presenting information about the project and its findings fed into a series of networking conversations and interest among members of what was a multi-audience, policy focussed workshop.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description http://www.open.ac.uk/researchprojects/living-multiculture/ 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Website about project.

The website has been a key dissemination forum for updates and activities on the progress of the project. Information about and attendance at project events is likely to have been increased by people accessing the website.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012,2013,2014
URL http://www.open.ac.uk/researchprojects/living-multiculture/