Understanding Experiences of Hate Crime Victimisation and Expectations of Criminal Justice Responses

Lead Research Organisation: University of Leicester
Department Name: Criminology

Abstract

The proposed research is centred around the issue of hate crime, a term that is used to describe crimes committed against people because of prejudice towards their identity characteristics or perceived 'difference'. The research will examine the nature and impact of hate crime (or targeted victimisation, to use the term preferred by the proposers) as experienced by those who are subjected to the types of violence, harassment and abuse associated with this harrowing form of crime. It will also investigate their perceptions and expectations of criminal justice agencies and other service providers in order to assess the needs of victims and to identify lessons for effective service delivery.

This will be achieved through the distribution of online and written surveys to a wide range of different communities susceptible to targeted victimisation and through the undertaking of interviews with members of these populations. Those groups who will be accessed include: minority ethnic and faith communities; lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender communities; those with physical or learning disabilities; the homeless; asylum seekers and refugees; and Gypsy Traveller communities. Equally, the research will have the capacity to capture the experiences and perceptions of those who may feel that they have been victimised because of mental health issues or their membership of an alternative subculture, or indeed because of other identity characteristics which do not form the basis of the more generic communities typically associated with hate crime victimisation.

The site for the proposed research is Leicester, one of the most plural cities in the UK containing a diverse range of communities who are targeted, or who are at risk of being targeted simply because of who they are. The research team have already secured access to in excess of 150 different community groups and networks, each containing large numbers of potential research participants who have suffered from this form of victimisation.

The research comes at a time when both official figures and academic studies show levels of hate crime to be rising and when people's fear of the 'other' continues to be exploited by far-right parties such as the British National Party and extreme protest groups like the English Defence League. As such the proposed research is both significant and timely, particularly as criminal justice agencies, local authorities and other organisations who could potentially offer support to victims, are facing converging pressures, including significant cuts to resources, the impact of organisational restructuring, civil unrest and a loss of public confidence in their policies and processes for responding to targeted victimisation. Against this background there is a danger that the forms of violence, harassment and abuse directed at some of the more vulnerable members of society could escape undetected as agencies are forced to prioritise what may be seen as more pressing, or more visible problems.

Within this context the study will make a practical contribution to knowledge about how agencies can develop cost-effective responses that meet the needs and expectations of victims of targeted violence. It will also contribute significantly to the academic literature on hate crime and victimisation, and the lessons learned at a regional level for both policy and scholarship will be extracted and disseminated to a national audience through publications, conferences and workshops.

Planned Impact

Who will benefit from this research?

The research proposal has the potential to benefit service users, vulnerable communities, academics and criminal justice policymakers and practitioners, including:
1. Potential and actual victims of hate crime
2. Community groups, networks and associations
3. The police service
4. Crown Prosecution Service
5. Local authorities
6. Victim Support
7. Ministry of Justice and Home Office
8. Charities and third sector organisations

How will they benefit from this research?

Achieving the aims and objectives will deliver a series of practical benefits. At one level, the research will involve community groups, networks and associations from the outset, ensuring that they are fully consulted throughout every stage of the research process and engaged in the dissemination of findings. Moreover, the study will contribute to debates about the scope and effectiveness of existing hate crime policies, and this will enable policymakers and practitioners to identify ways of tailoring services to meet the expectations of victims who require their support. Equally, it will help these organisations to develop responses to victimisation that are based upon the actual needs of victims, rather than assumptions about who their service users are and what their needs might be. At a broader level, the research will generate significant new data that will inform regional and national policy and practice. It has the capacity to make an important contribution to debates about the nature and impact of hate crime, the legitimacy and effectiveness of criminal justice policy, the use of engagement strategies with 'hard-to-reach' communities, and responses to victims of hate crime.

How will we provide opportunities to engage with the research?

The proposers have already established contact with gatekeepers and facilitators to each of the communities that will be involved in the research, and a representative cross-section will form a community working group which will be consulted at regular intervals. This will provide an important community interface to inform the research. The proposers have also secured the support of personnel from key local agencies, including the police, Victim Support and local authorities, who will form the project steering group and will help to maximise the policy impact of the research. Senior ACPO and Ministry of Justice leads on hate crime will also have an input. Other means for generating impact include:

1. A project website, which will be active throughout the study in order to publicise the research to the wider communities of Leicester and to promote ways of accessing support to potential and actual victims of targeted violence.
2. A plain English report summarising the research findings for non-academic users.
3. Translated copies of the report for intended beneficiaries of the research whose preference would be to receive a non-English language version.
4. Launching the findings at a national two-day conference (at the University of Leicester), which will devote separate days to considering the implications of the research for scholarship and for policy. National policy leads from the statutory and voluntary sectors will play a key role at this event.
5. Working with steering group members and senior national hate crime policymakers at a post-project workshop to develop an action plan to implement the research's recommendations.
6. Presenting the findings at four relevant academic and practitioner conferences.
7. Submitting articles based on the research to local media, community newsletters, relevant websites, practice-oriented academic journals such as 'Policing and Society', the 'British Journal of Community Justice', 'Criminology and Criminal Justice' and the 'British Journal of Criminology', and to magazines such as 'Criminal Justice Matters' and 'Police Review'.

Publications

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Chakraborti N (2015) Re-thinking hate crime: fresh challenges for policy and practice. in Journal of interpersonal violence

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Chakraborti N (2017) Responding to hate crime: Escalating problems, continued failings in Criminology & Criminal Justice

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Chakraborti N (2015) Mind the Gap! Making Stronger Connections Between Hate Crime Policy and Scholarship in Criminal Justice Policy Review

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Chakraborti, N. (2014) Briefing Paper 4: Racist Hate Crime

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Chakraborti, N. (2014) Victims' Manifesto

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Chakraborti, N. (2014) Briefing Paper 2: Gendered Hostility

 
Title A Short Animated Film - 'Challenge Hate' 
Description The research team have been working with an animation company in Leicester to produce a short 3 minute animation designed to make people think about what they could do to challenge hate within their everyday life. The animation consists of four short stories told by people who have experienced hate crime and who have participated in the Leicester Hate Crime Project. It will be disseminated through social media and hosted on the University of Leicester's website. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact The animation is being released in March and therefore it is difficult to describe any notable impacts at this point. However, the animation participants who have all experienced hate crime, have reported feeling empowered due to be able to share their stories and views with such a wide audience. 
 
Title A Short Film - 'The Harms of Hate' 
Description The project team produced a short film entitled 'The Harms of Hate' based on the key themes underpinning the project. The film showcases the stories of seven people who have been victims of hate crimes in Leicester, all of whom come from a range of backgrounds and who have been victimised for different reasons and in a variety of ways. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact As a result of producing this film, more than 250 regional, national and international voluntary and statutory organisations have requested a copy of the DVD. Feedback from these organisations suggests that the film is being shown in schools, colleges, youth groups, prisons, charities and faith groups to young people and adults from a range of different backgrounds. On 30 October 2014 'The Harms of Hate' won the Royal Television Award for 'Best Factual Programme' at the Royal Television Society Midlands Awards (as noted in the 'Awards and Recognition' section). The Best Factual Programme category contained 11 nominations, the highest number of all award categories. More recently, the film won the General In-House Award and the Special Jury Award at the British Universities Film and Video Council's Learning on Screen Awards. To date, the film has been viewed more than 5,700 times of YouTube. 
URL http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MCFJd2U2BNQ
 
Description The evidence from this project is based on research conducted with the largest and most diverse sample of hate crime victims ever identified in a single study. Over the course of two years the research team engaged with more than 4,000 people from different backgrounds and communities, and the sample of hate crime victims included nearly 1,500 people who had been subjected to acts of violence, hostility and intimidation because of their identity or 'difference'. The research has generated new knowledge in four key areas:

1) The nature and impact of hate crime victimisation

The research illustrated that hate crimes were a routine, and mostly unreported feature of many people's daily lives. This includes people who are targeted specifically because of their race, religion, sexual orientation, disability or their gender identity, as well as those who belong to the kinds of more marginalised groups so often overlooked within research and policy such as Gypsies and Travellers, the homeless, new migrant communities and those who live alternative lifestyles.
These offences took a range of different forms, including physical violence, cyberbullying, damage to property and sexually violent hate crime such as rape or sexual assault. All forms of hate crime had a significant impact upon victims' emotional and physical health, with particularly high numbers of victims of disablist and transphobic hate referring to feeling vulnerable, depressed or suicidal.

2) The profile of hate crime perpetrators

Hate crime perpetrators are often assumed to be complete strangers to their victims, and more often than not far-right sympathisers or extremists. However, in fewer than half of cases within this research was the offender unknown to the victim, meaning that more often than not the person perpetrating hate was someone familiar: a neighbour, a work colleague, a carer, a 'friend' or even a family member.


3) Victims' expectations in relation to justice
There is often an assumption that victims of crime demand punitive responses to offending behaviour. This research, however, has challenged that assumption, with participants showing an overwhelming preference for the use of educational interventions and restorative approaches to justice, as opposed to extended prison sentences or harsher regimes. Moreover, this preference was shared by victims of different types of violent and non-violent hate crime and from different communities, ages and backgrounds.

4) Implications for criminal justice agencies and other service providers

The research highlighted victims' lack of familiarity with the term 'hate crime' and their lack of awareness of how to access support services. It revealed that hate crime awareness campaigns are failing to resonate with people at a grassroots level, and especially those from smaller and emerging minority communities and from economically disadvantaged environments. The research also illustrated how few victims had reported experiences of hate crime to the police, and to other networks, organisations or individuals in a position of authority and trust. In addition to assessing barriers to reporting, the research identified ways of making reporting more accessible, reducing feelings of isolation and vulnerability, and meeting the needs of diverse 'hard-to-reach' communities.
Exploitation Route The research team produced a total of eight reports, including a Full Findings and Recommendations report; an Executive Summary; a series of themed briefing papers on Disablist Hate Crime, Gendered Hostility, Homophobic Hate Crime, Racist Hate Crime, and Religiously Motivated Hate Crime; and a Victims' Manifesto containing a 10-point plan outlining practical ways to support victims more effectively. These reports have been published in hard copy and online, and distributed to more than 300 organisations and networks across the criminal justice, local authority, education, health and third sectors.

The Victims' Manifesto enables practitioners and policy-makers to pledge support to the recommendations embodied within the 10-point plan put forward by the research team. To date, more than 75 public, private and third-organisations across the UK and Europe have pledged to incorporate the recommendations provided within the Victims' Manifesto into their existing and future policies.
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Education,Healthcare,Government, Democracy and Justice,Security and Diplomacy,Transport

URL http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/criminology/hate/project/our-reports
 
Description We have achieved impact following the production of eight project reports in 2014 which included the voices of many hundreds of hate crime victims who have never shared their story with the police or any other relevant organisation. The reports, which have been accessed by more than 1,000 policy-makers and professionals world-wide, provide evidence-based recommendations for policy and practice to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of services for victims. Specifically, the ESRC-funded Leicester Hate Crime Project was cited throughout the 2016 Government action plan for tackling hate crime in the UK and professionals from a range of sectors have commended the relevance of our reports. Using the findings from the Leicester Hate Crime Project, we have been able to secure further research funding which has enabled us to work with organisations across the UK to improve the sustainability and effectiveness of responses to communities, victims and perpetrators. Over the last six years we have worked with more than 200 criminal justice agencies, local governments, educational institutions, health and social care organisations and charities to ensure that the research outputs translate into tangible changes to policies and services for victims. This has resulted in the development of new and improved hate crime strategies; the delivery of empirically-driven, victim-centred training on hate crime to frontline professionals; the creation of new assessment tools to identify victim support needs on first contact; and increased investment in voluntary and community support services. This has benefited a wide range of public-sector agencies including criminal justice agencies, local authorities and health and social care organisations, all of whom have been able to make improvements to their services despite the challenges posed by ongoing austerity measures. We have also influenced the development of more effective and sustainable services for victims through the submission of expert evidence to Government committees (which have led to the publication of reports that include state recommendations for policy and practice) and through membership on the following advisory boards: • House of Commons Committee on Standards in Public Life • House of Commons Women and Equalities Committee as part of a Commons Select Committee on hate crime and transphobia • House of Commons Select Committee inquiry and report into hate crime and its violent consequences • Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Constabulary (HMIC) inspection of police responses to hate crime • Republic of Turkey Ministry for EU Affairs roundtable on combat racial and religious intolerance • Law Commission inquiry into hate crime legislation in 2014 and 2019 • National Police Chiefs' Council Deaf and Disability Forum • Crown Prosecution Service's Expert Consultative Group • International Network for Hate Studies Advisory Board • Tell MAMA National Advisory Board Using the empirical evidence generated from the ESRC-funded research, we have developed world-leading continuing professional development (CPD) training on hate crime. Thus far we have delivered CPD training to more than 1500 professionals and policy-makers - both face to face and via our digital training platform - working in criminal justice, education, local authorities, and health and social care. This evidence-based training is designed to enhance practitioners' understanding of hate crime, and to provide them with the knowledge they need to improve reporting rates, victim satisfaction rates and conviction rates. Every single delegate who has attended the training has rated the CPD training in exclusively positive terms and has stated that the knowledge and skills learned from the training will benefit them individually as well as their organisation. We have also been commissioned by the University of Leicester to produce mandatory online training on discrimination, harassment and hate crime, which has been completed by over 4,000 members of staff; and by Leicestershire Partnership NHS Trust to produce 'Health and Hate Crime' training which has been completed by more than 5,800 frontline professionals. "Working with the Centre for Hate Studies has led to significant & positive cultural change in relation to staff training and the embedding of new systems approaches/processes to track & report hate incidents in NHS inpatient & outpatient healthcare settings. This in turn has ensured that we as a Trust are equipped to support the practical and psychological needs of both patients & staff who have been affected." Leon Herbert, Prevent and Hate Crime Lead, Leicestershire Partnership NHS Trust "The training delivered to our senior leaders and frontline officers was really effective and has certainly made an impact in terms of people's knowledge and understanding of such crimes. The force used the training as a starting point for the development of a new approach to hate crime." Suzette Davenport, Chief Constable, Gloucestershire Constabulary We have mobilized public awareness and engagement with our research by using a number of different approaches, including presentations at more than 200 different community groups and public events which have reached a combined audience of more than 6,500 people. We have also used social networking platforms as a tool to facilitate engagement with national and international audiences. For example, our Twitter feeds have been used to run digital awareness-raising campaigns such as 'Exposing Everyday Prejudice'. Twitter metrics show that Tweets issued as part of these campaigns reached a total of 30,079 accounts, with 10% of followers based outside of the UK within EU countries and the US, and audiences including policy-makers, practitioners, academics, community groups and the general public. We have taken part in more than 300 media engagements since the launch of the ESRC-funded research, including features on national and local radio, television, newspapers and online blog sites. We have also increased public awareness through the production of a short film, entitled The Harms of Hate, which included victim testimonies to illustrate the physical and emotional damage caused by acts of hate. In total, more than 600 DVD copies of the film have been distributed worldwide and the film has been viewed more than 14,900 times to date on YouTube. The Harms of Hate won 'Best Factual Programme' at the Royal Television Society Awards 2014, 'Special Jury Award' at the Learning On Screen Awards 2015, and an 'Award of Excellence' at the Canadian Shorts International Film Festival 2017. It has also been shown in schools, colleges and Universities, and used in training by criminal justice practitioners, educators and health care professionals around the world. More recently, the research team produced an animated film designed to highlight ways in which we can all support hate crime victims without putting ourselves at any risk. The animated film has been viewed more than 10,000 times on Twitter and Facebook. Collectively, these approaches to public engagement have led to a significant improvement in awareness of hate crime and of its impacts.
First Year Of Impact 2014
Sector Communities and Social Services/Policy,Education,Healthcare,Government, Democracy and Justice
Impact Types Cultural,Societal,Economic,Policy & public services

 
Description All Party Parliament Group on British Muslims
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Gave evidence to a government review
Impact To provide expert oral evidence which shapes the development of a new UK-wide working definition of Islamophobia
URL https://le.ac.uk/news/2018/june/leicester-criminologist-presents-evidence-to-the-all-party-parliamen...
 
Description All Party Parliament Group on Hate Crime inquiry into the impact of hate crime on community cohesion
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Gave evidence to a government review
Impact The APPG Inquiry aims to gather evidence of how hate speech and hate crime impact on communities, and to provide detailed recommendations on how community cohesion can be strengthened in the face of rising hate crime and hate speech.
URL http://www.appghatecrime.org/
 
Description All Party Parliament Group on Islamophobia
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Gave evidence to a government review
Impact The All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on British Muslims was established on 18 July 2017 to build on the work of the APPG on Islamophobia, of which many Members were active in, but with a wider remit to examine a broad range of issues that British Muslims care about, and are affected by. Its main aims are to inform Parliamentarians, policy makers and wider society by highlighting the aspirations and challenges of British Muslims; celebrating the contributions of Muslim communities to Britain; and investigating prejudice, discrimination and hatred against Muslims in the UK.
URL https://static1.squarespace.com/static/599c3d2febbd1a90cffdd8a9/t/5bfd1ea3352f531a6170ceee/154331510...
 
Description CPS hate crime External Consultative Group
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
Impact To provide hate crime advice and expertise from a voluntary agency and community perspective on the range of hate crime issues including equalities issues. To provide a consultative forum for the CPS on its hate crime strategy, action plans and associated documents (policies, guidance etc).
 
Description Citation in Law Commission Reports
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Citation in systematic reviews
Impact Cited in two Law Commission (2014) reports, 'Hate Crime: Should the Current Offences be Extended?' and 'Hate Crime: Analysis of Consultation Responses', which were the outcome of a year-long national consultation that produced new recommendations to Government regarding the efficacy of existing hate crime legislation.
URL http://lawcommission.justice.gov.uk/areas/hate_crime.htm
 
Description Citation in the Review of Under-Reporting in Shropshire (Shropshire)
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
Impact Fairness, Respect, Equality Shropshire Ltd (FREsh) undertook a scoping exercise to understand the barriers and challenges that victims face when reporting hate crimes. The findings from the Leicester Hate Crime Project were cited throughout the report and specifically, the recommendations were referred to. The final report from FREsh has been widely accessed by the Police and local authority within Shropshire and has therefore raised awareness and understanding of hate crime and of how policy and practice could be improved. It is anticipated that the findings from the Leicester Hate Crime Project, as cited in the report, will be used to improve accessibility of public services and improve the efficiency and effectiveness of public services. However, due to the report having only been published in January 2016, this impact has not been actualised yet.
 
Description Citation in the UK Government's Plan for Tackling Hate Crime
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
URL https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/543679/Action_Against_Hate...
 
Description Consulting with policy-makers to improve hate crime policies and practices
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
Impact Using the findings from the Leicester Hate Crime Project, the research team have worked with multiple organisations including Hertfordshire Police, Just Lincolnshire, Leicester County Council, Leicestershire NHS Trust, and Northamptonshire Police, to make improvements to their existing hate crime policies and practices. This has included modifying existing policies or developing new strategies that help to raise awareness of hate crime more effectively, to increase hate crime reporting rates, and to improve the support services offered to victims. The research team continue to work with these organisations to evaluate the success of these changes to policy and practice.
 
Description Crown Prosecution Service Expert Advisory Group on Transgender Equality
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description Delivery of evidence-based training to policy-makers and practitioners (Leicester)
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact Using the findings from the Leicester Hate Crime Project, the research team have designed and delivered Continuing Profession Development training on a number of themes, including 'Disability Hate Crime', 'Engaging with Diverse Communities', 'Homophobic and Transphobic Hate Crime' and 'Supporting Victims of Hate Crime'. To date, the research team have delivered approximately 15 workshops and training sessions. These have been attended by more than 100 policy-makers and professionals from the Crown Prosecution Service, Police, NHS and local authorities, as well as other organisations. Feedback from delegates demonstrated that they had developed a greater understanding of hate crime and more effective skills in supporting victims: • 100% of delegates have rated our workshops as 'Good' or 'Very Good'. • 100% of delegates have stated that attending our workshops will benefit them within their professional roles. • 100% of delegates have stated that attending our workshops will significantly benefit their organisation. Three month follow-up communication with delegates suggests that they now feel more competent in responding to hate crime and more equipped to offer specialist support to hate crime victims. The research team continue to deliver CPD workshops and bespoke training packages to frontline practitioners and policy-makers.
URL http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/criminology/hate/professional/cpd-workshops
 
Description Delivery of evidence-based training to policy-makers and practitioners (throughout the UK) (2)
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact Professor Chakraborti and Dr Hardy have developed world-leading Continuing Professional Development (CPD) training on hate crime. Since March 2016, they have delivered CPD training to more than 400 practitioners and policy-makers working in criminal justice, education, local authorities, and health and social care. Every single delegate who has attended the training has rated the CPD training as 'Good' or 'Very Good' and stated that the knowledge and skills learned from the training will benefit them individually as well as their organisation. "Working with the Centre for Hate Studies has led to a significant and positive cultural change in relation to staff training. This in turn has ensured that we as a Trust are better equipped to support the needs of both patients & staff who have been affected." Leon Herbert, Prevent and Hate Crime Lead, Leicestershire Partnership NHS Trust "The training delivered to our senior leaders and frontline officers was really effective and has certainly made an impact in terms of people's knowledge and understanding of such crimes." Suzette Davenport, Chief Constable, Gloucestershire Constabulary They have also used their expertise to shape attitudes towards hate crime and harassment within the University of Leicester by producing online training materials which have been embedded as part of the mandatory equality and diversity training that is to be completed by over 4,000 members of staff.
 
Description Derbsyhire Police Hate Crime Training
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact The training is designed to improve police officer understanding of the nature, extent and impact of hate crime so that they are better equipped to flag incidents as hate crime or cyber-enabled, to provide a more empathetic response, to signpost to support services in Derbyshire and nationally, and to ask victims whether they feel their victimisation is motivated by prejudice or hostility.
 
Description Derbsyhire Police Hate Crime Training
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact The training is designed to improve police officer understanding of the nature, extent and impact of hate crime so that they are better equipped to flag incidents as hate crime or cyber-enabled, to provide a more empathetic response, to signpost to support services in Derbyshire and nationally, and to ask victims whether they feel their victimisation is motivated by prejudice or hostility.
 
Description Derbsyhire Police Hate Crime Training
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact The training is designed to improve police officer understanding of the nature, extent and impact of hate crime so that they are better equipped to flag incidents as hate crime or cyber-enabled, to provide a more empathetic response, to signpost to support services in Derbyshire and nationally, and to ask victims whether they feel their victimisation is motivated by prejudice or hostility.
 
Description Derbsyhire Police Hate Crime Training
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact The training is designed to improve police officer understanding of the nature, extent and impact of hate crime so that they are better equipped to flag incidents as hate crime or cyber-enabled, to provide a more empathetic response, to signpost to support services in Derbyshire and nationally, and to ask victims whether they feel their victimisation is motivated by prejudice or hostility.
 
Description Derbyshire Police Hate Crime Training
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact The training is designed to improve police officer understanding of the nature, extent and impact of hate crime so that they are better equipped to flag incidents as hate crime or cyber-enabled, to provide a more empathetic response, to signpost to support services in Derbyshire and nationally, and to ask victims whether they feel their victimisation is motivated by prejudice or hostility.
 
Description Expert advice provided to Leicester City and Leicestershire County Council professionals - Disability Services
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Participation in advisory committee
Impact Participation in this regional advisory committee enabled the research team to use the project's findings to identify the types of policy and practice developments that would help improve access to support services for hate crime victims. Healthcare professional on this committee developed a greater understanding of the nature, extent and impact of hate crime and of the importance of providing effective support to disabled victims of hate crime. Therefore, the audience learnt new knowledge and skills which they could use within their own field of work to improve the services they offer to people with learning and/or physical disabilities and/or mental ill-health.
 
Description Expert advice provided to the Leicestershire Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Participation in advisory committee
Impact Participation in this regional advisory committee enabled the research team to use the project's findings to identify the types of policy and practice developments that would help to improve the quality of service offered to hate crime victims. Practitioners on this committee developed a greater understanding of the nature, extent and impact of hate crime and of the importance of supporting victims through the reporting process. Therefore, the audience learnt new knowledge and skills which they could use within their own field of work to improve the services they offer to victims of hate crime.
 
Description Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Constabularies and Fire and Rescue Services - Expert Reference Group for the Inspection on the Police Response to Hate Crime
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Constabularies and Fire and Rescue Services - Inspection on the Police Response to Hate Crime
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
URL https://www.justiceinspectorates.gov.uk/hmicfrs/publications/understanding-the-difference-the-initia...
 
Description Home Affairs Select Committee Inquiry on 'Hate crime and its violent consequences' (expert witness)
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Gave evidence to a government review
URL https://www2.le.ac.uk/news/blog/2018-archive/february/leicester-criminologist-to-give-expert-evidenc...
 
Description Invitation to be part of the National Police Chiefs' Council Deaf and Disability Forum
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
URL http://www.npcc.police.uk/
 
Description Invitation to give evidence to House of Commons Select Committee
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Gave evidence to a government review
Impact Professor Neil Chakraborti was invited to present expert evidence to a House of Commons Women and Equalities Committee as part of an inquiry into transgender equality. An evidence session was held at Parliament on 8 September where Professor Chakraborti was asked to draw from his research findings to discuss issues of hate crime and transphobia. This evidence is to be used to generate a set of national recommendations which address the discrimination and unfair treatment faced by many trans people in the context of their work, education, healthcare and other important services.
URL http://www.parliament.uk/business/committees/committees-a-z/commons-select/women-and-equalities-comm...
 
Description Invited to submit evidence to Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Constabulary (HMIC) inspection of police responses to hate crime
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Gave evidence to a government review
URL https://www.justiceinspectorates.gov.uk/hmic/wp-content/uploads/hmic-inspection-programme-consultati...
 
Description Invited to submit evidence to the House of Commons Select Committee inquiry into hate crime and its violent consequences
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Gave evidence to a government review
URL https://www.parliament.uk/business/committees/committees-a-z/commons-select/home-affairs-committee/i...
 
Description Nottinghamshire Police and Local Authority HC Training
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact The training is designed to improve frontline professionals (within Nottingham City Council and Nottinghamshire Police) understanding of the nature, extent and impact of hate crime, the barriers to reporting, the legislative framework and the support needs of victims. This new knowledge should lead to the design/development of new awareness-raising campaigns, to a better initial response in terms of flagging incidents of hate crime and to improve victim interaction in terms of explaining the criminal justice process to the victims they engage with.
 
Description Nottinghamshire Police and Local Authority HC Training
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact The training is designed to improve frontline professionals (within Nottingham City Council and Nottinghamshire Police) understanding of the nature, extent and impact of hate crime, the barriers to reporting, the legislative framework and the support needs of victims. This new knowledge should lead to the design/development of new awareness-raising campaigns, to a better initial response in terms of flagging incidents of hate crime and to improve victim interaction in terms of explaining the criminal justice process to the victims they engage with.
 
Description Participation in Law Commission consultation
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a national consultation
Impact The Law Commission's consultation pertained to the role and functioning of the specific hate crime legislation. The researchers on the Leicester Hate Crime Project submitted verbal and written evidence to this consultation, which resulted in the Law Commission making a number of recommendations in 2014 that are available at http://lawcommission.justice.gov.uk/areas/hate_crime.htm
URL http://lawcommission.justice.gov.uk/consultations/hate_crime.htm
 
Description Participation in an advisory committee led by Stop Hate UK
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in advisory committee
Impact The research team was invited to form part of an advisory committee focusing on the victimisation of people belonging to alternative subcultures. One of the outputs from the committee was a policy document which was designed to inform national policy and practice within this area.
 
Description Presentation on the policing of hate crime to Surrey Police
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact The audience consisted of a mix of academics and practitioners, including police officers with responsibility for policing diversity and hate crime. The talk raised awareness among officers of the issues concerning victims' views of the policing they receive, that the project uncovered in its qualitative and quantitative strands. This will feed into the practice of police officers both on the ground and in a more strategic position in Surrey, and will improve the quality of service received by victims.
 
Description Presentations at national and international conferences and universities
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact Over the duration of the project, the research team delivered a wide range of presentations at annual conferences, including the British Society of Criminology, the American Society of Criminology, the ESRC Research Methods Festival and the University of Surrey's Postgraduate conference (see 'Engagement Activities' for further detail). They also delivered multiple keynote speeches, guest lectures and research lunches at local, national and international universities. As a result of these engagements researchers, academics and practitioners developed a greater awareness of the nature, extent and impact of hate crime, a greater understanding of associated research methods and an enhanced knowledge of new ways of improving policy and practice. In summary, the audiences developed new knowledge and skills which could be applied within their own field of work or research.
 
Description Presentations to students and teachers in schools and colleges (Leicester)
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact The research team delivered multiple presentations to more than 750 young people and staff members at Gateway College, Leicester International College, Leicester College, New College, and through ESOL classes (English for Speakers of Other Languages) in the city of Leicester. Feedback from both the students and staff who observed the presentation demonstrated that the audiences had developed a greater understanding of the nature, extent and impact of hate crime, and of effective policy interventions.
 
Description Professional development workshop delivered to practitioners working in the field of LGBT hate crime
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact The workshop helped to identify the types of policy and practice that help to improve the quality of service offered to victims of homophobic and transphobic hate crime. The practitioners who attended this workshop developed a greater understanding of the nature, extent and impact of hate crime and of the importance of supporting victims through the reporting process. Therefore, the audience learnt new knowledge and skills which they could apply within their own field of work to improve the support they offer to victims of homophobic, biphobic and transphobic hate crime.
 
Description The Turkish Ministry for EU Affairs evidence gathering session on hate crime and Islamophobia across Europe
Geographic Reach Europe 
Policy Influence Type Gave evidence to a government review
URL https://www2.le.ac.uk/news/blog/2017-archive/september/leicester-criminologist-invited-to-provide-ex...
 
Description Contract Research for West Midlands Police and Crime Commissioner
Amount £22,756 (GBP)
Organisation West Midlands Police and Crime Commissioner 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2017 
End 04/2017
 
Description Contract Research for the Equality and Human Rights Commission
Amount £26,586 (GBP)
Organisation Equality and Human Rights Commission 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 12/2014 
End 03/2015
 
Description Contract Research for the Hertfordshire Police and Crime Commissioner
Amount £23,799 (GBP)
Organisation Police and Crime Commissioner for Hertfordshire 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 12/2015 
End 04/2016
 
Description Contract research for Amnesty International UK
Amount £22,420 (GBP)
Organisation Amnesty International 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2016 
End 02/2017
 
Title 'Soft Approach' to Accessing 'Hard-to-Reach' Communities 
Description So-called 'hard-to-reach' communities have proved very difficult for many research teams to access. This may be because these teams have tried to access them via 'traditional' methods such as utilising community leaders or those community 'representatives' that are routinely used by criminal justice agencies. This strategy can mean that the 'usual' voices are heard and that those of 'ordinary' members of the public are lost. To navigate around this problem, this project employed a 'softer', more subtle approach to locating and engaging with a wide range of diverse communities. This approach involved the research team spending prolonged periods of time in public spaces and buildings across the city, including international supermarkets, cafes and restaurants, charity shops, community and neighbourhood centres, libraries, health centres, places of worship, pubs and clubs, taxi ranks, and shelters and drug and alcohol services that support 'hard to reach' groups. Adopting this method enabled us to engage with over 4,000 members of established and emerging communities in order to raise awareness of the project itself, and to promote further recognition of the harms of hate and available pathways of support for victims. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2013 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact This method enabled the research team to engage with over 4,000 members of established and emerging minority communities in order to raise awareness of the project itself, which resulted in over 1,300 people from traditionally 'hard-to-reach' communities participating in the project. 
 
Title Personal and reflective researcher field diary observations 
Description The Lead Researcher kept a field-note diary throughout the research process. The diary was used to detail observations and informal conversations with community groups, participants and practitioners. These accounts not only added additional insight into the context and impact of victimisation, but also provided an intimate and reflexive account of the lead researcher's experiences and emotions when conducting this research. This was the first time that such a tool has been involved in hate crime research. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2013 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact Keeping a field-note diary enabled the lead researcher to be fully reflexive when conducting her research, both in terms of the ongoing development of the methods used in the research and also in helping the lead researcher to assess the emotional impact of the research upon herself. As the project progressed the lead researcher could refine the 'soft approach' adopted to access 'hard-to-reach' groups, thereby generating more respondents and interviewees. At the same time, the lead researcher could also use her notes to reflect on the impact of the research upon herself, thus safeguarding her own mental health. 
 
Title Qualitative Dataset 
Description This is a collection of transcripts from interviews with 374 victims. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact This substantial dataset has been interrogated using a variety of qualitative analytical techniques and the subsequent findings have been incorporated into the five briefing papers and Findings and Conclusions report, as well as (thus far) two academic papers. They also informed the Victims' Manifesto, a 10-point action plan, which practitioners and academics have been encouraged to sign up to and which are designed to improve service provision for victims. 
 
Title Quantitative Dataset 
Description This is a dataset of 1,106 separate records generated by the online and hardcopy questionnaire survey of victims. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact This substantial dataset has been interrogated via the statistical analysis software SPSS. The statistics generated have been incorporated into the five briefing papers and Findings and Conclusions report, as well as (thus far) two academic papers. They also informed the Victims' Manifesto, a 10-point action plan, which practitioners and academics have been encouraged to sign up to and which are designed to improve service provision for victims. 
 
Description Hate Crime and Health Working Group 
Organisation Leicestershire Partnership NHS Trust
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Neil Chakraborti was invited to be part of the Leicestershire Partnership NHS Trust 'Hate Crime and Health' Working Group and provided expert advice to the policy leads and practitioners through this partnership.
Collaborator Contribution Partners on this working group shared ideas for good practice and identified ways in which their organisation could adopt existing services to meet the needs of hate crime victims.
Impact As a result of this partnership, Neil Chakraborti has met with policy leads from the 'Hate Crime and Health' working group to discuss future research collaborations that will identify and evaluate a series of healthcare pathways for hate crime victims.
Start Year 2013
 
Description National Police Chiefs' Council Deaf and Disability Forum 
Organisation College of Policing
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Stevie-Jade Hardy has been invited to be part of the NPCC Deaf and Disability Forum, which aims: • To ensure that all deaf and disabled people have equality of access to policing services and the criminal justice system • To ensure that the individual needs of deaf and deaf and disabled people are met and that they experience equitable, fair and consistent treatment across England and Wales • To ensure that confidence and satisfaction rates for disabled people are not lower than for non-disabled people To date, Stevie has shared the findings from the Leicester Hate Crime Project with the Forum members, which includes national policing policy-makers and a range of third sector organisations. In particular, she provided empirically-based recommendations that identified ways in which the police can better support disabled victims of crime.
Collaborator Contribution Partners on the Forum have contributed knowledge of the barriers encountered by the police in delivering an effective and responsive service to disabled people. Those partners from third-sector organisations have shared a broad body of evidence relating to the challenges faced by their service users when engaging within the criminal justice system.
Impact As the forum has only met once, it is difficult at this point to list any outputs or outcomes. However, the objectives of the Forum are: • To increase police efficiency, effectiveness and legitimacy through the development and implementation of policy and good practice relating to the deaf and disabled community • To achieve standardisation of processes across the forces of England and Wales relating to the deaf and disabled community • To increase and promote stakeholder and practitioner engagement and ownership in the development of policy and procedure relating to the deaf and disabled community • To monitor and scrutinise the effectiveness of measures and policies relating to deaf and disability issues and in particular, disability hate crime • To provide a body of expertise and professional support on deaf and disability issues
Start Year 2015
 
Description Steering Group Partnership 
Organisation Leicester City Council
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The research team organised regular meetings with the steering group members to update them on the progress of the project and the implications of the research findings. The research team will continue to work with the individual organisations to help implement the recommendations produced as part of the Leicester Hate Crime Project.
Collaborator Contribution Members of the steering group provided valuable support and advice throughout the duration of the project.
Impact As a result of the steering group activity, Neil Chakraborti was invited to be part of the Leicestershire Partnership NHS Trust 'Hate Crime and Health' Working Group. In addition, members of the research team have been invited by the steering group members to present the findings and recommendations from the Leicester Hate Crime Project at a range of panels and committees, including the Leicester Hate Crime Scrutiny Panel, the Regional Police Hate Crime Working Group and the Local Criminal Justice Board (LCJB) Disproportionality Group.
Start Year 2012
 
Description Steering Group Partnership 
Organisation Leicester County Council
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The research team organised regular meetings with the steering group members to update them on the progress of the project and the implications of the research findings. The research team will continue to work with the individual organisations to help implement the recommendations produced as part of the Leicester Hate Crime Project.
Collaborator Contribution Members of the steering group provided valuable support and advice throughout the duration of the project.
Impact As a result of the steering group activity, Neil Chakraborti was invited to be part of the Leicestershire Partnership NHS Trust 'Hate Crime and Health' Working Group. In addition, members of the research team have been invited by the steering group members to present the findings and recommendations from the Leicester Hate Crime Project at a range of panels and committees, including the Leicester Hate Crime Scrutiny Panel, the Regional Police Hate Crime Working Group and the Local Criminal Justice Board (LCJB) Disproportionality Group.
Start Year 2012
 
Description Steering Group Partnership 
Organisation Leicestershire Partnership NHS Trust
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The research team organised regular meetings with the steering group members to update them on the progress of the project and the implications of the research findings. The research team will continue to work with the individual organisations to help implement the recommendations produced as part of the Leicester Hate Crime Project.
Collaborator Contribution Members of the steering group provided valuable support and advice throughout the duration of the project.
Impact As a result of the steering group activity, Neil Chakraborti was invited to be part of the Leicestershire Partnership NHS Trust 'Hate Crime and Health' Working Group. In addition, members of the research team have been invited by the steering group members to present the findings and recommendations from the Leicester Hate Crime Project at a range of panels and committees, including the Leicester Hate Crime Scrutiny Panel, the Regional Police Hate Crime Working Group and the Local Criminal Justice Board (LCJB) Disproportionality Group.
Start Year 2012
 
Description Steering Group Partnership 
Organisation Leicestershire Police
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The research team organised regular meetings with the steering group members to update them on the progress of the project and the implications of the research findings. The research team will continue to work with the individual organisations to help implement the recommendations produced as part of the Leicester Hate Crime Project.
Collaborator Contribution Members of the steering group provided valuable support and advice throughout the duration of the project.
Impact As a result of the steering group activity, Neil Chakraborti was invited to be part of the Leicestershire Partnership NHS Trust 'Hate Crime and Health' Working Group. In addition, members of the research team have been invited by the steering group members to present the findings and recommendations from the Leicester Hate Crime Project at a range of panels and committees, including the Leicester Hate Crime Scrutiny Panel, the Regional Police Hate Crime Working Group and the Local Criminal Justice Board (LCJB) Disproportionality Group.
Start Year 2012
 
Description Steering Group Partnership 
Organisation Victim Support
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The research team organised regular meetings with the steering group members to update them on the progress of the project and the implications of the research findings. The research team will continue to work with the individual organisations to help implement the recommendations produced as part of the Leicester Hate Crime Project.
Collaborator Contribution Members of the steering group provided valuable support and advice throughout the duration of the project.
Impact As a result of the steering group activity, Neil Chakraborti was invited to be part of the Leicestershire Partnership NHS Trust 'Hate Crime and Health' Working Group. In addition, members of the research team have been invited by the steering group members to present the findings and recommendations from the Leicester Hate Crime Project at a range of panels and committees, including the Leicester Hate Crime Scrutiny Panel, the Regional Police Hate Crime Working Group and the Local Criminal Justice Board (LCJB) Disproportionality Group.
Start Year 2012
 
Description Surrey-Sussex Hate Crime Partnership 
Organisation HM Prison Service
Department HM Prison Send
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution This partnership came directly out of the success of the one that formed the Steering Group of the Leicester Hate Crime Project. Jon Garland instigated the partnership and co-ordinates its activities.
Collaborator Contribution The partners have input into the partnership's working and direction. They participate fully in the sharing of best practice in the network.
Impact As this partnership has only just been initiated there are currently no outputs as yet.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Surrey-Sussex Hate Crime Partnership 
Organisation Surrey Police
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution This partnership came directly out of the success of the one that formed the Steering Group of the Leicester Hate Crime Project. Jon Garland instigated the partnership and co-ordinates its activities.
Collaborator Contribution The partners have input into the partnership's working and direction. They participate fully in the sharing of best practice in the network.
Impact As this partnership has only just been initiated there are currently no outputs as yet.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Surrey-Sussex Hate Crime Partnership 
Organisation Sussex Police
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution This partnership came directly out of the success of the one that formed the Steering Group of the Leicester Hate Crime Project. Jon Garland instigated the partnership and co-ordinates its activities.
Collaborator Contribution The partners have input into the partnership's working and direction. They participate fully in the sharing of best practice in the network.
Impact As this partnership has only just been initiated there are currently no outputs as yet.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Surrey-Sussex Hate Crime Partnership 
Organisation Victim Support
Department Victim Support, West Sussex
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution This partnership came directly out of the success of the one that formed the Steering Group of the Leicester Hate Crime Project. Jon Garland instigated the partnership and co-ordinates its activities.
Collaborator Contribution The partners have input into the partnership's working and direction. They participate fully in the sharing of best practice in the network.
Impact As this partnership has only just been initiated there are currently no outputs as yet.
Start Year 2014
 
Title Digital training on hate crime 
Description There is growing evidence to show that levels of hate and extremism are rising across the UK and beyond, causing devastation to victims and their families and spreading mistrust within communities. Within a climate of heightened tensions and widening divisions, it is imperative that organisations across different sectors deliver effective, evidence-based responses to victims, perpetrators and wider communities. The Centre for Hate Studies has developed a suite of digital training units that equip practitioners with the knowledge to develop sustainable responses to hate and extremism. The training has been developed by world-leading hate crime experts, offers evidence-based guidance drawn from contemporary research from across the world, and includes real life case studies and good practice recommendations. 
Type Of Technology Webtool/Application 
Year Produced 2018 
Open Source License? Yes  
Impact Self-completion feedback forms illustrate that those who take the training have improved their awareness of hate crime, have developed new awareness-raising campaigns and reporting mechanisms, and feel more able to identify and 'flag' hate crimes and complete more robust risk assessments. 
URL https://le.ac.uk/hate-studies/training
 
Description #Call It Out Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Dr Stevie-Jade Hardy was invited to take part in a panel presentation at the Call It Out conference which was organised by Pride in Football. Drawing upon the findings from the Leicester Hate Crime Project, Dr Hardy spoke about the barriers that LGB&T victims face in reporting their experiences of hate crime to the police, which led to a lively question and answer session.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description 25 Years of Responding to Hate Crime: Genuine Progress or More Empty Promises? 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Prof Neil Chakraborti drew upon the research findings and recommendations from the Leicester Hate Crime Project to deliver a presentation at a seminar organised by the University of Portsmouth. The presentation was delivered to an audience of more than 30 students, academics, practitioners and members of the public and it was followed by a lively question and answer session.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description All Souls College Seminar Series 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Prof Neil Chakraborti was invited to present the research findings and recommendations from the Leicester Hate Crime Project at the University of Cambridge's All Souls Seminar Series. The seminar was attended by more than 40 academics, postgraduate and undergraduate students and professional practitioners. The presentation was designed to improve awareness of hate crime and the barriers that victims face in accessing justice and support, and it was followed by a question and answer session.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Amnesty International UK Annual Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Supporters
Results and Impact Dr Stevie-Jade Hardy was invited to participate in a panel presentation at the annual Amnesty International UK Members Conference. During the presentation, she highlighted key findings and recommendations from the Leicester Hate Crime Project which led to a number of requests for further information and media enquiries.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Article for Al Jazeera website, 'Half of UK sees The Sun tabloid as 'negative influence'' 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Dr Stevie-Jade Hardy was contacted by Al Jazeera to comment on recent research which suggested that tabloid media was fuelling hostility towards certain groups of others. Within the article - which was published on the 18th December 2017 - Dr Hardy drew upon research evidence from the Leicester Hate Crime Project to provide expert commentary. The intended purpose was to raise awareness of hate crime and to provide recommendations for a more responsible discussion about immigration.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.aljazeera.com/news/2017/12/uk-sees-sun-tabloid-negative-influence-171218085740939.html
 
Description Conference presentation at University of Birmingham (Birmingham) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact 30 academics and practitioners from a range of different fields listened to a presentation delivered by Stevie-Jade Hardy about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and learnt about the study's aims, methods and emerging findings.

During the discussion which took place after the presentation, members of the audience remarked on having developed a better understanding of the Leicester Hate Crime Project as a result of this engagement activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Delivering Continuing Professional Development (CPD) hate crime training to practitioners and policy-makers 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Professor Neil Chakraborti and Dr Stevie-Jade Hardy used the findings from the Leicester Hate Crime Project to develop and deliver continuing professional development (CPD) training on a range of different themes, including 'Disability Hate Crime', 'Homophobic and Transphobic Hate Crime', 'Supporting Victims of Hate Crime', and 'Engaging with Diverse Communities'. To date, more than 300 practitioners and policy-makers from the police, Crown Prosecution Service (CPS), local authority and NHS have attended the in-house workshops or bespoke training sessions. Delegates learnt about the nature, extent and impact of hate crime, and received best practice guidance on supporting victims of hate crime.

The research team have delivered training to practitioners and policy-makers from a range of different organisations. Delegate feedback demonstrated that attending the training had enhanced their knowledge of hate crime and developed their skills in providing support to victims. Further feedback suggested that as a result of the training, delegates were considering how they could improve policy and practice within their own organisation to ensure that they are providing effective and sustainable services.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Delivering Continuing Professional Development (CPD) hate crime training to practitioners and policy-makers (2) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact September 2015 - March 2016

Professor Neil Chakraborti and Dr Stevie-Jade Hardy delivered further continuing professional development (CPD) training on 'Engaging with Diverse Communities' and 'Perpetrators of Hate' to practitioners from the police, Crown Prosecution Service (CPS), local authority and NHS and other third sector organisations.

The workshops were delivered either in-house at the University of Leicester or within the organisation. Delegates learnt about the nature, extent and impact of hate crime, and received good practice guidance on how best to support victims of hate crime. Feedback on the day demonstrates that delegates felt that attending the training and developing a greater awareness of hate crime will better equip them and their organisation to support victims.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Event with Stop Hate UK (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact 20 members of the public and 6 staff members from Stop Hate UK and the Sophie Lancaster Foundation observed a presentation about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and learnt about how they could get involved in the research. The talk led to a lively questions and discussion session afterwards.

As a result of this activity, members of the public remarked on having developed a greater awareness of what a hate crime is, whom they could report to and how they could access support. In addition, the research team noted an increase in research participation through interviews and questionnaire completions as a result of this engagement activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Guest lecture at the University of Cambridge 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Professor Neil Chakraborti was invited to deliver a guest lecture at the University of Cambridge. His talk focused on the gaps between academic research, professional practice and the 'real world', and he drew upon the findings from the Leicester Hate Crime Project to illustrate these disconnects. The lecture was delivered to an audience of more than 30 students, academics, practitioners and members of the public and it was followed by a lively question and answer session.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Guest lecture at the University of Cambridge's Seminar Series (Cambridge) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact Professor Neil Chakraborti was invited to deliver a guest lecture at the University of Cambridge. His talk focused on the gaps between academic research, professional practice and the 'real world', and he drew upon the findings from the Leicester Hate Crime Project to illustrate these disconnects. The lecture was delivered to an audience of more than 30 students, academics, practitioners and members of the public. Audience members reported having developed a more comprehensive understanding of how academics, practitioners and policy-makers can respond more effectively to hate crime.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Guest lecture at the University of East London's Seminar Series (London) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Professor Neil Chakraborti was invited to deliver a guest lecture at the University of East London's Seminar Series, which was attended by more than 30 students, academics, practitioners and members of the public. The talk, which focused on the gaps between academic research, professional practice and the 'real world', enhanced the audience's knowledge of the Leicester Hate Crime Project and led to an increase in people accessing the research reports from our website.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Guest lecture at the University of Roehampton (London) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact Dr Stevie-Jade Hardy was invited to deliver a presentation at the University of Roehampton's Seminar Series, which was entitled 'Exploring the nature, extent and impact of post-Brexit hate crime'. Within the talk, which was delivered to more than 35 undergraduate and postgraduate students, she drew upon findings from the Leicester Hate Crime Project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Interview for a film - 'Hide and Tweet' (Surrey) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A group of young people approached Jon Garland about being involved in making a short film - 'Hide and Tweet' - which was funded by the British Council. Jon Garland was interviewed about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and the film was screened at the New Voices Festival in London. As a result the underlying themes and goals of the project were shared with a wider audience.


The young people who produced the film remarked on it being well received and stated that the project's input was helpful in this endeavour.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
URL http://newvoicesfestival.org.uk/
 
Description Issuing a press release about the Leicester Centre for Hate Studies 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Neil Chakraborti issue a press release about the launch of the Leicester Centre for Hate Studies on the 3rd February 2014. The Centre is a 'spin-out' from the Leicester Hate Crime Project (more information is provided within the 'Spin Out' section). The press released referred to the Leicester Hate Crime Project and enabled the general public to learn about the project's aims and emerging findings.


As a result of this press release the research team noted an increase in public interest about the project, as well as heightened interest from voluntary and statutory organisations.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www2.le.ac.uk/offices/press/press-releases/2014/february/university-of-leicester-launches-new...
 
Description Keynote speaker at Brent City Council's Conference (London) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Stevie-Jade Hardy was invited to deliver a keynote speech at Brent City Council's conference 'It's Time to Talk'. Her presentation, which was entitled 'Hate Crime: Definitions, Causes and Impacts', drew upon the findings and recommendations from the Leicester Hate Crime Project. The presentation was delivered to members of the public, practitioners and policy-makers and led to a significant number of individuals requesting further information about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and access to the research reports.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Keynote speaker at Victim Support's Annual South West Conference (Bristol) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Stevie-Jade Hardy was a keynote speaker at Victim Support's Annual South West Conference, which was attended by more than 40 policy-makers and practitioners who work for the charity. Her talk, entitled 'Hard to Reach or Easy to Ignore: Engaging with Diverse Communities', helped audience members to develop understanding of diverse communities and strategies to overcome the barriers they encounter when trying to engage with such populations.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Keynote speaker at an International Women's Day Event (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Using the findings from the Leicester Hate Crime Project, Dr Stevie-Jade Hardy delivered a presentation entitled 'Hate Crime: Impact, Causes and Responses'. The audience, which was made up of more than 175 women from minority ethnic and faith communities, learnt about the study's aims, methods and key findings. The presentation led to a lively question and answer session. Feedback from the event suggested that the talk enhanced delegates understanding of hate crime, of where people can report, and of what support is available to hate crime victims.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Keynote speaker at an international criminal justice conference (University of Oxford) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Professor Neil Chakraborti was a keynote speaker at an international 3 day conference entitled 'Justice and Penal Reform: Re-Shaping the Penal Landscape', held on 17-19 March at the University of Oxford. His plenary lecture ('Marginalising the Marginalised? Recognising Victims of Hate and their Perceptions of Harm, Vulnerability and [In]Justice') included findings and conclusions from the ESRC-funded Leicester Hate Crime Project. The lecture was delivered to an audience of more than 100 conference delegates and was live-streamed via the Internet to a wider audience of international scholars, practitioners and third sector professionals.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.howardleague.org/justice-and-penal-reform/
 
Description Lecture to prospective students at the University of Leicester (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact 70 potential students and their parents observed a lecture delivered by Stevie-Jade Hardy and learnt about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and the value of academic research. The presentation led to a lively questions and discussion afterwards.


Feedback from students after the lecture demonstrated that they had developed a greater awareness of what a hate crime was, how it affects victims and why it is important to report such experiences.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Media Engagement Activities (Blogs) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact The general public, academics, policy leads and practitioners learnt about the Leicester Hate Crime Project through a series of blogs written by Stevie-Jade Hardy, Neil Chakraborti and Jon Garland:

International Network for Hate Studies - Hate Crime HurtsSo Does Our Culture of Denial and Defensiveness
International Network for Hate Studies - The Human Costs of Hate Crime: Reflections of a Researcher
Department of Sociology, University of Surrey - Hate Crime Victimisation Study Uncovers the True Harms of Hate
International Network for Hate Studies - Who Perpetrates Hate? Findings from a Large-Scale Hate Crime Study
Policy Press - A Missed Opportunity: Why the Law Commission Got It Wrong on Hate Crime

The research team noted an increase in requests for further information as a result of these media engagements.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.internationalhatestudies.com/blog/
 
Description Media Engagement Activities (No.1) Leicester 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact The general public heard about the Leicester Hate Crime Project through a series of newspaper articles and radio interviews with the project team and learnt about how they could take part in the study.

October 2012-February 2013:
BBC Radio Leicester - Neil Chakraborti interviewed by Jonathan Lampon
BBC Radio Leicester - Neil Chakraborti interviewed on the Dulcie Dixon Show
The Voice of Russia - Phone interview with Neil Chakraborti
Leading Britain's Conversation (LBC) - Neil Chakraborti interviewed by Nick Ferrari

The research team noted an increase in public interest about the project (and in particular, interest from victims of hate crime seeking to take part in the research) as a result of these engagement activities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012,2013
 
Description Media Engagement Activities (No.2) Leicester 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact The general public learnt about the Leicester Hate Crime Project through various media activities involving the project team.

September to November 2013:
BBC Radio Leicester - Interview with Neil Chakraborti on the Rupal Rajani Show
BBC One East Midlands News - TV interview with Neil Chakraborti
BBC News - Website article
Inside Out East Midlands - TV interview with Neil Chakraborti and participants from the study


The research team noted an increase in public interest about the project (and in particular, interest from victims of hate crime seeking to take part in the research) as a result of this media activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
URL http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-leicestershire-23978511
 
Description Media Engagement Activities (No.3) Leicester 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact The general public heard about the Leicester Hate Crime Project through a series of newspaper articles, and TV and radio interviews with the project team and learnt about how they could take part in the study.

December 2013-April 2014

Able Magazine - Phone interview with Neil Chakraborti
BBC Radio Leicester - Live radio interview with Stevie-Jade Hardy on the Rupal Rajani show
Capital FM - Phone interview with Neil Chakraborti
Criminology in Focus (Departmental newsletter, University of Leicester) - Face to face interview with Neil Chakraborti
Daily Record - Phone interview with Neil Chakraborti
ESRC - The ESRC ran a feature about the Leicester Hate Crime Project on their website
ITV Central News - TV interview with Stevie-Jade Hardy and participants from the study
Leicester Mercury - First Person commentary piece written by Neil Chakraborti
Leicester Mercury - Phone interview with Neil Chakraborti
Leicester Mercury - Phone interview with Neil Chakraborti
LE1 (University of Leicester's magazine) - First Person commentary piece written by Neil Chakraborti
Sunday Mail - Phone interview with Neil Chakraborti
University of Leicester - The University of Leicester ran a feature entitled, 'Leading Social Science Research Anticipates the Future' in which the Head of the College of Social Science, Professor Steve King, referred to the project as 'innovative'

*The majority of these media engagements have a URL which relates to this activity and therefore, are still available to view by the public.



The research team noted a significant increase in public interest about the project, as well as heightened interest from voluntary and statutory organisations, as a result of these engagement activities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
URL http://www.leicestermercury.co.uk/University-Leicester-academics-launch-centre/story-20713571-detail...
 
Description Media Engagement Activities (No.4) Leicester 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact The general public learnt about the findings and recommendations of the Leicester Hate Crime Project through newspaper and online articles and through TV and radio interviews with the project team.

September - October 2014:
Leading Britain's Conversation - Radio interview with Neil Chakraborti
BBC East Midlands News - TV interview with Neil Chakraborti
ITV Central News East and West Midlands - TV interview with Stevie-Jade Hardy
BBC Radio Leicester - Radio interview with Stevie-Jade Hardy
University of Leicester's 'Criminology in Focus' magazine - An 'in-conversation' piece with Neil Chakraborti and Stevie-Jade Hardy
Sky News - TV interview and website article with Neil Chakraborti

Hard-copy and online articles:
ITV News
Sky News
BBC News Leicester
Leicester Mercury
Yahoo! News
Hartlepool Mail
Hemsworth and South Emsall Express
Leigh Journal
Surrey Comet
Milford & West Wales Mercury
Wirral Globe
Bury Times
Dudley News
Chelmsford Weekly News
Brentwood Weekly News
Penarth Times
Stourbridge News
Hereford Times
Belfast Telegraph
Pukaar News
University of Leicester - News and Events


The research team noted an increase in requests for further information and access to the project's reports from the general public, practitioners and policy leads.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Media Engagement Activities (No.5) (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Since the conclusion of the research, the general public has continued to hear about the Leicester Hate Crime Project, as well as our short film entitled 'The Harms of Hate', through a series of TV and radio interviews with the project team.

October 2014-August 2015
Action Media Kernow - Film interview with Stevie-Jade Hardy
BBC News - TV interview with Stevie-Jade Hardy
BBC East Midlands - TV interview with Stevie-Jade Hardy
BBC World Service - TV interview with Stevie-Jade Hardy
BBC Radio Leicester - Radio interview with Stevie-Jade Hardy
BBC Radio Leicester - Radio interview with Stevie-Jade Hardy
BBC Radio Northampton - Radio interview with Stevie-Jade Hardy
BBC Radio Three Counties - Radio interview with Stevie-Jade Hardy
Capital FM - Radio interview with Stevie-Jade Hardy
ITV Central News East and West Midlands - TV interview with Stevie-Jade Hardy
ITV Central News East and West Midlands (Fixers Special Report) - TV interview with Stevie-Jade Hardy
Smooth Radio - Radio interview with Stevie-Jade Hardy
University of Leicester's LE1 magazine - Interview with Neil Chakraborti
University of Leicester Talking Points - Blog by Stevie-Jade Hardy and Neil Chakraborti
University of Leicester press release - Interview with Neil Chakraborti and Stevie-Jade Hardy

The research team also continue to use social media platforms to disseminate the research findings, including Twitter (1,048 followers), Facebook (100 likes) and YouTube (4,600 views).

As a result of these engagement activities we noted an increase in public enquiries about the project, as well as an increase in requests to meet with the research team to discuss the research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Media Engagement Activities (No.6) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact The general public learnt about the findings and recommendations of the Leicester Hate Crime Project through newspaper and online articles and through TV and radio interviews with the project team.

September 2015-March 2016:
The Guardian - Interview with Neil Chakraborti (http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2015/nov/13/how-do-i-respond-racial-abuse-public-transport-onlookers-silent)
The Guardian - Interview with Neil Chakraborti (http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2015/nov/20/how-do-i-live-in-the-shadow-of-terrorism)
Planet Transgender - Interview with Neil Chakraborti (http://planettransgender.com/trans-inquiry-transgender-hate-crime-with-professor-neil-chakraborti/)
ITV Central news - TV interview with Stevie-Jade Hardy
BBC Radio Leicester - Radio interview with Neil Chakraborti
Stonewall - Live Twitter Chat involving Stevie-Jade Hardy
The University of Leicester - Stevie-Jade Hardy and Neil Chakraborti were both interviewed for a film as part of the University of Leicester's 'HeforShe' campaign

The research team also ran a week-long twitter campaign as part of 'Hate Crime Awareness Week' (12 Oct - 18 Oct 2015). During that week we tweeted findings from the Leicester Hate Crime Recommendations which included links to our reports. Twitter metrics illustrated that the campaign reached the feeds of more than 2,000 people locally, nationally and internationally. Followers were able to ask the research team questions about the project, and were directed to our website to find out further information.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Media Engagement Activities (No.7) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The general public learnt about the findings and recommendations of the Leicester Hate Crime Project through newspaper and online articles and through TV and radio interviews with the project team.
April 2016 - February 2017:

Radio 5 Live - Prof Neil Chakraborti
BBC News (online) - Dr Stevie-Jade Hardy - http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-36964916
Crimewatch UK (Television) - Dr Stevie-Jade Hardy
ProPublica (online) - Prof Neil Chakraborti - https://www.propublica.org/article/an-ocean-apart-but-united-in-concerns-about-hate-crimes
The Guardian (online) - Prof Neil Chakraborti - https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/jan/23/uk-media-misrepresents-muslims-islam-prejudice-press
Points West BBC News (Television) - Dr Stevie-Jade Hardy
Hertfordshire Police and Crime Commissioner (online) - Dr Stevie-Jade Hardy - http://www.hertscommissioner.org/2016-07-commissioner-issues-call-to-action-for-hate-crime-in-herts
University of Leicester (online) - Prof Neil Chakraborti and Dr Stevie-Jade Hardy - http://www2.le.ac.uk/offices/press/press-releases/2016/june/politicians-and-media-fuel-hate-crime-in-britain-2019-say-university-of-leicester-experts
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016,2017
 
Description Panel member at the screening of a hate crime film (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Stevie-Jade Hardy took part in a panel discussion after the first screening of 'Black Roses: The Killing of Sophie Lancaster'. The audience was made up of more than 100 people, including police officers, health and social care staff, council workers, as well as the general public. They learnt about the aims, findings and recommendations of the Leicester Hate Crime Project.

Feedback from the audience demonstrated that they had developed a greater understanding of the different forms that hate crime took and of who can be affected by it. This activity also led to an increase in enquiries for further information about the research and meeting requests with the research team.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www2.le.ac.uk/offices/press/press-releases/2015/may/pcc-funded-event-aims-to-help-stamp-out-h...
 
Description Presentation at De Montfort University (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact Stevie-Jade Hardy delivered a presentation about the Leicester Hate Crime Project at the 'Fresher's Fair' at De Montfort University. She spoke with approximately 25 different societies and 70 students to tell them about why the research was relevant to them and how they could take part in the study.

This audience noted that as a result of the presentation they had developed an increased understanding of what a hate crime was and whom they could report to. After this engagement activity the research team also noted an increase in requests for further information and further participation from students.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation at Ellesmere College (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact 12 pupils with general learning difficulties and 3 staff members observed a presentation about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and learnt about how they could take part in the study. After the presentation a lively and informative discussion took place between the students and the research team.

A school asked the research team to deliver a presentation focusing on the Leicester Hate Crime Project and after the event reported that pupils demonstrated greater awareness of what a hate crime was and why it is important to share their experiences. In addition, the research team noted that more pupils wanted to take part in the research as a result of the engagement activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation at Gloucestershire Constabulary's Strategy Launch Event (Gloucester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Using the findings from the Leicester Hate Crime Project, Dr Stevie-Jade Hardy delivered a presentation entitled 'Understanding and Tackling Hate Crime'. The audience of more than 100 policy-makers, practitioners, media outlets, and members of the public students learnt about the study's aims, methods and key findings. On request, every member of the audience was sent a link to the research reports so that they could find out further information about the project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Presentation at Gypsy and Traveller Equality (GATE) for Roma History Day (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Over 60 people from Gypsy and Traveller communities, organisations in Leicester and the general public listened to a presentation about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and how the research was relevant to them. The presentation resulted in an engaging questions and discussion session.

Those in attendance said that they had developed an increased awareness of what hate crimes are and how they could take part in the research. As a result of this presentation, the research team were introduced to a range of practitioners from different organisations which led to future collaborative activities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation at the African Caribbean Centre (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Elderly African women who experience mental ill-health listened to a presentation delivered by Jon Garland about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and learnt about why the project was relevant to them. The talk led to an engaging discussion about the group's experiences of hate crime.

Group members reported having developed a greater appreciation of why it was important to share their experiences of hate crime with the relevant organisation, as a consequence of the presentation. The research team noted that group were more willing to take part in a focus group as a result of this engagement activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation at the Anti-Muslim Hate Crime Symposium (Cambridge) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Using the findings from the Leicester Hate Crime Project, Stevie-Jade Hardy delivered a presentation entitled 'Hearing Hidden Voices: Exploring Anti-Muslim Hate Crime'. The audience of more than 30 policy-makers, practitioners and academics learnt about the study's aims, methods and key findings. The presentation led to a lively question and answer session.

Stevie-Jade Hardy was invited to deliver a presentation about the study's findings of anti-Muslim hate crime and the implications for policy and practice. Attendees of the symposium reported having developed a greater awareness of the nature, extent and impact of anti-Muslim hate crime. Feedback from the group also demonstrated that as a result of the presentation, delegates were going to pledge support to the recommendations outlined within the Victims' Manifesto.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Presentation at the City of Sanctuary (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact 20 asylum seekers and refugees and four voluntary staff members from the City of Sanctuary (an organisation which supports asylum seekers and refugees) attended a talk delivered by the research team which focused on the Leicester Hate Crime Project. The talk was followed by an engaging discussion based on the group's experiences of hate crime victimisation.

Feedback from the group highlighted that as a result of the talk both staff and service users had developed a greater awareness of what a hate crime is, whom they could report to and how they could access support. Furthermore, the research team noted that this engagement activity led to an increase in survey completion from asylum seekers and refugees (a group often considered 'hard to reach').
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation at the Combatting Hate Crime Conference (London) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Using the findings from the Leicester Hate Crime Project, Stevie-Jade Hardy delivered a presentation entitled 'Identifying the Barriers and Solutions to Hate Crime Reporting'. The audience of more than 100 policy-makers, practitioners, academics and students learnt about the study's aims, methods and key findings. The presentation led to a lively question and answer session, and Stevie-Jade Hardy was asked about where delegates could find out further information about the project and access the research reports.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2006
 
Description Presentation at the Foundation Errinerung, Verantwortung, Zukunft (EVZ) (Berlin, Germany) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Neil Chakraborti spoke about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and provided expert guidance for European policy-makers, professionals and NGOs at a workshop organised by the Foundation EVZ in Berlin, Germany, 2-3 September 2013. This generated a lively debate and discussion focusing on the needs of hate crime victims.

Participants at this workshop noted that they had a developed a better understanding of hate crime victimisation and associated policy implications as a result of this engagement activity. In addition, feedback from policy-makers and professionals in attendance indicated that they had developed a greater awareness of the nature, extent and impact of hate crime and were going to consider the project's implications for their own organisation.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation at the Gloucestershire Hate Crime Partnership Launch Event (Gloucester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Using the findings from the Leicester Hate Crime Project, Stevie-Jade Hardy delivered a presentation entitled 'Identifying the Barriers and Solutions to Hate Crime Reporting'. The audience of more than 100 policy-makers, practitioners and members of the public learnt about the study's aims, methods and key findings. The presentation led to a question and answer session, and Stevie-Jade Hardy was asked about where delegates could find out further information about the project and access the research reports.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Presentation at the Hate Crime Summit (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact More than 80 young people, teachers, carers and support workers listened to Stevie-Jade Hardy deliver a presentation about the Leicester Hate Crime Project. The audience learnt about the aims, methods, findings and recommendations of study. The presentation led to a lively question and answer session.

Stevie-Jade Hardy delivered a presentation and took part in a question and answer session at the Hate Crime Summit organised by Leicestershire County Council. Feedback from both the young people and staff who observed the presentation demonstrated that the audience had developed a greater understanding of the nature, extent and impact of hate crime. The talk also led to an increase in enquiries about the research and to an increase in meeting requests with the research team.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Presentation at the Highfields Area Forum (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Eight members of a community forum, which included three councillors and a representative from a local housing association, attended a talk by Stevie-Jade Hardy about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and learnt about why it was important for the community in their area.

Leicester 25th March 2013.

The forum members stated that as a result of the presentation they had developed a better awareness of the effects of hate crime and were more enthusiastic about promoting the Leicester Hate Crime Project to community members within the area.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation at the Institute for Public Safety, Crime and Policing (University of Northampton) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact More than 60 students, academics and practitioners from a range of different fields attended a presentation entitled 'Difference, Vulnerability and Prejudice: Key Findings from the Leicester Hate Crime Project', delivered by Jon Garland. The audience learnt about the project's aims, methods and key findings. The presentation led to an engaging debate about the implications of this research.

The audience reported that as a result of these presentations they had developed a better understanding of the research, and of the underlying causes and impacts of hate crime.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Presentation at the Loughborough Road Hostel (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Stevie-Jade Hardy delivered a presentation about the research to approximately 12 homeless people at the Loughborough Road Hostel. The audience learnt about the aims, methods and emerging findings of the project and how they could take part in it.

After the presentation the audience remarked on having never heard of the term 'hate crime' before the talk but as a result of engagement activity, they had developed a greater awareness of what a hate crime was and where they could report to. As a result of this engagement activity, the research team were invited back to conduct individual interviews with homeless people.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation at the Partnership Event hosted by Leicester NHS Partership Trust (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact More than 100 practitioners and policy-makers from Leicestershire NHS Partnership Trust listened to a presentation on the Leicester Hate Crime Project delivered by Stevie-Jade Hardy. The audience learnt about the aims, methods, findings and recommendations of study. The presentations led to an in-depth round table discussion about the implications of this research for their own role.

The research team were invited to deliver a presentation about the project findings and its implications at a partnership event hosted by Leicestershire NHS Partnership Trust. Feedback from the round table discussion demonstrated that as a result of the presentation attendees had developed a greater understanding of the nature, extent and impact of hate crime, and that they intended to find out more information about the ways in which they could improve the services they offer.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Presentation at the Polish Community Centre (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact 20 people of Polish descent listened to a talk by Stevie-Jade Hardy about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and learnt about why the study was relevant to their community. The presentation led to an in-depth discussion about the group's experience of living in Leicester and their experiences of hate crime.


As a result of the presentation, the research team developed a greater understanding of the Polish community in Leicester and in particular, some of the tensions that exist. In addition, members of the audience agreed to take part in the study through interviews as a direct result of this engagement activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation at the Refugee/Asylum Seeker Job Club (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact 12 asylum seekers and refugees listened to a presentation delivered by Stevie-Jade Hardy about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and learnt about how the research was relevant to them.

After the presentation the audience remarked on having never heard of the term 'hate crime' before the talk but as a result of engagement activity, they had developed a greater awareness of what a hate crime was and whom they could report to. The research team also noted that they had developed a better understanding of what barriers refugees and asylum seekers face when thinking of reporting their experiences of hate crime.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation at the ShOUT conference hosted by Leicestershire Fire and Rescue (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Over 80 practitioners from Leicestershire Fire and Rescue, Nottinghamshire Fire and Rescue, and Derbyshire Fire and Rescue listened to Stevie-Jade Hardy deliver a presentation about the Leicester Hate Crime Project. The audience learnt about the aims, methods, findings and recommendations of study. The presentations led to an in-depth discussion about the implications of this research for their own organisation.

The conference delegates reported having developed a greater awareness of the nature, extent and impact of hate crime victimisation as a result of this activity. Feedback from the group also demonstrated that after the event delegates were going to consider how they could implement the recommendations within their own organisation/community group.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Presentation at the Somali Development Service (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Somalian community members and the Member of Parliament for Leicester South listened to a talk by Stevie-Jade Hardy about the Leicester Hate Crime Project. The presentation generated an interesting and lively discussion about hate crime experiences in Leicester.

As a result of this activity several members of the Somali community indicated that they would like to take part in the study and the MP for the South of Leicester requested a meeting with the project team.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation at the University of Leicester (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact Stevie-Jade Hardy delivered a presentation about the Leicester Hate Crime Project at the 'Fresher's Fair', University of Leicester. She spoke with approximately 38 different societies and 100 students about how they could take part in the research.

This audience noted that as a result of the presentation they had developed an increased understanding of what a hate crime was and whom they could report to. After this engagement activity the research team also noted an increase in requests for further information and further participation from students.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation at the University of Leicester's College Doctoral Training Programme (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Professor Neil Chakraborti was invited to deliver a presentation as part of the University of Leicester's College Doctoral Training Programme, which was attended by more than 60 postgraduate students. His presentation utilised the methods and findings from the Leicester Hate Crime Project to demonstrate the importance of having impact upon policy and practice, and how this can be achieved. The presentation enhanced the student's knowledge of impact-related activities and led to an increased engagement with our research reports.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Presentation at the University of Ontario Institute of Technology (Canada) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact Dr Neil Chakraborti delivered a guest lecture entitled 'Hate Crime Victimization: Using Research to Inform Theory and Policy' to approximately 80 students and academics at the University of Ontario Institute of Technology. The audience learnt about the Leicester Hate Crime Project, and in particular the project's aims, methods and emerging findings.

Feedback from the audience in the question and answer session which took place after the presentation demonstrated that students had developed a greater awareness of the nature, extent and impact of hate crime.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Presentation at the University of Surrey (Surrey) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact More than 30 students and academics attended a presentation entitled 'Young People, Targeted Victimisation and Resistance', delivered by Jon Garland. The audience learnt about the project's aims, methods and key findings in relation to the victimisation of young people. The presentation led to an engaging debate about the project's theoretical contribution to the field of social sciences.

The audience reported that as a result of these presentations they had developed a better understanding of the research project, and of the experiences young hate crime victims and the coping mechanism they employ.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Presentation at the Warwickshire Hate Crime Conference (Warwick) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Over 60 practitioners and policy-makers from the Warwickshire County Council, the Police Service, the Crown Prosecution Services, as well as community organisations, listened to Neil Chakraborti and Stevie-Jade Hardy deliver a presentation about the Leicester Hate Crime Project. The audience learnt about the aims, methods, findings and recommendations of study. The presentations led to an in-depth discussion about the implications of this research for their own organisation.

Delegates reported that listening to the presentation had enhanced their knowledge of the nature, extent and impact of hate crime victimisation. Feedback from delegates also demonstrated that attendees were planning to use the information provided within the presentation, as well as the recommendations outlined within the project reports, to improve their existing policy and practices.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Presentation at the Welcome Project (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact 10 refugees and asylum seekers (from new and emerging communities including South Sudan, Iraq and Afghanistan) and 2 voluntary staff members observed a presentation about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and learnt about how the research was relevant to them. The talk led to an in-depth discussion between group members and the research team about experiences of hate crime.

As a result of the session service users stated that they had developed a greater awareness of what a hate crime was, whom they could report to and how they could access support. In addition, the research team noted that there was an increase in refugee and asylum seekers who expressed an interest in taking part in the study as a result of this engagement activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation at the launch of the 'Health and Hate Crime' partnership (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Using the findings from the Leicester Hate Crime Project, Stevie-Jade Hardy delivered a presentation entitled 'The Harms of Hate Crime'. The audience of more than 50 Leicester NHS Partnership Trust policy-makers and practitioners learnt about the study's aims, methods and key findings. The presentation was followed by an interesting question and answer session about the role that health and social care organisations play in supporting hate crime victims. The audience reported having developed a greater awareness and understanding of hate crime as a result of the presentation.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Presentation to Action Homeless (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact 12 homeless service users and 3 staff members attended a talk about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and learnt about how the research was relevant to them. The talk was followed by an in-depth discussion focusing on experiences of hate crime.

As a result of the session service users stated that they had developed a greater awareness of what a hate crime is, whom they could report to and how they could access support. Furthermore, the research team observed an increase in research participation through interviews and questionnaire completions as a result of this engagement activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to City and County Council Professionals - Disability Services (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact 6 staff members who work in Disability Services within Leicester City and County Council attended a presentation by Stevie-Jade Hardy and Neil Chakraborti. They were updated on the progress of Leicester Hate Crime Project and discussed how the research was relevant to their service users.


The attendees remarked that as a result of the talk they had become more aware of why the research was so important to their service users and were now more committed to facilitating access.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to Epilepsy Action (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Members of Epilepsy Action, a voluntary run community group, attended a talk and learnt about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and how the research was relevant to them.

Group members stated that as a result of the presentation they had developed an increased awareness of what a hate crime is, where they could report to and how they could access support. In addition, as a result of the talk the research team noted an increase in research participation through interviews and questionnaire completions.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to Gypsy and Traveller Equality (GATE) (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact Five members of the Gypsy and Traveller Equality group listened to a presentation and learnt about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and how the research was relevant to them and their community.

As a consequence of attending the talk members of GATE noted that they had developed a greater awareness of what a hate crime was, where they could report and how they could access support. As a research team we observed that members of the Gypsy and Traveller community were more eager to take part in the research due to this engagement activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to Hinckley Visually Impaired Group (Barwell, Leicestershire) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Stevie-Jade Hardy delivered a presentation about the Leicester Hate Crime Project to 15 visually impaired people who attend the Hinckley Visually Impaired Group. The group learnt about the aims and methods of the project, and why the research was relevant to them.

Group members reported having developed a greater understanding of what a hate crime was and why it was important to share their experiences of hate crime with the relevant organisation, as a consequence of the presentation. The research team noted that group were more willing to take part in the research as a result of this engagement activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to Policy Leads from the Local Authority (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact 12 policy leads and practitioners attended a talk about the Leicester Hate Crime Project, which led to questions and discussion about engagement, accessing potential participants, the outcomes of the project and future partnership work.

As a result of this activity, Health and Social Care policy leads and practitioners reported developing a greater understanding of the project and a desire to work with the research team to improve victim support in Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to Rainbow Voices (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact 15 members of a Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender community group observed a presentation about the Leicester Hate Crime Project. The research team had the opportunity to engage in an informative discussion about experiences of hate crime with a diverse group of people.

Feedback from the group highlighted that as a result of the talk they had developed a greater awareness of what a hate crime was, whom they could report to and how they could access support. Furthermore, the research team noted that there was an increase in survey completion as a result of this engagement activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to Ramgarhia Social Sisters Club (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Over 40 elderly Sikh women (a group often considered hard to reach) observed a talk about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and learnt how the research was relevant to them and to their community more broadly.

Group members stated that as a result of listening to the talk they had developed a greater awareness of what a hate crime is, whom they could report their experiences to and how they could access support. Furthermore, as a result of this activity the research team developed better relations with the group and witnessed an increase in questionnaire completions from the Sikh community.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to Ramgarhia Social Sisters Club (Leicester) (No.2) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Over 70 women from a range of different ethnic and religious backgrounds listened to a presentation about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and learnt about how the research was relevant to them.

Feedback from the group highlighted that as a result of the talk community members had developed a greater awareness of what a hate crime is, whom they could report to and how they could access support. Furthermore, the research team noted that as a result of this engagement activity there was an increase in survey completion.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to Refugee Action (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Representatives from new and emerging communities (including Congolese, Zimbabwean and Iraq) attended a presentation delivered by the research team and learnt about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and how they could get involved with the research. After the presentation an in-depth discussion focusing on experiences of hate crime took place.

Staff members from Refugee Action noted that community representatives had developed an increased awareness of what a hate crime was, where they could report and how they could access support as a result of attending the talk. Staff members also stated that this would have a wider impact on new and emerging communities in Leicester as the representatives who listened to the talk would return to their communities and share this information.

The research team noted that a greater number of asylum seekers and refugees completed a questionnaire as a direct result of this engagement activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to Safer Inside Safer Outside (SISO) (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Members of the voluntary group Safer Inside Safer Outside (which supports people with mental ill-health) attended a presentation by Stevie-Jade Hardy and learnt about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and how it was relevant to them.


Group members stated that as a result of the presentation they had developed an increased awareness of what a hate crime was, where they could report and how they could access support. In addition, the manager of the service remarked that the presentation had made her consider what more they could be doing as a service to support hate crime victims.

Finally, as a result of the talk the research team noted an increase in research participation through interviews and questionnaire completion.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to Stride (No.1) (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact 25 service users and 3 staff members from Stride - a community group supporting people with mental ill-health - observed a presentation about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and learnt about how the research was relevant to them. The presentation led to an informative and lively discussion about the research and the group's hate crime experiences.

As a result of the session service users noted that they had developed a greater awareness of what a hate crime is, whom they could report to and how they could access support. In addition, service users stated that taking part in the discussion with the research team and being listened to had left them feeling more valued as their experiences had been taken seriously.

Finally, the research team noted an increase in research participation through interviews and questionnaire completions as a result of this engagement activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to Students at two ESOL classes (No.2) (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact 30 learners from a range of new and emerging communities (including Indian, Bangladeshi, Somalian and Kurdish) and 4 staff members observed a presentation about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and learnt about how the research was relevant to them.

Feedback from teachers after the event illustrated that learners had developed an increased awareness of what a hate crime was and where they could report their experiences. In addition, as a result of the activity the research team was invited back to deliver presentations on the same theme to multiple ESOL classes throughout Leicester. Finally, the research team noted an increase in research participation through questionnaire completion due to this engagement activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to a Senior Citizens Club (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Members of an over 60's Irish social group listened to a talk by Stevie-Jade Hardy about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and learnt about what a hate crime was and how they could get involved in the study.



Group members stated that the presentation has given them an increased awareness of what a hate crime was, where they could report and how they could access support. In addition, as a result of the talk the research team noted an increase in research participation through questionnaire completion.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to a community group at the Bangladeshi Cultural Shomiti (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A community group for women from new and emerging communities (including people from Iran, Jordan, Bangladesh and Pakistan) listened to a talk delivered by Stevie-Jade Hardy about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and learnt about why it was relevant to them.

Group members remarked on never having heard the term 'hate crime' before, but noted that as a result of the talk they had developed an understanding of what a hate crime was and whom they could report to. In addition, after this engagement activity the research team were invited back to facilitate the completion of questionnaires with the group.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to a community group at the St Matthews Centre (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact Eight Zimbabwean community members listened to a presentation by Stevie-Jade Hardy about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and learnt about how it was relevant to their lives.

Community members remarked that they had developed a better understanding of what a hate crime was, and why it was important to report their experiences to a relevant organisation, as a result of the presentation. The research team noted that Zimbabwean community members appeared more willing to fill in a questionnaire after the engagement activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to a social group at the East West Community Centre (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Members of community group that supports minority ethnic women listened to a talk delivered by Stevie-Jade Hardy about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and learnt about how they could take part in the study. The presentation led to a lively discussion about the group's experience of living in Leicester and hate crime.

Group members reported having developed a greater appreciation of why it was important to share their experiences of hate crime with the relevant organisation, as a consequence of the presentation. The research team noted that the group were more willing to take part in individual interviews as a result of this engagement activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to an ESOL class (English for Speakers of Other Languages) (No.1) (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact 12 learners from predominantly Eastern European backgrounds observed a presentation about hate crime and more specifically, the Leicester Hate Crime Project. This was followed by a questions and discussion session which focused on experiences of hate crime.

Feedback illustrated that the presentation had given group members an increased awareness of what a hate crime is, where they could report and how they could access support. We also saw an increase in research participation and volume of enquiries as a result of this activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to an Elderly Women's Group at the Peepul Centre (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Over 40 Hindu women over the age of 60 years old, attended a presentation by Stevie-Jade Hardy about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and learnt about how the project was relevant to them. The talk led to an in-depth discussion about their experiences of hate crime victimisation.

Group members stated that as a result of the presentation they had developed an increased awareness of what a hate crime was and where they could report their experiences.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to an Over 60s Social Group (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Members of the social group listened to a talk given by Jon Garland about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and learnt about how they could take part. The talk generated a lively discussion about people's experiences of hate crime victimisation.



Group members stated that as a result of a project member delivering a presentation and facilitating a discussion, they felt that they had developed a greater understanding of what a hate crime was and whom they could report to.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to community members at the Adhar Project (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Over 30 members of a community group that supports minority ethnic women with mental ill-health listened to a talk delivered by Stevie-Jade Hardy. The group learnt about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and more specifically, how they could take part in the study. The presentation led to a lively discussion about the group's experiences of living in Leicester and hate crime.

Group members conveyed a greater appreciation of why it was important to share their experiences of hate crime with relevant organisations as a consequence of the presentation. The research team noted that the group members were more willing to take part in the study as a research participant as a result of this engagement activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to practitioners at a LGBT Hate Crime Workshop (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact 14 practitioners from a range of voluntary and statutory organisations listened to a presentation delivered by Stevie-Jade Hardy about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and learnt about some of the emerging findings within the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community. The talk led to an informative debate about tackling LGBT hate crime in Leicester.



As a result of this activity, practitioners from a range of organisations considered ways of improving the support they provide for LGBT victims of hate crime and discussed ways of making reporting pathways more accessible.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to prospective University of Leicester students (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Stevie-Jade Hardy presented about the project to 106 prospective students at the University of Leicester. The title of the presentation was '50 Shades of Hate: Using Research to Understand Hate Crime Victimisation'. The audience learnt about the aims, methods and emerging findings of the Leicester Hate Crime Project.

The presentation generated much debate and discussion about the project's aims, methods and preliminary findings. After the presentation the audience remarked on having developed a greater awareness of what a hate crime was and where they could report hate incidents.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to service users and staff at Network for Change (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact Service users and staff at Network for Change, an organisation supporting people with mental ill-health, observed a presentation by Stevie-Jade Hardy about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and learned how they could take part in the study.

As a result of this activity, service users at Network for Change expressed having a greater understanding of what a hate crime is and were keen to take part in the study. The research team were asked to return to the group to facilitate the completion of the questionnaire and to conduct interviews as a result of this engagement activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to service users at Akwaaba Ayeh Community Group (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact More than 30 elderly African Caribbean service users attended a talk delivered by Stevie-Jade Hardy and learnt about the Leicester Hate Crime Project. The talk sparked an insightful questions and discussion session.

The research team noted that as a result of this engagement activity they were invited back to conduct interviews with service users about their experience of hate crime.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to service users at Making Friends (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Members of a social group which supports people who are socially isolated and/or have mental ill-health attended a presentation by Stevie-Jade Hardy about the Leicester Hate Crime Project. The group learnt about what a hate crime was and whom they could report to, and a lively discussion followed the talk.

Group members stated that as a result of the presentation they had developed a greater understanding of why it was important to report experiences of hate crime. In addition, the research team were asked to return to facilitate the completion of questionnaires and conduct interviews with service users.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to service users at Mencap (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Service users at Mencap (an organisation supporting people with a range of learning and/or physical disabilities) listened to a talk delivered by Stevie-Jade Hardy about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and learnt about how the project related to their experiences. The presentation led to an insightful discussion about the group's experience of hate crime.

Group members developed a greater understanding of what a hate crime is and where they could report their experiences of victimisation to as a result of this engagement activity. In addition, the research team were invited back to interview group members after this event.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to service users at Rethink (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Service users and staff members at Rethink (a support group for people with mental ill-health) observed a presentation by Stevie-Jade Hardy about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and learnt about how they could take part in the project. The talk led to a lively discussion between service users and the research team about experiences of hate crime.

Service users developed a better understanding of what a hate crime was and whom they could report to as a result of this engagement activity. In addition, the research team were asked to return to the group to facilitate the completion of questionnaires and therefore this activity led to an increase in research involvement.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to service users at Strides Community Group (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact 30 service users who attend Strides - a social support group for people with mental ill-health - listened to a presentation delivered by Stevie-Jade Hardy about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and learnt about why the project was relevant to them.



Service users stated that as a result of this engagement activity they had developed a better understanding of what a hate crime was. The research team also noted that after the presentation service users were more willing to take part in the research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to service users at Vista (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact A mixed group of service users at Vista (an organisation supporting people with varying visual impairments) listened to a presentation by Stevie-Jade Hardy about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and learnt about how they could take part in the research. The talk led to an in-depth discussion about the group's experiences of hate crime.

Group members noted that as a result of attending the workshop they had learnt about what a hate crime is and now knew that they could share these experiences with their support workers. The research team also noted an increase in research participation through questionnaire completion due to this engagement activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to service users at Voluntary Action Leicester (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact More than 40 service users with a range of physical and/or learning disabilities listened to a presentation delivered by Stevie-Jade Hardy about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and learnt about how it was relevant to them. The talk led to an in-depth question and answer session afterwards.



During the discussion after the presentation, service users remarked on having developed a greater understanding of what a hate crime was as a result of this engagement activity. The research team were also invited back to the group to conduct interviews as a result of this session.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to service users at the Ajani Women and Girls Centre (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact 15 service users who attend a community group that supports minority ethnic women listened to a talk delivered by Stevie-Jade Hardy. The group learnt about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and more specifically, why the project was relevant to them. The presentation led to a lively question and answer session about hate crime.

Group members reported having developed a greater appreciation of why it was important to share their experiences of hate crime with relevant organisations as a result of the presentation. The research team also noted that group members were more willing to take part in the study as research participants as a result of this engagement activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to service users at the Centre Project (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Service users who attend the Centre Project, a voluntary run community group supporting people who are homeless and/or have mental ill-health, observed a talk and learnt about the Leicester Hate Crime Project.

Group members stated that as a result of the presentation they had developed an increased awareness of what a hate crime was, where they could report and how they could access support. In addition, as a result of the talk the research team noted an increase in research participation through interviews and questionnaire completion.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to service users at the Chinese Christian Centre (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact 13 members of the Chinese Christian Church listened to a talk delivered by Stevie-Jade Hardy about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and learnt about why the research was relevant to their community. The talk led to an in-depth discussion about the group's experience of hate crime.

After the presentation the audience remarked on having never heard of the term 'hate crime' before the talk, but as a result of this engagement activity they had developed a greater awareness of what a hate crime was and whom they could report to. The research team also noted that they had developed a better understanding of what barriers the Chinese community face when thinking of reporting their experiences. Finally, as a result of this engagement activity the research team were invited back to conduct a group interview.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to service users at the Gujarati Lunch Club (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Over 40 members of a community group that supports elderly minority ethnic women listened to a talk delivered by Stevie-Jade Hardy. The group learnt about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and more specifically, why it was relevant to them. The presentation led to a lively discussion about the group's experience of living in Leicester and hate crime.

Group members conveyed a greater understanding of why it was important to report their experiences of hate crime to relevant organisations as a consequence of the presentation. The research team also noted that group members were more willing to take part in the study as research participants as a result of this engagement activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to service users at the Leicester City of Sanctuary (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Refugees and asylum seekers (including people from Eritrea, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Zimbabwe, Iraq and Iran) who attend a voluntary community group, listened to Stevie-Jade Hardy deliver a presentation about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and learnt about what a hate crime was, where they could report to and how they could access support.

Several participants remarked that they now had a better understanding of why it was important to report any experiences of hate crime. Feedback from the group suggested that service users were very appreciative of the research team taking the time to engage with them. Finally, the research team noted an increase in research participation from refugees and asylum seekers through questionnaire completions and interviews due to this engagement activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to service users at the Leicester City of Sanctuary (No.2) (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact Service users at the Leicester City of Sanctuary (an organisation which supports refugees and asylum seekers) listened to a talk by Jon Garland about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and learnt about how they could take part in the study.

Group members at the Leicester City of Sanctuary expressed enthusiasm to take part in the research and to share their experiences with the research team as a result of this activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to service users at the Open Access Youth Club (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Young people who attend the youth group listened to a presentation delivered by Stevie-Jade Hardy about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and learnt about how it related to them. The talk led to an in-depth discussion about the group's experiences of hate crime.

Group members stated that as a result of the presentation they had developed an increased awareness of what a hate crime was, where they could report to and how they could access support. In addition, as a result of the talk the research team noted an increase in research participation through interviews and questionnaire completion.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to service users at the People's Forum (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Over 40 service users from the People's Forum (an organisation supporting those with mental ill-health) observed a presentation delivered by Stevie-Jade Hardy about the Leicester Hate Crime Project. The audience learnt about the aims, methods and findings of the study and discussed how they could use the recommendations to improve the support they provide to victims of hate.

The People's Forum asked the research team to deliver a presentation about the findings and implications of the Leicester Hate Crime Project and service users reported having developed a better understanding of the nature, extent and impact of hate crime victimisation as a result of this engagement activity. Feedback from service users demonstrated that they were appreciative that the project highlighted the victimisation that many of the group suffer on a day to day basis.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Presentation to students and teachers at Leicester International College (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Three classes of students (predominantly from Africa and the Middle East) listened to a presentation delivered by Stevie-Jade Hardy about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and learnt about why it was relevant to them.

The majority of students stated that they had never heard of the term 'hate crime' before but as a result of the presentation had developed a better understanding of what a hate crime was and whom they could report to. The research team were invited back to distribute questionnaires to students as a direct result of this engagement activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to students at DeMontfort University (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Over 30 Muslim students listened to a talk delivered by Stevie-Jade Hardy about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and learnt about why the research was relevant to them.


During the question and answer session which followed the presentation, students remarked on having developed a more comprehensive understanding of what a hate crime was and where they could report to as a result of listening to the talk. The research team also noted that there was an increase in survey completion directly after this engagement activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to students at Liverpool John Moores University (Liverpool) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact Stevie-Jade Hardy delivered two guest lectures (the first was for undergraduate criminology students and the second was for a mix of post-graduate students and academics) about the Leicester Hate Crime Project. The audience learnt about the project's aims, methods and emerging findings which led to a lively discussion on both occasions.

Both audiences remarked on having developed a greater awareness of the nature, extent and impact of hate crime as a result of listening to the presentations.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Presentation to students at an ESOL Class (No. 6) (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact 30 learners from a range of new and emerging communities (including Indian, Bangladeshi, Somalian, Iraqi, Sudanese and Kurdish) and 2 staff members observed a presentation about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and learnt about how the research was relevant to them.

Students stated that as a result of the presentation they had developed an increased awareness of what a hate crime was, where they could report and how they could access support. Furthermore, as a result of the talk the research team noted an increase in research participation through interviews and questionnaire completion.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to students at an ESOL Class (No.4) (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact 30 learners from a range of new and emerging communities (predominantly Indian and Bangladeshi students) and 2 staff members observed a presentation by Stevie-Jade Hardy about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and learnt about how the research was relevant to them.

Feedback from teachers after the event illustrated that learners had developed an increased awareness of what a hate crime was and where they could report their experiences. The research team noted an increase in research participation through questionnaire completion due to this engagement activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to students at an ESOL Class (No.5) (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact Three separate ESOL classes (made up of people from new and emerging communities, including Somalian, Eritrean, Iranian and Kurdish) attended a presentation by Stevie-Jade Hardy and learnt about the Leicester Hate Crime Project. This talk led to students practising their English by asking Stevie questions about the project and sharing their experiences.

After the engagement activity, the teachers from these classes noted that learners had developed an increased awareness of what a hate crime was and where they could report their experiences. The research team noted an increase in research participation from new and emerging communities through questionnaire completion due to this engagement activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to students at an ESOL Class (No.7) (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact More than 40 students from a range of different ethnic and religious backgrounds listened to a presentation delivered by Stevie-Jade Hardy about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and learnt about how they could take part in the research. The talk led to an interesting and insightful discussion about the group's experiences of hate crime.

Students remarked that as a result of the presentation they had developed a better understanding of what a hate crime is, why it was important to share their experiences and where they could report to. The research team also noted that the group appeared more willing to take part in the research as a result of the presentation.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to students at an ESOL class (No.3) (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact 30 learners from a range of new and emerging communities (including Indian, Bangladeshi, Somalian and Albanian) and 2 staff members observed a presentation by Stevie-Jade Hardy about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and learnt about how the research was relevant to them.



After the presentation, learners noted that as a result of the talk they felt more aware of what a hate crime was and where they could report their experiences. In addition, the research team noted an increase in research participation from new and emerging communities through questionnaire completion due to this engagement activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to students at an ESOL class (No.6) (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact Students attending an ESOL Health and Social Care course observed a talk delivered by Stevie-Jade Hardy about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and how they could take part in the study.

As a result of this activity, all members of the class expressed an interest in taking part in the study and the teacher requested further information so that she could pass it on to her other classes.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to students at the University of Leicester (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact Stevie-Jade Hardy has delivered presentations on the Leicester Hate Crime Project to a number of student groups at the University of Leicester. She has presented the findings and recommendations of the research to young people at UCAS taster days, to campus-based undergraduate students (BA Criminology) as part of a module on 'Hate Crime', to distance learning postgraduate students (MA Criminology), and to campus-based postgraduate students (BA Sociology) through a module on 'Research Methods'. In total, Stevie has spoken about the study's aims, methods and key findings to more than a 100 students at the University of Leicester. All of these presentations have led to a lively and informative question and answer session.

Feedback from students after these events demonstrated that they had developed a greater awareness of the concept of hate crime and a better understanding of the different forms and impacts of hate crime.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2006,2015
 
Description Presentation to students, staff and the general public at the University of Leicester (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Undergraduate and postgraduate students, staff and community members attended a presentation by Neil Chakraborti to learn about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and the emerging lessons for research and policy. The talk resulted in a lively question and answer session.


As a result of the presentation, several students wanted to take part in the research both as volunteers and participants.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to teachers who teach English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Stevie-Jade Hardy delivered a presentation about the Leicester Hate Crime Project to over 30 ESOL teachers. The audience learnt about the aims, methods and emerging findings from the project and why the research was relevant to their students. The talk led to an engaging question and answer session.

As a result of this engagement activity, the audience remarked on having developed a greater awareness of the nature, extent and impact of hate crime. In addition, the research team were invited to attend and present at multiple ESOL classes throughout the city of Leicester as a result of this event.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to the Departmental Equality Officers' Network, University of Leicester (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact More than 20 academics and administrators from the University of Leicester listened to a presentation delivered by Stevie-Jade Hardy. The audience learnt about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and how they could take part in the research.

The audience reported that as a result of this presentation they had developed a greater understanding of what a hate crime was and whom they could report to. The research team also noted an increase in public interest about the project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Presentation to the Hate Crime Scrutiny Panel (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Over 20 practitioners from the Police Service, the Crown Prosecution Services, and community representatives listened to Neil Chakraborti and Stevie-Hardy deliver a presentation about the Leicester Hate Crime Project. The audience learnt about the aims, methods, findings and recommendations of study. The presentation led to a lively question and answer session.

The research team were invited to deliver a presentation about the project findings and its implications at the Hate Crime Scrutiny Panel and the members of this group reported having developed a greater awareness of the nature, extent and impact of hate crime victimisation as a result of this activity. Feedback from the group also demonstrated that as a result of the presentations, group members were going to consider how they could implement the recommendations within their own organisation/community group.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Presentation to the Hate Incident Monitoring Project (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Over 20 practitioners from the Leicestershire County Council Community Safety Team listened to Neil Chakraborti and Stevie-Jade Hardy deliver a presentation about the Leicester Hate Crime Project. The audience learnt about the aims, methods, findings and recommendations of study. The presentation led to a lively question and answer session.

The members of this strategic group reported having developed a greater awareness of the nature, extent and impact of hate crime victimisation as a result of this activity. Feedback from the group also demonstrated that as a result of the presentation, group members were going to consider how they could implement the recommendations within their organisation.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Presentation to the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and Asexual Society (LGBTQA) Society (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact Undergraduate and Postgraduate students who are part of the LGBTQA society at the University of Leicester listened to a presentation by Stevie-Jade Hardy about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and learnt about how they could take part in the research.

The research team noted an increase in research participation through questionnaire completion and interviews from lesbian, gay and bisexual students due to this engagement activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to the Midlands Hate Crime Working Group (Birmingham) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Over 20 practitioners from the Police Service, the Crown Prosecution Services and the NHS listened to Neil Chakraborti and Stevie-Hardy deliver a presentation about the Leicester Hate Crime Project. The audience learnt about the aims, methods, findings and recommendations of study. The presentations led to an in-depth discussion about the implications of this research for their own organisation.

The research team were invited to deliver a presentation about the project findings and its implications at the Midlands Hate Crime Working Group and the members of this group reported having developed a greater awareness of the nature, extent and impact of hate crime victimisation as a result of this activity. Feedback from the group demonstrated that as a result of the presentations, group members were going to consider how they could implement the recommendations within their own organisation.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Presentation to the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The Chief Executive for the Police and Crime Commissioner and an Inspector from Leicestershire Police observed a talk about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and learnt about the ways in which the Office for the Police and Crime Commissioner could get involved.

The Chief Executive for the Police and Crime Commissioner invited the research team to deliver a talk and reported that team members had developed a greater awareness of the Leicester Hate Crime Project afterwards. This engagement activity also helped to develop a partnership between the research team and the Office for the Police and Crime Commissioner in Leicester.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to the Principals of local colleges (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact 15 head teachers from the local colleges observed a presentation delivered by Stevie-Jade Hardy about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and learnt about why the research was relevant to the students who attended their schools. The talk sparked a lively discussion about the issue of hate crime.



As a result of this engagement activity, the research team were invited into three schools to deliver presentations to students about the Leicester Hate Crime Project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to the general public at the Brite Centre (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact 20 community members who attend the Brite Centre (a neighbourhood centre in Braunstone) and three staff members listened to a talk delivered by Stevie-Jade Hardy. The group learnt about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and more specifically, why the project was relevant to them. The presentation led to a lively discussion about their experiences of living in Leicester and hate crime.

The audience's reported on having developed a greater appreciation of why it was important to share their experiences of hate crime with the relevant organisation, as a result of the presentation. The research team also noted that community members were more willing to take part in the research as a result of this engagement activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to young people at the First Out Youth Group (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact Members of the First Out Youth Group (a group which provides emotional support to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender young people) listened to a presentation delivered by Stevie-Jade Hardy and learnt about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and how they could take part in the research.

All members of the youth group remarked on having developed a greater awareness of what a hate crime was and where they could report as a result of the presentation. The research team also noted that all members of the group were willing to fill in questionnaires and take part in interviews after the engagement activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to young people at the St James Church Youth Club (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact 15 members of a church run youth club listened to a talk delivered by Stevie-Jade Hardy. The group learnt about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and more specifically, how they could take part in the study. The presentation led to a lively discussion about the group's experience of living in Leicester and hate crime.

After the presentation the audience remarked on having never heard of the term 'hate crime' before the talk but as a result of engagement activity, they had developed a greater awareness of what a hate crime was and whom they could report to. The research team were also invited back to distribute questionnaires to the youth club as a direct result of this engagement activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation to young people at the Thurnby Lodge Youth Club (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Over 20 young people from a socially and economically disadvantaged area of Leicester listened to a talk delivered by Stevie-Jade Hardy. The group learnt about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and more specifically, how they could take part in the study. The presentation led to a lively discussion about the group's experience of living in Leicester and hate crime.

The group of young people reported having developed a greater understanding of what a hate crime was, and where they could report, as a consequence of the presentation. The research team noted that the group were more willing to complete questionnaires as a result of this engagement activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentations to service users at the Dawn Centre (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Stevie-Jade Hardy attended the Dawn Centre (an organisation which supports homeless people) on four separate days to deliver presentations about the Leicester Hate Crime Project. In total, more than 100 service users and 5 members of staff learnt about the project and how it related to them. Each presentation led to a lively and informative discussion about the group's hate crime experiences.



As a result of this activity, service users stated that their experiences of victimisation had been somewhat validated as the research team had taken the time to engage with a group who are often overlooked and even, ignored. Furthermore, the research team were subsequently invited back to the Dawn Centre on multiple occasions due to the number of service users who wished to take part in the research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentations to students at Gateway College (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Stevie-Jade Hardy delivered six separate presentations over two days to more than 200 students and 10 teachers. Students and staff learnt about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and in particular, how they could take part in it. Each presentation led to an in-depth discussion about student experiences of living in a multicultural city and hate crime.



Feedback from students after each presentation demonstrated that they had developed a greater awareness of what a hate crime was and why it was important to report experiences of victimisation. In addition, the research team noted that large numbers of students were keen to share their experiences through survey completion as a result of this engagement activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presented research findings to the British Society of Criminology Midlands Branch 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Prof Neil Chakraborti used the research findings and recommendations from the Leicester Hate Crime Project to deliver a presentation at a seminar which formed part of a series for the British Society of Criminology Midlands Branch. The presentation was delivered to an audience of more than 30 students, academics, practitioners and members of the public and it was followed by a lively question and answer session.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Press release to raise awareness to research with Amnesty International UK 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Prof Neil Chakraborti and Dr Stevie-Jade Hardy were approached by Amnesty International UK who wanted to commission research after reading the Leicester Hate Crime Project reports. In June 2017, we published a joint press release which built upon the findings from the Leicester Hate Crime Project to highlight the barriers that victims continue to face when accessing justice. The press release and final report were intended to spark debate amongst the general public and call the Government to action. The press release was published by a number of media outlets, including: the Belfast Telegraph, AOL, Equality and Diversity Forum, Daily Mail Online, Daily Record, The Times, BT, Policing Insight, ITV, Irish Legal and Al Jazeera.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.dailymail.co.uk/wires/pa/article-4631624/Amnesty-want-better-police-training-deal-reporte...
 
Description Session No.1 at Headway (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact 12 service users with varying learning and/or physical disabilities attended a talk about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and learnt about how the research was relevant to them. The talk was followed by a questions and discussion session involving the service users and research team.



As a result of the session service users stated that they had developed a greater awareness of what a hate crime is, whom they could report to and how they could access support. In addition, the research team noted an increase in research participation through interviews and questionnaire completions as a result of this engagement activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Session No.2 at Headway (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact 12 service users with varying learning and/or physical disabilities attended a talk about hate crime and learnt how they could take part in the research and why it was relevant to them. The presentation led to an informative and engaging discussion involving service users and the research team.


As a result of the session, service users noted that they had developed a greater awareness of what a hate crime is, whom they could report to and how they could access support. In addition, service users stated that taking part in the discussion with the research team and being listened to had left them feeling more valued because their experiences had been taken seriously.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Session No.3 at Headway (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact 15 service users with varying learning and/or physical disabilities listened to a talk about the Leicester Hate Crime Project, learnt about how the study was relevant to them, and engaged in a questions and discussion session afterwards.



As a result of the session service users stated that they felt empowered as a result of learning about whom they could report to and how they could access support. Furthermore, the research team observed that service users were more enthusiastic to take part in interviews as a result of this engagement activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Session at the Race Equality Centre (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact 6 service users and 2 staff members from The Race Equality Centre (TREC) attended an information session to learn about the Leicester Hate Crime Project, and more specifically how the research was relevant to them.

The manager at TREC noted that service users had developed a better understanding of what a hate crime was, whom they could report to and how they could access support.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Session with Mencap Self Advocacy Group (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact 12 service users with multiple learning and/or physical disabilities and 3 staff members listened to a presentation about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and learnt about how the research was relevant to them. This led to an in-depth discussion focusing on the group's experiences of hate crime.

As a result of the session, service users stated that they had developed a greater awareness of what constituted a hate crime, whom they could report to and what forms of support they could access. In addition, the research team noted an increase in disabled people wanting to take part in the study as a result of this engagement activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Session with the Anchor Centre (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact 8 staff members who work at the Anchor Centre (an organisation that supports people who are homeless), attended an information sharing session and learnt about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and how the research was relevant to their service users.

Management at the Anchor Centre invited Stevie-Jade Hardy (Lead Researcher) to talk to staff members and reported that staff had developed a greater awareness of hate crime and more confidence in advising their service users who have experienced hate crime as a result of this activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Session with the Kurdish community at a Kurdish restaurant (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Members of the Kurdish community listened to a talk by Stevie-Jade Hardy about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and learnt about why it was relevant to them. The talk led to a lively discussion with the group about their experiences of living in Leicester.

The research team noted that they had developed a greater understanding about the Kurdish community within Leicester as a result of this engagement activity. In addition, this 'hard to reach' community agreed to share their experiences of hate crime in an interview after this meeting.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Taking Action Against Hate Crime in Post-Brexit Britain: Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Dr Stevie-Jade Hardy was invited to present the research findings and recommendations from the Leicester Hate Crime Project a conference organised by Public Policy Exchange. The conference was attended by more than 60 professional practitioners, policy-makers and students. The presentation was designed to improve awareness of hate crime and the barriers that victims face in accessing justice and support, and it was followed by a question and answer session.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description The Leicester Hate Crime Project Conference (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Over 130 practitioners, policy leads, academics and community members attended the end of project conference. The audience listened to multiple presentations delivered by Neil Chakraborti, Jon Garland and Stevie-Jade Hardy and learnt about findings and implications of the research. Each presentation led to an engaging debate between the attendees and the research team.

Feedback from the audience demonstrated that they had developed a greater awareness of the nature, extent and impact of hate crime victimisation as a result of the conference. In addition, practitioners from a range of voluntary and statutory organisations remarked that they were going to use the project's findings and recommendations to inform the service they provide to victims of hate.

As a result of this engagement activity, the research team noted an increase in requests for meetings from policy leads and practitioners who wanted to work collaboratively to implement the recommendations from the project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description The Leicester Hate Crime Project recieves Ministerial Endorsement (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact The research team collaborated with the Federation of Muslim Originations to arrange a ministerial visit from Baroness Warsi. The event involved more than 75 members of the general public listening to a presentation given by Baroness Warsi about community cohesion and hate crime. Within her presentation, Baroness Warsi referred to the Leicester Hate Crime Project and endorsed its aims. This talk led to a lively question and answer session.

Before the event took place, the Federation of Muslim Originations launched a press release regarding Baroness Warsi's visit, in which the University of Leicester and the project is referred to. In addition, the University of Leicester featured an article about the visit and the Leicester Hate Crime Project on their website.

The research team noted an increase in public interest about the project, as well as heightened interest from voluntary and statutory organisations, as a result of these engagement activities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www2.le.ac.uk/news/blog/2014-archive-1/april/minister-backs-works-of-university-criminologist...
 
Description The launch of the Leicester Centre for Hate Studies and the first screening of 'The Harms of Hate' - A short film (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The first screening of 'The Harms of Hate' coincided with the launch of the Leicester Centre for Hate Studies (see 'Spin Outs' for further information). The film involved participants from the Leicester Hate Crime Project talking about their experiences of hate crime victimisation. More than 130 people (from the police service, local authorities, service providers, NHS and schools and colleges) attended the launch which was hosted by Neil Chakraborti and Stevie-Jade Hardy. Within the introductory presentations, Neil Chakraborti spoke about the Leicester Hate Crime Project and the audience learnt about the project's aims, methods and emerging findings.

The research team noted a significant increase in public interest about the project and the short film, as well as heightened interest from voluntary and statutory organisations, as a result of this engagement activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MCFJd2U2BNQ
 
Description Twitter 'Question and Answer' session with students at Beauchamp College (Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Over 75 students took part in a Twitter Question and Answer session with Neil Chakraborti based on the Leicester Hate Crime Project and issues relating to diversity and multiculturalism.


The research team noted an increase in requests about further involvement in the study as a result of this engagement activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013