Enriching understanding of climate and energy related behaviours (Energy Behaviour Fellowship Follow On Fund)

Lead Research Organisation: University of the West of England
Department Name: Faculty of Environment and Technology

Abstract

Government policies across many fields are currently being steered by the concept of 'behaviour change' as a 'light-touch' alternative to regulation. Behaviour is neither simple to understand, nor to change. Current political circumstances have led to a high profile for a group of approaches that are aimed at 'nudging' behaviours, however the theories and understanding behind these are just one of a range of possible ways of interpreting the reasons people behave in the ways that they do. Not all behaviours are alike, and in terms of developing effective policies it is useful to have a range of possible approaches to choose from. For the non-expert though, understanding potential complementarities or conflicts between different approaches can pose a significant barrier to employing new strategies or to using a variety of methods, particularly when certain approaches may have more political acceptability despite potentially not being as effective.

The project will provide support to a range of stakeholders involved in developing and implementing policies around public behaviours in relation to energy usage and climate change. Following on from a successful 12-month social science placement Fellowship in DECC, the project will allow Dr Chatterton to build on the work and relationships already established in the Fellowship, in order to improve understanding with regard to a) public behaviours and social practices, and b) cross-departmental challenges in relation to climate change policies.

The project has support from the four government departments most closely identified with climate and energy related behaviours (DECC; the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra); the Department for Transport (DfT), and the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG)). This will provide Dr Chatterton access to spend time within each Department (an average of one month per Department) to help them to implement the latest thinking on behaviours into policies, and through concurrently working with the various Departments, take the opportunity to help them better understand the overlaps and possible conflicts or synergies between their respective policies.

The project will also take the learning from the original Fellowship, as well as from the departmental working, and share it with a limited number of relevant stakeholders from businesses and NGOs working in the area. This will help them improve their understanding of current approaches to behaviour, so as to enable them to more effectively play a positive role in their work with government and the public.

Planned Impact

The key beneficiaries of the project will be the government departments, businesses and NGOs directly engaged with the project. Through an effective and intensive interaction with these bodies, they will benefit from the opportunity to develop their understanding of a range of current approaches to behaviours, and to explore the ways in which their areas of activity interact with each other.

More widely, there is the opportunity to influence wider and improve government policy making, by helping establish new and more diverse approaches towards tackling 'behaviour change'. In addition to this, there will be the opportunity to work with businesses and NGOs to explore how they respond and relate to some of the less conventional approaches to understanding behaviour in the area of social practice theory. Particularly with businesses, there is the opportunity to establish relationships that may be able to fund longer-term engagement and work in this area.

The general public will also hopefully benefit through introducing government to a wider set of theories about behaviour, so that better policies can be developed that make the process of 'change' smoother and more positive than might otherwise be achieved.

Finally, through helping develop better policies in the fields of energy, environment and climate change, there is expected to be a global benefit through enabling more effective reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, use of environmental resources, and other negative impacts on the environment.
The primary aim of the project is to support the development of stronger in-house capacity to understand and implement learnings about climate and energy-related behaviours. Through ensuring that adequate time is allocated to direct and high quality contact with the project partners, it is anticipated that this will lead to a significant and lasting impact.

Publications

10 25 50
 
Description The project has established the need for policymakers/practitioners to approach the issue of 'behaviour change' with a more considered and structured analysis of the behaviour of concern, rather than assuming that 'one-size-fits-all' theories of behaviour can lead to successful translation of interventions from one policy area or behaviour of concern to another.



The project has resulted in the development, testing and refinement of the 'Four Dimensions of Behaviour' (4DB) framework as a tool for helping practitioners think through the many possible characteristics of a problem behaviour in a structured manner. This has now been published in a peer-reviewed journal (Chatterton and Wilson, 2013) as well as in two full conference papers and a briefing note (all on the Research Outcomes System).



The framework consists of four dimensions of 'Actor', 'Domain', Durability' and 'Scope', each with five levels:

Actor - Who or what is carrying out the behaviour?

Individual : Inter-Personal Network : Community : Segment/Group : Population

Domain - What shapes or influences the behaviour?

Psychological : Bodily : Technological : Institutional/Social : Infrastructural/Environmental

Durability - How does the behaviour relate to time?

One-off : Repeated : Dependent : Enduring : Norm-setting

Scope - How does the behaviour inter-relate with other behaviours?

Discrete : Inter-related : Bundled : Structuring : Pervasive



Extensive testing of the framework has shown that the 20(4x5) groupings are suitable for capturing and recording an extensive, varied and comprehensive set of characteristics for any behaviour that has been trialled on it (including behaviours from policy spheres of domestic energy, transport, environment and health). Once these characteristics have been captured, the framework facilitates the examination of these alone, or in relation to each other. This supports the application of different theories/models of behaviour to different aspects of the behaviours as well as identifying a much greater range of target points for interventions.



The 4DB framework was trialled in detail on twelve behaviours supplied by DECC, DfT and Defra:

Energy: Redoing your Kitchen, Replacing your Boiler, Taking Shorter Showers, Delaying the Start of the Heating Season.

Transport: Buying a Plug-In Vehicle, Commuting by Bicycle, Making Business Trips by Train, and Eco-Driving.

Environment: Purchasing Sustainable Food, Waste Recycling Activity, Bio-Diversity Conservation, and Laundry Practices that Consume Less Water.



Thinkpieces were also written for the Departments, demonstrating the applicability of the framework to communication strategies for increasing uptake of electric vehicles, differences between behaviour of SMEs and that of individuals, and modelling energy usage.



The framework has proved to be an adaptable way of introducing practitioners to the complex interactions between individuals and social contexts/factors. Whilst highlighting these underlying complexities, it does so in a manner that is structured, avoids unfamiliar and challenging language, and remains open to all theoretical approaches.



The ability of the framework to start bringing together psychological and sociological theories of behaviour might be best reflected in the comment at the 2014 ECEEE Summer Study from Prof. Harold Wilhite, where he stated that the framework represented "the future of social science engagement on energy efficiency".
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Energy,Environment,Leisure Activities/ including Sports/ Recreation and Tourism,Transport

 
Description There are two main areas where the '4 Dimensions of Behaviour' Framework and associated work has been identified as influencing aspects of policy development. Firstly within the rollout of Smart Meters in the UK (The single largest household intervention ever mandated by Government). The 4DB Framework was shown in a presentation and discussed by Dr Sarah Darby at the DECC Smart Meter Expert Workshop at Department for Business, Innovation and Skills on 9th December 2014. The work was also picked up by the Smart Meters Central Delivery Body (now Smart Energy GB) with email and telephone communication with both the Chief Executive of the SMCDB and Suzannah Kinsella. Recognition of this was given through inclusion in the contributors list of the final SMCDB Engagement Plan for Smart Meter Roll. The second area where the ideas developed in the project have had continued traction is within the International Energy Agency Demand Side Management programme in Task XXIV on Behaviour Change where on going participation in workshops and project reports is being recognised. The influence of my work continues to be seen in bother the IEA Task XXIV work and in government. In particular, despite considerable churn in terms of staffing within DECC, my material is continuing to be used for briefing new staff and shaping thinking on behaviour. The work undertaken in this and the Fellowship continues to shape a wide range of engagement work and academic research - it is now forming a significant influence on the major Horizon 2020 project ClairCity (Citizen Led Air Pollution Reduction in Cities www.ClairCity.eu) as well as shaping a NERC/Newton Fund project CADTIME (Clean AIr for Delhi Through Interventions Mitigation and Engagement). It has led to significant involvement in the ESRC Seminar Series on Behaviour Change as well as writing a chapter in the book associated with the series "Beyond Behaviour Change (Ed. F. Spotswood). It has also led to interaction in the Lancaster University led international network on Everyday Futures, and I participated in the second network workshop in Eindhoven in 2017.The work on the project is now extending to shape a GCRF Hub bid which has reached the second stage proposal round. There is continuing interest and engagement around the tool - it has recently been used by the Head of Communications in the Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy for some work being done around the issue of food waste.
First Year Of Impact 2013
Sector Agriculture, Food and Drink,Energy,Environment,Government, Democracy and Justice,Transport
Impact Types Societal,Policy & public services

 
Description Committee On Climate Change - Behaviour
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
Impact Following work undertaken for the Committee On Climate Change on reviewing the incorporation of 'behaviour' into the 5th Carbon Budget, the Committee decided to add an additional member ot the committee with a specialism in behaviour.
URL https://www.theccc.org.uk/2015/08/21/ccc-seeks-new-committee-members/
 
Description Assessing the Flexibility of Domestic Energy Using Behaviours
Amount £56,449 (GBP)
Funding ID TRN 393/04/2012 
Organisation Department of Energy and Climate Change 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 05/2012 
End 06/2012
 
Description CLAiR-City "Citizen Led Air pollution Reduction in Cities."
Amount € 6,692,546 (EUR)
Organisation European Commission 
Department Horizon 2020
Sector Public
Country European Union (EU)
Start 09/2016 
End 08/2020
 
Description Commissioned Research
Amount £1,500 (GBP)
Organisation Committee on Climate Change (CCC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 02/2015 
End 04/2015
 
Description EPSRC Energy Programme
Amount £806,910 (GBP)
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2012 
End 12/2016
 
Description EPSRC Energy Programme SANDPIT on Transport Behaviour
Amount £100 (GBP)
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 12/2011 
End 12/2011
 
Description EU STEEP project (Systems Thinking in Efficient Energy Planning)
Amount £19,330,787 (GBP)
Funding ID 691735 
Organisation European Commission 
Sector Public
Country European Union (EU)
Start 02/2016 
End 01/2021
 
Description Energy use and behaviour change in the domestic sector- review of existing evidence
Amount £56,449 (GBP)
Funding ID TRN 331/12/2011 
Organisation Department of Energy and Climate Change 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 03/2012 
End 06/2012
 
Description Heating Controls: International Evidence Base and Policy Experiences
Amount £18,593 (GBP)
Funding ID TRN1201/08/2016 
Organisation Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2016 
End 01/2017
 
Description NERC-Newton Fund : Atmospheric Pollution & Human Health in an Indian Megacity
Amount £815,417 (GBP)
Funding ID NE/P016588/1 
Organisation Natural Environment Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 11/2016 
End 10/2020
 
Description UK Centre for Research on Energy Demand
Amount £18,981,875 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/R035288/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2018 
End 03/2023
 
Title $ Dimensions of Behaviour Framework 
Description A framework for encouraging more detailed and textured (multi-dimensional) thinking on 'behaviour' related challenges. 
Type Of Material Model of mechanisms or symptoms - human 
Year Produced 2012 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact Broader thinking on behavioural problems 
URL http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03081060.2013.850257
 
Description International Energy Agency Implementing Agreement on Demand Side Management Task XXIV on Behaviour Change 
Organisation International Energy Agency Implementing Agreement on Demand Side Management Task XXIV
Country Global 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution After an initial invite to participate at an Task XXIV workshop hosted by UKERC in Oxford, this developed into a deeper relationship with an invite to participate in a conference in New Zealand and help run a accompanying parallel Task XXIV workshop. Following the workshop and conference, a week was spent with Dr Sea Rottman, co-leader of Task XXIV working sharing the work I have been doing n the 4DB Framework and multi-model approach in order to inform the Task XXIV report (see following link). Despite the UK not contributing financially to Task XXIV, DECC have been allowed to benefit from the work through my participation in the Task as a payment in kind. http://www.ieadsm.org/Files/Tasks/Task%2024%20-%20Closing%20the%20Loop%20-%20Behaviour%20Change%20in%20DSM,%20From%20Theory%20to%20Policies%20and%20Practice/Publications/Task%2024%20Subtask%20I%20Final%20Report.pdf
Start Year 2012
 
Description Institute of Air Quality Management - Routes to Clean Air 2016 conference - Bristol, 11th October 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Invited keynote speaker at major professional practitioner and policy conference on air quality.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://iaqm.co.uk/event/routes-to-clean-air-2016/
 
Description London Sustainability Exchange Workshop on NICE Air Quality Guidance with Chartered Institute of Environmental Health 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact NGO engagement workshop regarding the development of guidance by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence on air quality
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.lsx.org.uk/news/events.aspx?id=3747
 
Description Book Launch - Beyond Behaviour Change 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Gave a presentation as part of the book launch for a book (Beyond Behaviour Change ed. Fiona Spotswood) that I contributed a chapter on based on my research with government. The talk was well attended and generated lively infomral discussion afterwards.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://policypress.co.uk/beyond-behaviour-change
 
Description Bristol Festival of Nature event: ClairCity - Society vs the Individual 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Society vs the Individual: What really needs to change if we are to sort out air pollution and climate change?

Tim Chatterton, Air Quality Management Resource Centre, UWE Bristol.

Laura Fogg-Rogers and Corra Boushel, Science Communication Unit, UWE Bristol.

Spaces are limited for this event - get your free ticket here.

In order to prevent potential climate change catastrophe we need many countries and cultures to work together towards a shared aim. However, political, geographical and even administrative barriers mean this gargantuan task is often neglected by policymakers. Despite ratifying treaties for change such as the Paris Agreement, action is slow to transpire at a societal level and may even be reversed by political changes. Instead, environmental communication efforts focus on individuals - imploring us to change our personal behaviours to benefit the environment (Chatterton, 2016).

Conversely, psychological and social research indicates that asking individuals to change their behaviour against the norms of society is at best ineffective, and at worst harmful to the individual. Social Cognitive Theory indicates that parts of an individual's learning can be directly related to observing others within the context of social interactions and outside media influences (Bandura, 1977, 2001; Fogg-Rogers, Sardo, & Boushel, n.d.). Similarly, the COM-B model of behaviour change (Michie, van Stralen, & West, 2011), drawing on the Theory of Planned Behaviour, recognises that an individual's behaviour is part of an interacting system of their capability, opportunity, motivation and behaviours. However, many determinants of behaviour lie outside the individual, and to this end Chatterton and Wilson (2014) developed the "Four Dimensions of Behaviour" framework in order to highlight how diverse 'behaviours' can be, and how they can range from ones dominated by internal cognitive processes, to ones which are massively constrained by physical and social systems and structures.

In this talk, we argue that environmental communications, therefore, need to focus on creating societal change in order to enable individual behaviour change. In other words, people need to be given opportunities to change, they need to see others doing the same and they need to be supported in doing so.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.bnhc.org.uk/festival-of-nature/claircity-society-vs-individual/
 
Description Bristol Researchers' Night 2015 'Bright Night') 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Gave a public lecture as part of the 'Bright Night' event on different (social and individualistic) approaches to behaviour, stimulating a lively question and discussion session.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.bnhc.org.uk/bristol-bright-night/
 
Description Changing Minds: Communicate Symposium on Behaviour Change 3rd October 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact In the lead up to Communicate 2017, this exciting, new, one-day event took a focused look at behavioural science:

Understanding how people think, feel and respond to information is vital to successfully communicating environmental issues and influencing positive change. Expert researchers and communications practitioners brought together a diverse range of perspectives, using behavioural sciences to explore and influence a shifting landscape of echo-chambers, divisive opinions and fake news.

85 delegates came together for the day to discuss, debate and build a vital communications toolkit for the coming year using new insights into behavioural psychology and sociology.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.bnhc.org.uk/communicate/changing-minds-tools-behavioural-science/
 
Description Conference on Communication and Environment 29 June - 2 July 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The 14th biennial Conference on Communication and Environment (COCE 2017) is hosted by the School of Media, Communication and Sociology at the University of Leicester, which has a long-time and long-term commitment to environmental awareness, research and education. The University has recently updated its Environmental Sustainability Strategy (2015-2020), embedding it into the heart of what we teach and research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://theieca.org/conference/coce-2017-leicester
 
Description Defra-National Centre for Atmospheric Science policy workshop 17th January 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Apologies for the email out of the blue. I am a NERC Knowledge Exchange Fellow working with Defra and based at the National Centre for Atmospheric Science at the University of York. I am organising a policy forum to bring together members of the air quality research community and Defra officials to discuss air quality challenges, research and evidence gaps, and to explore opportunities for future collaboration. The focus is on the UK Clean Air Strategy which is currently being developed; this meeting provides an opportunity to discuss some of the themes and key areas for input from the academic community. I am only planning to have a couple of talks with most of the meeting given over to discussion sessions.

I am contacting you to invite you to give a short presentation on some of your work. I have seen you present a couple of times and have read some of your articles; of particular interest were your comments around the role of people and society in the air pollution issue (e.g. the article in Environmental Scientist on Air Pollution: putting people at the heart of the issues). There is also some interest in your recent MOToring Along report, although this forum is not focused on transport emissions but also wider air pollution sources. I think it is useful to look at air quality issues through different lenses and while we think about technological solutions, it seems that the air quality expert community less often get involved in the social side of the problem. It is hoped that your presentation could make the community think a little about the solution side of the issue, particularly the non-technical, and catalyse an interesting discussion.

The forum is on 17th January in Westminster, London. The talk would only be short, ten minutes maybe 15 if more time was needed, followed by a discussion session (so no need to leave time for questions). The idea of the talks is not to provide a lot of information but to give some key points in an accessible way to an audience that is a mixture of researchers and policy makers. The following session is not a panel discussion, but an open discussion session and it is hoped that your presentation would stimulate an interesting conversation between attendees and of course your input to that would be valuable. If you are not available (I appreciate it is not a lot of notice) then is there anyone that you work with that you feel could present on this topic?
Session 1: Clean Air Strategy

10:45 - 11:00 Harriet Wallace (Defra) - The Clean Air Strategy and the Emissions Challenge
11:00 - 11:45 Discussion.
11:45 - 11:55 Tim Chatterton - Putting people at the centre of air quality management (tbc)
11:55 - 12:30 Continued discussion - with some focus on the roles of and interactions between technology and behavioural/societal change to drive AQ improvements.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScnEypsRgKqDH6DY8ndQGSkk17m0hSoew279bpVSGmenpfWsg/viewform
 
Description Everyday Futures Network Workshop Eindhoven 10-12th July 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact A three day workshop exploring issues of the sociology of ever day practices and future design processes
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/everydayfutures/
 
Description Expert Reference Group Bristol City Council Joint Strategic Needs Assessment on Fuel Poverty 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Hello Tim,

Your name was mentioned by my colleague Claire Lowman as the best person to approach regarding our writing of the JSNA chapter on Fuel Poverty.

Bristol City Council is putting together a Joint Strategic Needs Assessment chapter on Fuel Poverty. The aims of the chapter is to discuss the issue of fuel poverty, highlight services that are currently available to those that are 'fuel poor' and determine areas for potential future improvements to reduce fuel poverty. We're currently putting together a reference group to provide input, data sources and expertise for the creation of the chapter.

The involvement would include:
• Attending Reference Group meetings (One December, one January)
• Providing input into the JSNA scope at the above meetings
• Provide data and expertise
• Providing feedback and comments on the JSNA drafts

Please let me know if this is something of interest to you.

Looking forward to hearing from you. Please let me know if you have any questions.

Kind regards,

Aisha Stewart - Installations Project Officer
Bristol City Council Energy Service
Contact Number: 0117 357 6605
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Foresight Future of Mobility project Sustainable Transport Roundtable 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact This report summarises the findings of a meeting of experts exploring the opportunities and implications arising from the future transport system.

The workshop considered 3 main questions around sustainable transport:

How can we make transport more sustainable, and increase active travel?
How can we improve air quality and decrease carbon emissions in the transport system?
What is the role for government and the private sector in moving to a more sustainable transport system?
This report was produced as part of the Foresight future of of mobility project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/future-of-mobility-workshop-on-sustainable-transport
 
Description Invitation to participate in Dutch Ministry for Infrastructure and Environment/European Commission workshop on "Behaviour in Sustainable Mobility and Logistics", Rotterdam, 27-28 September 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Major workshop between Dutch government and European commission helping shape the future of sustainable mobility policy and research, and how 'behaviour' is incorporated into this.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.nwo.nl/en/about-nwo/organisation/nwo-domains/magw/captain+for+one+day
 
Description Invited participant to closed ESRC 'Beyond Behaviour Change' seminar series; the 'evidence-policy gap' 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Closed workshop with select group of policy orientated academics and professional practitioners to try ad bring the outcomes of the ESRC 'Beyond Behaviour Change' Seminar series together and scope potential written outputs for policymakers and academic audiences.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/bl/research/csbci/esrcseminarseries.aspx
 
Description Invited presentation at 2016 Centre for Transport and Society Winter Conference on "Putting people at the heart of the air pollution problem: Developing a more social approach to emissions analysis and reduction" 14th December 2016. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation of policy implications of research work made to group of influential policy and professional practitioners
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/et/research/cts/presentations.aspx
 
Description Keynote plenary presentation at Air Quality 2018: Science and Application conference, Barcelona 12-16th March 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Keynote plenary presentation on brining social sciences into air quality management.258 delegates from 58 countries reached. Was well received as a potentially discipline shaping challenging and radical presentation, that set the tone for the conference.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://www.airqualityconference.org/
 
Description Member of Expert Panel for discussion of Air Quality and Transport Issues at 50th University Transport Study Group Conference, London 4th January 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Panel on air quality and transport issues.Audience reported changes in views
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://utsg.net/
 
Description Presentation and Involvement in ESRC Behaviour Change Seminar Series 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Contributed to the shaping of the ESRC Seminar Series, was a key presenter in one event and have participated in a number of others.

The Seminars bring together a wide range of participants who bring a disparate range of expertise to stimulate lively and productive debate about different ways of thinking on aspects of behaviour across a range of disciplines and policy areas.

Attendance is usually around 60 people.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/bl/research/csbci/esrcseminarseries.aspx
 
Description Presentation and panel member at Policy UK workshop on 'Improving Air Quality in Our Towns and Cities' 24th November 2017. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Presentation of policy implications from research work to influential group of policymakers, professional practitioners and third sector representatives.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.policy-uk.com/event/2365/Improving_Air_Quality_in_Our_Towns_and_Cities__Implementing__lsq...
 
Description Presentation on "The air pollution-transport divide: Why after two decades of statutory obligations is road transport derived air pollution not declining?" RGS Transport Geography Group workshop at Department for Transport, London, 29 August 2016. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Workshop to present policy relevant research to a select group of policymakers from DfT, DBEIS, and Defra.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://tgrg.wordpress.com/
 
Description Presentation on 'Putting people at the heart of Air Quality Management: Developing a more social approach to emissions analysis and reduction'. Public Health England 2016 Annual UK Review Meeting on Outdoor and Indoor Air Pollution Research in the UK, Solihull, 26 September 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Public Health England Workshop presenting Air Pollution Research to range of influential stakeholders
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.phe-events.org.uk/hpa/frontend/reg/thome.csp?pageID=239673&eventID=606&traceRedir=2&even...
 
Description Public Health England (PHE) Air Quality Review, Advisory Group - Social science / behavioural interventions 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dear Dr Tim Chatterton

Public Health England (PHE) Air Quality Review, Advisory Group invitation - Social science / behavioural interventions

You may be aware that the UK Government has requested that PHE review the evidence for effective air quality interventions and provide practical recommendations for actions to supplement those identified in the Government's Air quality plan for nitrogen dioxide in UK (2017) by August 2018. The recommendations must stratify any recommendations by their health and economic impact.
PHE has commissioned five rapid evidence assessments to inform its recommendations to ministers, covering: industrial, planning, vehicle, agricultural and behavioural interventions.
An Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM)-led consortium has been awarded the contract to undertake a rapid evidence assessment on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of social science / behavioural interventions to reduce air pollution. The deadline for the work is June 2018. Attached you will find the project specification.
To facilitate this work, an Expert Advisory Group in social science / behavioural change co-chaired by Dr Stuart Aldridge and Terry Blair-Stevens will be established. We would like to invite you to join the Advisory Group.
The advisory group will play a pivotal role in making recommendations and providing scientific and technical advice. Requests for advice or input will be via email and/or meetings. Meetings will take place via teleconference and will include the contractors. The frequency of these will need to depend on: progress or in response to any specific issues that need discussion.
Please reply to Stuart.aldridge@phe.gov.uk and aqreview@phe.gov.uk to confirm whether you wish to accept this invitation.
I very much hope for your support in the development and oversight of this important work.
Kind regards
Stuart

Dr Stuart Aldridge

Environmental Public Health Scientist
Environmental Hazards and Emergencies Department
Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards (CRCE)
Public Health England

stuart.aldridge@phe.gov.uk
Tel - 0115 8441417 Mob - 07795617568

www.gov.uk/phe Follow us on Twitter @PHE_uk

Protecting and improving the nation's health
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description RAC/DfT/ITS Workshop on Transport Poverty, RAC Foundation, London 24th November 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Research-policy engagement workshop with DfT and other influential participants at the RAC foundation
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description SHAPE - Interdisciplinary approaches to building performance indicators workshop 15th February 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact SHAPE Energy Research Challenge
Sonja Oliveira and Magda Baborska-Narozny
The project workshop contributes to the SHAPE Energy programme. It sets out a research challenge that seeks to explore and conceive a new conceptual approach to the study of building performance feedback practices.
Feeding back or feeding forward? A new lens into building energy use
SHAPE Energy Research Challenge
BACKGROUND: What changes and what remains stable when feeding back building(s) energy use to its users, designers, contractors or institutional clients? Building performance evaluations of both existing and new buildings across the EU have tended to reveal the, at times vast differences between predicted and actual energy use (De Wilde 20141, van Dronkelaar et al., 20162). In some EU states buildings consume almost 40% of overall energy used, with developing countries within and outside the EU expecting an alarming growth due to rapid urbanisation (Palmer et al., 2016 3). Whilst some parts of the research community address this problem by studying ways building energy use is predicted during design (Oliveira et al., 20174), others suggest solutions lie in more effective construction, operation and feedback of a building's energy use (Baborska-Narozny et al., 20165).
Developing energy feedback strategies such as metering, displays, certification and billing is viewed by policy makers, businesses and practice as a key approach to changing energy-use behaviour and reducing demand despite growing calls for a behavioural shift drawing on broader theoretical approaches (Bull and Yanda 20176; Chatterton 20117; Schweber and Leiringer 20128). Use of theoretical tools in the field of built environment research overall is still developing and largely overlooked (Schweber 20159). The focus of energy behaviour research and energy policy has, to date, tended to be on the end user, with little mention of how designers (architects, planners, engineers and builders amongst others) approach feedback derived from building performance studies. In addition, we know little of how those who design buildings and those who use them respond through action or inaction (similarly or differently) to any feedback strategies.
What actions change, and which remain stable? Feedback is supposed to enable an assessment of the problem and encourage better practice and learning, but does it actually do this in practice? How is feedback approached and actioned, if at all, by different actors who conceive a design and use its output? What logics guide the process of change and, if stability occurs, how and why does this manifest?
PURPOSE: The purpose of this workshop is to explore the questions above by drawing together researchers and practitioners with an interest and expertise in building performance research focusing on feedback practices in the domestic and non-domestic sectors. Workshop participants are drawn from a wide range of disciplinary perspectives including architecture, sociology, environmental science, sustainability consultancy, energy behaviour and engineering. The workshop is designed to explore the two questions below:
What are the central research challenges to the study of feedback practices?
What theoretical tools would improve the ability of researchers to meet these research challenges?
OUTCOME: Findings from the workshop would enable the development of a conceptual analytical model that could provide a cross-disciplinary lens into a novel examination of a widely developing research problem not just within the built environment but in other fields as well.
1 De Wilde, P. (2014). The gap between predicted and measured energy performance of buildings: A framework for investigation. Automation in Construction, 41, 40-49.
2 van Dronkelaar, C., Dowson, M., Spataru, C., & Mumovic, D. (2016). A review of the regulatory energy performance gap and its underlying causes in non-domestic buildings. Frontiers in Mechanical Engineering, 1, 17.
3 Palmer, J., Terry N., Armitage P. (2016) Building Performance Evaluation Programme: Findings from non-domestic projects, London: Innovate UK
4 Oliveira, S., Marco, E., Gething, B., & Organ, S. (2017). Evolutionary, not revolutionary-logics of early design energy modelling adoption in UK architecture practice. Architectural Engineering and Design Management, 13(3), 168-184.
5 Baborska-Narozny M., Stevenson F., Ziyad F. J. (2016) User learning and emerging practices in relation to innovative technologies: a case study of domestic photovoltaic systems in the UK, Energy Research & Social Science, Vol. 13, 24-37 6 Bull, R., & Janda, K. B. (2017). Beyond feedback: introducing the 'engagement gap'in organizational energy management. Building Research & Information, 1-16. 7 Chatterton, T. (2011). An introduction to thinking about'energy behaviour': A multi-model approach.Department of Climate Change, HM Government 8Schweber, Libby, and Roine Leiringer. "Beyond the technical: a snapshot of energy and buildings research." Building Research & Information 40, no. 4 (2012): 481-492. 9
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://shapeenergy.eu/
 
Description TLT/Peter Brett Associates Developer Masterclass: Air quality and its impact on planning and development 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Event sparked lively discussion and led to a number of follow up enquiries regarding planning applications and air quality issues.



Developer Masterclass: Air quality and its impact on planning and development
16:30 - 18:45 | 20 February 2018 |
TLT, One Redcliff Street, Bristol BS1 6TP
Air quality is an increasingly important consideration in the planning process, with developments being either refused planning permission on air quality grounds or being approved subject to significant contributions to mitigate air quality impacts.
With the potential imposition of Clean Air Zones, the development picture has the potential to get more complicated. This masterclass will provide a forum for discussion of these and other current major air quality issues, with the aim of providing clarity as to the implications for developments, both now and in the future.
The session will be led by guest speaker Dr Tim Chatterton (Senior Research Fellow, University of the West of England) and Graham Harker (Air Quality Team Leader, PBA).


Agenda
Registration and refreshments
Masterclass commences
Networking and drinks
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018