Psychosocial resilience in adolescent offspring of mothers with depression: testing causal mechanisms

Lead Research Organisation: Cardiff University
Department Name: School of Medicine

Abstract

Adolescent emotional and behavioural problems have become increasingly common. A key priority is to identify causal risk and protective mechanisms to inform policies and prevention strategies, especially in high-risk groups. A common contributory factor is exposure to maternal depression that can have a major impact on the development, health and wellbeing of children, especially when a mother's depression is chronic or recurrent. Problems often develop during adolescence and include depression, antisocial behaviour and difficulties at home and at school. However, maternal depression affects children in different ways. Many young people with a depressed mother do not develop behavioural or emotional problems and instead remain well-adjusted. This study tests the role that young people themselves, their families and friends play in promoting resilient adaptation to maternal depression as a risk influence. Is resilience more likely when a parent's depression does not interfere with effective parenting or when harmonious family relationships are maintained? Are children's own resources important, for example having effective coping strategies? Can positive relationships with friends compensate for difficulties at home? Understanding what best helps young people with depressed parents maintain positive psychosocial wellbeing as they grow up is important as this will facilitate identification of effective intervention targets. However, it is crucial to show that resilience promoting factors are associated with sustained protective effects, to consider whether they also predict change in well-being (e.g. recovery from earlier problems), to test the direction of effects thereby clarifying 'causal' mechanisms involved in resilience. To find out the causal pathways involved requires good understanding of how resilience in young people develops over time. This project makes use of two extremely valuable longitudinal datasets and analyses. The first is a large population cohort of parents and children studied from birth into adolescence. The second is a sample of parents with recurrent clinical depression. Both studies have followed parents and their children as they grow older. This means that analyses can begin to disentangle underlying causal processes by modelling how change in young people's mental health is related to change in the factors that promote resilience (and vice versa). The study will also address a number of other important issues. We will make sure that child, family and peer relationship factors that might form the targets for intervention are not just markers for correlated adversity. We will test which protective factors are specifically important in the context of maternal depression. The study will address whether different factors are important for boys and for girls, because this will later help tailor interventions appropriately. Finally, we will test whether explanations for resilience in young people affected by chronic maternal depressive symptoms in the general population are the same as for a sample of adolescents with more severely affected mothers with recurrent depressive disorder.

Planned Impact

One in ten young people suffer from significant emotional and behavioural disorders, and suicide is the third leading cause of death in teenagers and young adults. Moreover, evidence highlights that such problems have become more common in recent years. Youth depression and antisocial behaviour show strong continuities with adult psychosocial adjustment, and have broad consequences for young people's life chances, including education, work and family life. It is therefore a key social, economic and health priority to develop policies and practical interventions that reduce the incidence and burden of adolescent psychopathology. Epidemiological and clinical studies show that adolescents of depressed mothers are at an especially high risk of depression, conduct disorder, substance use, self harm and suicide. However, problematic outcomes are not inevitable for these young people as there is considerable variation in functional adaptation within this high risk group. It is striking that many adolescents appear remarkably resilient even when their mother suffers from chronic and severe depression. Having identified maternal depression as an important risk factor we now need to move forward by establishing what psychosocial factors promote adaptive adolescent developmental trajectories. Crucially, developmental processes and mechanisms that explain resilience remain poorly understood. The identification of modifiable protective mechanisms of relevance to this at-risk group will inform local and national policy and appropriate targets for preventative interventions. However, it is first necessary to be sure that identified protective factors result in sustained positive developmental trajectories, to better understand the causal mechanisms involved, and to ensure that findings are robust across different samples and population subgroups.

Specific beneficiaries of our research will include intervention experts and policy makers. We will work closely with those designing intervention programmes for young people living with mothers who are depressed. They will benefit by being informed of appropriate targets for new preventive strategies aimed at enhancing resilience. Policy-makers will also benefit directly from this research. Much research appropriately highlights the risks for offspring of depressed parents. Understanding promoters of resilience will provide a useful complement in making decisions about putting in place efforts to support these high risk adolescents, both locally and nationally. We will continue our work with the Dartington Social Research Unit (DSRU). For example, the PI is currently involved in work by the DSRU who are partnering several local authorities to test out innovative approaches to use evidence to shape children's services. We aim to use similar strategies to translate understanding of specific targets for promoting adolescent resilience based on a strong empirical and replicated evidence base into effective future policy and practice. This in turn makes it more likely that the research will have longer term benefits for young people affected by parental depression through improved access to effective interventions and services. This has the potential to benefit young people's immediate and long-term psychosocial functioning. Promoting resilient psychosocial trajectories in adolescents will have positive consequences for society as a whole by reducing the burden of economic and social costs associated with depression and antisocial behaviour.

Publications

10 25 50
 
Description In the UK at least 1 million children have a mother with serious depression. Maternal depression is a common risk factor for adolescent depression and antisocial behaviour. These problems are important to prevent given their substantial individual, social and economic impact. Some adolescents fare better than expected. Understanding resilience mechanisms is important for designing effective preventative interventions. Our objective was to identify modifiable child, family and social protective factors that contribute to resilience in two complementary datasets (a high risk sample of mothers with recurrent depression and a population birth cohort).
We were successful in achieving our aims. Key findings are as follows. 1) Resilience is not uncommon; around one in five in the high risk sample showed sustained good mental health. In both studies many young people had better than expected mental health given severity of their mother's depression. 2) Child self esteem, efficacy and exercise, parental warmth and support (including from fathers), and good quality social relationships are all important. 3) Multiple protective factors together contribute to resilience (high risk study: 0/1 protective factors: 0-5% resilient; 2/3 protective factors: 10-13%; 4/5 protective factors: 38-48% resilient). 4) In the population cohort protective factors assessed earlier in childhood (age 8-10) showed enduring protective effects that persisted to early adulthood (age 19). 5) Some predictors showed domain-specific protective effects. For example, fathers' emotional support and child physical exercise only showed protective benefits in relation to depression (not antisocial behaviour). 6) Less serious but sustained symptoms of depression in mothers (affecting 50% of the population cohort) are also associated with risks for youth mental health problems, but the same protective factors accounted for resilience in this group as in young people exposed to chronic severe maternal depression.
These novel findings were carefully tested to rule out alternative explanations. Protective effects were not simply proxies for less severe maternal depression. We also tested the possibility of reverse causation. For example, a cross-lagged modelling approach showed that fathers' emotional support predicts a decrease in adolescent depressive symptoms, but not vice versa.
These findings have important implications. First, not all parents with depression receive treatment, and treatment is not always successful. Depression is often chronic or recurrent. Identifying protective factors that help 'buffer' children from these risks is therefore important. Second, preventative interventions at present typically focus on specific mechanisms in isolation (e.g. psychological therapies or social interventions). Our study clearly shows that multi-modal interventions that enhance protective effects across multiple domains are needed. Third, simple changes to existing interventions could have substantial benefits, e.g. promoting frequent physical exercise, involving fathers in family-based interventions, and engaging with schools to help facilitate good social relationships.
Findings have been published in several journal papers, presented at international conferences, at meetings of health, education and social care practitioners, and to policy makers. Links with intervention scientists have helped inform the development of a new psychoeducation package for adolescents, currently being evaluated in a feasibility trial funded by NIHR/HCRW. Further work building on this award includes a MHRUK studentship starting 2020 to further investigate long-term resilience in high risk offspring of depressed parents, and understanding mental health resilience promotion is also a major theme of the newly funded Wolfson Centre for Young People's Mental Health.
Exploitation Route Existing interventions for young people affected by maternal depression should be modified and new ones developed. Their effectiveness then needs to be evaluated. We have disseminated our findings widely, established links with intervention scientists, and helped in the development of a new online psychoeducation package for adolescent depression. Findings are also relevant to practitioners working with families affected by maternal depression. Health professionals dealing with adult depression should be aware of risks for mental health problems in children, and also what factors might help prevent problems. Findings also have important public health and policy implications. Chronic severe depression affecting 1 in 20 mothers was associated with greatest risk, but half of mothers in the population cohort had less severe but sustained symptoms of depression also associated with maladaptive youth outcomes (depression, suicidality and antisocial behaviour). The same predictors accounted for resilience as in the highest-risk group. Therefore, efforts should also focus on developing effective mechanisms that deliver benefits to at-risk children beyond the clinical setting, for example via online psychoeducation. To achieve impact at local and national levels we are collaborating with the Dartington Social Research Unit, the National Centre for Mental Health, the Welsh Assembly Government, and health boards in Wales.
Sectors Education,Healthcare,Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism,Government, Democracy and Justice

 
Description Findings have now been integrated in the development of a new NIHR-funded psychoeducation package for adolescent depression. The package is currently being evaluated. A briefing on key research findings has been disseminated widely - to intervention experts in the UK and internationally, to policy makers (e.g. Children's commissioner for Wales), to voluntary organisations that provide help and information to young people with mental health problems, and to health professionals and related professional bodies and organisations (e.g. NICE). We have given an extensive range of talks to practitioners and policy makers. We plan to continue raising awareness of the main findings from the project, and are involved in ongoing discussions with policy makers and intervention/prevention experts to maximise impact from the project in future.
First Year Of Impact 2015
Sector Healthcare
Impact Types Policy & public services

 
Description policy brief on mental health resilience in at-risk adolescents
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Implementation circular/rapid advice/letter to e.g. Ministry of Health
 
Description British Psychological Society funding for hosting training workshop on longitudinal methods
Amount £2,500 (GBP)
Organisation British Psychological Society (BPS) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 03/2015 
End 03/2015
 
Description Early-onset depression: Characterising development and identifying risks
Amount £763,680 (GBP)
Funding ID Co-applicant 
Organisation Medical Research Council (MRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 11/2017 
End 11/2020
 
Description GW4 Biomed DTP - Optimizing adult mental health outcomes in children with neuordevelopmental problems
Amount £75,457 (GBP)
Organisation Medical Research Council (MRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2019 
End 04/2023
 
Description Optimizing outcomes in children of depressed parents: Identification of modifiable promoters of sustained mental health resilience.
Amount £77,344 (GBP)
Organisation Mental Health Research UK (MHRUK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2020 
End 09/2024
 
Description Wolfson Centre for Young People's Mental Health
Amount £10,000,000 (GBP)
Organisation The Wolfson Foundation 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 11/2020 
End 09/2025
 
Description DartingtonSRUresilience 
Organisation Social Research Unit at Dartington
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Informed senior research staff and trustees of findings from the project
Collaborator Contribution Hosted seminar, and agreed to assist in preparation of policy brief and dissemination of findings to local and national stakeholders
Impact Dartington Social Research Unit hosted seminar to discuss findings
Start Year 2015
 
Description Early Intervention Foundation 
Organisation Early Intervention Foundation
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Joined scientific advisory project on EIF project on ACEs and child development.
Collaborator Contribution EIF agreed to sit on Implementation and Engagement Board for new Wolfson Centre for Young People's Mental Health
Impact EIF ACEs report to be published spring 2020. Wolfson Centre I&E board to sit annually 2021-2025
Start Year 2019
 
Description Early adversity 
Organisation National Institute of Health and Medical Research (INSERM)
Country France 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Hosted visit and organised seminar; Joint symposium for NCDS@60
Collaborator Contribution Coding of prospectively assessed ACEs in National Child Development Study; Joint symposium for NCDS@60
Impact The long term psychological and physiological consequences of childhood adversities: identifying exposures and pathways over the life course using the NCDS. Paper symposium to be presented at "NCDS 60 years of our lives". London, 2018
Start Year 2017
 
Description NIHR Developing and evaluating an online psychoeducation package for adolescent depression 
Organisation National Institute for Health Research
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Advisor on resilience in adolescents at high risk of developing depression. Thapar is supervisor of NIHR Fellowship
Collaborator Contribution Development of evidence-based psychoeducation package for young people with or at high-risk of depression. Elements informed by findings of resilience grant (e.g. role of co-parent when one parent is depressed). Provided input from clinical and psychoeducation perspectives. Now advising on prevention and intervention approaches as part of new Wolfson Centre for Young People's Mental Health
Impact None as yet
Start Year 2013
 
Description Psychosocial resilience in adolescent offspring of mothers with depression: Testing causal mechanisms 
Organisation King's College London
Department Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution PI
Collaborator Contribution Co-Investigators
Impact Collishaw et al, 2016 Lancet Psychiatry Mahedy et al, 2018, Journal of Adolescence
Start Year 2012
 
Description Psychosocial resilience in adolescent offspring of mothers with depression: Testing causal mechanisms 
Organisation London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution PI
Collaborator Contribution Co-Investigators
Impact Collishaw et al, 2016 Lancet Psychiatry Mahedy et al, 2018, Journal of Adolescence
Start Year 2012
 
Description Psychosocial resilience in adolescent offspring of mothers with depression: Testing causal mechanisms 
Organisation University of Oxford
Department Department of Social Policy and Intervention
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution PI
Collaborator Contribution Co-Investigators
Impact Collishaw et al, 2016 Lancet Psychiatry Mahedy et al, 2018, Journal of Adolescence
Start Year 2012
 
Description Psychosocial resilience in adolescent offspring of mothers with depression: Testing causal mechanisms 
Organisation University of Sussex
Department School of Psychology Sussex
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution PI
Collaborator Contribution Co-Investigators
Impact Collishaw et al, 2016 Lancet Psychiatry Mahedy et al, 2018, Journal of Adolescence
Start Year 2012
 
Description Welsh Assembly Government - joint post 
Organisation Government of Wales
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Joint funded post between Cardiff University and Welsh Government to start 2021. The post will bridge across the Wolfson Centre for Young People's Mental Health and Welsh Government. This role will focus on evaluation of youth mental health policy, on using scientific discoveries on youth mental health to inform further policy developments, and on ensuring that the research activities of the Wolfson Centre for Young People's Mental Health are informed by policy and practice stakeholders in Wales. It will involve data analysis of longitudinal population data, national administrative data sets, and repeated whole school population health and wellbeing surveys. The postholder will work in partnership with policy makers, practitioners and the public to facilitate and conduct policy evaluation studies. This will include time spent working within Welsh Government.
Collaborator Contribution joint funding and supervision of this research/policy post
Impact none as yet
Start Year 2020
 
Description B debate Barcelona 2014 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Two day debate to inform future international epidemiological studies involving brain sciences, and to discuss and inform public health policy.



Possible future collaborations discussed including possible links with WHO asthma worldwide monitoring to consider whether could be extended to cover child mental health trends.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.bdebate.org/en/forum/environment-and-child-brain-development-challenges-global-context
 
Description Baglan hospital resilience talk 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact attended by CAMHS psychiatrists and psychologists. Discussed implications for clinical practice

been invited to give further talks
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Bristolintervention 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Met with colleagues at Bristol University undertaking research on interventions aimed at fathers in early childhood (J Evans group). Shared findings on role of fathers in promoting resilience in order to influence planned intervention trials conducted at Bristol.

Grant applications adapted to take account of new findings. Rebecca Pearson at Bristol involved in resilience paper.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Dartington November 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Dartington Centre for Social Policy seminar for Fellows on risk and resilience in young people with a depressed parent. Audience included wide range of professionals (Head teachers, youth offending, judiciary, CAMHS). Debate and discussion about implications for policy and practice. Request for more information and links from audience on whom to disseminate resilience findings
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description DartingtonSRUseminar 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Discussed implications of findings of resilience project for policy and practice. Considered ways in which to maximise impact. Agreed to collaborate on policy/practice briefings and further dissemination of findings to policy makers, including directors of local authorities.

Dartington SRU staff and trustees expressed interest in the project and offered to facilitate dissemination and host future seminar
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description ESRC Society Now article and news release 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Article in ESRC Society Today magazine about mental health resilience study.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.esrc.ac.uk/files/news-events-and-publications/publications/magazines/society-now/society-...
 
Description ESRCResearchMethods 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Well attended talk on methods for undertaking cross-cohort comparisons in understanding trends in mental health, e.g. calibration. Talk filmed and publically available.

Requests for further information on calibration methods
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.ncrm.ac.uk/TandE/video/RMF2014/filmed.php?id=24ca418
 
Description Exeter seminar 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Open seminar at Exeter University Mood Disorders Centre, Think Tank series. Talk to academics and general public on intergenerational risks for depression and resilience sparked questions and discussion on future research possibilities as well as policy and practice implications
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.exeter.ac.uk/mooddisorders/thinktank/previousexternalspeakers/
 
Description GH children services meeting 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Talk on improving mental health outcomes for children in Wales - Welsh Government, children's services meeting

not sure
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description GHtalkBristol 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Talk on family relationship influences

not known
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description GHtalkYouthJustice 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Youth Justice Board seminar

not known
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description LHR14child effects 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Several hundred people attended the Life History Research Society Meeting. This talk was part of a symposium addressing issues regarding the intergenerational transmission of risk and resilience in offspring of depressed mothers. The talk was well attended and resulted in questions and discussions both at the meeting and subsequently

Adapted publication in light of comments
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Mental health resilience (School Ysgol Plasmawr) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Invited talk for school Inset day to train teachers in relation to youth mental health resilience
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description National Safeguarding Week 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Invited presentation about promoting mental health resilience in at-risk young people today followed by debate. Around 40 social care and educational practitioners attended this session as part of National Safeguarding Week
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.cardiffandvalelscb.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/Final-Programme-of-Events.pdf
 
Description Organiser of ESRC Festival of Social Science. 'How can science improve mental health' 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact A level students from two secondary schools attended an event in which they were able to engage with researchers in psychology, mental health and neuroscience with interactive displays showcasing mental health research. Students were given guided tours of the genetics labs and the Cardiff University Brain Research Imaging Centre. The second part of the visit involved a debate about youth mental health with an expert panel comprising researchers and clinicians. Feedback from students and their teachers was very positive, and students reported better understanding about mental health, both schools agreed to strengthen links with our department, and one of the schools has already helped by participating in research since the event. Other plans are to have a youth advisory group to guide future research studies.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description RBJ - MHTW 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Talk on development of psycheducation package

none as yet
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description RBJ BAPSCAN 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Discussion of how professionals can best help young people with depression

not known
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description RCP Higher Trainees 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation of resilience research findings to Child Adolescent Psychiatry trainees

Great interest from conference attendees and reported that relevant to clinical practice
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Resilience - CAMHS 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Type Of Presentation Keynote/Invited Speaker
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Health professionals
Results and Impact Delivered a talk on resilience to health professions from CAMHS

Unknown
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Resilience info sheet 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Information on resilience study sent to policy makers, intervention experts and third sector (e.g. Chief Scientific Officer, Wales; YoungMinds; NICE)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Reuters, GMA Network 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Stephan Collishaw commenting on his research about resilience factors protecting adolescents with depressed parents
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://uk.reuters.com/article/us-health-adolescents-depression-teens-idUKKBN0TZ2L220151216
 
Description Talk to SPRs, 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Seminar on life course links, risk and resilience in psychopathology for SPRs and consultant psychiatrists in South Wales
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Wired Gov 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Stephan Collishaw commenting on his research about resilience factors protecting adolescents with depressed parents
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.wired-gov.net/wg/news.nsf/articles/Mental+health+problems+for+children+of+depressed+paren...
 
Description formal meeting with Cardiff and Vale UHB to discuss joint research 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Meeting with health board directors to discuss plans for joint funded post and research collaboration in area of youth mental health.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description formal meeting with Prince's Trust to discuss joint activity 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Agreement reached on future research collaboration and letter of support provided for funding application for new Youth Centre
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019