Understanding the relationship practices of abusive partners in same sex and/or trans relationships and their implications for theory and practice.

Lead Research Organisation: University of Sunderland
Department Name: Social Sciences

Abstract

In recent years in the UK there has been recognition that domestic violence takes place in same sex and/or trans relationships and a parallel and emerging body of research which has begun to explore and develop understandings about how and why this occurs, and whether and how victim/survivors seek help. The principal investigator (PI) and co-investigator (Co-I) have both made key contributions towards the development of this knowledge in the UK, with the PI and Co-I having conducted in-depth qualitative research with victims/survivors of abuse in same-sex relationships within two different projects, and the PI also having co-conducted the first comprehensive national survey of domestic violence in same-sex relationships. However, despite this growing body of research, there has been no dedicated research on those who are the abusive partners in same sex and/or trans relationships, and consequently there has been little evidence available on which to base the development of services to address their behaviours.

This research project aims to start this process by conducting a mixed method study to explore understandings about abusive and associated help-seeking behaviours by partners who are abusive in same sex and/or trans relationships; and the understandings of practitioners who might reasonably expect to work with them. The coalition government's Violence Against Women and Girls Action Plan (2011) makes clear that prevention, accountability and rehabilitation are core to eradicating violence against women and girls; and that though most victim/survivors of violence are heterosexual women and girls that domestic violence occurs within same sex relationships. This means that different methods need to be identified to provide appropriate responses to those who are abusive in same sex and/or trans relationships. In order to develop this aspect of the research we will draw on existing knowledge about heterosexual perpetrators in order to draw comparisons across gender and sexuality.

In the first phase of the research, a quantitative survey will be undertaken which will be based on an existing, tested, and reliable survey tool co-designed by the PI. This will be amended to make it appropriate and targetted at those who have been abusive in same sex and/or trans relationships. Follow-up qualitative interviews will be conducted with volunteers recruited from the survey to explore more in-depth accounts of abusive relationships from the point of view of the partner who has used abusive behaviours. The focus in these interviews will be to identify how they make sense of their own behaviours and whether and how they seek help.

In the second phase, focus groups and individual interviews will be conducted with relevant practitioners in order to seek their perspectives on the key findings from the first phase of the fieldwork and to explore their understandings of what services might be appropriate for perpetrators in same sex and/or trans relationships, and any barriers to offering such services. Respect, the national pracitioners association for those working with perpetrators of heterosexual domestic violence will be key here to facilitating recruitment of experienced practitioners who have worked with perpetrators of heterosexual domestic violence. However, other routes to recruitment will also be used, for example through the Nottingham Domestic Violence Forum, the North East LGBT Domestic Violence Forum and the national LGBT Domestic Violence Forum.

Key outputs expected to result from this research are a knowledge base about abusive partners in same sex and/or trans relationships and their help-seeking and recommendations for practitioners who are working with and developing interventions for abusive partners in same-sex and/or trans relationships; and the development of a methodology for the complex and highly sensitive task of research perpetrators of domestic violence in same-sex and/or trans relationships.

Planned Impact

This is a timely piece of research as the Violence Against Women and Girls Action Plan (2011) has identified prevention, rehabilitation and holding those who are violent/abusive accountable as key aims to be achieved over the next five years; and acknowledges that work needs to be targeted at victim/survivors and those who are abusive/violent across gender and sexuality. Making perpetrators accountable for their behaviour has proved challenging: attrition rates are amongst the highest of all crimes (Hester, 2006); and evidence of efficacy of voluntary perpetrator programmes is mixed. However, it is believed that these programmes offer real alternatives to criminalising partners who are also often parents. The challenge is to design the programmes to be appropriate for those attending them yet very little is known about those who are abusive in same sex and/or trans relationships or what might work for them in the design of interventions for them. This project intends to contribute to these debates at two levels: both theoretically in terms of how the disconnect between the heteronormative model of domestic violence might be addressed and amended to be more inclusive of diverse relationships; and in practice in terms of how interventions might be designed to more reflect the specificities of those who are abusive in same sex and/or trans relationships.

Through inclusion of practitioners in the research and of key agencies such as Respect and Broken Rainbow on the steering group it is intended that the findings will be discussed and disseminated in such a way as to have direct impact on the domestic violence field and in the provision of interventions for abusive partners (as well as support for victim/survivors and their children).

The dissemination strategy is informed by the goal of maximising impact: two free dissemination events at the end of the Project with an invited audience (including those identified by the steering group); a research report with key findings and recommendations for practice published online and distributed at the dissemination events and through networks identified by the steering group (e.g. on the website of Respect; Broken Rainbow; Stop Domestic Abuse on the LGBT Youth Scotland website); publications in 3 practitioner journals (for e.g. British Journal of Social Work; Probation Journal; Howard Journal of Criminal Justice) and 3 academic journals (Violence Against Women; Sexualities;Journal of Homosexuality); papers presented at 1 national conference (British Criminological Society Conference) and 2 international conferences (European Sociological Association, Violence Against Women, Canada). It is also intended that a book will be written in a style that is accessible and engaging for both academic and practice audiences.

It is also intended that the findings will inform the broader field of relationships and intimacy for academic and practitioner (e.g. counselling) audiences. The findings will be of interest to both of these audiences in terms of what those entering same sex and/or trans relationships expect from these relationships; how and in what ways these relationships are gendered; whether and from whom those in these relationships seek help about their abusive behaviours; what kinds of help those who have been abusive might want and/or use. It is intended that there will also be a report written that addresses this agenda which will be circulated to agencies such as Relate (who will also be invited to the dissemination events).

Finally it is intended that the findings will also be written up for LGBT audiences in key mediums, such as Diva and Gay Times the two biggest selling magazines within the UK for LGB readerships; and through newsletters and other appropriate publications aimed at trans communities.
 
Description The key findings of the Coral Project are:
1. The distinctive methodology of recruiting a non-clinical, national community sample has provided new knowledge about the range of violent and potentially abusive behaviours that might be enacted in relationships where one partner identifies as lesbian, gay, bisexual and/or trans (LGBT); their attitudes towards relationships; and self-assessment of their own behaviours in relationship (for example, their tendency to be controlling, angry or trusting). This knowledge allows us to achieve one of the project's aims to make sense of how abusive behaviours play out across sexuality and gender. The survey tool has successfully recruited participants who report a profile of coercively controlling behaviour but none of these participants were recruited to interview. Instead, analysis of accounts of violent and potentially abusive acts reported in interviews show these were more often in self-defence or retaliation or reflective of a volatile relationship or one that was about to end. The findings reinforce the methodological strengths of using a mixed methodology in the field of intimate partner violence because of the ways in which qualitative data analysis has enabled a deeper understanding of the quantitative data as well as pointing to the limitations of quantitative data collection in this field. The success of the methodology challenges generic surveys of violence and abuse which commonly make assumptions that any reported incident of violence/abuse is de facto evidence of 'domestic violence'. Our qualitative data demonstrates the importance of understanding context, motivations, impact and meanings of violent and abusive acts. Implications for practice point to the need for more targeted interventions to address different kinds of violence and abuse.
2. Significant levels of inequality in the provision of interventions in the voluntary and mandatory sectors were found. Implications for LGB and/or T offenders not able to attend accredited perpetrator programmes include harsher sentencing and diminished opportunities for parole. In voluntary and mandatory sectors there are also implications for managing risk and ensuring the safety of their current/ex partners and children.
3. The multi-layered data analysis has allowed us to consider the utility of Johnson's typology of intimate partner violence for the relationships of LGB and/or T people in the UK context. Our analysis suggests that his typology can be applied to these relationships and that the typology could be amended to include the possiblity that both coercive controlling violence and situational couple violence can include non-physical forms of violence
4. A key conclusion arising from the findings is the need for a more integrated approach in the delivery of what we call 'relationships services' for LGB and/or T people. Findings showing different motivations for and impacts of violence and abuse taken together with the findings showing many of those seeking formal help opt for counselling and therapy suggest that there is a need for relationships services (sex and relationship education, relationships and other counselling and therapists, youth workers, specialist domestic violence practitioners working with survivors and perpetrators, mainstream practitioners in mental health services, housing, the police and so on), should be better equipped to identify what the needs are of LGB and/or T service users in relation to violence and abuse and better signpost them to appropriate services, including, where appropriate, within criminal justice system.
4. The survey design and follow-up interviews provide a model for further research including of domestic violence and abuse in heterosexual relationships. This will allow for a more complex unpacking of the violence and abuse being reported as well as better understanding of the needs both of those who report victimisation and those who report the enactment of violence and abuse. In this context, the implications of the Coral Project for more integrated relationships services are also applicable for heterosexual relationships.
Exploitation Route As the analysis developed we realised that there were implications of our work beyond that relevant to the domestic violence sector and perpetrator work: including for youth work, sex and relationships education and providers of counselling/therapeutic responses. The methodology was thus altered to include these practitioners in focus groups considering preliminary findings. As a result we intend to provide a series of practitioner briefings aimed at each of the practitioner groups we have identified. We have also been asked to provide case studies for use in training which will be developed as training resources. In line with our recommendations, a pilot intervention project has been developed by Broken Rainbow and Respect which awaits a funding decision. We are currently writing articles aimed at practitioner and mainstream audiences (e.g. Women's Aid SAFE has commissioned an article and asked for a further one).
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Education,Healthcare,Government, Democracy and Justice

URL http://www.sunderland.ac.uk/research/areasofresearch/centreforappliedsocialsciences/projects/abusivepartnersinsamesexrelationships/#d.en.55480
 
Description The Coral project ended at the end of November 2014. It is still early days to report on impact, particularly in the current funding climate. As part of the dissemination strategy the Coral Project held dissemination events in London, Sunderland, Edinburgh and Cardiff. Of the 163 attendees at the Sunderland dissemination event and the 73 attendees at the London dissemination event, 146 completed evaluation forms (62%). Participants came from a range of agencies, including senior managers and frontline practitioners from within mandatory and voluntary perpetrator programmes, the Crown Prosecution Service, youth projects including sexual health projects, LGBT organisations (e.g. Galop, MESMAC), domestic violence and abuse specialists (e.g. IDVAs, MARAC coordinators), sexual violence specialists (e.g. Rape Crisis, ISVAS), counsellors and therapists working privately and from within third sector counselling services (including from within the NHS). Of these, 99% said the Coral Project findings would be useful for their work (13% 'extremely useful', 59% 'very useful' and 27% 'quite useful'). Asking participants in what ways the report and findings would be useful, 32% said for developing practice; 24% for developing training; 8% for securing funding; and 36% for increasing knowledge/awareness about the field. In order to further support these impacts we suggested providing Briefing Papers aimed at different practitioner groups. In the evaluation of the two events we asked participants to indicate which Briefing Papers they would wish to receive from the list of: voluntary perpetrator interventions; mandatory perpetrator interventions; youth work; sex and relationships work; specialist domestic violence sector; counselling and therapy; LGBT sector. Participants showed interest in the full range suggesting not only that we were able to include a range of practitioners in the dissemination events but also that there is significant interest in finding out more about how the findings can be applied in practice. We have circulated draft briefing papers to practitioners within Probation and counselling/therapy services, both third sector and NHS to get feedback on their usefulness for wider dissemination. However, we are currently involved in the following activities or are aware of the following developments arising from the Coral Project: i. Raising awareness of the needs of those who are abusive in LGB and/or T relationships: We have spoken at five events where practitioners and academics have been invited in London, Worcester, Chester and at both dissemination events of the Mirabel Project in London and Durham in January 2015) (numbers overall = 450). ii. We have published a summary of findings in SAFE, the Women's Aid Magazine aimed at practitioners. iii. Working with practitioners to improve their practice: a. We are currently working with probation projects in four probation services (in London, the South East, and at NOMS national office) and four counsellors/therapists in the North East to develop our briefing papers aimed at these groups and in giving advice on the development of perpetrator interventions and relationship interventions more generally for LGB and/or T abusive partners. Our findings suggest that there can be confusion amongst individuals about their being a perpetrator/victim when they use retaliatory or defensive violence/abuse and this has had some impact on practitioners who are considering piloting more general 'relationships' work with LGB and/or T communities. b. Dr Barnes has been invited to give input into the development of an LGBT version of an existing domestic violence and abuse awareness programme (the DAY programme, designed and coordinated by Natalie Collins) that practitioners are trained to deliver to young people. This development work is scheduled for December 2015 and will make use of the Coral Project findings, particularly with regard to helping practitioners to differentiate victims and perpetrators, understand identity abuse and tackle the invisibility of LGBT domestic violence and abuse that is a product of the 'public story' of domestic violence and abuse. c. In addition, Prof Donovan is working with a colleague at Sheffield Hallam to promote an informal sex and relationships education agenda for LGB and/or T young people and recently she co-facilitated an ESRC funded Social Science Festival national panel on this. Out of this is expected to develop a national network of interested practitioners currently providing information SRE for young LGB and/or T people that will draw on findings from the Coral Project to inform best practice that includes attention to behaviours in relationships that might be violent/abusive. iv. We are aware of the findings being used by the following organisations: a. Coral Project findings have been cited in a report written by Citizens Advice Bureau calling for experienced social and legal support for victims of domestic abuse, with particular recognition of marginalised groups such as LGBT individuals (Parker, I. (2015) Victims of Domestic Abuse: Struggling for Support?). Evidence from the Coral Project has also been cited in the Kirklees Domestic Abuse Strategy (Kirklees Council (2015) Kirklees Domestic Abuse Strategy 2015-2018: Taking Up the Challenge Towards Freedom). The Coral Project end-of-project report has also been included as a signpost for police in the College of Policing Authorised Professional Practice Resources on domestic abuse risk and vulnerability. The following findings from our work have resonated with practitioners in the field: b. The apparent confusion amongst LGB and/or T people themselves as well as practitioners about identifying perpetration and /or other uses of violence/abuse: This has led some practitioners to consider developing interventions that are more generally targeted at 'relationships work' rather than specifically at 'perpetration'. Broken Rainbow, LGBT Youth Scotland and Equation in Nottingham have all indicated that the findings have informed their work in thinking about and responding to domestic violence and abuse where at least one partner identifies as LGB and/or T. Equation intends to hold a conference in early 2016 to which we will be invited to present our findings to a practitioner audience. c. The lack of interventions of any kind for LGB and/or T people concerned about their own relationship behaviours: This has prompted three agencies to consider the development of programmes (one is a probation service and the other are Respect in partnership with Broken Rainbow) and to apply for funding. d. The different ways in which power might be exerted within LGB and/or T relationships. This has led to specific case studies from the Coral Project to be used in training by the Dyn Project in Safer Wales to increase awareness. Equation in Nottingham is also planning to develop training on violence and abuse in self-defence and resistance and the Coral Project data may be used as part of the training materials. e. The need for counsellors/therapists to have the opportunity for training, both in: i. Knowledge about the relationships LGB and/or T people might have and the similarities and differences that might occur as compared with their heterosexual counterparts; and ii. Knowledge about domestic violence and abuse and how dynamics of power and relationship rules might impact on how partners in the relationship might understand and make sense of their experiences in relationships where at least one partner identifies as LGB and/or T In relation to this, a new Community Interest Company in the North East, Back on Track, aiming to provide counselling and advocacy for LGB and/or T communities has been interested in how these findings will inform their counselling services. i. Broken Rainbow, the national LGBT domestic violence and abuse helpline, with Respect, the national umbrella organisation for domestic violence and abuse perpetrator services, have co-designed a pilot project developing an intervention for LGBT perpetrators. They have submitted a bid for funding for this intervention and have invited the PI and the Co-I to be involved in the evaluation of this pilot project, if funded. ii. Hampshire Police have reported to us that, as a result of this project, they now involve Diversity Officers whenever a same-sex domestic violence and abuse case is reported. Early reports suggest that this is having a positive impact for those cases. iii. In March 2017 we presented a keynote at a half-day event organised by Equation, a domestic violence third sector organisation in Nottingham. The event was about working with perpetrators and they were launching a toolkit for practitioners about working with heterosexual male perpetrators. They are currently waiting to hear about some funding that will allow them to develop the toolkit to make it appropriate to working with LGB and/or T perpetrators and we have agreed to act as advisers on this development. In March 2018 SafeLives had a Spotlights on LGBT DVA and Invited Catherine to give a webinar on Coral Project Data as it relates to the use of violent/abusive behaviours and how Johnson's typologies can be used to help make distinctions between the use of violent/abusive behaviours in the relationships where at least one partner is LGB and/or T. In April 2018 Catherine was invited to the Galop organised Home Office consultation group on the new DVA bill because of the research I have done with Prof Marianne Hester on a previous ESRC award and also because of the work I have done with Dr Rebecca Barnes on the Coral Project, this award.
Sector Communities and Social Services/Policy,Government, Democracy and Justice
Impact Types Societal

 
Description Member of Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) North East: Same Sex Sexual Violence Panel
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description Member of steering group overseeing PCC project to develop regional training for domestic violence and abuse
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description Member of the NE PCC LGBT Advisory Group
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description University of Sunderland, Centre for Applied Social Sciences (CASS), Research Support Fund
Amount £8,706 (GBP)
Organisation University of Sunderland 
Department Centre for Applied Social Sciences
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 02/2014 
End 07/2014
 
Description Dissemination Event for Coral Project in Scotland 
Organisation LGBT Youth Scotland
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Having secured an extension to the ESRC grant we funded the venue and catering for the dissemination event
Collaborator Contribution Our partners promoted the event, found the venue and provided administrative support for registrations etc.
Impact The partnership is on-going with these organisations providing routes into the Scottish Domestic Violence and Abuse sector; and promoting research to LGBT communities. This partnership began during the previous ESRC project and as a result of our Interim report on the Coral Project partners have said they have already started to embed our findings into their work, especially their training. At the dissemination event as part of the panel discussion Safer Families Edinburgh (who provide perpetrator programmes for heterosexual men) and LGBT Youth Scotland agreed they should explore the potential for working together on developing interventions for abusive LGBT partners.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Dissemination Event for Coral Project in Scotland 
Organisation Scottish Women's Aid
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Having secured an extension to the ESRC grant we funded the venue and catering for the dissemination event
Collaborator Contribution Our partners promoted the event, found the venue and provided administrative support for registrations etc.
Impact The partnership is on-going with these organisations providing routes into the Scottish Domestic Violence and Abuse sector; and promoting research to LGBT communities. This partnership began during the previous ESRC project and as a result of our Interim report on the Coral Project partners have said they have already started to embed our findings into their work, especially their training. At the dissemination event as part of the panel discussion Safer Families Edinburgh (who provide perpetrator programmes for heterosexual men) and LGBT Youth Scotland agreed they should explore the potential for working together on developing interventions for abusive LGBT partners.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Dissemination Event for Coral Project in Scotland 
Organisation Voluntary Action Fund
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Having secured an extension to the ESRC grant we funded the venue and catering for the dissemination event
Collaborator Contribution Our partners promoted the event, found the venue and provided administrative support for registrations etc.
Impact The partnership is on-going with these organisations providing routes into the Scottish Domestic Violence and Abuse sector; and promoting research to LGBT communities. This partnership began during the previous ESRC project and as a result of our Interim report on the Coral Project partners have said they have already started to embed our findings into their work, especially their training. At the dissemination event as part of the panel discussion Safer Families Edinburgh (who provide perpetrator programmes for heterosexual men) and LGBT Youth Scotland agreed they should explore the potential for working together on developing interventions for abusive LGBT partners.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Dissemination Event for Coral Project in Wales 
Organisation Safer Wales Dyn Project
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Having secured an extension for the ESRC project we funded the venue and catering for the dissemination event. We also attended and presented key findings from the Coral Project Interim Report.
Collaborator Contribution The Dyn Project found the venue, promoted the event and coordinated registration, providing administrative support.
Impact The Project Coordinator for the Dyn Project was on the steering group for the ESRC/Coral Project and as a result of our interim findings provided a workshop at our September 19th dissemination group on working with male survivors. The Project Coordinator has said our interim findings have resulted in changes in approaches to risk assessment of male survivors.
Start Year 2012
 
Description Pilot Intervention project for abusive LGBT partners to intimate relationships 
Organisation Broken Rainbow
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Our Interim Report recommends that a pilot project should be set up to explore the development of voluntary interventions for abusive LGBT partners. We have worked with Respect and Broken Rainbow to develop the bid and intend to be involved with evaluating the project should it secure funding.
Collaborator Contribution Respect is the national professional association for practitioners providing perpetrator programmes for, ostensibly heterosexual men. Broken Rainbow is the national organisation that provides a national helpline for LGBT survivors of domestic violence and abuse. Both of these projects were on the Coral Project Steering group advising on survey and interview design, recruitment and attending, speaking at dissemination events in London and Sunderland and helping to promote these events. These organisations intend to work with us to develop a pilot programme as recommended by our interim report and have invited us to be a partner for funding so that we can evaluate the pilot.
Impact It is too early to report on any outputs or outcomes for this partnership
Start Year 2012
 
Description Pilot Intervention project for abusive LGBT partners to intimate relationships 
Organisation Respect (Domestic Violence Prevention Service)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Our Interim Report recommends that a pilot project should be set up to explore the development of voluntary interventions for abusive LGBT partners. We have worked with Respect and Broken Rainbow to develop the bid and intend to be involved with evaluating the project should it secure funding.
Collaborator Contribution Respect is the national professional association for practitioners providing perpetrator programmes for, ostensibly heterosexual men. Broken Rainbow is the national organisation that provides a national helpline for LGBT survivors of domestic violence and abuse. Both of these projects were on the Coral Project Steering group advising on survey and interview design, recruitment and attending, speaking at dissemination events in London and Sunderland and helping to promote these events. These organisations intend to work with us to develop a pilot programme as recommended by our interim report and have invited us to be a partner for funding so that we can evaluate the pilot.
Impact It is too early to report on any outputs or outcomes for this partnership
Start Year 2012
 
Description 8. The Coral Project Dissemination Event, Sunderland, Sept 19th, 2014 'Exploring Abusive Behaviours in LGB and/or T Relationships' The Interim Report 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Talk sparked questions and discussion afterwards

Nearly 50% of participants signed up to receive practitioner briefings
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description A talk and a workshop about LGBT DVA Help-seeking 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Stonewall Housing Launch of Research into Housing for V/S of LGBT DVA 'Domestic Violence and Abuse in the Relationships of LGB and/or T People: implications for housing' June (Manchester) and November (Brighton) 2018
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Barriers to responses and interventions for abusive partners in LGBT relationships: practitioners' perspectives' Northern Rock Foundation International Seminar Series 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Talk sparked questions and discussion afterwards

Networking with practitioners
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
URL http://www.sunderland.ac.uk/research/areasofresearch/centreforappliedsocialsciences/seminars/interpe...
 
Description Lecture on DVA in the relationships of LGB and/or T people 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact As part of their series of public lectures, Newcastle College in partnership with the Literary and Philosophical Society in Newcastle, invited me to give a lecture.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Member of Specialist Panel to consider the Domestic Violence Bill 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Galop, at the invitation of the Home Office convened a specialist panel of LGBT DVA specialists to consider the consultation paper about the potential Domestic Violence Bill
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2008
 
Description Panel member at live-streamed event 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact I was invited to be a panel member of a live streamed discussion following the global premier of 'Key Change' a play depicting women in prison and the domestic violence in their lives. The play was premiered at the Tyneside Cinema in November 2017 and I was invited to speak about the experiences of domestic violence in the relationships of LGB and/or T people. The panel was live streamed and is estimated to have been watched by up to 10,000 people worldwide.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Panel member of national MARAC Scrutiny Panel on LGBT DVA 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact I was invited to join a national MARAC Scrutiny Panel considering LGBT DVA case studies to contribute to a best practice guidance statement from Safe Lives.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Participation in regional series of talks about domestic violenc 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact I presented a talk for the North East Women's Network in their series of talks about domestic violence. The talk was intended to shed light on the issue of how, in a 'same sex' relationship where domestic violence takes place, to ascertain which might be the partner who is victimised and which might be the perpetrator.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Practitioners' responses on developing responses to lesbians, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) perpetrators of domestic abuse: deliberating sameness and difference, De Montfort University, Interdisciplinary DV Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Talk sparked questions and discussion afterwards.

Involvement led to being asked to author a book chapter for an edited collection, and to being invited to speak at a subsequent event.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Presentation at Practitioner Conference on Domestic Violence Perpetrators 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact I was invited to be a keynote speaker at an event organised by Equation, a Nottinghamshire based organisation working to address domestic violence and abuse. This conference was focussed on working with perpetrators of domestic violence.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Presentation to mixed academic/non-academic audience in Tokyo, Japan 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact This was a lecture given in Tokyo to a mixed academic/ non-academic audience of about 25 people. The title was 'Domestic violence in lesbian, gay, bisexual and/or transgender (LGBT) people's intimate relationships: key issues and debates in theory and methodology', 12th October 2018 at the National Institute of Social Security and Population Research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Talk at the Joint North East LGBT Lawyers and NE LGBT Police Officers Event on Domestic Violence and LGBT people, 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact I was invited to speak at an event jointly organised by the North East LGBT Lawyers and NE LGBT Police Officers which was focussed on domestic violence and abuse in the relationships of LGB and/or T people. This included a panel question and answer session.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Webinar for Safe Lives on LGB and/or T perpetrators of domestic violence and abuse 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact I presented through a webinar our research on LGB and/or T perpetrators. The webinar was run by Safe Lives as part of their special Focus on LGBT and DVA
http://www.safelives.org.uk/knowledge-hub/spotlights/spotlight-6-lgbt-people-and-domestic-abuse
https://recordings.join.me/J_FSbF2UNUafDJut71XA8w
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://www.safelives.org.uk/knowledge-hub/spotlights/spotlight-6-lgbt-people-and-domestic-abuse
 
Description Workshop on LGB and/or T use of violence/abuse in their relationships 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact As part of their series on continuing professional development workshops Newcastle Counselling Service invited me to come and speak about the use of violence/abuse in the relationships of LGB and/or T people.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019