Following Young Fathers: The lived experience of young fatherhood.

Lead Research Organisation: University of Leeds
Department Name: Sociology & Social Policy

Abstract

Following Young Fathers addresses an important and under-researched topic - the lived experience of young men entering into fatherhood. Young fathers are defined as those entering parenthood under the age of 25, of whom an estimated 25% are in their teens. We currently know relatively little about how and why young men become fathers at an early age, how young fatherhood is constituted and practiced and what impact policy interventions or other kinds of support may have on these processes. We also know little about the dynamics of young fatherhood - how the lives of these young men unfold over time, what their past experiences and future aspirations are, and what barriers and enablers exist to improving their life chances, and potentially the life chances of their children (Alexander et al 2010). The broad aim of this research is to address these gaps in knowledge in ways that are theoretically engaged, empirically innovative and policy relevant. A greater understanding of young fatherhood is essential if policy and practice responses are to be effective.

The study will address the following research questions:
1) How is young fatherhood constituted, practiced and understood in varied socio-economic, relational and familial contexts?
2) What opportunities and challenges are associated with early entry into fatherhood and how do these impact on the life chances of young fathers, and potentially, the life chances of their children?
3) How and why do young men enter into early parenthood? How is young fatherhood 'worked out' over time and how do the life histories and circumstances of young men and their future aspirations impact on their current experiences and practices?
4) What impact do policy interventions and other kinds of support have on the lives of young fathers? How is professional support for young fathers perceived by young men, service providers and practitioners?
5) How effective is current policy and practice in meeting the needs of young fathers and what might lead to more effective strategies and provision?

Building on a baseline study of young fathers (Lau Clayton 2011; Neale and Lau Clayton 2011), our objectives are to investigate the changing practices, values and identities of young fathers, the dynamics of their parenting, partnering, familial and professional relationships, and the development of effective policy and practice responses to young fatherhood. Our core method is a Qualitative Longitudinal (QL) tracking study of a varied sample of 25 young fathers, conducted through 3 waves of in-depth interviews and 2 rounds of focus groups held over the study period. The tracking study will be accompanied by 3 complementary strands of work. We will conduct a secondary analysis of existing qualitative evidence utilising innovative data sharing workshops. This will enable us to scale up the qualitative evidence base on young fatherhood. We will also undertake a review of policy and practice developments of relevance to our topic from the past two decades, and produce an inventory of specialist support for young fathers. Finally we will conduct a case study evaluation of local service provision. The case study involves an evaluation of support for young fathers provided by a new 'Early Start' service for parents from pre-birth to age 5, based on a merger of health visiting and Children's Centre staff. We will use an innovative 'knowledge to action' framework that engages local practitioners in the research. Through our tailored methods and outputs we aim to increase the practical utility and impact of this research for policy and professional practice and for wider audiences.

Planned Impact

The proposed study is designed to generate useful and distinctive knowledge for policy and professional practice; we have built in specific research questions designed to address policy and practice concerns. We envisage that it will also benefit young fathers, and will increase understanding of their lives, and the lives of their families and children. The tracking study will yield knowledge on the entry of young men into fatherhood, including their values and attitudes towards contraception and abortion; on the constitution of young fatherhood; the dynamics of their lives; and insights into their life chances. The study will also generate data on their support needs and views on provision. The secondary analysis strand of work will place this new data in wider perspective, thereby ensuring a broad and robust evidence base. The knowledge generated will benefit professionals across a range of fields and in statutory and voluntary sectors wherever support is provided for young men and young parents. This includes those commissioning and providing SRE (Sex and Relationship Education) to young men in varied settings, and those supporting prospective and new young fathers through generic and specialist pre-natal and parenting services, including the Early Start programmes and Family-Nurse partnerships. The study is likely to be of direct interest to parents and young people, and to professionals who work with young men and fathers, including schools, health and social services, family support services, youth groups and parental advice groups. It will benefit policy makers who are engaged in the task of developing effective strategies and practice guidance in response to early pregnancy and fatherhood in a context where current knowledge is patchy and limited. In the light of our base line study, we anticipate too that the young fathers in the sample will benefit directly from their inclusion in a process that seeks to understand their subjective experiences, enables their views to be counted and empowers them in a context where they are often marginalised (Owen et al 2008).

The local case study evaluation will yield data on the effectiveness and appropriateness of service provision for young fathers. This data will be of direct use to local practitioners and service providers as they implement a new early intervention service for young and disadvantaged parents and parents-to-be. The case study will facilitate professionals in tracking and reflecting upon the development of their service. The focus groups will enable them to take stock and reflect collectively on how the initiative is developing and what might improve provision. The research will serve as a mechanism to bring practitioners, service providers and young fathers into conversation with each other, achieved via focus groups and a practitioner training day at which young fathers will be encouraged to speak. More broadly the research has the potential to increase the effectiveness of public services and policy in this important field and in enhancing the quality of life for young fathers and their families.

The anticipated impacts on policy and practice are both instrumental and conceptual and will be achieved through a combination of methods designed to take effect over a relatively short period of time (described further in the pathways to impact). These include a Qualitative Longitudinal (QL) design for the tracking of real time developments; a collaborative 'knowledge to action' framework; targeted outputs and events; and a multi-disciplinary forum for shared information and debate (Following Fathers Network). Research-practice partnerships can be effective in leading to organisational improvements (Nutley 2010). The ethics of this process are important, reflecting a commitment by the research team to enable service providers to develop research-based practice and to gain a sense of joint ownership of the process and outcomes of the study.

Publications

10 25 50
publication icon
Colfer S (2015) Young Dads TV: digital voices of young fathers in Families, Relationships and Societies

publication icon
Johnson D (2015) Not your stereotypical young father, not your typical teenage life in Families, Relationships and Societies

publication icon
Ladlow L (2016) Risk, Resource, Redemption? The Parenting and Custodial Experiences of Young Offender Fathers. in Social policy and society : a journal of the Social Policy Association

publication icon
Lammy MP D (2015) Bringing young fathers into the fold: policy challenges and developments in Families, Relationships and Societies

publication icon
Lau Clayton C (2016) The Lives of Young Fathers: A Review of Selected Evidence. in Social policy and society : a journal of the Social Policy Association

publication icon
Lau Clayton, C (2017) Fertility, Health and Lone Parenting

 
Description Following Young Fathers: Key Findings.
Bren Neale and Carmen Lau Clayton




Our findings are reported in publications and briefing papers available at www.followingfathers.leeds.ac.uk. The research extended a baseline study begun under ESRC Timescapes (Neale and Lau Clayton 2011; 2014; Neale and Morton 2012; Neale 2013, Neale 2015b, referred to below).

1. Lived experiences.
We tracked 31 young fathers (aged 15-25) over time (see Neale et al briefing 8 for methodology), revealing their aspirations to 'be there' in an enduring and meaningful relationship with their children. This was so regardless of socio-economic background, life circumstances, partnered, single, resident or non resident status, or the relationship with the mother. In 29 cases the pregnancies were not planned but this did not mean an unwanted child. Wherever they could, fathers developed and sustained regular contact with their children over a 2-4 year period. These findings challenge entrenched views of young fathers as 'feckless' (Neale et al briefing 1, Neale 2015a, Neale and Davies 2015a, 2015b).
Yet there are barriers to establishing a role and identity as a young father, including 1) socio-economic hardship: limited opportunities to develop a 'breadwinner' role (Neale and Davies 2015a; briefing 4); 2) minimal housing support (Neale and Ladlow briefing 7); lack of parenting skills and experience (Neale et al briefing 1; Neale briefing 6); and 4) volatile relationships with mothers and maternal grandparents. In a culture where mothers remain primary carers and decisions run vertically down the maternal line, contact could be curtailed or blocked (Lau Clayton briefing 2; Neale and Lau Clayton 2014 and briefing 3). For those living with long term poverty or as young offenders, negative public perceptions and limited professional support could compound these problems (Ladlow and Neale 2015; Neale and Ladlow briefing 5, Neale briefing 6).

2. Policy Responses.
While pockets of good professional practice exist, there is no coherent or unifying policy to guide professional development in recognising and pro-actively supporting young fathers: support services are sorely needed but hard to access. The assumption is that young fathers are 'hard to reach', resulting in a culture of 'sidelining' them as a risk, rather than treating them as a resource for their children (Neale 2015a, Neale briefing 6, Neale and Davies 2015b; Davies and Neale 2015). There is a pressing need to change the way young fathers are represented and understood in society. Promoting the collective voices of young fathers, as 'experts by experience' is an essential part of this process (Neale 2015a; briefing 6; Neale and Davies 2015b).

3. Methods and Research Infrastructure.
We have advanced qualitative longitudinal methods and ethics (Neale 2013; Neale 2015b, Lau Clayton 2013) and built capacity in participatory research and the co-construction/co-dissemination of knowledge with young fathers and our networks of practitioners over time (Neale and Morton 2012, Neale et al briefing 8; Neale and Davies 2015b). These collaborations culminated in an impact initiative proposal to the University of Leeds, which was successfully funded. It comprises three work packages that will embed the findings of the study centrally into professional practice and training (Neale and Tarrant; see website). We developed new protocols for data management/archiving as part of the phase 2 development of the Timescapes Archive. The composite dataset was shared for secondary use and archived during the life time of the project (Neale et al briefing 8).
Exploitation Route In collaboration with key stakeholders in our practitioner network, Neale and Tarrant, with support from Lau Clayton, have developed an impact initiative that has been funded via the University of Leeds Impact Acceleration Fund. The work, which is scheduled for 12 months from April 2016, and involves three work packages. These are designed to take forward the findings from the FF study to create a new culture of support for young fathers across sectors (local authority, leading family charity and private consortium in the secure estate). The new initiative, Supporting young Dads (SYD) is described on the FF website.
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Education,Healthcare,Government, Democracy and Justice,Other

URL http://www.followingfathers.leeds.ac.uk
 
Description This research used a participatory, partnership model of working with practitioners, including the co-production and co-dissemination of findings (See FRS Open Space outputs). The time frames for this study, beginning with a baseline study funded under ESRC Timescapes (PI: Neale) means that we have built and sustained this model of partnership working over many years, creating some impact as an integral part of the research process (in the sense of conceptual impacts: changing public perceptions, staff training and development and enhancing practice protocols). This methodology is documented in Neale and Morton (2012) and Neale et al Briefing paper no. 8. The project has resulted in funding for a one-year impact initiative (University of Leeds) in collaboration with the Family and Childcare Trust, Leeds City Council, Young offender practitioners and the APPG on fatherhood. This is designed to feed the findings of the study into practice developments, including advancing joined up, sustained provision for young offender fathers entering re-settlement, developing the Young Dads Collective North, training young fathers in mentoring and advocacy work, and establishing a national training program for practitioners working with young fathers. Details of the Supporting Young Dads initiative are available on the FYF s website.
First Year Of Impact 2012
Sector Communities and Social Services/Policy,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Education,Healthcare
Impact Types Cultural,Societal

 
Description Department for Work and Pensions invited consultation on contributions of young fathers
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a national consultation
 
Description Empirical and methodological contribution to Family Strategic Partnership (Department for Education funded) review on young fatherhood
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
 
Description Engagement in the All Party Parliamentary Group on Fatherhood, Sub group on young fatherhood, Westminster
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description Production of briefing papers series and resource booklets for policy and practice use (see publications for details).
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
URL http://followingfathers.leeds.ac.uk/findings
 
Description Seeing young Fathers in a Different Way: National Practitioner Conference
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description ESRC collaborative studentship scheme administered through the White Rose DTC. Awarded to B. Neale in 2013
Amount £54,330 (GBP)
Organisation Economic and Social Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2014 
End 08/2017
 
Title refined methodologies for dynamic research through time 
Description Through the five years of this study we have tried out and refined methods for capturing time in the field (e.g. through the use of time maps); for temporal analysis (e.g. through the use of framework grids that enable thematic data to be condensed and interrogated by case and wave); and for the ethical conduct of a QL study working with vulnerable participants (working with principles of reciprocity, on-going consent and consultation over the representation of data. We have reported on these methods in series of QL methods guides (available on the Timescapes Website, under knowledge bank); in our detailed guide to the Following young Fathers study and dataset (Neale et al following young fathers briefing paper no. 8, available on the Following young Fathers website, under findings); and in published papers (Neale (2013) Adding Time into he Mix: Stakeholder ethics in Qualitative Longitudinal Research; Neale 2015) Time and the Life course in Worth and Hardill (eds) Researching the Life course, Bristol: Policy Press; and in numerous invited presentations to academic and post graduate audiences at conferences and seminars in the UK and internationally. 
Type Of Material Model of mechanisms or symptoms - human 
Year Produced 2010 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact We have built capacity in QL research methodology through these routes: over the past five years interest in using this methodology and appreciation of its value for capturing life course dynamics across a range of studies, including in STEM disciplines has grown significantly in the UK, and increasingly in Europe and the US, Canada and Australia. 
 
Title sustained participatory research with participants and practitioners 
Description Over a five year period (2010-15) we have tested out a new model of practitioner engagement in our research, based on close collaboration and partnership working that evolves over time. The process is woven into each phase of the research, from inception, where practitioners are engaged in formulating the key focus of a study, and in identifying gaps in knowledge that need investigating, to the conduct of the study for example through sample recruitment and maintenance over time, through to the co-production and co-dissemination of evidence and knowledge (as evidenced in our guest editorship of the Open Space in the journal Families, Relationships and Societies, where we commissioned contribution from David Lammy MP, chair of the All Party Parliamentary Group on Fatherhood, from three of our practice partners in the study, and from two of the young men who were part of our sample (see publications for details of these contributions). This methodology is written up in Neale and Morton, Creating Impact through QL Research, Timescapes methods guide no. 20, and in Neale et al Researching Young Fatherhood over time, Briefing paper no. 8 in the Following young fathers briefing paper series - these are available on the Timescapes and Following young fathers websites (www.timescapes.leeds.ac.uk/knowledge bank; www.followingfathers.leeds.ac.uk/findings. 
Type Of Material Model of mechanisms or symptoms - human 
Year Produced 2012 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact Growth in participatory styles of research and in co-creation and co-production of knowledge as research tools in the generation of new forms of evidence for policy and practice. 
 
Title Advancing and refining models and methods for archiving and re-using Qualitative longitudinal data. 
Description During the course of this study we held data sharing workshops, made our dataset available for re-use and secondary analysis with selected projects, and provided the test case for the phase two development of the Timescapes Archive, supporting the development of the new open source software, the user interface and the spread sheets used for data management and preparation of data for archiving. We also set up the landing pages for projects depositing their data with the Timescapes Archive and supported the development of mechanisms to publicise the archive and promote research. Neale created a new website for the Archive during 2014, and has produced a new guide for depositors, working with the archive team. We were successful in archiving our following young fathers dataset with the Timescapes archive during the life time of the project where it is now available for re-use and as a teaching resource for registered users of the archive (see http://timescapes-archive.leeds.ac.uk. We have described these processes in Neale et al Researching young fatherhood over time: the Following young fathers study and dataset. Briefing paper no. 8 available on the Following Young Fathers website under findings. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2014 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The archiving and re-use of QL data is a rapidly growing field that this project has substantially contributed to. The Timescapes Archive was developed in collaboration with the UK Data Archive (under the Timescapes programme) and its phase two development has substantially increased its utility and ease of data discovery for researchers. it is recognised and promoted by the UK Data Archive as the designated resource in the UK for the deposit and re-use of QL datasets. We encourage researchers to create a catalogue record of their dataset for the UK Data Archive, so that it can be promoted by the national archive and users directed to its location. The Timescapes Archive is now fully recognised by ESRC as a world leading resource for the archiving and re-use of QL data and is part of the designated resource infrastructure for the recent (late 2015) ESRC call for Secondary Data Analysis projects. 
 
Description Early Intervention Foundation, All Party Parliamentary Group on Fatherhood, Leeds City Council, Oakhill Secure Training Centre, Young Dads Council 
Organisation Early Intervention Foundation
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Early Intervention Foundation: importing knowledge on value of early intervention and of continuity of care over time in the context of young fatherhood; advising the foundation on methodologies for building lived experiences and complementary forms of dynamic and qualitative data into evidence building for policy. All Party Parliamentary Group on Fatherhood: Sub group on young fathers: presenting evidence to the group on the values, practices and support needs of young fathers (Bren Neale, Carmen Lau Clayton) Leeds City Council: Teenage Pregnancy and Parenthood Partnership: Disseminating evidence on the lived experiences and support needs of young fathers; contributing to training modules and the development of evaluation tools; feeding evidence to support further funding of service (Carmen Lau Clayton, Laura Davies); development of proposal and potential funding to pilot new services (Bren Neale and Anna Tarrant). Oakhill Secure Training Centre, Supporting and developing plans for an evaluation of a young fatherhood programme in a youth custodial setting (Bren Neale and Linzi Ladlow).
Collaborator Contribution Early Intervention Foundation, All Party Parliamentary Group on Fatherhood and Working with Men: Fora for dissemination and promotion of evidence to policy makers Leeds City Council: research partner: major contribution to sampling, sample recruitment, sample maintenance, contributing data on sample over five years; member of research strategy/advisory group; co-producers and co-disseminators of evidence; impact initiative partners. Oakhill Secure Training Centre, Fatherhood Institute, and Young Dads Collective (formerly Young Dads TV and Council) : contribution to sampling and sample recruitment for young offender fathers and marginalised young fathers; members of research strategy/advisory group; practitioner contribution to building evidence base on marginalised young fathers; co-producers and co-disseminators of evidence on young fathers: impact Initiative partners.
Impact Joint and commissioned publications in Neale and Davies (eds) Seeing young Fathers in a Different Way Open Space for Families, Relationships and Societies July 2015.
Start Year 2010
 
Description Early Intervention Foundation, All Party Parliamentary Group on Fatherhood, Leeds City Council, Oakhill Secure Training Centre, Young Dads Council 
Organisation Leeds City Council
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Early Intervention Foundation: importing knowledge on value of early intervention and of continuity of care over time in the context of young fatherhood; advising the foundation on methodologies for building lived experiences and complementary forms of dynamic and qualitative data into evidence building for policy. All Party Parliamentary Group on Fatherhood: Sub group on young fathers: presenting evidence to the group on the values, practices and support needs of young fathers (Bren Neale, Carmen Lau Clayton) Leeds City Council: Teenage Pregnancy and Parenthood Partnership: Disseminating evidence on the lived experiences and support needs of young fathers; contributing to training modules and the development of evaluation tools; feeding evidence to support further funding of service (Carmen Lau Clayton, Laura Davies); development of proposal and potential funding to pilot new services (Bren Neale and Anna Tarrant). Oakhill Secure Training Centre, Supporting and developing plans for an evaluation of a young fatherhood programme in a youth custodial setting (Bren Neale and Linzi Ladlow).
Collaborator Contribution Early Intervention Foundation, All Party Parliamentary Group on Fatherhood and Working with Men: Fora for dissemination and promotion of evidence to policy makers Leeds City Council: research partner: major contribution to sampling, sample recruitment, sample maintenance, contributing data on sample over five years; member of research strategy/advisory group; co-producers and co-disseminators of evidence; impact initiative partners. Oakhill Secure Training Centre, Fatherhood Institute, and Young Dads Collective (formerly Young Dads TV and Council) : contribution to sampling and sample recruitment for young offender fathers and marginalised young fathers; members of research strategy/advisory group; practitioner contribution to building evidence base on marginalised young fathers; co-producers and co-disseminators of evidence on young fathers: impact Initiative partners.
Impact Joint and commissioned publications in Neale and Davies (eds) Seeing young Fathers in a Different Way Open Space for Families, Relationships and Societies July 2015.
Start Year 2010
 
Description Early Intervention Foundation, All Party Parliamentary Group on Fatherhood, Leeds City Council, Oakhill Secure Training Centre, Young Dads Council 
Organisation Parliament of UK
Department All Party Parliamentary Group on Fatherhood
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Early Intervention Foundation: importing knowledge on value of early intervention and of continuity of care over time in the context of young fatherhood; advising the foundation on methodologies for building lived experiences and complementary forms of dynamic and qualitative data into evidence building for policy. All Party Parliamentary Group on Fatherhood: Sub group on young fathers: presenting evidence to the group on the values, practices and support needs of young fathers (Bren Neale, Carmen Lau Clayton) Leeds City Council: Teenage Pregnancy and Parenthood Partnership: Disseminating evidence on the lived experiences and support needs of young fathers; contributing to training modules and the development of evaluation tools; feeding evidence to support further funding of service (Carmen Lau Clayton, Laura Davies); development of proposal and potential funding to pilot new services (Bren Neale and Anna Tarrant). Oakhill Secure Training Centre, Supporting and developing plans for an evaluation of a young fatherhood programme in a youth custodial setting (Bren Neale and Linzi Ladlow).
Collaborator Contribution Early Intervention Foundation, All Party Parliamentary Group on Fatherhood and Working with Men: Fora for dissemination and promotion of evidence to policy makers Leeds City Council: research partner: major contribution to sampling, sample recruitment, sample maintenance, contributing data on sample over five years; member of research strategy/advisory group; co-producers and co-disseminators of evidence; impact initiative partners. Oakhill Secure Training Centre, Fatherhood Institute, and Young Dads Collective (formerly Young Dads TV and Council) : contribution to sampling and sample recruitment for young offender fathers and marginalised young fathers; members of research strategy/advisory group; practitioner contribution to building evidence base on marginalised young fathers; co-producers and co-disseminators of evidence on young fathers: impact Initiative partners.
Impact Joint and commissioned publications in Neale and Davies (eds) Seeing young Fathers in a Different Way Open Space for Families, Relationships and Societies July 2015.
Start Year 2010
 
Description End of project national conference-Seeing Young Fathers in a Different Way, 2015, Bren Neale, Carmen Lau Clayton, Linzi Ladlow 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Disseminating findings from the ESRC funded following young fathers study; providing a forum for discussion and debate between practitioners and young fathers who contributed to this event: provision of workshops to explore means for embedding findings from this research into practice settings, and influencing perceptions of young fathers by policy makers, press and the general public.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://followingfathers.leeds.ac.uk/findings-and-publications/
 
Description Higher Education teaching course material, Carmen Lau Clayton 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact Using the Following Fathers outputs as a teaching resource and tool to inform and create debate and discussion around young fatherhood and young fathers' support needs with undergraduate students on a 'working with children, young people and families' degree course. The majority of these students will go on to study or work in the family and youth sector.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description International Conference presentations: E.g. European Sociological Association (Families and Intimate lives stream), Centre for Research on Families and Relationships, Journal of Youth Studies Conference: 2011, 2013, 2015, Bren Neale and Carmen Lau Clayton. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Disseminating findings from the ESRC funded following young fathers study.

increased knowledge, links made internationally
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014,2015
URL http://followingfathers.leeds.ac.uk/findings/presentations
 
Description Invited Presentations/ Consultations: E.g. All Party Parliamentary Group on Fatherhood, Department of Work and Pensions, Family Strategic Partnership Young Fathers Steering Group (supported by the Department of Education), 2012, 2013, 2015, Carmen Lau Clayton, Bren Neale, Laura Davies 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Disseminating findings from the ESRC funded following young fathers study.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013,2015
URL http://followingfathers.leeds.ac.uk/findings-and-publications/
 
Description National conference presentations: E.g. British Sociological Association -University of Leeds, Knowledge into Practice Conference- University of York, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, Carmen Lau Clayton, Bren Neale, Laura Davies, Linzi Ladlow 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Disseminating findings from the ESRC funded following young fathers study to academic audiences.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2011,2012,2013,2014,2015
URL http://followingfathers.leeds.ac.uk/findings-and-publications/
 
Description Seminars: E.g. University of Sheffield, University of Leeds, Leeds Trinity University, 2011, 2013, 2014, 2015, Carmen Lau Clayton, Bren Neale, Laura Davies, Linzi Ladlow 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Disseminating findings from the ESRC funded following young fathers study.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2011,2012,2013,2014,2015
URL http://followingfathers.leeds.ac.uk/findings-and-publications/
 
Description Symposium on young fatherhood, delivered at the Social Policy Association Annual Conference, organised by Neale. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact This symposium brought together some of the leading researchers in the field of young fatherhood research and policy to share insights on the lived experiences and support needs of young fathers in a changing practice landscape. They were drawn from both academic and practice organisations, providing a link between the two. The event was chaired by Neale and supported by Linzi Ladlow. Speakers were Laura Davies for the following young fathers team; Professor Harry Ferguson (Nottingham) Jessica Cundy (Barnardos) and RAchel Deacon ( LSE). The symposium resulted in a themed section of Social Policy and Society (published on line in 2015).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description University of Hamburg invited research presentation and teaching 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact Sharing research findings and methods as part of an invited talk and teaching session
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Victoria Derbyshire programme (BBC2) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Asked to advise on young fatherhood issues and share insights from study in relation to a BBC 2 programme planning and research for a programme on young mothers
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Workshops: E.g. Leeds Young Fathers Forum, Leeds Beckett University, 2011, 2014, Carmen Lau Clayton, Laura Davies and Linzi Ladlow 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Disseminating findings from the ESRC funded following young fathers study.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2011,2014
URL http://followingfathers.leeds.ac.uk/findings-and-publications/
 
Description Young Fathers and Health Experiences 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact International BAPSCAN conference, disseminating findings and next steps in relation to health of young fathers and professional support
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018