Muslims, Trust and Cultural Dialogue

Lead Research Organisation: University of East London
Department Name: Arts and Digital Industries

Abstract

Recent high-profile interventions by politicians in the West declaring the failure of multiculturalism have had, as their very thinly disguised context, mistrust in those Muslim communities that have been growing in Western Europe and the United States since the end of the colonial era. While a certain amount of expediency and projection may be read into such utterances, the sense that multiculturalism has been a flawed experiment - and the idea that unintegrated Muslims are evidence of this - has become a truism of much journalism and media coverage too.

Important work, particularly in the social sciences, is ongoing to identify the domestic and international factors leading to Muslim alienation within Western society. Thus far, however, political, cultural and philosophical questions of trust - how it is built, how it operates and how it can be undermined - have largely been overlooked in favour of a rush to judgement and a clamour for decisive action of one kind or another. This multidisciplinary project will serve to rectify this oversight by analysing the conditions of trust and mistrust in a number of areas of social and cultural life. As such, it will help to nuance and further the Global Uncertainties core interest in ideologies and beliefs. It takes the form of a network of scholars, non-academic partners and stakeholders, under the direction of Dr Peter Morey of the University of East London, who will come together to explore questions of trust and trust building in politics and society, culture and the arts, and business and finance. The geographical focus is on Britain and the United States, where thorny questions about the place of ethnic and cultural minority groups have taken on an added (and sometimes vitriolic) urgency, although the variety of diasporic communities that make up Muslim minorities in these countries mean that we will also engage with cultural practices and values born in South Asia and and the Arab world too. Through workshops, roundtable discussions, scholarly publications, exhibitions, video material and the Internet, we will build a platform for the latest thinking on intercultural trust, both at the theoretical and intellectual levels, and in everyday practices. An interactive website will be the first port of call for information, discussion, disseminating findings and archiving events. In addition, we will be building a web collection on Muslims and intercultural trust with the British Library which, taken together with the other outputs, will form a solid and evolving empirical and theoretical basis for understanding how trust is understood and enacted in contemporary multicultural societies.

Muslims, Trust and Cultural Dialogue is committed to understanding how existing practices in a variety of cultural arenas enact dialogue and negotiation between groups in ways that can help us move beyond misunderstanding and negative stereotyping. It aims to provide a foundation of thoroughly researched knowledge that can then be used to build and shape dialogue at the level of community organisations and policy making. We will make significant interventions in public debates about intercultural dialogue and questions of trust: to explore how trust is created and how it can be nurtured as well as undermined; to empower groups utilising the various mechanisms of civic engagement; and to provide those engaged in political and social policy-making with a better understanding of how their activities affect others and how trust and dialogue can make them more effective.

Planned Impact

I have chosen to identify impact in part by correlating potential beneficiaries with the constituencies addressed by the project partners and planned events. For example, the Dialogue Society, with whom I am organising three roundtable sessions, is an established charity that has a remit to advance social cohesion by connecting communities. It is well connected in government and business and its work includes discussion forums, courses, capacity building publications and outreach. The proceedings of these roundtable events will be part of the Society's manuals for community organisations. Thus, our work will reach those end users - a combination of individuals and organisations - that commonly access and benefit from the Dialogue Society's work.

Likewise, my collaboration with Engage will draw on their links with British Muslims and local communities. Engage is dedicated to improving the rates of civic participation, media involvement and political engagement by British Muslims. We will be drawing on this experience in setting the agenda for our conferences and seminars, and by working with Engage to produce the action packs on Islamic Finance which will be distributed to mosques, community groups and businesses in the London area, with the possibility of a broader geographical roll out later. These will be of interest to all those, whether in the public, private or third sector, who see potential in the establishment of parallel financial protocols in accord with Islamic principles: something of a growth area in the contemporary financial world.

In addition I will be participating in a short documentary film and discussion on the Islam Channel's 'Politics and Media' show on the project theme of trust and cultural dialogue. The Islam Channel's mission is to act as an interface between Muslims and non-Muslims to remove misconceptions and challenge stereotyping. The channel is available globally and on the Internet, and is broadcast to a hundred and thirty two countries around the world. This collaboration is likely to be key to the project effecting a global impact footprint.

The newly formed Centre for the Study of Pakistan at SOAS is a key partner in this project, organising seminars, providing central London venues, and participating in the photographic exhibition and its attendant events. It is a focal point for research and teaching on Pakistan from a range of disciplinary perspectives. With Pakistan often identified as a key area of 'global uncertainty' and its diasporic populations subject to ever more stringent scrutiny, the participation of the Centre will stimulate interest among expatriate Pakistanis and those with professional, economic or strategic interests in the region. (For example, contact has already been made with Gemma Thompson from the FCO's Community Engagement Unit, who has expressed an interest in the work.)

Access to policy makers and government agencies is a key part of the plan for impact. As well as the Dialogue Society, our efforts in this regard will be helped by our partnership with the Muslim Institute (through their new quarterly publication, Critical Muslim, for which I write). Critical Muslim aims to become the preeminent publication taking a critically interrogative approach to Muslim matters. Its high profile editor, Ziauddin Sardar is well-known as a polymath and influential communicator, with a significant international following.

Finally, impact on a wide range of users will be guaranteed by the interactive website, which will archive events, disseminate findings and provide an interactive discussion forum. The website will be preserved in the British Library's Web Archive to which we will be adding a number of other websites, building, for the first time, a collated set of online resources about Muslims, trust and dialogue in perpetuity for all kinds of users.
 
Description Muslims Trust and Cultural Dialogue has explored how the conditions for trusting intercultural relations can be nurtured. Its focus is on diverse spheres of activity - society and citizenship, culture and the arts, and business and finance - and it has identified different approaches that yield potential transferable paradigms for trust building.

We have explored the fraught history of trust in diverse societies, examining different historical and political traditions and visions of the good society. Our findings underline the importance of what might be called intercultural (rather than traditionally multicultural) approaches, in which integrationist discourse and the idea of entrenched cultural identities are challenged in an active dialogue between free partners who allow for their own perspectives to be tested and possibly modified.

In particular, we have discovered that effective techniques for trust building - such as those used among the community arts organisations who have been the subject of our case studies - have a potential broader application. They involve shared goal setting and an awareness of mutual vulnerability, along with other stages in a process that builds trusting relations between individuals and groups for particular ends. We are currently finessing this as a prospective 'tool kit' to be road tested further in future funded projects.

Thus far, our findings can be summarised under the following headings:

1) New Knowledge
Through a series of events and talks we have begun to map the coordinates of trust as they appear on a 'macro' level - the level of politics and social and philosophy. This has taken place at events such as our two major international conferences where delegates were tasked with thinking about questions of trust in current debates about multiculturalism, and how to get 'beyond' Islamophobia. Among the participants were key figures in this area, such as Lord Bhikhu Parekh and Professors John L. Esposito and Tariq Modood, among a number of other international luminaries, and their papers are archived on our website (see 'Other Outputs'). We also welcomed Professor Onora O'Neill, one of the founding thinkers in the field of social trust in its modern form. The insights from these and other events are being collated for publication in two books which will make a major contribution to our understanding of intercultural trust and dialogue.

In the third year we have focused on issues arising from Islamic innovations in business practice, with a conference at UEL on 'Trust and Islamic Capital', and one held by our partners at Michigan State on 'Global Halal', and how the politics of the permissible shapes Islamic cultural products and financial systems.

2) Networks and Collaborations
The project leader, Professor Morey, assembled a series of partnerships with colleagues from SOAS, University of London; Michigan State University; Virginia University; and York University (UK) as well as Professor Akbar S. Ahmed's 'Journey into Europe' research team, based at the American University, Washington DC.. Partners in these institutions have brought their particular disciplinary skills to bear on the different sections of the project, with results that can be seen on the website and with publications pending.

In addition, we have partnered with non-HE organisations such as The British Library, The Dialogue Society and MEND (formerly Engage) to ensure in-put from practitioners. (One of the highlights of these interactions was finding out about the work of Equaliteach, whose business it is to confront prejudicial Islamophiobic attitudes in education and devise strategies for combating it.)

One of the most significant collaborations has been with Professor Akbar S Ahmed's Journey into Europe project. In its early days, Muslims, Trust and Dialogue was instrumental in working with Professor Ahmed to shape the project, which looks at Muslims, citizenship and identity at a pan-European level. We helped to draft the research questions and our own researchers worked on the British leg undertaking fieldwork surveys and interviews. Professor Ahmed is currently working on a book from this project, to be published towards the end of 2016. A feature-length documentary, entitled 'Journey into Europe' has already been completed and has been shown to appreciative audiences across the US and, more recently, in Britain.

I have included more on these relationships and the specific work undertaken by partners in the 'Collaboration' section elsewhere in this submission.

3) Research Methods
We have worked at different levels: the abstract/philosophical level where consideration of citizenship and 'the Good Society' are paramount; but also the practical level where we explore instances of intercultural trust building in everyday life. As a result we have used a mixture of methodologies to link the two: hermeneutic and discourse analysis traditions, communication studies paradigms and political theory, but also the anthropological and sociological staples of structured and semi-structured interviews with individuals and groups. This latter strand was initiated in the second year in collaboration with the Journey into Europe project (see above). In the third year this approach was extended in a series of small scale case studies where our researchers engaged with selected arts groups whose aims are to foster dialogue and intercultural understanding.
Exploitation Route We are building a resource for those, in a variety of sectors, involved in the promotion of intercultural trust and dialogue. This will consist of those publications currently in process - and which will appear over the next two or three years - and the website which already houses podcast and video material and to which more will be added this year, including practical tips and findings from the fieldwork. In addition, we have the two documentary films resulting from our collaborations with our American partners. All this material can be accessed by policy makers, those involved in the culture industries, and those working in the business and finance sector. These will be of interest to those thinking about how better to address Muslims with due consideration for their needs and values.

There are several areas for potential study that MTCD has thrown up. These include a further exploration of the concept of 'postsecularism', as a descriptive and critical category; and the notion of 'halal' as a broad marker of the culturally permissible.

In particular, our own work has pointed out the potential value of 'interculturalism' as a comparatively new orientation - derived from education and constructivist paradigms - as an alternative to existing dominant binaries such as integration and assimilation. The importance of this more open, dialogic space, has also emerged from our case studies as the key to creating trust between different and potentially antagonistic groups.These areas provide a rich arena of study for future research projects.
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Creative Economy,Education,Government, Democracy and Justice,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections

URL http://www.muslimstrustdialogue.org
 
Description The project's findings are now being collated and written up in the form of academic publications. 4 books are now planned over the next 3 years (two monographs and two edited volumes, plus an assortment of journal articles and chapters). While these are in preparation the work of MTCD is available via our two completed documentary films - 'Journey into Europe' and 'Migrations of Islam' and online resources housed on the project website. With regard to Professor Akbar S. Ahmed's work in partnership with us on the Journey into Europe project, the documentary based on the research has now been finished. Professor Peter Morey acted as executive producer for the film. As a distinguished academic and diplomat, Professor Ahmed has managed already to reach out to a wide audience. The film has played in numerous venues in the US, including the Ralph Bunche Library in the US State Department, where the audience was composed of experts and policy makers. Additional showings have taken place at the Cosmos Club, Washington DC; the William and Mary Global Film Festival, Virginia; and the Second Annual Muslim Film Festival, Milwaukee. In addition, there have been positive testimonials and reviews, including in the Saudi Gazette and Huffington Post. Professor Ahmed continues to promote and give interviews connected to the film. Professor Peter Morey introduced the inaugural UK screening at LSE in January. The film will follow earlier works by Professor Ahmed in reaching government, diplomats, policy-makers and opinion formers in the months and years to come. The book by Professor Ahmed featuring this research, entitled Journey into Europe: Islam, Immigration and Identity, was published by Brookings in February. It has so far been positively reviewed in several publications including, The News, dawn, and The Daily Times. A reception and discussion was held at the Pakistan Embassy in Washington on 27 February 2018. I also recommend the documentary film produced as part of the project by our partners at the Michigan State University Muslim Studies Program (director Salah D. Hassan). This hour-long film 'Migrations of Islam' explores Muslim self-fashioning and intercultural trust in the Great Lakes area of the United States. It was premiered in Britain at our 'Beyond Islamophobia' conference in June 2014. Since then it has played at numerous documentary film festivals and conferences in the US including: East Lansing Film Festival; Queens International Film Festival, NY; Ethnogra Film Festival; and the World Documentary Conference. The film has received positive reviews from the audiences. Audiences have indicated that the film makes an important contribution to the understanding of the diversity of Muslim Americans and also the various ways that Muslims in the US express themselves. Some have emphasized the need for more films like Migrations of Islam that have a different focus, such as the issue of race and religion, especially given the large number of Black Muslims in the US and their specific histories. Others have commented on the importance of making a film that addresses specifically conversion to Islam among Americans. The photographic festival 'The Art of Intergration', featuring pictures by the renowned photographer Peter Sanders, ran as part of the project between April and June 2015. This was extremely successful, with more than 7000 visitors across the two month period it was open, including several school parties. It also generated regional press coverage on BBC London news (http://www.bbc.co.uk/london/content/articles/2007/06/22/towerhamlets_peter_video_feature.shtml) . Viewer reactions were captured in a Visitor Book. We are still collating these, but a number testify to raised levels of knowledge and changed attitudes as a result of seeing the exhibition. Our work was cited in the PaCCS Policy Briefing, 'Religion and Contemporary Security' challenges (2016) with the recommendation that the arts and cultural forms of expression ought to form a more central plank in engagement between communities. Mention here was made of perhaps the most original facet of the work: scoping and devising a 'tool kit' for building intercultural trust. This has emerged in the final year of the project from the case studies our team has carried out with interfaith community arts group. We are evolving techniques based on shared goal-setting, collaborative interdependence and mutual vulnerability, as a potential model which can be rolled out on a larger scale to develop more trusting intercultural relations. This work draws on constructivist paradigms of building intercultural understanding, but develops them further by incorporating techniques from theatre practice and drama therapy. We envisage significant future impact from this as we research it further in subsequent projects. This has potential use in many areas where intercultural trust needs improving. In the first post-award year (2016) MTCD co-organised a half-day conversation on the impact of the Prevent Duty on public bodies. This was a collaboration between the Universities of East London and Middlesex. Forty professionals and stakeholders attended and were invited to share their observations about the Prevent duty, any criticisms, and suggestions for improving the kind of work Prevent is supposed to do. The resulting policy briefing, entitled 'Trust and the Prevent Duty' is housed on the PaCCS website. A further, more detailed publication, is also forthcoming, co-authored with Yasmin Alibhai-Brown. We will be disseminating the findings to participants, stakeholders and policy makers. This work has inspired ourselves and other parties to research further into Prevent and the counter-terrorism strategy more generally. UEL and Middlesex also have plans for follow-up activities in future months.
First Year Of Impact 2016
Sector Communities and Social Services/Policy,Government, Democracy and Justice,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections,Security and Diplomacy
Impact Types Cultural,Societal,Policy & public services

 
Description Citation in PaCCS Policy Briefing Document
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
 
Description Invited participant in Cabinet Office 'Horizon Scanning' roundtable on trust (8th July 2014)
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description British Library Web Archiving 
Organisation The British Library
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The Research Assistant, Asmaa Soliman, is collaborating in the British Library's web archiving programme. This is a digital collection of the world's online media including websites. We have been tasked with helping in the construction of an archive of Muslim-related websites, with an emphasis on those interested on interfaith or intercultural engagement and dialogue.
Collaborator Contribution Facilitated training in the web archiving software and offered advice and guidance.
Impact We are present collating the Muslim web archive which will, once completed, provide research and knowledge resources to a wide range of users from one site. A URL will become available once the collection has reached a more advanced stage.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Dialogue Society 
Organisation Dialogue Society, London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Co-organised two roundtable discussions and co-organised and hosted one public seminar in collaboration with the Dialogue Society (February - May 2013) on the project strand themes of society and citizenship, business and finance and culture and the arts.
Collaborator Contribution Co-organised and hosted two roundtable events and co-organised one public seminar on strand themes of society and citizenship, business and finance and culture and the arts.
Impact The roundtable discussions, attended by a range of participants and involving invited speakers from the relevant sectors, were conducted under Chatham House rules. A brief report of these is contained on the website. The public seminar was recorded and a podcast and report are available on the site too. http://www.muslimstrustdialogue.org/index.php/mtcd-in-business-and-finance/103-muslims-trust-and-cultural-dialogue-in-business-and-finance http://www.muslimstrustdialogue.org/index.php/politics-and-society/104-muslims-trust-and-cultural-dialogue-in-politics-and-society http://www.muslimstrustdialogue.org/index.php/arts-and-culture/121-mtcd-in-culture-community-and-the-arts
Start Year 2013
 
Description Jouney into Europe 
Organisation American University
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We provided researchers, intellectual and logistical support for the British leg of Professor Akbar S. Ahmed's Journey into Europe Project (May - August 2014) and shared expertise in the production of the film documentary of the same name (2015).
Collaborator Contribution Professor Ahmed's team conducted Europe-wide research into Muslim belonging, citizenship and trust in Europe, sharing their findings with us, as their partners, in the form of reports and video material. They have made a documentary film for a general audience based on the research as well as a monograph authored by the Professor. The MTCD PI Peter Morey is the Executive Producer of this film.
Impact Documentary film 'Journey into Europe' (2015) and book to follow. At present Professor Ahmed regularly writes journalistic and op ed pieces based on this research.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Michigan State University Muslim Studies Program 
Organisation Michigan State University
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We have collaborated with MSU's Muslim Studies Program by participating in, co-organising, publicising, and helping with logistics for their 'Global Halal' conference (February 2015). Members of the MTCD team presented papers at this conference too.
Collaborator Contribution MSU Muslim Studies Program, under the direction of Dr Salah D. Hassan have co-produced with MTCD a documentary film 'Migrations of Islam' (2014) on Muslim self-fashioning and intercultural trust in the United States.
Impact Documentary Film: 'Migrations of Islam' (2014) director Salah D. Hassan
Start Year 2012
 
Description School of Oriental and African Studies 
Organisation School of Oriental and African Studies (University of London)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Co-organisation of seminar series and two-day international conferences on 'Trust and Multiculturalism' (2013) and 'Beyond Islamophobia' (2014). Also, co-editing duties for volumes emerging from these conferences as well as the PI, Peter Morey collaborating with the Chair of the Centre for the Study of Pakistan, Dr Amina Yaqin, on a book on intercultural trust and Muslims.
Collaborator Contribution The Centre for the Study of Pakistan, SOAS, has assisted with the organisation both of a seminar series and two international two-day conferences, providing hosting, catering and other types of support. In addition, the Centre Chair, Dr Amina Yaqin has produced a published article on trust and Pakistani women's autobiography, is editing a volume of essays, and co-authoring, with the PI, Professor Peter Morey, a book on intercultural trust and Muslims.
Impact Dr Yaqin wrote an essay entitled 'Autobiography and Muslim Women's Lives' published in the Journal of Women's History (25:2, 2013). We are also working currently on three interdisciplinary volumes - two edited collections reflecting the themes and proceedings of the annual conferences, and a co-written book on intercultural trust and Muslims. (publication details to be confirmed)
Start Year 2012
 
Description University of York 
Organisation University of York
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Logistical support for 'Prizing Muslims' writers workshop held at University of York on 18 May 2014. Organisation of a planned writers' festival at SOAS, University of London, March 2015.
Collaborator Contribution Organisation and hosting of 'Prizing Muslims' workshop. Participation in Cultural Confluences writers' festival at SOAS, University of London, March 2015.
Impact Podcast of the day's event at http://www.muslimstrustdialogue.org/index.php/arts-and-culture/146-publishing-and-prizing-muslims-workshop
Start Year 2013
 
Description Appearance on RT's 'Sputnik' current affairs discussion programme 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The talk sparked a discussion, evidenced by subsequent tweets to the programme.

Increased awareness of the Framing Muslims book, which was featured in the introduction and the findings from which were discussed in the interview.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Cultural Confluences Spring Literature Festival 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The Cultural Confluences Spring Literature Festival at SOAS followed on from a smaller, more academically-focused event at York the previous year. Where that was concerned to examine the creation and marketing of Muslim writing in the UK and US, drawing in writers and publishers, this was a showcase for the work of a range of writers from around the world. As such, its audience tended more towards the general public, students and book lovers.

Writers from the UK, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Lebanon were invited to read from their work and discuss questions of cultural convergence and confluence and, specifically, whether literature can help build trust between communities. The readings were well received by a sizable audience who were also fully involved in the discussions that followed each reading. Topics covered included censorship and freedom of speech, cultural representation and the impact of international politics on literary production and reception.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.muslimstrustdialogue.org/index.php/arts-and-culture/171-homepage5-3
 
Description Main Speaker at PaCCS Policy Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact In September 2015, I - along with my research assistant, Asmaa Soliman - was a main speaker at the PaCCS Policy Workshop. This event was designed to engage policymakers and stakeholders in work arising from the Leadership Fellowships having specifically to do with religion and security. Around 50 delegates attended across the day, including civil servants, academics and those involved in deradicalisation and interfaith work. Our talk was well-received, generated questions, discussion, and subsequent breakout groups were able to further consider our findings and suggestions.

This workshop led directly to the publication of a related policy document (see 'Policy' section of form) in which a brief overview of our work and some summary recommendations were included. As the document has only just appeared impact is hard to gauge at this point. (The decision to produce the policy document is the 'decision' referred to in the section below.)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/news/policy-workshop-role-religion-contemporary-security-challenges/
 
Description Panellist in discussion on 'Muslims and Trust', Bradford Literature Festival, 16 May 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Around 50 people attended the panel on Muslims and Trust which was part of the first annual Bradford Literature Festival (which itself aims to reach out across community dividing lines and bring together diverse audiences). This panel consisted of myself, Hasan Mahamdallie, Baroness Syeda Warsi and Yasmin Alibhai-Brown. Using my project's research as a launchpad we discussed a range of general issues standing in the way of the promotion of trust between Muslims and non-Muslims in contemporary Britain.

There was a lively discussion afterwards with animated audience participation. (Indeed, the session overran slightly owing to the level of audience engagement and quality of the debate. The discussion was tweeted by various members of the audience and we carried it on our project Twitter feed.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.bradfordliteraturefestival.co.uk/events/panel-discussion-muslims-and-trust/
 
Description Photographic Exhibition - The Art of Integration 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The Art of Integration was a two-month exhibition of photographs by the renowned photographer Peter Sanders, held at the Brunei Gallery, London between April and June 2015. Sanders' work foregrounds the diversity of Muslim life in Britain, combating stereotypes by showing how Muslims are proactive citizens performing important tasks and engaging in everyday activities. The pictures are largely informal - although a few are symbolically staged - and serve to show the famous and the not-so-famous, providing a snapshot of Muslim life in Britain today.

This exhibition was staged in partnership with HRH Prince Charles' Mosaic Arts Trust. The launch evening in April was attended by over 100 people. During the time the exhibition was open it received over 7000 visitors, and several school visits. It was also the subject of a piece on the BBC London television news.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-32863718
 
Description Second Glance/Double Take Art exhibition 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Many commendations offered to Dr Madeline Clements for organising the events part of the Muslims, Trust and Cultural Dialogue project. Viewers of the art remarked on its technical proficiency and the insights it shed on Muslim sense of self, both in Pakistan and the diaspora.

The exhibition initially ran in conjunction with the 'Beyond Islamophobia' academic conference in June 2013, and was staged outside the Khalili Lecture Theatre (7-14 June 2014). Afterwards, however, the exhibition was taken to the Constantine Gallery, Middlesborough between 25 and 27 June, where another audience had the chance to see it.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.lovemiddlesbrough.com/whats-on/event/4565/second-glance-double-take-ii
 
Description Sixth Form Workshop on Religion and Conflict 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact PaCCS organised an event for sixth formers from schools participating in the 'Brilliant Club' at the OU buildings in Camden in September 2016. Pupils were invited to engage with the work of projects falling under the PaCCS umbrella with a religion and conflict theme. For MTCD, I devised a set of trust-building activities for students as well as asking them to think in more general terms about why we give and withhold trust and the impact of cultural difference on this. Students worked in small breakout groups but in plenary sessions students were invited to brainstorm a prepared set of questions and feed back to the whole participating group.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Worhsop 'conversation' with invited stakeholders to discuss the impact of the Government's Prevent Duty on public bodies 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This half-day workshop 'conversation' involved stakeholders from professional bodies, third sector workers, policy officials, students, academics and others. They were brought together at Friends House in Euston in May 2016 to discuss the impact of the Prevent Duty on public bodies to be proactive in looking for signs of radicalisation and extreme views. I organised this as part of the MTCD impact trail with Professor Yasmin Alibhai-Brown of Middlesex University. We employed a plenary/breakout group approach to determine what were the main concerns professionals had with Prevent as currently articulated. The outcome was a policy briefing document, suggesting changes, and a longer report, the latter of which is still in preparation.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/policy-briefings/trust-and-the-prevent-duty/
 
Description Young Muslim Artists event 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The project Research Assistant organised an evening with young Muslim artists, hosted by the Universal Peace federation in May 2014. The event included singers, rappers, musicians, and comedians. It was well attended by a wide range of people and led to very positive feedback and prompts to organise another similar event in the future.

Increased awareness both of Professor Akbar S. Ahmed' collaborative work with us on the 'Journey into Europe' and, perhaps more importnatly, of the diversity of Muslim live performance artistic practices.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.muslimstrustdialogue.org/index.php/journey-into-britain