Describing sociolinguistic variation in verb directionality in British Sign Language: A corpus-based study

Lead Research Organisation: University College London
Department Name: Experimental Psychology

Abstract

The aim of this project is to exploit an existing large video dataset of British Sign Language (or 'BSL', the language of the British deaf community), collected under the BSL Corpus Project (BSLCP, 2008-2011), and to conduct corpus-based investigations into a unique aspect of its grammar. In BSLCP, data were collected from 249 native and near-native deaf signers of BSL from 8 sites across the United Kingdom. The data are representative of the language community, including a mix of men and women, deaf adults with deaf parents and those with hearing parents, signers who are young and old, and individuals from working and middle class backgrounds as well as different ethnic groups. The primary aim of the project is to use the data collected to investigate variation and change in the use of directional verbs in BSL. Directional verbs like ASK in BSL move in the signing space between locations associated with, e.g. the person asking and the person being asked. Because these verbs incorporate an element of pointing within them, they are unique to sign languages, yet the way they are used in everyday conversation is not well understood. This project will enable us to relate the use of indicating verbs to social factors, such as a signer's language background, age, region or social class, in order to study how they vary. An understanding of variation in sign languages like BSL is important because of their unique sociolinguistic situations. Only 5-10% of the British deaf community acquires BSL as their first language from signing parents, with the majority of signers learning BSL from deaf peers in schools for deaf children or from friends in early adulthood. As a result of this unusual pattern of language transmission, together with other factors such as the lack of a widely-used writing system, no standard variety of BSL used in education, and extensive contact with the spoken language of the surrounding community, sign language use in the British deaf community exhibits a great deal of variation. Since the 1980s, the increasing use of BSL on television and in a wider variety of social situations means that the language is undergoing rapid change. The greater understanding of directional verbs in BSL as well as their variation and change which will result from this project will lead to improved sign language teaching resources that will more accurately describe how the language is used by a range of subgroups within the British deaf community. Another aim of the current project is to transform part of this video dataset created under BSLCP (2008-2011) into a centralised source of data for ongoing research efforts that aim to understand BSL and sign languages of deaf communities in general. Advances in technology have made it possible for these video recordings of sign language data to be given linguistic annotations which can be accessed on-line. In the past, the use of analogue video material and the lack of video annotation software did not allow for efficient access to source material when analysing sign language data. Following BSLCP, the first national web-based and publicly accessible collection of BSL video material that can be used for sign language research is now available (www.bslcorpusproject.org), and the current project proposes to transform part of this collection into a searchable archive (i.e. a 'corpus'). A more searchable, accessible BSL Corpus will enable more research on the structure and use of BSL. This will in turn bring about improvements to the training of BSL teachers, sign language interpreters and educators of deaf children. Furthermore, the project also makes possible work comparing BSL with related and unrelated sign and spoken languages elsewhere in the world, and will lead to an improved understanding of human language in general.

Planned Impact

Who will benefit:

-Practitioners: The greater understanding of BSL that will result from our work will lead to improved opportunities for training of sign language teachers, sign language interpreters, and educators of deaf children. Access to more information about the structure and use of BSL will lead to improved sign language teaching resources, such as textbooks and video/DVD/online materials, that accurately describe how the language is used by a range of subgroups within the British deaf community. This will in turn enable us to create more reliable and valid assessment instruments to evaluate deaf children's language development, as well as assess the progress of students in classes teaching BSL as an additional language or in sign language interpreter trainee programs. Thus, our work will benefit professionals in the wider field of deafness generally.
-BSL learners: The benefit of BSL research to practitioners and professionals such as BSL teachers, interpreter trainers and other educators will have an immediate impact on those who learn BSL from these educators. This includes hearing people who learn BSL formally as adult students (in further/higher education or in third sector adult learning programmes). But there are also many individuals (deaf and hearing, children, teenagers and adults, also some hearing parents of deaf children) who learn BSL informally through friends, family or by other means. The benefits to informal learners are perhaps not as immediate as formal learners but they will be just as powerful, if not more so, considering that most BSL signers have few opportunities to study BSL formally.
-Policy-makers: The greater understanding of BSL and improved resources for BSL teaching, learning and research will provide an evidence-base for policy-makers in supporting appropriate education, training and services for deaf children and adults. This will help close the gap in education, employment, and health between deaf people throughout their lifespan and their hearing peers.
-Deaf people in society: A major social benefit will be in relation to equity and the status of deaf people in British society. More appropriate resources for the bilingual education of deaf children, sign language teaching, and sign language interpreter training will lead to improved quality of educational and interpreting services for deaf people and provide more opportunities for self-development and employment. Deaf people who can become more highly qualified and trained will be in a better position to contribute to society in different ways, and will be able to achieve greater recognition, access, and equity in the wider community.

How they will benefit from this research:

-Accessible online BSL corpus: The fact that the BSL Corpus is available online (http://www.bslcorpusproject.org/data) and, with the current project, will be more searchable/accessible to the deaf community and the wider public, alongside publicly available online corpora of spoken languages such as the British National Corpus of English, will help justify and strengthen the linguistic status of BSL which will in turn support full participation of their users in British society.
-Knowledge exchange: Findings will be presented at the British Deaf Association annual conference, and we will host a workshop for the British deaf community not only to share our findings but also to set the agenda for future work on the BSL Corpus. Moreover, research findings will also be shared via DCAL seminars and workshops specifically targeting sign language teachers and interpreters, including the Association of BSL Tutors and Assessors, the Association of Sign Language Interpreters, and Signature.

Publications

10 25 50
 
Description Directional verbs ('agreement' (Padden, 1983)/'indicating' verbs (Liddell, 2000)) in sign languages, e.g. GIVE in British Sign Language, can be directed towards locations in space associated with their arguments. Some have argued this modification is fundamentally the same as grammatical agreement in spoken languages, is obligatory, and is often accompanied by grammatical non-manual markers such as eye-gaze (Neidle et al., 2000; Lillo-Martin & Meier, 2011). Others propose this modification is fundamentally different from agreement, representing instead a fusion of linguistic and gestural (specifically pointing) elements (Liddell, 2000).
In this project, we considered linguistic and social factors in the use of directional verbs in conversational data from the BSL Corpus (www.bslcorpusproject.org/data, n=1680). Preliminary results reveal that modification of directional verbs occurs for both subject (66%) and object arguments (64%), but not obligatorily for either. Furthermore, 3rd-to-3rd person modification is rare, occurring in only 7% of our data. (Examples of prototypical directional verbs in the literature involve 3rd-to-3rd person modification (e.g. JOHN POINTa MARY POINTb aASKb "John asked Mary", where the verb ASK moves from the location associated with John to the location associated with Mary)). Finally, constructed action (i.e. nonmanual enactment/embodiment) co-occurred with 65% of tokens where eye-gaze was directed towards a subject or object.
The rate of modification suggests that directionality in BSL is not obligatory; while this may be attributed to ongoing grammaticalisation processes, no social factors were significant thus no evidence was found of language change across age groups. Instead, our results appear to suggest that directionality is a pointing-based reference tracking system, aligning with the cognitive/functional view that directional verbs represent a fusion of linguistic and gestural elements (de Beuzeville et al., 2009; Liddell, 2000). Additionally, these findings highlight the importance of using corpus data for (sign) linguistics research, to verify or counter previous claims based on little data.
Exploitation Route This project will have several impacts on the 'user' community, which is primarily British Sign Language teachers, students, interpreters, interpreter trainers and other (sign) language professionals working with Deaf people.
Firstly, there are clear implications for how directionality should be taught to learners of BSL. The sign linguistics literature contains many examples of 3rd-to-3rd person modification as noted above in (1) and therefore, this structure is taught by many BSL teachers as a standard/prototypical way of using directional verbs. The fact that we found this structure to be so low in frequency (only 7%) suggests that this structure could be taught as possible but should not be taught as prototypical to learners. Instead, our findings suggest that the use of first person modification with directional verbs, with simultaneous use of constructed action, should be taught as a more frequent use of directionality.
Secondly, the inclusion of verb directionality in BSL SignBank (dictionary and reference grammar) will be invaluable to the user community. The fact that this information will be included in BSL SignBank dictionary and reference grammar, and will be constantly updated as work continues on the BSL Corpus means that this key information will be available to various users including learners, even as the language changes. This will be a vast improvement over verb directionality information as given in the only other linguistically-organised BSL dictionary (Brien 1992), which according to our findings in many cases is outdated and/or inaccurate.
Sectors Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Education,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections

URL http://www.bslcorpusproject.org/projects/directional-verbs-project/
 
Description One important outcome of the project is completion of 50,000 lexical annotations of conversation data from the British Sign Language Corpus from 4 regions (London, Manchester, Bristol and Birmingham) which were made available online in mid-2014 (www.bslcorpusproject.org/data); these have been an invaluable resource to other researchers. As of May 2015, 43 researchers are registered and have access to the full set of the BSL Corpus data, including 24 research students and 19 academic/research staff. The BSL Corpus has also had considerable non-academic impact as well. Students, teachers and interpreters are using the BSL Corpus data directly and also via BSL SignBank, an online dictionary based on signs from the BSL Corpus, which is clear from regular posts about the BSL Corpus on social media sites. These groups have been targeted directly during a wide range of workshops, open days, roadshows and other events held with the British Deaf community. This will continue in the long term in the form of seminars and other training sessions as part of DCAL's Continuing Professional Development programe from 2015 onwards, particularly BSL Linguistics sessions aimed at BSL tutors and interpreters. The open-access portion of the BSL Corpus is also being used by the Deaf community and other professionals outside of DCAL. One example we know about is the NHS National Deaf Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service which has used and promoted the BSL Corpus in its BSL training services. Also, we have had requests from an additional 43 people (as of May 2015) who are not researchers (mostly students, teachers and interpreters) who want to access the restricted conversation and interview data - the demand for this is clearly there but cannot be granted due to consent given at time of filming. Allowing this access would require more funding which we will be seeking in the future. Impacts arising specifically from this project on directional verbs in BSL include a much better understanding of how this set of verbs works in BSL conversation - both for academics (as evidenced by conference presentations and journal publications) and for non-academics (as evidenced by positive feedback from workshops, seminars, etc aimed at the Deaf community which have reported = results from this project). Additionally, BSL SignBank now includes a tag for which which BSL signs act as directional verbs based on the data from this project - this is the first time that usage-based information about directional verbs has been added to any sign language dictionary.
First Year Of Impact 2014
Sector Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Education,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections
Impact Types Cultural,Societal

 
Description DCAL Research Skills Summer School
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact This summer school for research students examined linguistic, psycholinguistic and neuroscience approaches to the research area of language of deaf people. It attracted research students from Europe, Africa and beyond.
URL https://www.ucl.ac.uk/dcal/study/short-and-online-courses/research-skills-summer-school
 
Description Digging into Data Challenge
Amount £100,000 (GBP)
Funding ID Digging into Signs 
Organisation Jisc 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 06/2014 
End 05/2015
 
Description Digging into signs: Developing standard annotation practices for cross-linguistic quantitative analysis of sign language data
Amount £124,965 (GBP)
Organisation Research Councils UK (RCUK) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 05/2014 
End 04/2015
 
Description When do gestures become linguistic? Understanding the gesture-language interface through a corpus-based study of pointing signs in sign languages
Amount $345,000 (AUD)
Organisation Australian Research Council 
Sector Public
Country Australia
Start 06/2014 
End 05/2015
 
Description Consultation about creation of Moroccan Sign Language corpus 
Organisation National School of Mineral Industry
Country Morocco 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Consultation with Abdelhadi Soudi, Head of the interdisciplinary research team "Mathematics-Computer Science and Linguistics", Ecole Nationale de l'Industrie Minérale, Rabat, Morocco
Start Year 2013
 
Description Consultation about creation of historical corpus of American Sign Language 
Organisation University of Connecticut
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Consultation with Ted Supalla, University of Connecticut about creation of historical corpus of American Sign Language
Start Year 2012
 
Description Consultation about phonological change in sign languages 
Organisation Mason Perkins Deafness Fund (MPDF)
Country Italy 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Consultation with Elena Radutzky, Mason Perkins Deafness Fund, Rome, Italy
Start Year 2013
 
Description Consultation about sign language documentation at borders of Brazil, Uraguay, Argentina 
Organisation Federal University of Pelotas (UFPel)
Country Brazil 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Consultation with Tatiana Lebedeff, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Brazil
Start Year 2013
 
Description Consultation about sign language machine translation techology in Brazil 
Organisation New Scientist
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Consultation with Niall Firth, New Scientist magazine
Start Year 2013
 
Description Consultation about use of BSL corpus data for improvement of sign language recognition technology 
Organisation University of Aberdeen
Department Department of Computing Science
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Consultation with Ernesto Compatangelo, Department of Computing Science, University of Aberdeen about use of BSL Corpus data to improve Portable Sign Language Translator (http://www.technabling.co.uk/pslt)
Start Year 2012
 
Description Consultation about use of BSL corpus data for improvement of sign language recognition technology 
Organisation University of Sheffield
Department Department of Computer Science
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Consultation with Trevor Cohn, Dept of Computer Science, University of Sheffield about use of BSL Corpus data for work on automatic machine translation
Start Year 2012
 
Description Consultation on language and gesture in sign language and multimodal corpora 
Organisation University of Nottingham
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Consultation with Svenja Adolphs, Professor of English Language and Linguistics, Nottingham University
Start Year 2013
 
Description Consultation on language and gesture in sign language and multimodal corpora 
Organisation University of Nottingham
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Consultation with Svenja Adolphs, Professor of English Language and Linguistics, Nottingham University
Start Year 2013
 
Description Creation of Indian Sign Language corpus 
Organisation Central Institute of Indian Languages
Country India 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Consultation with Amaresh Gopalakrishnan, Central Institute of Indian Languages, about creation of Indian Sign Language corpus
Start Year 2012
 
Description European COST action SignGram : unraveling the grammars of European sign languages : pathways to full citizenship of deaf signers and to the protection of their linguistic heritage 
Organisation European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST)
Department Unraveling the Grammars of European Sign Language
Country European Union (EU) 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Member of European COST action SignGram: Unraveling the grammars of European sign languages: pathways to full citizenship of deaf signers and to the protection of their linguistic heritage. http://parles.upf.edu/en/content/cost-signgram
Start Year 2011
 
Description Funded expert consultant on Gallaudet University Priority Research grant to Dr. Julie Hochgesang, "A Motivated Look at Indicating Verbs in ASL", 2020-2022 
Organisation Gallaudet University
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Kearsy Cormier as funded expert consultant on Gallaudet University Priority Research grant to Dr. Julie Hochgesang, "A Motivated Look at Indicating Verbs in ASL"
Collaborator Contribution Kearsy Cormier as funded expert consultant on Gallaudet University Priority Research grant to Dr. Julie Hochgesang, "A Motivated Look at Indicating Verbs in ASL"
Impact In progress
Start Year 2020
 
Title BSL SignBank: sign language lexical database system 
Description BSL SignBank is an open access, online lexical database and dictionary of British Sign Language, based on and adapted from Auslan (Australian Sign Language) SignBank. BSL SignBank was the first adaptation of the Auslan system. 
Type Of Technology Webtool/Application 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact SignBanks for other sign languages are emerging based on the BSL adaptation, including Sign Language of the Netherlands and Finnish Sign Language, with proposals underway for SignBanks in other countries. 
URL http://bslsignbank.ucl.ac.uk
 
Description A sign of where you're from? BDN article 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact "A sign of where you're from?" Research article by Rose Stamp, Adam Schembri, Bronwen Evans, Kearsy Cormier, featuring research on accommodation in BSL, British Deaf News, April 2015.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description BBC See Hear, featuring British Sign Language Corpus 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Interviewee for BBC See Hear, featuring British Sign Language Corpus, 28 May 2014. Aired on BBC early 2015.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description BSL Corpus ten year celebration event. 3 November, 2018. DCAL. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact On Saturday 3 November, DCAL hosted the BSL Corpus 10-year celebration event. This public event was hosted live in central London and simultaneously live streamed online to viewers in the United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand. DCAL invited every single person who has been involved in the creation and development of the BSL Corpus over the past ten years: fieldworkers, language consultants, researchers, teachers, community members, visiting scholars and more. Anyone who is interested in BSL and signed language linguistics was also invited and welcome to attend. Half of the day was about disseminating research findings - what has been learned over the years from doing research using the BSL Corpus and also the related BSL Signbank dictionary. The other half of the day showcased people from across the UK who have been using the BSL Corpus and/or BSL SignBank for reasons other than research, especially for BSL teaching and/or interpreter training. The main language of the event was BSL, with over 100 Deaf and hearing BSL signers attend in person, with another 200+ people watching online. The event was fully accessible with voice interpretation from BSL into English and live English captions.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://bslcorpusproject.org/events/bsl-corpus-10-year-celebration/
 
Description BSL Linguistics for BSL tutors, DCAL CPD 18 April 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact BSL Linguistics for BSL tutors. Workshop delivered with Robert Adam as part of DCAL's Continuing Professional Development programme for teachers of BSL, 18 April 2015.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description BSL SignBank is the First British Sign Language Dictionary Based on Actual Use 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Kearsy Cormier as interviewee for "BSL SignBank is the First British Sign Language Dictionary Based on Actual Use," featuring BSL SignBank. News item on Shiny Shiny, mainstream technology website for women, 26 September 2014. http://www.shinyshiny.tv/2014/09/signbank-bsl-dictionary.html
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.shinyshiny.tv/2014/09/signbank-bsl-dictionary.html
 
Description BSL SignBank is the first British Sign Language dictionary based on actual use 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact ShinyShiny article about BSL SignBank

Greater knowledge among the Deaf community
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.shinyshiny.tv/2014/09/signbank-bsl-dictionary.html
 
Description BSL SignBank, a 'living' British Sign Language dictionary, is launched online 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Kearsy Cormier as interviewee for "Deaf News: BSL SignBank, a 'living' British Sign Language dictionary, is launched online", featuring BSL SignBank. Limping Chicken (world-leading deaf blog), 7 October 2014. http://limpingchicken.com/2014/10/07/deaf-news-bsl-signbank-a-living-british-sign-language-dictionary-is-launched-online/
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://limpingchicken.com/2014/10/07/deaf-news-bsl-signbank-a-living-british-sign-language-dictionar...
 
Description BSL SignBank: The first usage-based sign language dictionary 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact "BSL SignBank: The first usage-based sign language dictionary", featuring BSL SignBank. News item in Hearing Times, national newspaper for deaf and hard-of-hearing, 30 September 2014, http://www.hearingtimes.co.uk/News/21961/BSL%20SignBank-%20The%20first%20usage-based%20sign%20language%20dictionary
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.hearingtimes.co.uk/News/21961/BSL%20SignBank-%20The%20first%20usage-based%20sign%20langua...
 
Description Deaf News: Researchers find that regional variations of BSL are in decline 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Cormier interviewed about BSL Corpus - Limping Chicken website

Deaf public became more aware of our research
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://limpingchicken.com/2014/04/24/deaf-news-researchers-find-that-regional-variations-of-bsl-are-...
 
Description Hot off the press: New DCAL paper on lexical variation and change in BSL in PLOS ONE 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This paper presents results from a corpus-based study investigating lexical variation in BSL. An earlier study investigating variation in BSL numeral signs found that younger signers were using a decreasing variety of regionally distinct variants, suggesting that levelling may be taking place. Here, we report findings from a larger investigation looking at regional lexical variants for colours, countries, numbers and UK placenames elicited as part of the BSL Corpus Project. Age, school location and language background were significant predictors of lexical variation, with younger signers using a more levelled variety. This change appears to be happening faster in particular sub-groups of the deaf community (e.g., signers from hearing families). Also, we find that for the names of some UK cities, signers from outside the region use a different sign than those who live in the region. Authours: Rose Stamp, Adam Schembri, Jordan Fenlon, Ramas Rentelis, Bencie Woll & Kearsy Cormier

Deaf public and researchers became more aware of our research
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0094053
 
Description Is BSL changing? (British Deaf News, 2014) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact "Is BSL changing?" Research article featuring research on lexical variation and change in the BSL Corpus, British Deaf News, June 2014.

N/A
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Limping Chicken Article: BSL SignBank, a 'living' British Sign Language dictionary, is launched online 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Limping Chicken Article about BSL SignBank

Greater knowledge among the Deaf community
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://limpingchicken.com/2014/10/07/deaf-news-bsl-signbank-a-living-british-sign-language-dictionar...
 
Description New British Sign Language Dictionary - BSL SignBank 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Article about BSL SignBank

Deaf public became more aware of our research
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.signhealth.org.uk/new-british-sign-language-living-dictionary/
 
Description Sign language corpora, Corpus MOOC interview 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Kearsy Cormier interviewed about sign language corpora. Invited expert interview as part of 'In-conversation' teaching materials, Lancaster University's internationally recognised Corpus MOOC, "Corpus linguistics: method, analysis, interpretation," spring term 2014, recorded 23.1.14. www.futurelearn.com/courses/corpus-linguistics
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.futurelearn.com/courses/corpus-linguistics
 
Description Sign language corpora, interview for Corpus MOOC, K Cormier 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Filmed informal interview, "In Conversation", KC answering questions about sign language corpora, one of a group of experts talking about applications of corpora offered as supplementary materials as part of CASS Corpus MOOC https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/corpus-linguistics

N/A
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description The British Sign Language Corpus and BSL SignBank, K Cormier 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact invited lecture at CASS, Lancaster

N/A
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description The core lexicon and non-core lexicon in sign languages, training for Moscow students 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact "The core lexicon and non-core lexicon in sign languages," training session for Russian Sign Language interpreting students from Moscow State Linguistic University, 21-23 April 2015.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description The importance of language documentation and corpora for sign languages 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Primary Audience
Results and Impact Invited presentation at SOAS Endangered Languages Week 2013
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity
 
Description Why BSL linguistics matters for BSL teaching and learning 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact "Why BSL linguistics matters for BSL teaching and learning," article written by Kearsy Cormier, Robert Adam & Bencie Woll for Limping Chicken (world-leading deaf blog) 16 December 2015 http://limpingchicken.com/2015/12/16/dcal-why-bsl-linguistics-matters-for-bsl-teaching-and-learning/ and re-published 9 January 2016 due to popularity of first posting.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://limpingchicken.com/2015/12/16/dcal-why-bsl-linguistics-matters-for-bsl-teaching-and-learning/
 
Description Workshop delivered at International Mother Language Day event, Communication ID 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Cormier, Kearsy & Robert Adam. 2015. "Current Issues in BSL Lingustics", workshop delivered at International Mother Language Day event for Deaf community, co-sponsored by DCAL and Communication ID, 20 February 2015. Two workshops delivered, one in morning and one in afternoon - questions and discussion followed each.

Several expressions of interest in DCAL's Continuing Professional Development programme and Msc programmes.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.communicationid.co.uk/news/international-mother-language-day-2015