(Re)Imagining Youth: A Comparative Sociology of Youth Leisure in Scotland and Hong Kong

Lead Research Organisation: University of Glasgow
Department Name: School of Social & Political Sciences

Abstract

In recent years, the 'global' question has become central to debate in the social sciences. For some, processes of globalisation have created increased homogeneity of culture in geographically diverse communities; for others, the effects of globalisation are both heterogeneous and unpredictable, as global and local cultures conflict and merge (Appadurai 1996). Such debates are all the more prescient in non-Western settings, as postcolonial perspectives challenge Western analyses of culture and identity (Said 1978; Spivak 1999). Layered into these seemingly new debates, however, are longstanding sociological issues relating to class, place and identity; access to 'global' culture remains sharply stratified by access to resources (Bauman 1998, 2000a). These debates have a particular resonance with young people, who experience both the precariousness of the global economy (Furlong and Cartmel 2007), and the leading-edge of global consumer culture (Young 1999). Comparative study of youth between East and West, therefore, has the potential to interrogate theoretical debates relating to globalisation, postcolonialism and culture in a way that is both timely and targeted (Giddens 2002; Robertson 1995; Bauman 2000b).

(Re)Imagining Youth aims to engage with these debates through analysis of continuity and change in youth leisure in two geographically and culturally diverse research sites: Scotland and Hong Kong. The study adopts a historical and cross-cultural comparative design, building on landmark research carried out in both study locations by the pioneering sociologist Pearl Jephcott (1967, 1971). Scotland and Hong Kong have experienced economic convergence since these studies were published, yet remain culturally distinct; thus creating a unique test-bed for analysis of global and local forces on youth leisure in a comparative context. Areas of thematic convergence and divergence include, for example, street-based vs. on-line leisure; structured vs. unstructured leisure; youth transitions; work and education; 'risky' leisure (drinking, smoking, gambling, fighting, offending); consumerism and consumption.

Responding to recent calls for new forms of global qualitative methodologies (Burawoy 2000; Kenway and Faley 2009; Wacquant 2008), the study will involve concurrent data-collection in case-study locations in Scotland and Hong Kong - including ethnographic observations, stakeholder interviews, focus group discussions, oral history interviews, and on-line data-collection - using common procedures to ensure comparability. Approximately 150 young people aged 16-24, with a cross-section of age, gender, socio-economic background, and work/study status, will be recruited through local youth organisations in both case-study locations (preliminary agreements in place). In addition, in recognition of the increasing importance of on-line leisure spaces for young people, these methods will be complemented by a range of ethnographic and interview data from young people's online environments. Together, these data will allow for a unique contribution to a range of academic and public debates at local, national and international levels.

Planned Impact

Beyond academia, the main beneficiaries of the research will be policymakers in local and national government, Third Sector organisations, professionals and practitioners working with young people (including play and youth workers, social workers, youth justice practitioners and community safety teams), as well as young people and their communities.

In each of the study sites, inter-generational issues pertaining to young people and leisure habits have become prominent in recent years. In Scotland, the so-called 'Glasgow Effect' - persistently high rates of ill-health and mortality that far exceed predictable levels, to an extent that is neither predicted nor explained by the most sophisticated statistical analyses - has been attributed to deeply-entrenched habits, through which health behaviours are transmitted between generations (Walsh et al 2010). In Hong Kong, there has been increasing alarm relating to the so-called 'post-80s' and 'post-90s' generations of young people (deGolyer 2010) which are perceived to be more radical and politicised than previous generations; alongside popular alarm relating to 'young night drifters' who are marginalised from mainstream society (Lee 2000; Groves et al 2011). In both locations, therefore - though in different ways - there is both public and political interest in the impact of structural change on the habits and behaviours of young people. The unique vantage point offered by this research project - allowing for both historical and cross-cultural comparison - will yield a range of policy insights that will be of interest to a non-academic audience. Analysing young people's leisure habits in this way has the potential to illuminate the broader social processes involved in the transmission of deep-rooted traits and sensibilities; as well as supplying critical insights from a cross-cultural perspective with which to view public policy through fresh eyes.

We aim for our research to be used to: inform public policy relating to children and young people; improve the delivery of public and private services, particularly leisure provision, for young people; enhance the quality of life, health and creative output of young people and their communities. To this end, two half-day dissemination seminars will be held towards the end of the project - one each in Glasgow and Hong Kong - incorporating both academic and non-academic participants. A short, non-technical pamphlet summarising key research findings will be prepared for dissemination at these events, and posted on the project website, alongside a podcast of the key presentations. We will promote these events through our blog and Twitter feed.

At a local level, the principles of participation and co-production that were central to Jephcott's original study will also form a core aspect in the impact planning for the study. We intend to establish a youth advisory group (comprised of young people who participated in one of our previous research projects) and a research advisory group (which will include a range of key stakeholders), to assist with research design and practitioner-relevance. We will explore developing partnerships with national organizations which promote youth participation and with relevant local organizations (see 'Pathways to impact'). Finally, the project will seek to engage and empower community partners, utilising in-depth methods (including participatory visual and online methods) designed to enable participants to co-produce data for the project. We will engage in community-based knowledge-exchange via two public exhibitions of images and other materials generated as part of the study, with invitations extended to a selection of research participants, their friends and family, and representatives of participating organisations.
 
Title A Window On: (Re)Imagining Youth in Hong Kong and Scotland (Centre for Chinese Contemporary Art) 
Description Exhibition of material generated as part of (Re)Imagiing Youth study, comprising researcher- and participant-generated photography, specially commissioned professional illustrations, as well as interview extracts and multi-media elements. Accompanied by a talk highlighting key themes from the study, as part of CFCCA's 'Thursday Late' series: As young people across the world are increasingly confronted with a lack of work, housing, and social stability this talk will explore the emergence of youth political movements in two very different contexts. In 2014 the youth-led 'Occupy' movement for universal suffrage brought the eyes of the world's media onto the city of Hong Kong; whilst at the same time in Scotland, the independence referendum saw young people - including 16 and 17 year-olds - politically mobilised as never before. Drawing on a study of youth leisure in Scotland and Hong Kong, this talk by Dr Susan Batchelor, Senior Lecturer of Sociology and Dr Alistair Fraser, Lecturer in Criminology (Sociology) at the University of Glasgow, will discuss these political movements, reflecting on issues of globalisation, social change and forms of engagement. 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact The open public forum created by the event led to the engagement of a cross-section of the artistic community in discussions pertaining to young people and political mobilisation in the UK and Hong Kong. 
URL https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/thursday-late-a-window-on-reimagining-youth-in-hong-kong-and-scotland...
 
Title The (Re)Imagining Youth Exhibition (Glasgow and Hong Kong) 
Description Youth leisure has been a recurring source of public and political concern since the birth of the teenager in the late 1950s. Traditionally this concern has focused on young people's use of public space for delinquent and deviant activities. More recently, however, attention has turned to young people's retreat into private space and their use of digital technologies. The (Re)Imagining Youth exhibition sought to explore these issues through a focus on changing representations and realities of youth leisure in two geographically and culturally diverse sites: Glasgow and Hong Kong. Showcasing research funded under the ESRC-RGC bilateral fund, the exhibition drew together images from Pearl Jephcott's groundbreaking work from the 1960s, alongside contemporary illustrations and photography. Comparing the post-industrial cityscape of Glasgow with the globalised density of Hong Kong, the exhibition interrogated questions of globalization, inequality and social change in a way that was grounded in the experiences of young people. 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact The Hong Kong exhibition was held in MC3 Creative Space, University of Hong Kong, during August 2015. The Glasgow exhibition took place at The Bridge in Easterhouse, as part of the ESRC Festival of Social Science in November 2015. The Bridge is an award winning facility that joins together Glasgow Life Swimming Pool, Library, Glasgow Kelvin College, and Platform arts centre - making it an ideal location to engage local community members, especially young people. We estimate that approximately 700 people saw the exhibition and 70 attended the launch event, 45 of whom completed attendee questionnaires. Feedback was overwhelmingly positive, with 100% of survey respondents reporting enhanced awareness of the social sciences and better knowledge of the topic of the exhibition. Indicative written comments included: 'Very interesting study and great to learn about Hong Kong' 'Good to see university people coming to the community' 'I thought that this was a GREAT exhibit which opened my eyes to Glasgow's youth and beyond' 'Excellent - haven't seen research findings presented in a way that engages so many groups in a public space' The Glasgow exhibition was featured in the University of Glasgow website and (http://www.gla.ac.uk/news/headline_431835_en.html) and reported on in national press (e.g. The Scotsman http://www.scotsman.com/news/scotland/top-stories/researchers-reveal-what-connects-youth-of-glasgow-and-hong-kong-1-3940020#axzz3qzoxPiqc). Both events fostered increased interest in the research (evidenced by more traffic to the project website, and additional followers on Twitter and Facebook) and resulted in requests for further information/invitations to participate in future events (from academics, practitioners and community groups). 
URL https://reimaginingyouth.wordpress.com/exhibition/
 
Description Building on landmark sociological research from the 1960s (Jephcott 1967, 1971), (Re)Imagining Youth examined youth leisure in Glasgow and Hong Kong as a means of interrogating theoretical debates relating to globalisation and social change. The project involved concurrent, qualitative research in two comparable case-study locations. A total of 22 focus groups and 70 individual interviews were conducted with young people, alongside 16 interviews with local stakeholders. In addition, we gathered 500 images (photography and drawing), alongside 200 online survey responses.

Our findings suggest four conclusions for theoretical and methodological analyses of youth in a global context:

• First, the value of lessons learned from historical comparison. Jephcott's work demonstrates that there is nothing radically new about contemporary patterns of youth leisure. Across both contexts, place has remained a central driver of identity-formation, particularly in those areas of the city in which opportunities for economic and social mobility are limited. Where processes of globalisation are felt, they tend to impact on young people's spatial im/mobility, as a result of privatisation of public space and commercialisation of leisure. This suggests that leisure habits and dispositions remain more rooted in previous generations than in globalised cultures.

• Second, the study highlights the importance of the city as a lens through which to read the opportunities available to young people. In a global hierarchy of cities, there are only a few lead actors, while many others compete for supporting roles. As Glasgow has experienced economic decline, Hong Kong has risen in prominence - with corresponding impacts on the economic and social landscape of city-spaces. While in Hong Kong the construction of a new housing estate near to the airport has created geographical isolation, in Glasgow regeneration has created economic exclusion. These forms of structured immobility were articulated at a local level by a strong attachment to place; similar kinds of subjectivities have evolved within specific socio-spatial contexts, reflecting a comparable impact of global forces. In this sense, the city plays a central role in refracting and filtering transnational processes of globalisation, precariousness and neoliberalism.

• Third, the findings have underscored the importance of recognising the new forms of online interaction and engagement that have emerged in recent years. While online forms of communication and association should not be viewed in isolation - in both sites young people lived a simultaneously online and offline existence - it was clear that online communication was facilitating real-world engagement (for example in relation to political activism around the Independence Referendum in Scotland and the Umbrella Movement in Hong Kong). These emergent 'spaces' of youth represent a critical mediating point between the 'spaces of place' and 'spaces of flows' in which place-based identities are less fixed and different ways of thinking and being possible.

• Taken together, these conclusions suggest the need to decentre and recalibrate the contexts through which studies of youth, place and space are situated. The effects of globalisation are multiple, various and contingent, and it is only through grounded comparative between Western and non-Western contexts that such complexities can be captured effectively.
Exploitation Route We envisage that our work will make a contribution to academic debates relating to youth, globalisation and social change. Within the field of youth studies, for example, the changing nature of youth leisure has been much debated with recent writings questioning the emergence of a 'global youth culture'. Our research demonstrates that whilst some convergences exist between the lives of young people in the Glasgow and the Hong Kong - as a result of a shift in production from the West and new employment opportunities and consumerist lifestyles in the East - important differences remain, formed by local traditions and structures.

Access to leisure and recreation opportunities is associated with numerous health and social benefits, including reduced obesity, improved self-esteem, increased community cohesion, and reduced crime. Our research provides in-depth and up-to-date evidence on young people's leisure opportunities, habits and behaviours, alongside analysis of the factors that shape these patterns. This information can be used to shape policy and practice, informing local authority planning or supporting charitable funding applications. Thinking about similarities and differences in youth leisure in a transnational context creates space for discussion of the drivers of difference and the ways in which learning can be drawn from overseas examples.
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Education,Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism,Government, Democracy and Justice,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections,Retail,Transport

URL https://reimaginingyouth.wordpress.com/
 
Description Publication and dissemination from the (Re)Imagining Youth research are currently ongoing. To date the main impacts from the study are as follows: 1) Contribution to public understanding around youth leisure and youth politics During the lifespan of the project we have dedicated a significant amount of time and resources to public engagement activities. In 2014 and 2015, Batchelor and Whittaker participated in two 'Meet the Expert' workshops at Glasgow Science Centre, as part of the European Researchers' event Explorathon. These hands-on activities were targeted mainly at families and allowed us to engage children and young people with the methods used in the study, e.g. interviewing their parents and grandparents about what they did in their spare time, provoking intergenerational discussions and reflections about youth and social change. In 2015, we hosted two exhibitions of images produced during the course of the research: one in Hong Kong (Fraser and Ling) and one in Glasgow (Batchelor and Fraser). Both were accompanied by a series of linked activities, designed to encourage audiences to engage with the material in a more informed and insightful manner. Approximately 150 people attended the respective launch events. Feedback was overwhelmingly positive, with 100% of survey respondents reporting enhanced awareness of the social sciences and better awareness of the topics covered as part of the exhibitions. Indicative written comments included: 'Very interesting study and great to learn about Hong Kong'; 'Good to see university people coming to the community'; 'I thought that this was a GREAT exhibit which opened my eyes to Glasgow's youth and beyond'; 'Excellent - haven't seen research findings presented in a way that engages so many groups in a public space'. The University of Glasgow press office gained the helped Batchelor and Fraser to develop a press release to accompany the Glasgow exhibition, which took place during the ESRC Festival of Social Science 2015. This resulted in two articles in the national press, publicising the exhibition and reporting key findings from the research. Also in 2015, Fraser and Batchelor presented a one-off evening event focusing on the role of young people in the recent political movements in Scotland and Hong Kong, as part of Glasgow's Centre for Contemporary Arts' 'The Shock of Victory' programme. The event included a film screening and panel discussion with local youth activists, and was attended by approximately 30 people, including students, artists, activists, academics and members of the general public. In 2016, the (Re)Imagining Youth was featured in the University of Glasgow 'Barras Social' event, as part of the ESRC Festival of Social Sciences. An estimated 100 visitors visited the stall, staffed by Batchelor and departmental colleagues. Images from the research, alongside the posters of our key findings, prompted discussion of themes raised in the study, e.g. in relation to the decline of public space and the growth of commercial and online leisure activities for youth. We also made new connections with other social scientists attending the event, as well as with local service providers, and received invitations to present our work. Batchelor was also responsible for developing and maintaining a coherent web presence and social media strategy throughout the lifespan of the project. As of March 2016, the (Re)Imagining Youth website has had 6,271 visitors and 13,359 views. The project has over 800 followers on Twitter. This web presence has been played an important role in connecting us with academic and practitioner audiences, as well as providing a platform for dissemination of our research to participants and members of the general public. 2) Contribution to and reframing of practitioner debates around young people and leisure space The engagement activities outlined above have resulted in various invitations to present our work to practitioner audiences. In 2015, Fraser, Ling, Batchelor and Whittaker presented emergent findings to HKYWCA social work outreach staff, Hong Kong. This provided feedback on early analysis so as to maximise relevance of future outputs. In 2016, Batchelor and Whittaker were invited to give a keynote presentation at Playing Together, the first national joint event for leaders and service managers from the play and youth work sectors in Scotland, funded by the Scottish Government's Play Strategy. The key focus of our contribution was play spaces, with an emphasis on the decline of public spaces for play - and the potentially positive contribution of online spaces for youth leisure. This contribution was recognised on the subsequent report, Playing Together, jointly produced by PlayScotland and YouthLink Scotland (2016, p. 24). The resultant action plan included the following recommendations, based on our research: - Challenge negative perceptions and views of children and young people playing or utilizing the public realm - Encourage and facilitate intergenerational dialogue to engage play memories and the value of play - Reframe online play for the benefit of children and young people Batchelor and Whittaker were subsequently invited to present findings from the research to YouthLink Scotland's Annual Joint Meeting of Local Authority Youth Work Managers and National Voluntary Youth Organisations later the same year. Following this meeting Batchelor was invited to join the advisory committee for #scotswummin, a YouthLink Scotland project looking at youth work's contribution to the women's movement since 1850, funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund.
First Year Of Impact 2016
Sector Communities and Social Services/Policy,Education,Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism
Impact Types Societal

 
Description Citation in Playing Together Post-Symposium Report
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
URL http://www.playscotland.org/wp-content/uploads/Playing-Together-Report-2016.pdf
 
Description Membership of steering group for Youthlink #scotswummin project
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
URL https://www.scotswummin.org
 
Description Adam Smith Research Foundation Seedcorn Funding
Amount £1,742 (GBP)
Funding ID 23064 
Organisation University of Glasgow 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2014 
End 07/2015
 
Description Principal's Early Career Mobility Fund
Amount £3,730 (GBP)
Organisation University of Glasgow 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2015 
End 01/2015
 
Description Sociology Research Incentivisation Scheme 2013/14
Amount £1,320 (GBP)
Funding ID 23064 
Organisation University of Glasgow 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2014 
End 06/2014
 
Description Sociology Research Incentivisation Scheme 2014/15
Amount £1,000 (GBP)
Organisation University of Glasgow 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2015 
End 05/2015
 
Description Sociology Research Incentivisation Scheme 2015/16
Amount £528 (GBP)
Organisation University of Glasgow 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2016 
End 05/2016
 
Description Sociology Small Grant
Amount HK$10,000 (HKD)
Organisation University of Hong Kong 
Sector Academic/University
Country Hong Kong
Start 01/2014 
End 05/2014
 
Description Sociology Small Grant
Amount HK$15,000 (HKD)
Organisation University of Hong Kong 
Sector Academic/University
Country Hong Kong
Start 01/2015 
End 05/2015
 
Title Batchelor, S. (2017) (Re)Imagining Youth Leisure in Glasgow. [Data Collection]. Colchester, Essex: UK Data Archive. 
Description The (Re)Imagining Youth study explored socio-cultural meanings and changing experiences of youth leisure in two case-study locations: one in Glasgow and one in Hong Kong. This dataset is drawn from the Glasgow field site and includes transcripts of: semi-structured interviews conducted with stakeholders (n=8), focus groups with young people (n=9), and semi-structured interviews with young people (n=22). Topics covered include: leisure activities, leisure spaces, meanings of leisure, youth transitions, education, employment, digital technology. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2017 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact Dataset deposited 2017. 
 
Description HKU 
Organisation University of Hong Kong
Department Department of Sociology
Country Hong Kong 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The (Re)Imagining Youth study was a collaborative research project, funded under the ESRC/RGC bilateral scheme. Two research teams conducted concurrent data collection in two case study locations: Batchelor and Whittaker in Glasgow and Fraser and Ngai in Hong Kong. Throughout the project the team met regularly via Skype to discuss literature, research tools, data collection, analysis and writing, and we also met periodically in person - at conferences and field trips. The Glasgow team collected the following data: 12 structured field observations, 9 focus groups, 40 individual interviews, and gathered 93 responses via an online survey.
Collaborator Contribution The Hong Kong team successfully completed 12 structured field observations, 7 focus groups, 40 individual interviews, and gathered 100 responses via an online survey.
Impact All outputs relating to this grant result from this collaboration.
Start Year 2013
 
Description (Re)Imagining Youth Exhibition launch (Glasgow) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The (Re)Imagining Youth Glasgow Exhibition drew together images from Pearl Jephcott's groundbreaking work from the 1960s, alongside contemporary illustrations and photography collected as part of our contemporary research. Comparing the post-industrial cityscape of Glasgow with the globalised density of Hong Kong, the exhibition interrogated questions of globalization, inequality and social change in a way that was grounded in the experiences of young people. It took place at The Bridge in Easterhouse, Glasgow, an award winning facility that joins together Glasgow Life Swimming Pool, Library, Glasgow Kelvin College, and Platform arts centre - making it an ideal location to engage local community members, especially young people.

The exhibition was accompanied by a series of linked events, designed to encourage audiences to engage with the material in a more informed and insightful manner. To launch the event there was be a special talk by Professor John Goodwin on the legacy of Pearl Jephcott and Drs Batchelor, Fraser and Whittaker introduced the (Re)Imagining Youth study, followed by a drinks reception. Approximately 70 people attended the launch event, 45 of whom completed attendee questionnaires. Feedback was overwhelmingly positive, with 100% of survey respondents reporting enhanced awareness of the social sciences and better awareness of the topic of the exhibition. Indicative written comments included:

'Very interesting study and great to learn about Hong Kong'
'Good to see university people coming to the community'
'I thought that this was a GREAT exhibit which opened my eyes to Glasgow's youth and beyond'
'Excellent - haven't seen research findings presented in a way that engages so many groups in a public space'

There were also other opportunities to meet the researchers and attend some special drop-in sessions where visitors could explore the history of the East End or try out methods used in the study.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://reimaginingyouth.wordpress.com/exhibition/
 
Description (Re)Imagining Youth Exhibition launch (Hong Kong) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The Hong Kong team was awarded $15,000 from the Department of Sociology to support an exhibition, held in MC3 Creative Space, University of Hong Kong, during August 2015. The exhibition included original artworks of youth leisure in Hong Kong created for the exhibition, alongside a range of photography, sound installations and interactive exhibits, including several works created by research participants. The purpose of the exhibition was to disseminate early findings from the research and involve a range of stakeholder communities in discussion about how best to take forward the project. Approximately 50 people attended the launch event, which included a presentation by the researchers followed by questions and discussion.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013,2015
URL https://reimaginingyouth.wordpress.com/events/
 
Description (Re)Imagining Youth Exhibition press release 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Press release devised with assistance of ERSC and UofG press offices. Resulted in two articles in The Scotsman newspaper, reporting key findings from the study, which in turn led to subsequent enquiries about the research/increased attendance at our exhibition.

http://www.scotsman.com/news/researchers-reveal-what-connects-youth-of-glasgow-and-hong-kong-1-3940020#axzz3qzoxPiqc
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.gla.ac.uk/news/headline_431835_en.html
 
Description From Umbrella Movement to Indyref: Youth, politics and the art of resistance (CCA, Glasgow) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact As part of Glasgow's Centre for Contemporary Arts' 'The Shock of Victory' programme, we presented a one-off evening event focusing on the role of young people in the recent political movements in Scotland and Hong Kong, incorporating three platforms for discussion:

Introduction - (Re)Imagining Youth: A presentation of findings from a recent research study on youth leisure and public housing in Glasgow and Hong Kong, drawing key points of similarity and difference between the two contexts.

Film Screening - Lessons in Dissent: A screening of the documentary Lessons in Dissent, focusing on Joshua Wong, central figure in the recent Umbrella Movement.

Panel Discussion - From Umbrella Movement to Indyref: A panel discussion reflecting on the parallels and contrasts between youth politics in Scotland and Hong Kong, including Matthew Torne (director, Lessons in Dissent), Dr Susan Batchelor (Senior Lecturer, University of Glasgow), Loki (Glasgow-based activist and resident artist, VRU) and Suki Wan (Member of Scottish Youth Parliament, Glasgow Shettleston).

Approximately 30 people attended the event, including a mixture of students, artists, activists, academics and members of the general public. The film screening was followed by a lively Q&A discussion, and has fed into plans for future research activity, including a co-authored research paper for a prestigious edited collection on 'Youth Politics in Crisis'.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://vimeo.com/144014363
 
Description Meet the Expert (Glasgow Science Centre 2014) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Specially designed posters and postcards stimulated adult visitors' interest in the study - and in social science research more generally. Visitors to our stall were interested in finding out more about social science and asked questions about the methods used to study the social world.
The drawing activity attracted a lot of interest, especially amongst younger children and their parents. The children really enjoyed drawing pictures of the things they enjoyed doing in their spare time and most of their drawings depicted sporting activities such as swimming and football. This prompted discussion amongst their parents about what wasn't depicted (e.g. watching television) and reflection on their own experiences of youth leisure.
The activities targeted at older children and young people provoked less discussion about the project, but lots of questions about sociology/social science and our jobs at the university.
Presentation of historical images of the Glasgow fieldsite (on plasma screens) sparked interest of older visitors and led to intergenerational discussions about their experiences growing up in Glasgow and perceptions of how things have changed for young people today.

As a result of this activity we inspired interest in social science research in general and our study in particular, making it more accessible to children, young people and their families. The event (and the publicity surrounding it) resulted in increased traffic to our project website and increased Twitter followers, and also helped us recruit further participants. Our discussions with children, young people and their parents and grandparents also enriched our ongoing data collection and analys
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.explorathon.co.uk/glasgow
 
Description Meet the Expert (Glasgow Science Centre 2015) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Specially designed posters and postcards stimulated adult visitors' interest in the study - and in social science research more generally. Visitors to our stall were interested in finding out more about social science and asked questions about the methods used to study the social world.
The drawing activity attracted a lot of interest, especially amongst younger children and their parents. The children really enjoyed drawing pictures of the things they enjoyed doing in their spare time and most of their drawings depicted sporting activities such as swimming and football. This prompted discussion amongst their parents about what wasn't depicted (e.g. watching television) and reflection on their own experiences of youth leisure.
The activities targeted at older children and young people provoked less discussion about the project, but lots of questions about sociology/social science and our jobs at the university.
Presentation of historical images of the Glasgow fieldsite (on plasma screens) sparked interest of older visitors and led to intergenerational discussions about their experiences growing up in Glasgow and perceptions of how things have changed for young people today.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://reimaginingyouth.wordpress.com/events/
 
Description Reimagining Crime and Justice: People's Palace Takeover 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact This event involved a 'take-over' of the People's Palace Museum, Glasgow, by staff and researchers from the Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research (SCCJR). The event formed part of an ongoing project, with the same title, which brings the cutting-edge research of SCCJR members into dialogue with the existing collections at the People's Palace through the use and application of 'ibook' technology. This technology allows for self-guided tours of the museum with embedded audio, video, and interactive information and will be used to 'reimagine' existing objects, and instigate new conversations around issues of crime and justice

The takeover day event involved the stationing of SCCJR staff and students next to selected objects in the People's Palace collection, with the intention of engaging school pupils and members of the public in conversation about the piece. Prepared interactive materials will be used to relate the object to the work of the researcher, and used to stimulate a discussion about crime and justice. Dr Susan Batchelor represented the (Re)Imagining Youth research team at the event, drawing on exhibits about youth, leisure and the night-time economy (alongside research data generated by the study) to question stereotypes around gangs, violence and drunken youth disorder in Glasgow.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description The Barras Social 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact (Re)Imagining Youth took part in an exciting University of Glasgow event as part of the ESRC Festival of Social Sciences 2016. Alongside the usual Christmas bargains, researchers from across the University of Glasgow were in amongst the usual market stalls, sharing their research. There were demonstrations, games, exhibitions, music and film throughout the day, looking into some of the big questions about equality and change in our society.

There were approximately 100 visitors to the (Re)Imagining Youth stall, including families who had travelled from across the central belt of Scotland specifically to attend the event, as well as local residents, most of whom were elderly and were in the barras to do their regular Saturday shopping. Children and young people were able to try out some of the methods used in the research, e.g. drawing pictures, filling in surveys, or interviewing members of their family about what they liked to do in their spare time. We also displayed a number of images - historical and contemporary - collected during the course of the study. Alongside the posters of our key findings, these images prompted discussion amongst older visitors about social change in the East End of Glasgow. Many visitors discussed themes raised in our research, e.g. in relation to the decline of public space and the growth of commercial and online leisure activities for youth. We asked people to share their views using post-it notes, which we displayed on the stall for everyone to have a look at.

Feedback was generally positive, with an increase in traffic to our website after the event, as well as some new Twitter followers. We also made new connections with other social scientists attending the event, as well as with local service providers, and received invitations to present our work at future events.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.gla.ac.uk/myglasgow/news/headline_499134_en.html
 
Description Visit to Bield Sheltered Housing (Anniesland, Glasgow) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Public engagement activity with residents of a local sheltered housing association in Glasgow. Short presentation (15 minutes) on research findings, using images collected during the course of the research (historical and contemporary, in both Glasgow and Hong Kong). This was followed by informal discussion about residents' experiences growing up in Glasgow and perceptions of how things have changed for young people.

Participation in the activity allowed residents to come together to discuss common experiences and common concerns. They shared happy memories about spending time in local cafe's and cinemas, going out dancing 'for a lumber', and playing football in communal grounds. They talked lot about the changes that have occurred since they were young, particularly in relation to the privatization of leisure space and activities, and were interested in finding out more about the changing pressures facing young people today. A number of participants commented that our findings in this area challenged some of their assumptions. Participants were also particularly interested in the experiences of young people in Hong Kong and those who had visited the city were keen to hear about how things there had changed.

Feedback following the event was very positive, with staff reporting increased wellbeing amongst the group and an interest in pursuing future intergenerational work.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://reimaginingyouth.wordpress.com/2015/07/27/how-did-you-spend-your-free-time-as-a-teenager-dis...
 
Description Visit to HKYWCA youth outreach team (Yat Tung Estate, Hong Kong) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Key findings from the project were presented to a group of outreach social workers involved in the research in January 2015. The purpose of this visit was to seek feedback on emerging themes, based on the the assumption that by tapping into practitioners' knowledge and expertise, the research will be more responsive and relevant to their concerns. Six members of the outreach team attended this meeting, alongside four researchers. We had a constructive dialogue, with both parties reporting a greater understanding of the issues, and a developing sense of partnership.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015