Longitudinal Study of Young People (LSYPE) data linkage

Lead Research Organisation: University College London
Department Name: Social Science

Abstract

The Longitudinal Study of Young People in England (LSYPE) was launched in 2004 with an initial sample of around 15,700 young people in year nine, and therefore aged 13 or 14. Information has been collected from the study members every year for seven years, and the most recent survey was conducted in 2012 when individuals were 19 or 20. For the first four years of the study their parents were also interviewed. The LSYPE was funded by the Department for Education (DfE) and they have used the evidence from the study to inform policy making and to help improve services for young people. For example, the decision to raise the compulsory participation age in education and training from 16 to 18 was influenced by findings from the study. It has also been widely used by academic researchers in the UK and elsewhere. The main things that have been studied are factors affecting young people's progress through school and into further or higher education, training, or work, and how this is influenced by family background and young people's aspirations and attitudes towards school.
One of the strengths of the LSYPE is that it has been linked with the DfE's administrative records of all state schools and pupils - the National Pupil Database. This includes information about each school and pupil. Most importantly, it provides details of the young people's educational attainment at GCSE and A-level.
Other administrative datasets have potential for research, including records about further and higher education, state benefits and earnings, hospital admissions and criminal behaviour. Linking existing LSYPE data to these administrative records would enable further useful research. It would provide information on study members at age 22/23, and into the future, without having to conduct further surveys. However, this can't be done without the permission of the study members, and it is important that they understand fully what is planned.
The first step will be to re-contact the study members to ask them permission for this data linkage and for the DfE to pass on their contact details so that we can continue the study. This will be done by posting them a leaflet and consent forms, and asking them to return them. The next step will be to provide the government departments, who hold these administrative records, with the name, sex, date of birth and address of study members who agree, in order that they can find them in their records and extract the data about them.
Once we have the linked data, we will prepare it for use by other researchers by creating summary variables and producing a guide to how to use the data. We will encourage the use of the data by running separate workshops for researchers interested in health, education and economic information. The data will be stored securely, and only made available to bona-fide researchers. The DfE will also pass on the contact details, of study members who agree, and we will store them in a secure address database. We can then maintain contact with the study members, and send them summaries of research findings based on the study. We hope it will be possible to survey them in the future, both to collect information which would help us to understand the linked data, and to ask for information not included in administrative sources. However, this can only be done if additional funding can be secured.
The LSYPE has already provided rich information about young people's pathways through secondary school and into higher education or the labour market. However, extending the information we have about these young people will allow us to understand the outcomes of different trajectories and of family background, risky behaviours, and attitudes and aspirations. This is particularly important as this generation, born in 1989/1990, is entering young adulthood at a time when the British Government is still grappling with the consequences of a severe world recession.

Planned Impact

There are three key groups who will benefit from the proposed study. First, as discussed in the section on academic beneficiaries, researchers from a wide range of disciplines will benefit from the unique resource represented by this detailed and innovative cohort study. Second, policy makers within government and international organisations, and third, ultimately the wider public, will benefit from the findings of the research. These latter groups are the focus here.
The LSYPE cohort was originally designed to answer questions about the causal processes that lead to positive and negative educational outcomes for individuals. Developing a better understanding of these causal pathways can ultimately lead to greater effectiveness of schools and educational institutions more broadly in order to enhance the wellbeing of young people and maximise their opportunities and life chances. Our aim is to maintain the LSYPE cohort and link the existing datasets to administrative data on further and higher education, the labour market and state benefits, hospital episodes and records of offending. This will result in a research resource that can be used to understand more about the factors influencing individuals' experiences and choices as they make the transition into young adult life, and their outcomes at this age.
Our longer-term aim is to maintain and enhance the first LSYPE cohort so that it provides a rich research resource documenting the lives and experiences of a large representative sample of those born in England in 1989/1990. As this cohort grows older the study will be able to provide evidence to inform a wide range of policy issues.
The link between IOE and the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS), via Professor Dearden as Co-I, is particularly important for ensuring that the LSYPE ultimately has an impact on policies relating to individuals' experiences of higher education and transitions to young adult life. IFS has excellent links to key personnel in DfE, BIS and DWP which will help ensure both that the research agenda will be shaped by policy interests and that research findings are effectively disseminated and discussed with those most likely to find them of relevance.
Staff on the team at IOE has extensive experience of knowledge transfer with researchers and policy makers located in government departments and the devolved administrations. CLS already regularly produces high quality Briefing Papers for the policy-maker audience based on the results of the birth studies' data. A similar approach could be adopted with the LSYPE study in future if resources allow. Researchers from government departments, and organisations within the third sector, will be included in the consultation process to determine the exact content of any new LSYPE data collection sweeps, to ensure the relevance of the data collected.
 
Description Some of the key findings are outlined below, based on research outputs from the PI and Co-I which were funded from the grant. The scientific impact of the award is much wider, with many additional outputs using the data arising from other grant-funded research, both within CLS and by external reserachers.

Henderson, M. (2019). The Quarter-Life Crisis? Precarious Labour Market Status and Mental Health among 25 year olds in England. Longitudinal and Life Course Studies. We find black and minority ethnic groups have lower odds of reporting mental ill-health at age 25 than the white group. With respect to labour market status, we find that net of socio-economic characteristics, educational attainment, behavioural variables and income at age 25, those who are unemployed are more than twice as likely to report symptoms of poor mental health as those who are employed. Shift workers and those on zero-hours contracts are also at a greater risk of mental ill-health by 47% and 44% respectively than those who are not shift workers or zero-hours workers. We find no significant difference for those who have a second job or are on a permanent contract for mental health at age 25 compared to those who do not have a second job or are on a temporary contract.

Anders, J. and Henderson, M. (2019). Socioeconomic Inequality and Student Outcomes in English Schools. In L. Volante;, S. Schnepf, J. Jerrim, D. Klinger. (Ed.), Socioeconomic Inequality and Student Outcomes - National Trends, Policies, and Practices. (pp. 20). London: Springer. This chapter explores socioeconomic inequality in educational outcomes in England using Next Steps. We begin by describing the key features of the English education system and highlight the characteristics of the student population. We explore the educational outcomes of socioeconomically disadvantaged young people through comparison of a number of different outcomes during educational careers. We analyze policies introduced or mooted in recent years to consider the extent to which they are likely to address these challenges successfully. These include the introduction of "academy" schools, reforms to the school curriculum, changes to education funding, the potential (re-) growth of academically selective schooling, increased investment in early years education, and an increased focused on gathering and disseminating robust evidence on 'what works' in educational attainment.

Henderson, M. (2016). Bullying experiences among sexual minority youths in England: The nature, prevalence and association with life satisfaction. Journal of Research in Gender Studies. We find that young Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual (LGB) adults had a 52 per cent chance of having been bullied in the past year at age 20, compared to a 38 per cent chance for their heterosexual peers, after taking into account other characteristics that may make someone more likely to be targeted, such as gender, ethnicity, disability, or family socioeconomic background. This paper also examines the association between being bullied and life satisfaction: the findings show that by the time they reached age 20, young LGB adults were less likely than their heterosexual peers to report being "very satisfied" with how their lives had turned out so far. However, all young adults - regardless of sexual identity - were less likely to be very satisfied with their lives if they had been bullied. These findings suggest that in order to tackle the problem, anti-bullying interventions cannot be focused only at schools and their pupils. Policymakers, employers, further education institutions and others working with young adults need to do just as much in order to challenge discrimination at all ages.

Thornby, M., Calderwood L., Kotecha M., Beninger K. & Gaia A. (2018). Collecting Multiple Data Linkage Consents in a Mixed-mode Survey: Evidence from a large-scale longitudinal study in the UK Survey Methods: Insights from the Field. Retrieved from https://surveyinsights.org/?p=9734
We describe the protocol for asking consent to data linkage on nine different sources and present empirical evidence on consent to data linkage from qualitative interviews, a pilot study, and the mainstage survey. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that discusses the practicalities of implementing a data linkage protocol asking consent both retrospectively and prospectively, on multiple domains, and in the context of a mixed-mode survey. Overall, respondents considered it acceptable to give consent without signing forms. As opposed to signed consent, this protocol minimises respondent burden and survey cost. Qualitative interviews showed that, overall, asking consent to link records from multiple domains is considered acceptable, and separate questions are preferred to a unique "catch all" item. The consent rates in the mainstage Next Steps Age 25 survey shows that consent rates were much lower in web than in telephone and face-to-face.
Exploitation Route We anticipate that our key findings may stimulate and motivate further use by researchers, and may be of interest to policy makers and practitioners. As outlined in the narrative impact section, some of these finding have already have impact. In particular, we have run events highlighting the research on Bullying, Mental Health and Labour Market inequalities with policy and practitioner audiences, and the research on ethnic inequalities in the labour market contributed to a recent report by Carnegie Trust and Operation Black Vote.

As noted above, the scientific and societal impact of this grant is much wider as the data have been used widely for other grant-funded research within CLS and by external researchers.
Sectors Education,Healthcare

URL http://www.cls.ucl.ac.uk
 
Description The grant has supported a number of events and output aimed at bringing research findings to policy and practitioner audiences. Some examples of high-impact activities are given below. The non-academic impact of the award is much wider, with many additional outputs using the data arising from other grant-funded research, both within CLS and by external reserachers. RACIAL INEQUALITY IN THE WORKFORCE: REPORT AND DEBATE IN THE HOUSE OF LORDS (2nd March 2020): Using data from the Next Steps age 25 sweep Dr Morag Henderson (Next Steps Co-I) worked together with the Carnegie Trust and Operation Black Vote to write a report which explores the policy context of precarious work by ethnicity and its association with mental health. The findings show that among millennials Black and Minority Ethnic (BAME) are at greater risk of being in unstable employment and that being in unstable employment increases the risk of reporting mental ill health symptoms. The research garnered a lot of media attention, including interviews on the Today Programme and the BBC News Channel, Worklife as well as press coverage in the Guardian, the Independent, BBC News, Metro and the Business Telegraph. A lively debate was hosted by Lord Simon Woolly at the House of Lords on 2nd March with a panel of speakers including: Clive Lewis MP, Matthew Taylor (Chief Executive of the Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce), Zubaida Haque (Deputy Director of the Runnymede Trust), Paul Rees (Chief Executive of the Royal College of Psychiatrists) Lord Simon Woolley (Chief Executive of Operation Black Vote), and Morag Henderson (CLS), and chaired by Douglas White (Head of Advocacy at Carnegie Trust). Over 100 representatives from national and local government, the third sector, academia and the media attended the launch of the report at the House of Lords. Many delegates followed up with queries about the research and recommendations. Lord Woolley also discussed the report's findings at a House of Lords debate on education and social mobility on 6 March 2020. REALISING ASPIRATIONS? GENDER, ETHNICITY AND JOB INEQUALITIES (8th November 2018): As part of the ESRC Festival of Social Science, CLS hosted a public lecture and debate on 8 November 2018 to showcase findings from CLS research into differences and inequalities in children's career aspirations. The event drew on findings published in its policy briefing 'Occupational aspirations of children from primary school to teenage years across ethnic groups' and launched a set of animations and school resources for teaching pupils about gender bias in career choices. Approximately 90 people attended the event, including one large group of sixth form students from a local school. This event explored recent research on the occupational aspirations of boys and girls of different ethnic groups, with the first viewing of an animation on gendered choices and a panel discussion of the barriers that may prevent those from minority ethnic groups achieving their aspirations. There were two elements to the event. The first involved the first showing of an animation relating to findings on the ways boys and girls continue to express highly gendered preferences about their future jobs. The animation was followed by a discussion of the challenges in changing stereotypes and expectations relating to "men's" and "women's" work among youth, and different approaches. The second part of the event provided the opportunity for discussion of occupational aspirations of children from different ethnic groups and how they evolve across their childhoods. CLS research Dr Samantha Parsons, and CLS collaborator Prof Lucinda Platt spoke alongside Omar Khan, Director of Runnymede, Heidi Mirza Professor Emerita at UCL and black feminist professor of race equality and women's rights, Esohe Uwadiae LSE Law Graduate and former Education Officer for LSESU, Nik Miller, Chief Executive of the Bridge Group. ESRC SOCIAL SCIENCE WEEK EVENT: MENTAL ILL HEALTH (9th November 2017): Young people's mental health and wellbeing has become a prominent social issue in recent months, receiving high-profile attention from the royal family and political parties. This seminar presented civil servants at the Department of Health and Public Health England with the most recent findings on the state of mental health and wellbeing among two important generations of Britons: those born in 2000-01, and 1989-90. Prof Emla Fitzsimons presented findings from the Millennium Cohort Study on the prevalence of mental ill health from age 3 to 14, focusing on the crucial age 11-14 period, when puberty is underway and children move from primary to secondary school. The findings will show the relationships between mental illness and other areas of life, including bullying, pubertal age, socioeconomic position, and family stability. Prof Fitzsimons will also explore the differences between mental illness and wellbeing at this critical age. Dr Morag Henderson presented findings from new age 25 data from Next Steps on the prevalence of mental ill health from adolescence through to early adult life. The findings covered how adolescent mental illness is associated with outcomes at age 25, including general health, BMI, educational qualifications, and employment. THE IMPACT OF ZERO HOURS CONTRACTS ON YOUNG PEOPLE (July 2017): Using data from the Next Steps age 25 sweep Dr Morag Henderson found that young people on zero-hours contracts were at greater risk of reporting symptoms of psychological distress than those in stable jobs and were less likely to report being in good physical health. The research attracted media attention national and regionally. Coverage included pieces in the print editions of the Time, the Guardian, and the Metro, as well as online in The Independent and the Mirror and on the BBC3 and ITV websites. In parliament, Jeremy Corbyn referred to the research during Prime Minister's Questions (5th July 2017). He said "When Tories talk of tough choices, we know who suffers, the poorest and most vulnerable in our society. Young people employed on zero-hours contracts are more likely to have worse mental and physical health". This stimulated additional research examining the ethnic dimension to precarious work (Henderson, M. (2019). The Quarter-Life Crisis? Precarious Labour Market Status and Mental Health among 25 year olds in England. Longitudinal and Life Course Studies) and a collaboration with Operation Black Vote and the Carnegie Trust which includes a policy focussed report and an event at the House of Lords (noted above). ANTI-BULLYING (2015): Bullying experience and effects: UK evidence (public engagement event): In the lead-up to Anti-Bullying Week 2015, the Centre for Longitudinal Studies and the Anti-Bullying Alliance hosted campaigners, charities, local authorities and others to discuss the latest evidence on how bullying is affecting children and young people. This event was part of the ESRC Festival of Social Science, and was hosted by Barclays at their creative space in east London. It was hosted by CLS in collaboration with the Anti-Bullying Alliance. Speakers included Dr Stella Chatzitheochari, University of Warwick (presented research on bullying among children with disabilities); Dr Morag Henderson, CLS (presented research on bullying among sexual minorities); Prof Louise Arseneault, King's College London (presented on the long-term effects of childhood bullying on adult physical and mental health); Kiri Joliffe, Young NCB representative (presented a first-hand account of her experiences being bullied at school); Anna Feuchtwang, Anti-Bullying Alliance (chair). There were just under 140 delegates in attendance: 42 members of the third sector, 28 members of the public sector, 38 academics, 21 members of the general public, and 9 others.
First Year Of Impact 2015
Sector Communities and Social Services/Policy,Education
Impact Types Societal,Policy & public services

 
Description Invited to present seminar at Department of Health and Social Care
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description The impact of zero hours contracts on young people Citation by Jeremy Corbyn during PMQs (5 July 2017)
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
Impact The impact of zero hours contracts on young people (July 2017) Using data from the Next Steps age 25 sweep Henderson found that young people on zero-hours contracts were at greater risk of reporting symptoms of psychological distress than those in stable jobs and were less likely to report being in good physical health. The research attracted media attention national and regionally. Coverage included pieces in the print editions of the Time, the Guardian, and the Metro, as well as online in The Independent and the Mirror and on the BBC3 and ITV websites. In parliament, Jeremy Corbyn referred to the research during Prime Minister's Questions (5th July 2017). He said "When Tories talk of tough choices, we know who suffers, the poorest and most vulnerable in our society. Young people employed on zero-hours contracts are more likely to have worse mental and physical health"
URL http://hansard.parliament.uk/commons/2017-07-05/debates/27D7456E-4A86-4E37-B48F-DB6246E36630/Engagem...
 
Description 'First in the family', higher education choices and labour market outcomes
Amount £159,065 (GBP)
Funding ID EDO/43570 
Organisation Nuffield Foundation 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2018 
End 07/2020
 
Description 'First in the family', higher education choices and labour market outcomes (PI Morag Henderson)
Amount £159,065 (GBP)
Organisation Nuffield Foundation 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2018 
End 03/2020
 
Description Next Steps Metadata into CLOSER Discovery
Amount £39,075 (GBP)
Organisation Economic and Social Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2017 
End 03/2019
 
Description Next Steps age 31
Amount £4,368,759 (GBP)
Organisation Economic and Social Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2018 
End 03/2022
 
Description Private Schooling in the UK in the 21st Century: Participation and Outcomes
Amount £148,760 (GBP)
Funding ID ES/R003335/1 
Organisation Economic and Social Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 11/2017 
End 10/2019
 
Description WWCW Highlight Call: Understanding social isolation and subjective wellbeing across the life course: a project using five British birth cohort studies
Amount £236,553 (GBP)
Funding ID ES/T007575/1 
Organisation Economic and Social Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 05/2020 
End 03/2022
 
Description Young People's Science and Career Aspirations and Outcomes age 20-23 ('Aspires3')
Amount £834,637 (GBP)
Funding ID ES/S01599X/1 
Organisation Economic and Social Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 02/2020 
End 01/2023
 
Title Next Steps - Linked Education Data (Individualised Learner Records) 
Description Next Steps: Linked Education Dataset (Individualised Learner Records), England, 2005 - 2014: Secure Access 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2020 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact None as yet 
URL https://beta.ukdataservice.ac.uk/datacatalogue/studies/study?id=8577
 
Title Next Steps - Linked Education Data (National Pupil Database) 
Description Next Steps: Sweeps 1-8, 2004-2016: Secure Access. National Pupil Database pupil and exam level records data for Key Stages 4 and 5 have been added. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2020 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact None as yet 
URL https://beta.ukdataservice.ac.uk/datacatalogue/studies/study?id=7104
 
Title Next Steps Sweeps 1-8, 2004-2016: Secure Access, 4th Edition 
Description Next Steps: Sweeps 1-8, 2004-2016: Secure Access - 4th edition. For the fourth edition (October 2018), all school identifiers have been replaced with anonymised identifiers in the data file 'all_pupil_level_achievement_data_lsype_1_restricted' and all university identifiers have been replaced with anonymised identifiers in the data files 'w6_young_person_sensitive_variables_restricted' and 'w7_young_person_sensitive_variables_restricted'. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact None as yet. 
URL https://beta.ukdataservice.ac.uk/datacatalogue/studies/study?id=7104
 
Title Next Steps, Sweep 8 - Geographical Data - 2011 Boundaries - 1st edition 
Description Next Steps: Sweep 8, 2016: Geographical Identifiers, 2011 Census Boundaries: Secure Access 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2017 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact None as yet. 
URL https://discover.ukdataservice.ac.uk/catalogue/?sn=8190&type=Data%20catalogue
 
Title Next Steps, Sweeps 1 and 8 - Geographical Data - 2001 Boundaries - 1st edition 
Description Next Steps: Sweeps 1 and 8, 2001 and 2016: Geographical Identifiers, 2001 Census Boundaries: Secure Access 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2017 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact None as yet. 
URL https://discover.ukdataservice.ac.uk/catalogue/?sn=8189&type=Data%20catalogue
 
Title Next Steps, Sweeps 1-8 - Secure Access - 3rd edition 
Description Next Steps: Sweeps 1-8, 2004-2016: Secure Access 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2017 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact None as yet. 
URL https://discover.ukdataservice.ac.uk/catalogue/?sn=7104&type=Data%20catalogue
 
Title Next Steps: School segregation in all secondary schools in England / UKDS Secure Access for project 92560 
Description Next Steps: School segregation in all secondary schools in England / UKDS Secure Access for project 92560 This is a dataset released as part of the CLS data sharing project DAC ref 028 - The impact of socio-economic background and secondary schooling on students' access to labour market: Evidence from England, This is a CLS proposal that requested to link between-school segregation figures in all secondary schools in England, derived from the low security Schools Annual Census to Next Steps Secure Lab data (Project 92560). 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact None as yet. 
 
Title Next Steps: linked Education data (NPD and ILR) / Government review of post-18 education provision 
Description Next Steps Sweep 8: linked Education data (NPD and ILR) / Government Review This is a dataset released as part of the CLS data sharing project DAC ref 039 - The proposed work will contribute to the Governments review of post-18 education provision, and is being done at the request of the review commissioner, Professor Alison Wolf. The analysis will consider the factors associated with aspirations, progression and outcomes in post-compulsory education for members of the LSYPE2 cohort, and compare to those of the LSYPE1 individuals, in order to identify changes over time. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact None as yet 
 
Description Operation Black Vote, Carnegie UK Trust, UCL Centre for Longitudinal Studies 
Organisation Carnegie Trust
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Dr Morag Henderson, CLS researcher and Co-Investigator of Next Steps, co-authored a policy report on race inequality in the workplace. The report was largely based on Dr Henderson's research in to the racial inequalities in access to stable employment, using Next Steps data. Her research also investigated differences in mental health among 25-year-olds in different types of employment. At the parliamentary launch of the report, Dr Henderson presented her findings to representatives of national and local government, parliament, third sector, academia and media. She discussed the importance of the findings and recommendations in a panel discussion, alongside Lord Simon Woolley (Director of Operation Black Vote), Matthew Taylor (CEO of the RSA), Zubaida Haque (Deputy Director of Runnymede Trust), and Paul Rees (CEO of the Royal College of Psychiatrists). The UCL Centre for Longitudinal Studies also managed the media relations for the report, resulting in widespread national coverage in online and broadcast news outlets.
Collaborator Contribution The report was co-authored by Carnegie UK Trust and Operation Black Vote. Carnegie led the production of the report, and authored sections on policy context. Operation Black Vote hosted and led the report launch and public affairs activity, and authored several of the recommendations.
Impact Policy report: Race Inequality in the Workplace Policy event: report launch Press release: BAME millennials at greater risk of being in unstable employment
Start Year 2019
 
Description Operation Black Vote, Carnegie UK Trust, UCL Centre for Longitudinal Studies 
Organisation Operation Black Vote
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Dr Morag Henderson, CLS researcher and Co-Investigator of Next Steps, co-authored a policy report on race inequality in the workplace. The report was largely based on Dr Henderson's research in to the racial inequalities in access to stable employment, using Next Steps data. Her research also investigated differences in mental health among 25-year-olds in different types of employment. At the parliamentary launch of the report, Dr Henderson presented her findings to representatives of national and local government, parliament, third sector, academia and media. She discussed the importance of the findings and recommendations in a panel discussion, alongside Lord Simon Woolley (Director of Operation Black Vote), Matthew Taylor (CEO of the RSA), Zubaida Haque (Deputy Director of Runnymede Trust), and Paul Rees (CEO of the Royal College of Psychiatrists). The UCL Centre for Longitudinal Studies also managed the media relations for the report, resulting in widespread national coverage in online and broadcast news outlets.
Collaborator Contribution The report was co-authored by Carnegie UK Trust and Operation Black Vote. Carnegie led the production of the report, and authored sections on policy context. Operation Black Vote hosted and led the report launch and public affairs activity, and authored several of the recommendations.
Impact Policy report: Race Inequality in the Workplace Policy event: report launch Press release: BAME millennials at greater risk of being in unstable employment
Start Year 2019
 
Description Record Linkages with HMRC 
Organisation HMRC HM Revenue & Customs
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution We are working closely with HMRC officials to enact record linkages on the basis of informed consent to all four of the CLS cohort studies
Collaborator Contribution HMRC are contributing their expertise, and advice as well as ultimately the provision of linked data
Impact Joint presentation at CLOSER workshop in July 2016 Aiming for output of linked data, made available for the research community to use
Start Year 2012
 
Description Record linkages with Department for Education 
Organisation Department for Education
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution CLS is working in close partnership with DfE to enact linkage of DfE's National Pupil Database (NPD) and associated records (e.g. ILR and HESA) to the CLS cohorts (MCS and Next Steps), and to share this data with researchers via the UK Data Service (UKDS)
Collaborator Contribution DfE has provided CLS with linked data and maintains an ongoing agreement for onward sharing
Impact Many research papers have been created by the research community as a outcome of this partnership.
Start Year 2010
 
Description Record linkages with Department for Work and Pensions 
Organisation Department for Work and Pensions
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution We are working in partnership with DWP to enact consented record linkages in all four CLS studies
Collaborator Contribution Graham Knox and Mike Daly at DWP have developed a model for linkage projects like ours and are engaging collaboratively with us in this
Impact We are aiming for a set of linked data for research with an agreement for onward sharing
Start Year 2012
 
Description Record linkages with Ministry of Justice 
Organisation Ministry of Justice
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution CLS is working with MoJ to enact linkage of Police National Computer (PNC) database records with Next Steps, and to share this data with researchers via the UK Data Service (UKDS). We may also in future link PNC data to the other cohort studies.
Collaborator Contribution Agreements are being putting in place around data linkage and onward sharing.
Impact CLS has completed a draft sharing agreement and Data Protection Impact Assessment and submitted them to MoJ. MoJ are reviewing these.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Record linkages with NHS Digital for tracing and research 
Organisation Health & Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The aim of this collaboration is to achieve linkage between data provided by a number of bodies via NHS digital to the CLS cohorts, and to achieve agreement for onward sharing with researchers
Collaborator Contribution We have worked closely with NHS Digital to achieve linkage for both tracing and research, and discussions relating to onward sharing are ongoing.
Impact n/a
Start Year 2013
 
Description Record linkages with NHS Digital for tracing and research 
Organisation NHS England
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The aim of this collaboration is to achieve linkage between data provided by a number of bodies via NHS digital to the CLS cohorts, and to achieve agreement for onward sharing with researchers
Collaborator Contribution NHS has provided CLS with data for tracing purposes, so that CLS can re-contact cohort members before a survey. It has also notified CLS of cohort members deaths or embarkations. NHS has provided health data linked to three CLS cohort Studies (Next Steps, BCS70 and NCDS). CLS is currently negotiating for permission to onward share the data with the research community
Impact Methodological work on the data .
Start Year 2017
 
Description Records Linkage with UCAS 
Organisation Universities and Colleges Admissions Service
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution CLS is working in close partnership with UCAS to enact linkage of Universities and Colleges admissions data to the CLS cohorts (MCS and Next Steps), and to share this data with researchers via the UK Data Service (UKDS)
Collaborator Contribution UCAS has agreed to link and share their data with CLS data and for this linked dataset to be onward shared with the researchers. Both organisations are currently working on a draft Data Sharing Agreement.
Impact Many research papers will be created by the research community as a outcome of this partnership.
Start Year 2019
 
Description "Private schooling, subject choice and upper secondary academic attainment in England: Using the Next Steps Generation" was presented at the Private Schools Workshop on 17th December 2018, London 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact The paper presented explores Private Schooling in England.

With approximately three times the resources per pupil in private, compared with state schools, Britain's private sector presents an interesting case of what could be expected from schools that are extremely well resourced. This paper studies the links between private schooling and educational performance in upper secondary school, as measured through their performance in 'A level', the main school-leaving assessment which determines access to universities. Using data from the Next Steps survey of pupils born in 1989/90, we find evidence that, compared with otherwise observably similar state school students in upper secondary education and controlling for prior attainment, those at private school study 27 percent more 'facilitating' subjects, which are known to be favoured by high-status universities; they are placed 8 percentage points higher in the A level rankings (this could be equivalent to the difference between a student with AAB to a student with AAA) and 11 percentage points higher in the rankings for 'facilitating' A levels (this could be equivalent to the difference between a student with ABB to a student with AAA). We find no evidence of a private school advantage for ever attending any university but some evidence of a private school advantage for attending an elite university. Taken together with earlier studies at primary and lower secondary education levels, our findings mean that private schooling in Britain is associated with modest but cumulative advantages at all stages of education from primary onwards.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Adolescent wellbeing conference UCL - 12th December 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Mental health and wellbeing in the Millennium Cohort Study, Professor Emla Fitzsimons
Using data from the Millennium Cohort Study, we will report on the prevalence of mental ill-health through childhood, from age 3, and into early adolescence, age 14. We will focus on the transition of symptoms between age 11 and 14 years, a key transitional stage of pubertal development, coinciding also with the important move from primary to secondary school. We will present a range of relevant correlates of different transition experiences, including bullying, pubertal age, socio-economic position, family stability etc. We will also investigate correlates of both mental illness and wellbeing in adolescence, and thereby the extent to which these two concepts - often considered to be two ends of the same spectrum - overlap or differ.

'From adolescence to early adulthood: longitudinal analysis of probable mental ill health', Dr Morag Henderson
This analysis will make use of the new age 25 data from the Next Steps cohort of young people born in 1989/1990. This presentation will explore mental ill health longitudinally and will examine correlates of adolescent mental ill health (at age 14 and 16) and their association with mental ill health at age 25. It will also identify the correlates of recovery from adolescent mental ill health and explore what predicts prolonged incidence of mental ill health symptoms and 'recovery'. Moreover the question of how adolescent mental ill health is associated with social outcomes at age 25 will be answered, including labour market outcomes, life satisfaction, family form ation and drug use.


'Early childhood parenting type and adolescent mental health problems', Dr Aase Villadsen
Several factors have been shown to contribute the development of childhood and adolescent mental health problems. However, family environment and parenting are highlighted as especially influential, with the period of early childhood being regarded as formative years that continue to shape outcomes later in life. The well-known typology of parenting of Baumrind - authoritative, permissive, authoritarian, uninvolved - is based on configurations of high and low parental responsiveness and demandingness. The authoritative parenting type, characterised by high levels of warmth and high structure, is regarded as optimal in terms of child functioning. A number of previous studies have confirmed this; although these have largely examined concurrent or short-term associations between parenting types and child functioning. Very little is known about the relationship between parenting types and children's longer-term adjustment, which we study here. Using data from the Millennium Cohort Study we examine parenting types in early childhood (age 3) and their longitudinal prediction of mental health difficulties in early adolescence (age 14).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Analysis: Who are the children hoping to earn £24 an hour? 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Children from some ethnic minority groups are most likely to aspire to university and aim for well-paid jobs, a new study has found. Researchers from the London School of Economics and the UCL Institute of Education analysed data on more than 12,000 children born in the UK at the turn of the new century who are taking part in the Millennium Cohort Study. These findings featured in a BBC News analysis piece authored by Professor Lucinda Platt, LSE.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-45561184
 
Description Animations - Aspirations animations and classroom resources 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Based upon information from the Millennium Cohort Study our research shows that when 11-year-old girls are asked about their dream jobs, they tend to think of ones where the current workforce is predominantly made of women, while boys set their sights on jobs that are largely carried out by men. We've created animations and classroom resources aimed at primary school pupils 7-11 years old, and at young people aged 11-14. The animations and classroom resources are designed to inspire and challenge pupils to consider the effects of gender bias on the choices they make for their careers. During 2019 we are hoping to pilot the animations and classroom resources with teachers, career advisers and pupils to see if they might be of value as a learning resource for schools across the country.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Blog: Anti-Bullying Week 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This blog came in response to the DfE's announcement that 30,000 fewer young people in England are being bullied compared to 10 years ago. The blog was timed to coincide with Anti-Bullying Week. The blog covered findings from MCS, Next Steps and NCDS.

The blog was extensively shared on social media, with engagement predominently from academics and third sector organisations.

No impact as of yet.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://ioelondonblog.wordpress.com/2015/11/17/bullying-what-have-longitudinal-studies-taught-us/
 
Description Blog: Economics of Higher Education on Inter generational Upward Mobility 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact A blog summarising the research from the 'First in Family' work using Next Steps.

We use 'Next Steps', a longitudinal sample of English children born in 1990, who entered sixth form in 2006. They were followed every year through their secondary schooling and again later in early adulthood at age 25. The longitudinal nature of the data allows us to control in a detailed way for the children's family background, income, and their prior attainment in order to isolate the association between parental education and their child's education. We find that:

FiF young people make up 18 percent of a recent cohort in England, comprising nearly two-thirds of all university graduates
Comparing individuals with no parental higher education, ethnic minorities and those with higher levels of prior attainment are more likely to experience intergenerational educational mobility and become a FiF
Once at university, those who are FiF are more likely to study Law, Economics and Management and less likely to study other Social Sciences, Arts and Humanities than students whose parents are university graduates
FiF students are less likely to study at and graduate from elite universities such as those belonging to the Russell Group, which are considered more prestigious, research intensive institutions
FiF have a higher probability of not completing their degree, even after prior educational attainment, individual characteristics and socio-economic status are taken into account
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://economicsofhe.org/2019/12/06/do-first-in-family-university-students-have-different-universit...
 
Description Briefing paper: Occupational aspirations of children from primary school to teenage years across ethnic groups 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact This briefing paper was written by Prof Lucinda Platt and Dr Sam Parsons. It focused on the findings for two key research questions: How do occupational aspirations of girls and boys from different ethnic groups compare? and To what extent do they feed through into subsequent occupational outcomes? The briefing was made available on the CLS website.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://cls.ucl.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/9948_CLS_Paper_Occupational_Aspirations_of_Children...
 
Description Bullying experience and effects: UK evidence (public engagement event) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact In the lead-up to Anti-Bullying Week 2015, the Centre for Longitudinal Studies and the Anti-Bullying Alliance hosted campaigners, charities, local authorities and others to discuss the latest evidence on how bullying is affecting children and young people. This event was part of the ESRC Festival of Social Science, and was hosted by Barclays at their creative space in east London. It was hosted by CLS in collaboration with the Anti-Bullying Alliance.

Speakers included Dr Stella Chatzitheochari, University of Warwick (presented research on bullying among children with disabilities); Dr Morag Henderson, CLS (presented research on bullying among sexual minorities); Prof Louise Arseneault, King's College London (presented on the long-term effects of childhood bullying on adult physical and mental health); Kiri Joliffe, Young NCB representative (presented a first-hand account of her experiences being bullied at school); Anna Feuchtwang, Anti-Bullying Alliance (chair).

There were just under 140 delegates in attendance: 42 members of the third sector, 28 members of the public sector, 38 academics, 21 members of the general public, and 9 others.

Following the presentations from academics, the panel (including a young person and members of the Anti-Bullying Alliance team), engaged in a discussion with the audience.

Delegates gave this event an average of 8/10 on satisfaction, and a 8.5/10 on relevance.

Following the event, a PGCE Programme Leader from the UCL Institute of Education requested more information on the research to inform teacher training on equality and diversity.

CLS also had requests for further information from Buckinghamshire County Council, The Theatre Centre (empowering young leadership and youth activism through the arts), and members of the public.


Following the event, the Founder and President of Red Balloon Learner Centres asked to collaborate on future bullying work.

Following the event, a delegate from Buckinghamshire County Council requested 100 copies of all event materials to distribute to delegates at the Council's upcoming E-Safety Conference for students and professionals working with children and young people.

Our co-hosts, the Anti-Bullying Alliance, have asked us to run a joint seminar every year in advance of Anti-Bully
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.cls.ioe.ac.uk/bullyingseminar
 
Description CLS cohort training event, Cardiff University 14th March 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Longitudinal data across the life course: an introduction to using cohort data
14 March 2018
Cardiff University
Longitudinal data are a powerful resource for addressing a wide range of scientific questions in various social, health, political and geographical sciences.
For example, what determines health across life? How has social mobility changed? What determines voting preferences?
This workshop will give both first-time and more experienced data users an insight into four of the UK's internationally-renowned cohort studies run by the Centre for Longitudinal Studies (CLS):
• 1958 National Child Development Study;
• 1970 British Cohort Study;
• Millennium Cohort Study;
• Next Steps (previously known as the Longitudinal Study of Young People in England).
Delegates will be given an introduction to each of the cohort studies as well as further information on how to access and use them. There will also be updates about recent developments in each of the studies, including upcoming new data releases.
The session will feature guest speakers who will discuss their use of cohort data across a range of topics such as the role of grandparents, social participation in adulthood, and children's wellbeing.
Delegates will also have the opportunity to discuss their own research ideas, gain advice and ask questions over a networking lunch.
The workshop will be run by staff from CLS, which is based at the Department of Social Science, UCL Institute of Education.
Speakers
• David Bann (Research Officer, Centre for Longitudinal Studies)
• Stuart Fox (Research Associate, Cardiff University)
• Jennifer Hampton (Research Assistant, WISERD)
• Morag Henderson (Co-Investigator of Next Steps, Centre for Longitudinal Studies)
• Vanessa Moulton (Research Associate, Centre for Longitudinal Studies)



Provisional programme outline
10:30 Welcome
10:35 Introduction to the cohort studies
David Bann, Morag Henderson, Vanessa Moulton
11:35 Tea and coffee
12:00 Interdisciplinary research examples

Grandparent involvement in children's lives Jennifer Hampton

Studying Social Participation in middle age using the National Child Development Study
Stuart Fox

From adolescence to early adulthood: longitudinal analysis of probable mental ill health
Morag Henderson

13:00 Lunch and discussion
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Centre for Global and Higher Education Conference Presentation, 3 April 2019 UCL IoE 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact This parallel panel involved research using Next Steps data which examines inter generational educational mobility as part of the CHGE conference.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Conference Paper: SLLS Potsdam 24-27 Sept 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Two pieces of research using Next Steps was presented at this conference by Morag Henderson, The influence of private Schooling and subject choice on attainment and university progression and WP indicators work.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Contribution to Methodology of Longitudinal Surveys (MOLS2) conference 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact We had a significant presence at the 2018 Methodology of Longitudinal Surveys conference at the University of Essex which took place between 25th-27th July 2018. https://www.mols2.org.uk/. It is a specialist international conference focusing on longitudinal survey methods, which last took place in 2006. It lasted 3 days with several parallel sessions at each time, attended by around 150-200 academics, professional survey practitioners and post-graduate students from around the world. It was attended by eight members of CLS staff. In total, we delivered and/or co-authored four presentations based on the all of our four cohort studies, covering innovations in participant engagement, predictors of consent to data linkage, collection of bio-social data and innovations in the CLS cohorts (which was part of a special invited pre-conference workshop). Our presence at the conference was re-enforced through Twitter, with two CLS staff members tweeting from the conference and also tweets sent from CLS main account, and also CLS had a stand at the conference.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.mols2.org.uk/
 
Description Contribution to the European Survey Reseach Assocation conference 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact We had a significant presence at the 2017 international conference of the European Survey Research Association in Lisbon, Portugal which took place between Monday 17th and Friday 21st July 2019. http://www.europeansurveyresearch.org/conference. It is a large conference lasting 5 days with multiple strands parallel sessions at each time, attended by around 800 academics, professional survey practitioners and post-graduate students from around the world. This is one of the major international survey methodology conferences, which takes place biennially. It was attended by eight members of CLS staff. In total, we delivered and/or co-authored eight presentations based on the all of our four cohort studies, covering participant engagement, data linkage, responsive design, bio-social data collection, occupation coding, and missing data. We are also organised conference sessions on surveying children and young people, biomedical data collection and handling missing data. Our presence at the conference was re-enforced through Twitter, with two CLS staff members tweeting from the conference and also tweets sent from CLS main account.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.europeansurveyresearch.org/conference
 
Description Contribution to the European Survey Research Association conference 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact We had a significant presence at the 2015 international conference of the European Survey Research Association in Reykjavik, Iceland. which took place between Monday 13th and Friday 17th July 2015. http://www.europeansurveyresearch.org/conference. It is a large conference lasting 5 days with multiple strands parallel sessions at each time, attended by around 800 academics, professional survey practitioners and post-graduate students from around the world.

This is one of the major international survey methodology conferences, which takes place biennially. It was attended by eight members of CLS staff. In total, we delivered and/or co-authored eleven presentations based on the three of our four cohort studies, covering surveying children and young people, collection of time-use and activity monitor data, data linkage, mixed-modes, event history calendars, para-data, DDI and interviewer training. Many of the presentations were joint with the survey agencies we have worked with on the studies (NatCen, IPSOS-MORI and TNS-BMRB). We are also organised seven conference sessions in total on surveying children and young people, collecting time-use data and administrative data linkage.

Our presence at ESRA was backed up by a London-based social media strategy which involved tweets from the @clscohorts account to promote the presentations on the cohort studies and the sessions we organised. Two of the staff members also engaged in tweeting at the conference. It total we sent around 150 tweets making us among the top tweeters at the whole conference. This enabled the research to reach far more people, both at the conference and beyond.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.europeansurveyresearch.org/conference
 
Description Cross Cohort Research Programme Conference, Special session: Subject choice and social mobility, London, 29 Nov 2018. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Co-presenters include Prof Alice Sullivan, Dr Vanessa Moulton, Dr Jake Anders.

This inter-disciplinary special session aims to showcase the outstanding research explaining subject choice differences throughout the education system. In addition we hope to explore how these choices may influence educational and employment trajectories, as well as other aspects of life. Delegates will have an opportunity to:
• raise awareness of your current work on subject choice
• disseminate research findings and receive feedback
• develop collaborations and plan joint funding bids
• network with colleagues from across disciplines, sectors and locations
• hear about data sources and the latest resources for research
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Department for Education Meeting and Presentation on 'First in the family' university graduates in England: The Next Steps Generation, 26 April 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Caroline Keim hosted this meeting and presentation at the Department for Education on 26th April 2018. This paper explores the characteristics of a recent generation of 'first in the family' (FiF) university graduates in England using a nationally representative dataset, Next Steps to provide the first comprehensive, descriptive statistics on this group. We identify the proportion of FiF young people at age 25 as compared to their peers who either match their parent's education level (either with degree or without degree) or are downwardly mobile, meaning their parent(s) has a university degree, but they do not. Our results show that that 24 per cent of young people aged 25 in 2015 in England are FiF, comprising nearly two-thirds of all university graduates of this cohort. Comparing groups with no parental higher education we find that ethnic minorities and those with higher levels of prior attainment are more likely to be FiF, and that those who are FiF are more likely to study Law, Economics and Management and less likely to study other Social Sciences, Arts and Humanities than those who are not FiF students. We find evidence that university type varies by FIF status, so too does dropout, where FiF students are at greater risk of dropout, once prior attainment, individual characteristics and socio-economic status are taken into account. Implications for these findings are discussed.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description ESRC International Centre for Lifecourse Studies in Society and Health Perspectives on Mental and Physical Health, Initial findings from Next Steps 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact ESRC International Centre for Lifecourse Studies in Society and Health 38th CENTRE DAY: Tuesday 25th April 2017. This was an invited talk at which I presented the inital findings from Next Steps to a group of policymakers, academics and students who may not be traditional users of Next Steps but who, once they were made aware of the new data, are likely to make use of it. The findings also have strong policy relevance in substantive terms given their focus on health and wellbeing.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description ESRC SOCIAL SCIENCE WEEK EVENT: MENTAL ILL HEALTH 9th November 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Young people's mental health and wellbeing has become a prominent social issue in recent months, receiving high-profile attention from the royal family and political parties.
This seminar will present civil servants at the Department of Health and Public Health England with the most recent findings on the state of mental health and wellbeing among two important generations of Britons: those born in 2000-01, and 1989-90.
Prof Emla Fitzsimons will present findings from the Millennium Cohort Study on the prevalence of mental ill health from age 3 to 14, focusing on the crucial age 11-14 period, when puberty is underway and children move from primary to secondary school. The findings will show the relationships between mental illness and other areas of life, including bullying, pubertal age, socioeconomic position, and family stability. Prof Fitzsimons will also explore the differences between mental illness and wellbeing at this critical age.
Dr Morag Henderson will present findings from new age 25 data from Next Steps on the prevalence of mental ill health from adolescence through to early adult life. The findings will also cover how adolescent mental illness is associated with outcomes at age 25, including general health, BMI, educational qualifications, and employment.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description European Survey Research Association (ESRA) conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact CLS presented its latest research on survey methods at the European Survey Research Association (ESRA) conference, which took place at the University of Zagreb in Croatia from 15 to 19 July 2019. Staff from across CLS gave eight presentations at the event, and members of the team were also available on our exhibition stand during the week if delegates had any questions. ESRA hosts its main conference every two years, bringing together around 800-900 survey researchers from across Europe and beyond, with the aim of fostering communication between substantive specialists working with survey data and survey methodologists, as well as experts in statistical analysis. Traditionally hosted in European university buildings to keep registration fees to a minimum, the aim is to be as inclusive as possible, promoting in particular, the participation of doctoral students and Early Career Researchers. As well as showcasing the latest research based on surveys and survey methodology, the conference offers a number of professional development opportunities, including short courses and awards.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://cls.ucl.ac.uk/cls-to-present-latest-survey-methods-research-at-international-conference/
 
Description Hosted a conference to discuss the future scientific direction of CLS cohorts - attended by academics, policy makers and third sector 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact On 30 January 2019, Alissa Goodman and her team hosted an invitation only meeting on the future scientific direction of the longitudinal cohort studies at CLS. The meeting provided an opportunity for key academics, policy makers and third sector to shape how the cohorts are developed, and to ensure CLS support this audience in their research, as well as addressing policy needs of the future. Key messages from the consultation were documented in a report and will support the development of scientific plans for the CLS cohorts from 2020 onwards.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description How are millennials faring? Initial findings from Next Steps Department for Education 21st December 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact From adolescence to early adulthood: longitudinal analysis of probable mental ill health', Dr Morag Henderson
This analysis will make use of the new age 25 data from the Next Steps cohort of young people born in 1989/1990. This presentation will explore mental ill health longitudinally and will examine correlates of adolescent mental ill health (at age 14 and 16) and their association with mental ill health at age 25. It will also identify the correlates of recovery from adolescent mental ill health and explore what predicts prolonged incidence of mental ill health symptoms and 'recovery'. Moreover the question of how adolescent mental ill health is associated with social outcomes at age 25 will be answered, including labour market outcomes, life satisfaction, family formation and drug use.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description How are millennials faring? Initial findings from Next Steps, Department for Education Presentation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact How are millennials faring?: Initial findings from Next Steps. Dr Morag Henderson and Dr Lisa Calderwood.

This was an invited talk at the Department for Education by Emaline Kulasinghe. We talked for one hour to an audience of 40 policy makers present in the room and many others dialling in to the presentation through conference calling technology from across the country. The presentation included content on the process of restarting the first Longitudinal Study of Young People in England at age 25, now referred to as 'Next Steps'. Including a discussion about sample size, attrition, contents of the study and opportunities for research. In addition, initial results were presented on mental health, the role of diet and exercise on weight and health, politics, perception, identity and economic activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Inequalities and the Curriculum a Department for Education presentation 7th November 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Inequalities and the Curriculum
Alice Sullivan, Jake Anders, Vanessa Moulton, Catherine Dilnot and Morag Henderson

This lunchtime seminar will discuss some of the recent findings from a team of researchers based at UCL Institute of Education. The seminar will run from 12pm-1pm (with 15 minutes for questions) and the room has been booked for an additional 30 minutes for [optional] further discussion. The paper by Jake Anders, Morag Henderson, Vanessa Moulton and Alice Sullivan examines the role of the school in producing curriculum differences using multi-level variance decomposition models applied to administrative data on young people in state schools in England. The paper by Vanessa Moulton, Alice Sullivan, Morag Henderson and Jake Anders examines whether taking EBacc eligible subjects or applied subjects at 14-16 made a difference to transitions at 16-plus, both in terms of staying on in education, progressing to A levels, and taking 'facilitating' subjects at A level. The paper by Alice Sullivan, Morag Henderson, Vanessa Moulton and Jake Anders examines the association between curriculum choice from 14-16 and its association with status attainment at age 25. Catherine Dilnot's paper uses a taxonomy of A-levels developed from the published preferences of the Russell Group of 24 high status UK universities, categorizing A-levels as 'facilitating', 'useful' and 'less suitable' for university entry. She examines the relationships between having such A-levels and rank score of university attended.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Invitation to join ADR UK Research Commissioning Board, attending three meetings of the Board in 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Professor Alissa Goodman was invited to join the ADR UK Research Commissioning Board, and attended three meetings of the Board in 2019. The Board oversees the distribution of ADRUK strategic funding for research-ready datasets and research using administrative data, according to criteria including that the work is clearly linked to the priorities of UK government departments.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Invited panel member to a session at the CLOSER: preparing for the future longitudinal conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact In January 2020, Professor Alissa Goodman spoke as an invited panel member on the plenary opening panel session at the CLOSER conference 'Preparing for the future II: international approaches to challenges facing the longitudinal population studies'. The panel each discussed some of the current challenges facing longitudinal studies, including maintaining the relevance and scientific value of longitudinal studies in the data linkage, big data era, and how we can ensure that the studies are used and funded into the future.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.closer.ac.uk/event/preparing-future-longitudinal-conference-2020/
 
Description Leadership Committee meeting and Expert Group for the Administrative Data Research Partnership (ADRP) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Alissa Goodman was invited and attended the first Leadership Committee meeting for the Administrative Data Research Partnership (ADRP) in December 2018, as well as an Expert Group meeting for ADRP in February 2018.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018,2019
 
Description Liaison with Administrative Data Reseach Network 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact We have had a number of meetings and other communications with staff at the Administrative Data Research Network, another ESRC funded investment, in order to explore closer working with this and to ensure efficiency between ESRC investments in relation to pursuing linked data requests for CLS, and for Next Steps specifically. In particular we have made progress with the possibility of linking Next Steps data to UCAS data held by ADRN.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017,2018
 
Description Meeting at the Nuffield Foundation on adolescent cohort studies 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Lisa Calderwood participated in a half-day invited meeting organised by the Nuffield Foundation called 'CROSSING HORIZONS: New avenues in research with longitudinal adolescent cohorts'. Lisa gave a presentation about the Next Steps cohort study and during discussion shared learning from other CLS cohort studies, particularly Millennium Cohort Study.

This seminar focused on in-depth discussion of large-scale longitudinal cohort studies of youth in precarious social, economic and political circumstances, with presentations from both UK based cohort studies and Mzantsi Wakho, an ongoing longitudinal study of a cohort of 1,500 HIV-positive and negative adolescents, with community-tracing over three years (2014-2017), located in South Africa. As well as population cohorts, it also included a number of clinical cohorts following adolescents with experience of HIV.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Meeting with Clare Baker, Department for Education 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Alissa Goodman, Lisa Calderwood and Danielle Gomes met with Clare Baker, Head of Performance Tables Development Unit, Education Data Division at Department for Education to discuss opportunities for linking CLS cohorts into the DfE's Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Meeting with Katherine Woolf regarding setting-up a new cohort study 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact One hour meeting with Dr Katherine Woolf (Senior Lecturer in Medical Education, Deputy Lead for Research UCL Medical School) to give advice regarding setting-up a new cohort study
Update: 15/02/2018: I have recently learned that this project has been funded and Katherine has indicated she may ask me to join advisory panel/for other advice.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Meeting with the UCL Widening Participation Team; Presentation of intitial findings on 'First in the family' university graduates in England: The Next Steps Generation, 20th June 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presented project plans and initial findings on First in Family project to Widening Participation professionals on 20th June, 2018. This paper explores the characteristics of a recent generation of 'first in the family' (FiF) university graduates in England using a nationally representative dataset, Next Steps to provide the first comprehensive, descriptive statistics on this group. We identify the proportion of FiF young people at age 25 as compared to their peers who either match their parent's education level (either with degree or without degree) or are downwardly mobile, meaning their parent(s) has a university degree, but they do not. Our results show that that 24 per cent of young people aged 25 in 2015 in England are FiF, comprising nearly two-thirds of all university graduates of this cohort. Comparing groups with no parental higher education we find that ethnic minorities and those with higher levels of prior attainment are more likely to be FiF, and that those who are FiF are more likely to study Law, Economics and Management and less likely to study other Social Sciences, Arts and Humanities than those who are not FiF students. We find evidence that university type varies by FIF status, so too does dropout, where FiF students are at greater risk of dropout, once prior attainment, individual characteristics and socio-economic status are taken into account. Implications for these findings are discussed.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Meetings with survey agencies regarding strategic issues and data collection innovations 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact We wrote to all of the main UK survey agencies - Ipsos MORI, NatCen, TNS-BMRB, Gfk-NOP, ONS - to ask them to showcase to us some of the innovations in data collection and new technologies that they may have carried out on commercial and other kinds of studies, and also to invite them to discuss with us strategic issues facing longitudinal studies in the UK. All of the responded positively and these meetings were held in Summer 2016.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Mental health and wellbeing in the millennial generations 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact As part of the ESRC's Festival of Social Science, CLS hosted a breakfast seminar focused on mental health and wellbeing. Emla Fitzsimons, Praveetha Patalay and Morag Henderson presented recent research from MCS and Next Steps covering the state of mental health wellbeing among the two generations. The seminar concluded with a discussion of the findings led by Louise Arseneault. The session was aimed mainly at policymakers and third sector organisations. Of the 10 evaluations received, 90% rated the event as 'Very' interesting and 80% rated it as 'Very' educational. When asked if they would use what they learnt in their own work, 40% 'Strongly Agreed' while 60% 'Agreed'.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.cls.ioe.ac.uk/Conference.aspx?itemid=4648&itemTitle=Mental+health+and+wellbeing+in+the+mi...
 
Description NCDS 60th Birthday Celebration Conference: Presenting "'First in the family' university graduates in England " 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact The work presented explores the characteristics of a recent generation of 'first in the family' (FiF) university graduates in England using a nationally representative dataset, Next Steps to provide the first comprehensive, descriptive statistics on this group. We identify the proportion of FiF young people at age 25 as compared to their peers who either match their parent's education level (either with degree or without degree) or are downwardly mobile, meaning their parent(s) has a university degree, but they do not. Our results show that that 24 per cent of young people aged 25 in 2015 in England are FiF, comprising nearly two-thirds of all university graduates of this cohort. Comparing groups with no parental higher education we find that ethnic minorities and those with higher levels of prior attainment are more likely to be FiF, and that those who are FiF are more likely to study Law, Economics and Management and less likely to study other Social Sciences, Arts and Humanities than those who are not FiF students. We find evidence that university type varies by FIF status, so too does dropout, where FiF students are at greater risk of dropout, once prior attainment, individual characteristics and socio-economic status are taken into account. Implications for these findings are discussed.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://twitter.com/CLScohorts/status/917426681236901889
 
Description Next Steps Age 31 Scientific Consultative Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Delegates from the scientific community, government departments, members of the third sector and other stakeholders gathered to discuss the proposed content of the data collection instruments at the Next Steps Age 31 survey. There were 56 delegates registered for the event. Delegates scored the event an average of 8.75/10 on satisfaction and 7.75/10 on relevance to their work. Some comments from delegates include: "Good organisation. Informative presentations from theme leaders. Plenty of opportunity for discussion." and "Thank you for organising this thought provoking event."
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://cls.ucl.ac.uk/events/next-steps-age-31-scientific-consultative-conference/
 
Description Next Steps participant-facing website and social media 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact CLS designed and built a participant-facing website for Next Steps study members. The purpose of the website is to provide feedback to study members on the findings and impact of the study, as well as to provide important information about upcoming surveys and how they can update their contact details. Study members can also access any information that has been sent to them by post, the study's other main communication channel. An animated video, interactive study timeline and infographics of descriptive statistics were developed to provide a more engaging way of providing the information to study members. CLS also set up a Facebook page and Twitter account to engage with study members via social media. Quarterly social media campaigns will begin in 2017 to update cohort members on recent findings from the study, and encourage them to update their contact details.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.nextstepsstudy.org.uk
 
Description Next Steps participant-facing website and social media 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact The purpose of the website and social media channels (Facebook and Twitter) is to provide feedback to study members on the findings and impact of the study, as well as to provide important information about upcoming surveys and how they can update their contact details. Study members can also access any information that has been sent to them by post, the study's other main communication channel. Over the course of the past year, the website has had 5,003 users and 9,522 unique pageviews. At the time of submission, the Facebook page had 188 followers (176 likes) and the Twitter account had 85 followers.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://nextstepsstudy.org.uk/
 
Description Paper presentation at BERA Newcastle conference 10-12 September 2018: 'First in the family' university graduates in England: The Next Steps Generation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This paper explores the characteristics of a recent generation of 'first in the family' (FiF) university graduates in England using a nationally representative dataset, Next Steps to provide the first comprehensive, descriptive statistics on this group. We identify the proportion of FiF young people at age 25 as compared to their peers who either match their parent's education level (either with degree or without degree) or are downwardly mobile, meaning their parent(s) has a university degree, but they do not. Our results show that that 24 per cent of young people aged 25 in 2015 in England are FiF, comprising nearly two-thirds of all university graduates of this cohort. Comparing groups with no parental higher education we find that ethnic minorities and those with higher levels of prior attainment are more likely to be FiF, and that those who are FiF are more likely to study Law, Economics and Management and less likely to study other Social Sciences, Arts and Humanities than those who are not FiF students. We find evidence that university type varies by FIF status, so too does dropout, where FiF students are at greater risk of dropout, once prior attainment, individual characteristics and socio-economic status are taken into account. Implications for these findings are discussed.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.bera.ac.uk/
 
Description Paper presentation at SLLS Milan conference 9-11 July 2018: 'First in the family' university graduates in England: The Next Steps Generation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This paper explores the characteristics of a recent generation of 'first in the family' (FiF) university graduates in England using a nationally representative dataset, Next Steps to provide the first comprehensive, descriptive statistics on this group. We identify the proportion of FiF young people at age 25 as compared to their peers who either match their parent's education level (either with degree or without degree) or are downwardly mobile, meaning their parent(s) has a university degree, but they do not. Our results show that that 24 per cent of young people aged 25 in 2015 in England are FiF, comprising nearly two-thirds of all university graduates of this cohort. Comparing groups with no parental higher education we find that ethnic minorities and those with higher levels of prior attainment are more likely to be FiF, and that those who are FiF are more likely to study Law, Economics and Management and less likely to study other Social Sciences, Arts and Humanities than those who are not FiF students. We find evidence that university type varies by FIF status, so too does dropout, where FiF students are at greater risk of dropout, once prior attainment, individual characteristics and socio-economic status are taken into account. Implications for these findings are discussed.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://www.slls.org.uk
 
Description Participant mailing: Next Steps annual engagement mailing 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact In June 2018, CLS sent its annual engagement mailing to Next Steps study members. The update included findings from the study on the connection between sleep and obesity, GCSE subject choice and girls' likelihood of staying in school, and the relationship between zero-hours contracts and health.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://nextstepsstudy.org.uk/resources/
 
Description Participating in Resolution Foundation's study on Exploring Inequalities-igniting research to better inform UK policy 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Alissa Goodman is participating in a UCL Resolution Foundation project combining research and evidence on inequality in the UK to lead to informed and joined-up policy making, coordinated by the Resolution Foundation between February - September 2019. In May 2019, Alissa was asked to present the opening 'provocation' to kick start the discussion on Inequalities in Health.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Participation with Prospective Studies Engagement Group and ALSPAC 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Alissa Goodman is member of a new Prospective Studies Engagement Group (PSEG), run by ALSPAC, bringing together experts in the field of cohort engagement to explore the most effective ways of engaging with study participants involved in longitudinal population studies.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Policy event: Race Inequality in the Workplace (parliamentary report launch) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact On 2 March 2020, over 100 representatives from national and local government, the third sector, academia and the media attended the launch of the report 'Race inequality in the Workplace' at the House of Lords. CLS researcher and Co-Investigator of Next Steps, Dr Morag Henderson, presented findings from Next Steps on racial inequalities in employment stability. Dr Henderson also took part in a panel discussion on the importance of the findings alongside Lord Simon Woolley (Director of Operation Black Vote and head of the UK government's Race Disparity Unit), Matthew Taylor (CEO of the RSA), Zubaida Haque (Deputy Director of Runnymede Trust), and Paul Rees (CEO of the Royal College of Psychiatrists).

The event was exceptionally well attended by a broad range of organisations, many of whom followed up with queries about the research and recommendations. Lord Woolley also discussed the report's findings at a House of Lords debate on education and social mobility on 6 March 2020.

About the event

Launch of 'Race Inequality in the Workforce' - a report using new data to exploring the relationships between employment, ethnicity and mental health. Hear from a panel of leading experts on these themes, chaired by Lord Simon Woolley, chief executive of Operation Black Vote and head of the UK government's Race Disparity Unit.

About the report

In the midst of political, social, demographic and technological changes taking place in the UK, the world of work is rapidly evolving. There are growing challenges in terms of job security, low pay, opportunities for progression and terms and conditions. Meanwhile, there is growing evidence of a rise in mental health issues; and a wider context where many ethnic minority groups have long experienced disadvantage in the labour market.

Carnegie UK Trust, Operation Black Vote and UCL Centre for Longitudinal Studies have come together to explore the specific links between ethnicity, work and mental health; to examine these relationships and consider the steps required to ensure that fair and decent work is accessible across all sectors of society.

In this report, we present new data from Next Steps, a longitudinal study of the 'millennial generation' in England. The work reveals persistent issues around the relationships between employment, ethnicity and mental health and underlines that there are enduring inequalities in the workplace between ethnic groups. The report presents recommendations for actions - for government, for mental health services and for employers.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/launch-event-race-inequality-in-the-workforce-tickets-92730488387
 
Description Presentation at British Academy Event hosted by Dr Shure on "'First in the family' university graduates in England: The Next Steps Generation", 20 Sept 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact This paper explores the characteristics of a recent generation of 'first in the family' (FiF) university graduates in England using a nationally representative dataset, Next Steps to provide the first comprehensive, descriptive statistics on this group. We identify the proportion of FiF young people at age 25 as compared to their peers who either match their parent's education level (either with degree or without degree) or are downwardly mobile, meaning their parent(s) has a university degree, but they do not. Our results show that that 24 per cent of young people aged 25 in 2015 in England are FiF, comprising nearly two-thirds of all university graduates of this cohort. Comparing groups with no parental higher education we find that ethnic minorities and those with higher levels of prior attainment are more likely to be FiF, and that those who are FiF are more likely to study Law, Economics and Management and less likely to study other Social Sciences, Arts and Humanities than those who are not FiF students. We find evidence that university type varies by FIF status, so too does dropout, where FiF students are at greater risk of dropout, once prior attainment, individual characteristics and socio-economic status are taken into account. Implications for these findings are discussed.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.ucl.ac.uk/ioe/events/2018/sep/path-higher-education-socioeconomic-disadvantage-plans-and...
 
Description Presentation at Columbia University on "'First in the family' university graduates in England: The Next Steps Generation" 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Professor Jane Waldfogel hosted this presentation on 12 April 2018. This paper explores the characteristics of a recent generation of 'first in the family' (FiF) university graduates in England using a nationally representative dataset, Next Steps to provide the first comprehensive, descriptive statistics on this group. We identify the proportion of FiF young people at age 25 as compared to their peers who either match their parent's education level (either with degree or without degree) or are downwardly mobile, meaning their parent(s) has a university degree, but they do not. Our results show that that 24 per cent of young people aged 25 in 2015 in England are FiF, comprising nearly two-thirds of all university graduates of this cohort. Comparing groups with no parental higher education we find that ethnic minorities and those with higher levels of prior attainment are more likely to be FiF, and that those who are FiF are more likely to study Law, Economics and Management and less likely to study other Social Sciences, Arts and Humanities than those who are not FiF students. We find evidence that university type varies by FIF status, so too does dropout, where FiF students are at greater risk of dropout, once prior attainment, individual characteristics and socio-economic status are taken into account. Implications for these findings are discussed.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.columbia.edu/
 
Description Presentation at Edinburgh University hosted by Prof Iannelli on "From adolescence to early adulthood: longitudinal analysis of probable mental ill health", 5-6 June 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Despite an increase in living standards and material comforts in industrialised societies, today's 'emerging adults' (aged from late teens to mid-to-late 20s) face greater challenges than ever before. The aim of this paper is to explore the relationship between labour market status and mental health for the 'millennial generation' in England, and whether it varies by gender and ethnicity. This study will be the first to draw on the results from the 2015 sweep of Next Steps data when the sample members are aged 25 and, together with the previous seven sweeps, bring the debate up to date by providing first estimates of the life condition of contemporary emerging adults. We find black and minority ethnic groups have lower odds of reporting mental ill-health at age 25 than the white group. With respect to labour market status, we find that net of socio-economic characteristics, educational attainment, behavioural variables and income at age 25, those who are unemployed are more than twice as likely to report symptoms of poor mental health as those who are employed. Shift workers and those on zero-hours contracts are also at a greater risk of mental ill-health by 47% and 44% respectively than those who are not shift workers or zero-hours workers. We find no significant difference for those who have a second job or are on a permanent contract for mental health at age 25 compared to those who do not have a second job or are on a temporary contract.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Presentation at Next Steps Age 31 Scientific Consultative Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact In January 2020, Professor Alissa Goodman co-led the session on 'Labour market experiences, education, income and assets' at the Next Steps Age 31 Scientific Consultative Conference. The aim of the session was to help shape the contents of the Age 31/2 sweep of Next Steps questions on labour markets, education, income and assets.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Presentation on 'Curricula, schools and social mobiltiy' at DfE, 7th November 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Around 50 civil servants attended this seminar at DfE. The project team (Alice Sullivan, Morag Henderson, Vanessa Moulton, Jake Anders) and Catherine Dilnot presented a summary of findings from the project, as well as Catherine's work (which will appear in a special issue of ORE alongside findings from the project team). Next Steps was the main dataset exploited in this work. The civil servants were very engaged and interested in the findings. Emaline KULASINGHE [mailto:Emaline.KULASINGHE@education.gov.uk] , the organiser of the regular DFE seminar, was keen to encourage us to contact her with other suggestions for seminars.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Presentation to New York City University 10th April 2018 : "'First in the family' university graduates in England" 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Professor Mary Clare Lennon hosted this presentation at City of New York University. The work presented explores the characteristics of a recent generation of 'first in the family' (FiF) university graduates in England using a nationally representative dataset, Next Steps to provide the first comprehensive, descriptive statistics on this group. We identify the proportion of FiF young people at age 25 as compared to their peers who either match their parent's education level (either with degree or without degree) or are downwardly mobile, meaning their parent(s) has a university degree, but they do not. Our results show that that 24 per cent of young people aged 25 in 2015 in England are FiF, comprising nearly two-thirds of all university graduates of this cohort. Comparing groups with no parental higher education we find that ethnic minorities and those with higher levels of prior attainment are more likely to be FiF, and that those who are FiF are more likely to study Law, Economics and Management and less likely to study other Social Sciences, Arts and Humanities than those who are not FiF students. We find evidence that university type varies by FIF status, so too does dropout, where FiF students are at greater risk of dropout, once prior attainment, individual characteristics and socio-economic status are taken into account. Implications for these findings are discussed.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://www2.cuny.edu/
 
Description Press release: BAME millennials at greater risk of being in unstable employment 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Millennials from Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) backgrounds are 47% more likely to be on a zero-hours contract, and have 10% greater odds of working a second job, compared to their White peers, according to a new report from the UCL Centre for Longitudinal Studies, Carnegie UK Trust, and Operation Black Vote. BAME millennials are also 5% more likely to be doing shift work, and are 4% less likely to have a permanent contract than White workers. At the report's launch in Parliament on Monday 2 March 2020, the authors will call on the Government, mental health services and employers to take action to tackle racial inequalities in access to good work. The research was featured in BBC Radio 4, BBC Asian Network, BBC News Channel, BBC News, The Guardian, The Independent, Metro, Yahoo! Finance, About Manchester, HR Magazine and Business Telegraph on 2 March 2020.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://cls.ucl.ac.uk/bame-millennials-at-greater-risk-of-being-in-unstable-employment/
 
Description Press release: Being on a zero-hours contract is bad for your health, new study reveals 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A briefing paper, press release and social media content were published to share the Next Steps age 25 findings on economic activity. Young adults who are employed on zero-hours contracts are less likely to be in good health, and are at higher risk of poor mental health than workers with stable jobs. Researchers from the Centre for Longitudinal Studies analysed data on more than 7,700 people living in England who were born in 1989-90 and are being followed by a study called Next Steps. They found that at age 25, people on zero-hours contracts and those who were unemployed were less likely to report feeling healthy, compared to those in more secure employment. Those with zero-hours contracts were also at greater risk of reporting symptoms of psychological distress. This press release was picked up by The Times, The Guardian, Independent, Mirror, Metro, Morning Star, Huffington Post, ITV online news, BBC3 online news, and regional news websites. During Prime Minister's Questions, on July 5th, the leader of the opposition, Jeremy Corbyn mentioned the research when debating with Prime Minister, Theresa May. He said: "When Tories talk of tough choices, we know who suffers: the poorest and most vulnerable in our society. Young people employed on zero-hours contracts are more likely to have worse mental and physical health."
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.cls.ioe.ac.uk/news.aspx?itemid=4623&itemTitle=Being+on+a+zero-hours+contract+is+bad+for+y...
 
Description Press release: LGB bullying 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Bullying does not stop in the playground for lesbian, gay and bisexual young people, study finds

Lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) young people are more likely than their heterosexual classmates to be bullied throughout secondary school and into adulthood, according to new research.

This press release was based on research using Next Steps.

Key coverage:

London Evening Standard, Mon 9 Nov, pg. 9 (see attached)
Huffington Post http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2015/11/09/young-gay-people-are-twice-as-likely-to-be-bullied-than-their-straight-peers_n_8505614.html
Western Daily Press http://www.westerndailypress.co.uk/8203-Lesbian-gay-bisexual-youngsters-likely/story-28122192-detail/story.html
Diva News http://www.divamag.co.uk/category/news/homophobic-bullying.aspx

A headmaster from Brighton College requested further information after seeing the article in the Evening Standard. He cited the findings in an op-ed piece for the Telegraph, and in his speech for the college's conference on homophobic bullying.


The Headmaster of Brighton College requested more information on the research findings to use in his speech for an upcoming conference on Anti-Homophobia In Schools. The conference is aimed at school leaders, and the other speakers include Nicky Morgan, Secretary of State for Education and Minister for Equalities; Lord Cashman, Labour party spokesman on gay rights; Matthew Parris, the former Conservative MP and now columnist for The Times; William Emery the first public school Head Boy to 'come
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.cls.ioe.ac.uk/news.aspx?itemid=4376&itemTitle=Bullying+does+not+stop+in+the+playground+fo...
 
Description Press release: Millennials who chose an apprenticeship over university are just as happy with their lives, study finds 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Twenty-somethings who pursued vocational training rather than university report being just as satisfied with their lives, according to new research. Researchers from the UCL Institute of Education and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine examined information on more than 9,500 young people living in England, who were born in 1989-90 and are being followed by a study called Next Steps. They found that there was no 'right way' to transition into adult life. Instead, young people followed a range of viable paths after completing compulsory schooling at age 16.

This press release was picked up by The Times, the Daily Mail, City A.M. and other regional news outlets. It received positive reactions from the Department for Education, including the Chief Scientific Advisor who circulated it to relevant civil servants. The findings and the response from the press and DfE were shared with participants in the annual mailing.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.cls.ioe.ac.uk/news.aspx?itemid=4563&itemTitle=Millennials+who+chose+an+apprenticeship+ove...
 
Description Press release: Vocational GCSEs may be holding girls back, research suggests 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact This press release covered two CLS working papers, both using Next Steps data. One of the working papers ('Continuing Education Post-16: Does What You Study at GCSE matter?') showed how girls who take 'applied' subjects, such as health and social care or home economics, at GCSE may be facing educational disadvantage as they are less likely to study past A-level and also less likely to take 'facilitating' A-levels favoured by prestigious universities. The other paper highlighted the influence that schools have on pupils' GCSE subject choices, showing how a bright pupil in an academically selective school is more likely to take an academic route than an equally bright pupil in a less selective school. The press release on these two papers secured coverage in the Independent as well as the TES, Schools Week, and a range of regional newspapers. Alice Sullivan, one of the authors of the papers gave an interview to Sky News Radio, which supplies the national and international news, sport, business and entertainment news to almost every commercial radio station in the UK. One of the two papers ('Does What you Study at GCSE Matter') was referenced in a post on the Department for Education Facebook page on 1 March 2018, in support of studying EBacc subjects, including languages: https://www.facebook.com/116423535060106/posts/1590555454313566
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.cls.ioe.ac.uk/news.aspx?itemid=4641&itemTitle=Vocational+GCSEs+may+be+holding+girls+back%...
 
Description Public lecture and debate: Realising aspirations? Gender, ethnicity and job inequalities 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact As part of the ESRC Festival of Social Science, CLS hosted a public lecture and debate on 8 November 2018 to showcase findings from CLS research into differences and inequalities in children's career aspirations. Approximately 90 people attended the event, including one large group of sixth form students from a local school. Comments from the feedback forms included:

• Informative and interesting
• It was great
• Excellent and interesting event - great range of speakers
• Wonderfully informative and helpful, especially as a sixth form student
• Excellent - thanks
• Fantastic event, very well organised
• An absolutely brilliant event, some very interesting research and a great discussion. Definitely eye-opening on aspirations in general

About the workshop

This event explored recent research on the occupational aspirations of boys and girls of different ethnic groups, with the first viewing of an animation on gendered choices and a panel discussion of the barriers that may prevent those from minority ethnic groups achieving their aspirations.

There were two elements to the event. The first involved the first showing of an animation relating to findings on the ways boys and girls continue to express highly gendered preferences about their future jobs. The animation was followed by a discussion of the challenges in changing stereotypes and expectations relating to "men's" and "women's" work among youth, and different approaches.

The second part of the event provided the opportunity for discussion of occupational aspirations of children from different ethnic groups and how they evolve across their childhoods. This is a previously unstudied area. Recent research has shown that children from minority ethnic groups are not only aspiring to be highly educated but also to participate in 'good jobs' to a greater extent than their majority counterparts. Educational outcomes are tracking these aspirations, but job outcomes do not seem to be to the same extent.

How do we understand these findings? What are the factors enabling and preventing boys and girls from different ethnic groups from achieving their ambitions in adulthood? Panellists with expertise in education, women's rights and race equality offered their perspective on the findings and the audience were invited to discuss their reflections and possible ways forward.

Speakers
Omar Khan (@omaromalleykhan) is the Director of Runnymede, the UK's leading independent race equality think tank.
Heidi Mirza (@HeidiMirza) is Professor Emerita at UCL, is a black feminist professor of race equality and women's rights, and author of works on education and race and gender inequality.
Samantha Parsons is Research Associate at the Centre for Longitudinal Studies, UCL and works on adult basic skills, disability and socioeconomic disadvantage.
Lucinda Platt (@PlattLucinda) is Professor of Social Policy and Sociology at LSE, and works on ethnicity, migration and inequality.
Esohe Uwadiae is a 2017 LSE Law Graduate and former Education Officer for LSESU. She currently works as a Senior Faculty Administrator for Regent's University London.
Nik Miller (@bridge_group) is Chief Executive of the Bridge Group. Prior to his appointment he worked in the USA, at the University of Warwick, and was most recently Head of Corporate and Alumni Relations at the University of York.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016,2018
URL https://cls.ucl.ac.uk/events/realising-aspirations-gender-ethnicity-and-job-inequalities/
 
Description Restarting Next Steps and Initial Findings, 18th January 2018, Economic and Social Research Institute (Dublin) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact How are millennials faring?: Initial findings from Next Steps. Dr Morag Henderson and Dr Lisa Calderwood. This was an invited talk at the Economic and Social Institute in Dublin . We talked for one hour to an audience of 72 policy makers, researchers and academics. The presentation included content on the process of restarting the first Longitudinal Study of Young People in England at age 25, now referred to as 'Next Steps'. Including a discussion about sample size, attrition, contents of the study and opportunities for research. In addition, initial results were presented on mental health 'From adolescence to early adulthood: longitudinal analysis of probable mental ill health'. This analysis made use of the new age 25 data from the Next Steps cohort of young people born in 1989/1990. This presentation explored mental ill health longitudinally and will examine correlates of adolescent mental ill health (at age 14 and 16) and their association with mental ill health at age 25. It also identified the correlates of recovery from adolescent mental ill health and explored what predicts prolonged incidence of mental ill health symptoms and 'recovery'. Moreover the question of how adolescent mental ill health is associated with social outcomes at age 25 was addressed, including labour market outcomes, life satisfaction, family formation and drug use.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Round table meeting with hosted by National Centre for Longitudinal Data/ANU Centre for Social Research and Methods 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A round table day-long meeting hosted by with National Centre for Longitudinal Data/ANU Centre for Social Research and Methods with Australian Departments of Social Services, Education, Health, Defence and Veterans Affairs, and Australian Bureau of Statistics. The main purpose of the meeting was for me to share experience and expertise from running the CLS cohort studies with key stakeholders in Longitudinal Studies in Australia and this included funders, policy-makers, study teams, academic users and survey organisations. I gave a presentation covering how we have approached challenges including data linkage, mixed-mode, impact on the CLS studies, and answers questions from participants.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Royal Economic Society Conference Brightn 27th March 2018: "'First in the family' university graduates in England" Special Higher Education Symposium 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact The work presented at RES explores the characteristics of a recent generation of 'first in the family' (FiF) university graduates in England using a nationally representative dataset, Next Steps to provide the first comprehensive, descriptive statistics on this group. We identify the proportion of FiF young people at age 25 as compared to their peers who either match their parent's education level (either with degree or without degree) or are downwardly mobile, meaning their parent(s) has a university degree, but they do not. Our results show that that 24 per cent of young people aged 25 in 2015 in England are FiF, comprising nearly two-thirds of all university graduates of this cohort. Comparing groups with no parental higher education we find that ethnic minorities and those with higher levels of prior attainment are more likely to be FiF, and that those who are FiF are more likely to study Law, Economics and Management and less likely to study other Social Sciences, Arts and Humanities than those who are not FiF students. We find evidence that university type varies by FIF status, so too does dropout, where FiF students are at greater risk of dropout, once prior attainment, individual characteristics and socio-economic status are taken into account. Implications for these findings are discussed.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.res.org.uk/event-listing/annual-conference.html
 
Description SLLS Conference presentation: 18th-21st October 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact I gave a conference presentation at the Society for Longitudinal and Life Course Studies which was well attended by CLS staff on the subject of Subject Choice. There was considerable discussion afterwards and from this we started to form a research group on the topic of Subject Choice bringing together international researchers who are working in this field.

The abstract follows:

In this paper we identify patterns of subject and qualification choices made at age 14. Most past research on 'subject choice' has focused on the later stages of educational trajectories, particularly Higher Education. However, the choices made at early branching points can limit pupils' subsequent options, potentially contributing to educational inequalities. This paper identifies the patterns of General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE) subjects chosen by a cohort of young people born in 1989/1990. We make use of the Next Steps data (formerly the Longitudinal Study of Young People in England (LSYPE)) which is linked to the National Pupil Database. We develop an approach to measuring the academic selectivity of subjects and qualifications. We examine the roles of social class, parental education, income, gender and ethnicity in determining participation in these curriculum groupings. We also examine the role of the intersections of these variables, for example, the different role of gender for working and middle class youth. Using measures of prior attainment measured at age thirteen, we address the question of whether curriculum differentials simply reflect differences in prior attainment or whether they actually exacerbate inequalities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.slls.org.uk/#!call-for-papers/c11p2
 
Description SLLS Workshop 2017: An Introduction to the Next Steps Age 25 Data 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The aim of this workshop is to introduce participants to the Age 25 Next Steps data and demonstrating its longitudinal power.
Next Steps (previously known as the Longitudinal Study of Young People in England) is a major national cohort study following the generation born in 1989/1990. It fills the 30-year gap in the UK's national cohort study series between the 1970 British Cohort Study and the Millennium Cohort Study and provides multi-disciplinary longitudinal data for a large-scale and nationally representative probability sample of young adults.
The age 25 survey took place in 2015/2016 and collected detailed information about the lives of young adults growing up in Britain today and in particular on transitions out of education and into early adult life. The data can be used to examine a broad range of research questions relating to higher education, employment, housing and family formation, and mental and physical health.
After giving some background to the dataset, the sample design and content will be discussed alongside strategies for dealing with attrition and weights. Methods of accessing the data will be highlighted and initial findings examining health, mental health, diet, physical activity and economic activity will be covered. More specifically the format of the workshop will be: Objectives; Funding; Sample Design; Content; Initial Findings; Response & Attrition; Sampling and Non-response weights; Data Access (UKDS) and Documentation; Understanding the data; Recoding variables; Deriving variables cross-sectionall; Linking data longitudinally; Deriving variables longitudinally
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description School Student Event: Presented research to IoE's third 'A level Sociology Conference' 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact I presented at the IOE's third 'A Level Sociology Conference'. It's a free half-day conference for A Level Sociology students and their teachers from state schools across London and further afield, and is a chance for students to hear from and discuss with leading UCL academics featured on the A Level Sociology syllabus. The event aims to give students a deeper understanding and insight into current and classic sociology of education research, theory and methodological approaches. I presented research on the First in Family project, which highlights the importance of university subject choice and institutional choice. Over 1000 school students attended this event.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Seminar at Australian National University (ANU) Centre for Social Research Methods 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact I gave a seminar on 'How are millennials faring? Next Steps at age 25: survey implementation and initial findings' to Australian National University (ANU) Centre for Social Research Methods
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Seminar at Social Research Centre, Melbourne 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact I gave a staff seminar on 'methodological innovations in the UK cohort studies' at the Social Research Centre, Melbourne. This is a independent survey research organisation.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Seminar at University of Auckland 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact I gave a seminar on 'Methodological Innovations in the UK cohorts' at the University of Auckland, arranged by the Growing Up in New Zealand study team
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Social Justice Expert Steering Group, Department for Work and Pensions (8th December) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact I took part in this day of discussion about the research output using the cohort studies related to Social Justice. We reviewed the government research led by Paul March, Social Justice Lead Analyst on Children, Families and Disadvantage and gave comments and suggestions for improvement. We discussed the salient isuses and helped to make decisions about the future of the research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/department-for-work-pensions
 
Description Train the trainer: a workshop to explore longitudinal data to inform your teaching in quantitative social science subjects 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact On 22 May 2019, CLS presented at this CLOSER workshop aimed at lecturers. This free one-day event gave an overview of longitudinal data available to lecturers who teach and supervise students in quantitative social science subjects. The day also gave an opportunity for instructors and supervisors to discuss their teaching needs with the data providers and colleagues at the workshop.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://cls.ucl.ac.uk/events/train-the-trainer/
 
Description Webinar: Introduction to Next Steps and the Age 25 Survey 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact This webinar introduced Next Steps to both first-time and more experienced users. It focused on the newly-available data from the age 25 survey. It gave attendees the opportunity to learn about the Next Steps sample, how to access the data and what content had been included in the most recent Age 25 Survey. Attendees also had the chance to ask the speakers questions about the data. There were 47 people registered for this webinar. The session was split into four sections and individual recordings uploaded to Youtube. As of 12 February 2018, the four videos have been viewed 82 times altogether.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.cls.ioe.ac.uk/Conference.aspx?itemid=4611&itemTitle=Webinar%3a+Introduction+to+Next+Steps...
 
Description Website: Next Steps participant-facing website and social media 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact CLS designed and built a participant-facing website for Next Steps study members. The purpose of the website is to provide feedback to study members on the findings and impact of the study, as well as to provide important information about upcoming surveys and how they can update their contact details. Study members can also access any information that has been sent to them by post, the study's other main communication channel. An animated video and interactive study timeline were developed to provide a more engaging way of providing the information to study members. To date the site has had 3,239 visitors and 10,397 unique pageviews.

CLS also set up a Facebook page and Twitter account to engage with study members via social media.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.nextstepsstudy.org.uk
 
Description Widening Participation Seminar to WP Practioners, hosted by Jade Hunter, UCL 10 July 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This 2 hours workshop to Widening Participation practitioner network from around the country to discuss WP indicators, and present the summary findings from three academic papers to an audience comprising representatives from: Education charity; Government department; Grammar school; HE membership organisation; Mental health research unit;
Professional services staff from Oxbridge; Post-92 university and RG Universities. Academics, students and school leadership.

'First in the family': higher education choices and labour market outcomes: Anna Adamecz-Volgyi, Morag Henderson and Nikki Shure (UCL)
The policy discussion about 'widening participation' (WP) in UK higher education (HE) has expanded beyond traditional socioeconomic gaps to identifying 'first in the family to attend university' students as a specific form of disadvantage. 'First in Family' (FiF) refers to students who attend university (and obtain a degree), but whose mother and father did not. Fifteen of the 24 Russell Group universities explicitly target these individuals in their WP campaigns, although little is known about their characteristics. This project is the first large-scale research study on FiF in England.

This seminar will present first results on FiF students in England, including how they compare to their peers who are not FiF students. We will explore to what extent FiF is a useful indicator for widening participation, that is, how well it proxies existing measures of disadvantage. We will then explore the decisions FiF students make in terms of HE institution, subject choice and non-completion as compared to their non-FiF peers at university. Furthermore, we will investigate how being FiF affects labour market outcomes, including probability of employment and whether earnings differ by FiF status.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Workshop - Longitudinal data across the life course: an introduction to using cohort data 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact On 17 May 2019, CLS hosted an introductory workshop at the University of Edinburgh for new and prospective users of CLS cohort data. The 75 delegates were largely from Scotland, with some coming from Greater London, South West, Wales, North West, South East, West Midlands, Northern Ireland, and abroad.
About the workshop: Longitudinal data are a powerful resource for addressing a wide range of scientific questions in various social, health, political and geographical sciences. For example, what determines health across life? How has social mobility changed? What determines voting preferences? This workshop gave both first-time and more experienced data users an insight into four of the UK's internationally-renowned cohort studies run by the Centre for Longitudinal Studies (CLS): 1958 National Child Development Study; 1970 British Cohort Study; Millennium Cohort Study; Next Steps (previously known as the Longitudinal Study of Young People in England). Delegates were given an introduction to each of the cohort studies as well as further information on how to access and use them. The session featured guest speakers who discussed their use of cohort data across a range of topics such as transition to primary school in Scotland, social inequality and general cognitive ability, and selective schooling and adult health. Delegates also had the opportunity to discuss their own research ideas, gain advice and ask questions over a networking lunch.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://cls.ucl.ac.uk/events/longitudinal-data-across-the-life-course-an-introduction-to-using-cohor...
 
Description Workshop: An introduction to using cohort data 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact On 4 June 2018, CLS hosted an introductory workshop at Cardiff University for new and prospective users of CLS cohort data. The 47 delegates were largely from Wales, with some coming from Greater London, South West, Scotland, North West, South East, West Midlands, and abroad.

About the workshop
Longitudinal data are a powerful resource for addressing a wide range of scientific questions in various social, health, political and geographical sciences. For example, what determines health across life? How has social mobility changed? What determines voting preferences? This workshop gave both first-time and more experienced data users an insight into four of the UK's internationally-renowned cohort studies run by the Centre for Longitudinal Studies (CLS):

1958 National Child Development Study;
1970 British Cohort Study;
Millennium Cohort Study;
Next Steps (previously known as the Longitudinal Study of Young People in England).

Delegates were given an introduction to each of the cohort studies as well as further information on how to access and use them. The session also featured updates on recent developments in each of the studies, including upcoming new data releases. The session featured guest speakers who discussed their use of cohort data across a range of topics such as the role of grandparents, social participation in adulthood, and children's wellbeing. Delegates also had the opportunity to discuss their own research ideas, gain advice and ask questions over a networking lunch.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://cls.ucl.ac.uk/events/event-template-to-clone/
 
Description Workshop: Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge on Widening Participation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Date: 20 November 2019
Time: 12:15-4:00 pm
Location: Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge with Morag Henderson, Nikki Shure and Anna Adamecz-Volgyi
This is the first in a series of events which will present rigorous evidence on different aspects of Universities' efforts to widen participation and their activities to support learners from more disadvantaged backgrounds whilst in university. The events will provide a forum for discussion of how such evidence might be used in practice. The aim of the series is to enable academics and practitioners to come together to discuss what constitutes effective practice and how the sector might go about evaluating their own practice. The first workshop will focus on the challenge of identifying disadvantaged students.
Is 'first in family' a good indicator for widening university participation?: Anna Adamecz-Völgyi, Morag Henderson and Nikki Shure
Currently, a range of universities use 'first in family' or 'first generation' as an indicator to increase the diversity of their student intake, but very little is known about whether this is a good indicator of disadvantage and how it overlaps with other widely used indicators. We use nationally representative, longitudinal survey data linked to administrative education data from England to provide the first comprehensive analysis of the first in family measure. We show how first in family correlates with other commonly used measures of disadvantage and find that it captures additional disadvantage over and above other measures. We employ parametric probability and non-parametric classification models to look at its relative predictive power to predict university participation and graduation. We find that being first in family is an important barrier to university participation and graduation, even after controlling for other sources of disadvantage. This seems to work through the channel of early educational attainment. Our research provides evidence that the first in family indicator could be key in efforts to widen participation at universities through the use of contextualised admissions.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Young people's subject choice: influences and impact 29th November 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact This seminar, chaired by Professor Anna Vignoles, a Nuffield Foundation Trustee and Professor of Education at the University of Cambridge, will bring together findings from three Nuffield-funded studies which have been investigating subject choice in school, what influences the students' decisions and the impacts these have on their access to higher education.
1. Subject choice at 14- options, decisions and their influence in access to higher education - can studying certain combinations of subjects at 14-16 narrow inequalities in access to university? Read more
Jake Anders, Senior Research Fellow in Education, Evaluation and Inequality, UCL Institute of Education
2. What can we learn from studies of pairs of twins about subject and other study choices? Read more
Kathryn Asbury, Senior Lecturer and Programme Leader for the MSc Psychology in Education, University of York
3. Does providing young people with information about future earnings influence post-16 subject choices? Read more
Peter Davies, Professor of Education, University of Birmingham
A panel including The Rt Hon. David Laws, Executive Chairman of the Education Policy Institute, and, Professor Cristina Iannelli, Institute for Education, Community and Society at the University of Edinburgh, will discuss the findings and their implications for policy and practice and will explore how different types of evidence can help us think through the issues surrounding subject choice at school.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description conference: BERA, Manchester 11-13 Sept 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Two pieces of research using Next Steps was presented at this conference by Morag Henderson, The influence of private Schooling and subject choice on attainment and university progression and WP indicators work.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019