Health risks and benefits of extended working life (the HEAF Study)

Lead Research Organisation: University of Southampton
Department Name: Community Clinical Sciences

Abstract

The need to keep Britain's ageing population economically active has prompted government policies aimed at extending working lives. However, working beyond the traditional retirement age may not be feasible for those with major health problems of ageing and, depending on occupational and personal circumstances (e.g. savings, retirement intentions, domestic responsibilities, whether work is arduous, rewarding), might be either good or bad for health. Non-medical circumstances, including the design of work and workplace policies, may also hinder or harm prospects of job retention.

Better information on these questions has many potential uses - e.g. to optimise government and employer policies; to identify interventions that may help older workers with health problems to remain in work; to alert doctors to medical problems associated with poor vocation outcomes; and to inform fitness for work decisions; to improve the design of work for older people; evidence on health, ageing, and risk of occupational injury can be used to ensure older workers are placed in safe work and that, where possible, their employment opportunities are not restricted without good justification.

We are being funded by the charity Arthritis Research UK to recruit and follow 6,000 men and women aged 50-64 years from some 18 general practices in England. The practices contribute to the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD), a research database maintained by the government's Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). The CPRD contains a log of every medical consultation episode associated with significant events, illnesses, or medical activity (diagnosis, referral, prescription, death etc) among the patients of participating general practices. These data are pseudo-anonymised (only identifiable by an ID code) and collected by MHRA from 250 practices in England and Wales, from which we will sample practices.

CPRD linkage offers compelling scientific and logistic advantages. In particular, because we will access the entire GP medical records of participants in selected areas of inquiry, we can pursue our study questions using a hugely detailed database in which many health events and their timings are objectively corroborated. This will enable us to explore the effect of health on work, and vice versa, at a level of detail that is not feasible in periodic interviewer-administered or postal surveys. Moreover, the data will be captured at very low cost relative to alternative means of acquiring the same information.

ARUK has provided funding only to investigate the impact of common musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) of ageing on work retention and the effect of deferring retirement on musculoskeletal health. This leaves us short, particularly in respect of research assistant time to develop the cohort and computing and statistical time to analyse the many non-MSD problems that the dataset offers. We hope through this bid to maximise the value of the cohort, and the efforts of participants, by extending our analysis to a much broader range of health conditions and their impact on work participation. Funding will be used to purchase more research assistant, data programmer and statistical time, but many of the other costs (eg mailing, clerical, payment to practices) are already met and many of the practical hurdles (eg ethics and governance permissions, access rights to CPRD data) have already been resolved. The MHRA's research director is a collaborator in this application.

Patients from participating general practices who agree to be studied will complete questionnaires about their work and home circumstances, initially over a 3-year follow-up. With their written permission, we will access their health data via the CPRD and link this to their questionnaire data. The inter-relation of changes in employment (with reasons) and changes in health (eg major new illnesses, new treatments, mortality) will be examined statistically.

Planned Impact

The main beneficiaries of the research will be policy makers within government, patients (workers), employers, occupational health & safety (OHS) professionals, other clinicians and researchers.

In common with other Western nations, the British government needs individuals to work on and retire later. This need arises from lack of funds to support the state pension and other welfare benefits and the growing dependency ratio as the population ages - where possible, individuals need to be self-supporting for longer & continue contributing taxes for longer, rather than drawing welfare benefits. The need is driving official policies aimed at extending working lives (eg removal of the default retirement age, deferred eligibility to a state pension). At the same time, increasing numbers of people are intent on working longer, to build savings for retirement in the face of personal indebtedness, higher costs & taxes, and diminishing returns on savings and pensions. However:

i) The health consequences of such a policy require assessment, given the theoretical balance of benefits and risks, both in continued working and in early, normal and deferred retirement. Benefits and risks may be context specific, varying according to ways in which jobs are surrendered (eg voluntarily vs involuntarily) and surrounding personal circumstances (eg whether a person has enough retirement income for self-support and support of dependants; whether the work surrendered is seen as rewarding or distasteful, physically arduous or not; whether the individual has social support outside work etc). Retirement may bring health benefits of its own, which may be lost through extended working life.

ii) The scope to keep people with health problems in work, and its limits, are not well defined. Data on how health limits work participation at older ages are urgently needed. Data are needed also on effect modifiers of associations with work status in older workers with health problems so that measures that promote better participation can be encouraged and barriers to participation removed.

iii) Potential interventions need to be identified. Part of the solution may lie in better medical care. However, interventions need not be medical but can relate, for example, to social policies and the organisation of work to support individuals with health problems. Similarly, barriers may be social, personal, financial or arising from want of good workplace support. (Thus, for example, the vocational outcome for a person with large joint disease could vary markedly between blue-collar and white-collar employment; within a blue-collar job, according to ergonomic aids, scope for job sharing and alternative duties; and between people according to other motivating/de-motivating factors, within and outwith work, as well as quality and type of health care.)

Better understanding of these issues should help in refining public health & social policies. Assuming a continuing need for work at older ages, it can assist the design of better work for older people, identify the supports they need and help them to lay better plans for eventual retirement.

Potential beneficiaries of the study include the national workforce, future generations of workers entering retirement, and employers, the goals being to optimise health outcomes related to employment and support for older workers. Employers and OHS teams will benefit from having an evidence base from which to make decisions on safety and fitness for work, and which informs the design of workplace adaptations to preserve work capacity.

The study has international relevance, given the age profiles of Western countries. However, findings will be of particular value to the cross-departmental Health, Work and Well-being government programme and its sponsors in the Department for Work & Pensions, the Department of Health, the HSE, the Scottish Executive the Welsh Assembly and the Northern Ireland Workplace Health Strateg

Publications

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Description Demographic trends in developed countries have prompted governmental policies aimed at extending working lives. However, working beyond the traditional retirement age may not be feasible for those with major health problems, and depending on occupational and personal circumstances, might be either good or bad for health. To address these uncertainties, in 2013-2014, we recruited 8,134 adults aged 50-64 years from 24 British general practices contributing to the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD). Participants have completed questionnaires about their work and home circumstances at baseline, and will do so regularly over follow-up, initially for a 5-year period. With their permission, we will access their primary care health records via the CPRD. The inter-relation of changes in employment (with reasons) and changes in health (e.g. major new illnesses, new treatments, mortality) will be examined. At present the baseline and first 3 follow-ups have been completed and the fourth is underway; Over 75% of baseline participants are still returning questionnaires. The record linkage stage happened in January 2017 and the CPRD data is now linked to the data set and analysis is ongoing at February 2018.

Most significant achievements from the award
At baseline, the HEAF study provided descriptive information on employment patterns, working conditions and self-reported health in 50-64 year-olds across England, novel information on psychosocial aspects of work, people's feelings about their work and factors that could feature in retirement decision-making, and data on health-related job loss (HRJL).

Some, 32% of 50-64 year-olds were not in work, 24% being fully retired. Adverse work conditions were fairly common. For example, among the 68% of people still in paid work, 37% reported being on their feet for >3 hours at a time, 24% still regularly undertook hard physical work that raised sweat and 16% still worked frequent shifts; adverse psychosocial conditions were also common - 1 in 3 people found their work colleagues to be difficult, 1 in 5 reported no choice over their work content and timetable, 1 in 5 perceived their job to be insecure, 1 in 7 often lay awake at night worrying about work, 1 in 10 rarely felt supported and 1 in 10 rarely felt appreciated by work colleagues. All of these undesirable work characteristics showed a gradient by social class, being worse among routine and manual occupations than in intermediate occupations, which were worse than higher managerial workers. One in 10 of respondents said they were finding it very difficult to manage financially these days, while 1 in 8 stated that they intended never to retire. Health problems were fairly common: 1 in 4 had borderline depression, 1 in 4 had fair or poor Self-rated Health (SRH), 1 in 5 to 1 in 7 had troublesome persistent bodily pain, while significant numbers reported impairments of function and senses, and also prolonged sickness absence and work limitations.

Among those not in work at baseline, 1 in 3 reported leaving their last job for a health reason (HRJL), sometimes several reasons, and 1 in 12 of these people was receiving an ill-health pension. In almost half of such cases a musculoskeletal problem was cited as a contributory factor in job loss, in a third mental health problems, and in 1 in 7 a cardiorespiratory problem. As expected, unemployment and HRJL were more common in manual than in managerial occupations.

All of the many self-reported health measures in the baseline HEAF questionnaire were strongly related to HRJL - for example, after allowing for age and sex, odds of HRJL were 16 times higher in those with difficulty in walking than in those without, 8.6 times higher in those with fair/poor SRH, and substantially higher in those with low mood, poor well-being, worsening memory, and persistent troublesome musculoskeletal pain. Recent HRJL was even more strongly related with such symptoms.

The syndrome of "frailty" has previously only been studied in geriatric populations, where a score of markers developed by Fried et al predicts falls, hospitalisations, institutional care, dependency and mortality. Little is known about the prevalence of "frailty" in mid-life and whether it is a cause of employment difficulties. In all, 3.9% of 8,095 eligible respondents from the baseline analysis of HEAF were classed as "frail" and 31.6% as "pre-frail". Three-quarters of the former were not in work, while 60% had left their last job on health grounds (odds ratio (OR) for HRJL, vs. non-frail subjects, 30.0 (95% Confidence Interval (CI) 23.0-39.2). Among those in work, ORs for prolonged sickness absence, cutting down substantially at work and struggling with work's physical demands were 10.7 (95%CI 6.5-17.7), 17.2 (95%CI 10.5-28.4) and 14.8 (95%CI 8.2-26.6) respectively. We calculated population attributable fractions (PAFs), representing the proportion of the population burden that is potentially preventable assuming that risk factors are causal and can be eliminated: the PAF for HRJL when any frailty marker was present was 51.8% and that for prolonged sickness absence was 32.5%. These findings suggest that frailty and its components could be important causes of HRJL at a population level. Associations were strongest with slow reported walking speed, with the possibility that motor function may be a major driver of the problem, and risk estimates were higher in manual workers than white-collar professionals, although frailty still had a major adverse impact on work capacity even in the latter group. With access to the CPRD data we plan to characterise the frail in our study in more detail. Analysis of the year 1 follow-up responses indicates however, that among those in work at baseline, frailty is also a strong predictor of job loss and HRJL over the following year (Hazard Ratio (HR) 7.8, 95%CI 4.3-14.2). We hope to conduct face to face assessments of physical function in a subset of HEAF subjects. A possible application would be to screen for frailty in workers using simple questions and office-based tests and then intervene to tackle related adverse employment outcomes. (Such an approach, based around exercises to improve balance and muscle strength and improve diet, has been used successfully to combat some of the adverse effects of frailty in the elderly.)

The baseline questionnaire also collected information on job dissatisfaction and its potential drivers, and on impaired sleep quality. Both of these outcomes have been linked with sickness absence, labour turnover and poor well-being. In HEAF, job dissatisfaction was more common among men, below age 60 years, in those living in London and the South East, in the more educated and in those working for larger employers. The main contributors to job dissatisfaction among employees were feeling unappreciated and/or lacking a sense of achievement (PAF 55%-56%), while in the self-employed, job insecurity was the leading contributor (PAF 79%). Job dissatisfaction was associated with all of the adverse health outcomes examined (odds ratios of 3-5), as were most of the negative perceptions of work that contributed to overall dissatisfaction. We concluded that employment policies aimed at improving job satisfaction in older workers should focus particularly on relationships in the workplace, fairness, job security and instilling a sense of achievement. If older workers are to be retained in the job market for longer, such measures will increasingly become necessary to implement.

Previous studies on insomnia have rarely focussed on older workers, among whom the occupational causes of sleep disturbance may vary from younger colleagues. One of the few such investigations, of French utility workers (the Gazel Study) reported improved sleep quality after planned normal retirement. As demographic trends in developed countries are now requiring people to work longer rather than retire, research on avoidable occupational determinants of insomnia in older workers is pertinent and topical. Insomnia was reported by 18.8% of HEAF subjects, being commoner in women, current smokers, obese individuals, those living alone, and those in financial hardship, and less prevalent in the educated, those in South-East England, and those with friendships and leisure-time pursuits. Occupational risk factors included unemployment, shift working, lack of control and support at work, job insecurity, job dissatisfaction and several of its determinants (lacking a sense of achievement, feeling unappreciated, having difficult work colleagues, feeling unfairly criticised). Population burden of insomnia was associated particularly with difficulties in coping with work demands, job insecurity, difficult colleagues and lack of friendships at work (PAFs 15-33%). Insomnia was strongly associated with seven measures of poorer self-assessed health. We conclude that insomnia in mid-life may be caused or aggravated by several workplace elements that could be avoided through better employment practices.

Other analyses are at earlier stages. We have found, however, that high body mass index (BMI) is a weak risk factor for job loss, HRJL, absenteeism, and reduced work productivity; that chronic regional musculoskeletal pain is a stronger risk factor for these outcomes; and that risks of job loss are notably high if obesity and chronic lower limb pain coincide. Initial findings fed into a review for government led by Dame Carol Black.

We have also found that HRJL had a 1-year incidence of 3.4% (95%CI 2.9-4.0%), the leading causes being mental (40%) and musculoskeletal (37%) ill-health. Some 6.3% (95%CI 5.6-7.0%) of HEAF respondents changed jobs over the first year of follow-up, while 4.3% (95%CI 3.5-5.2%) of those in their 50s and 60s took up a new job. Chronic regional pain was a strong predictor of incident HRJL (HRs 3.2 to 4.2, depending on anatomical site), while after allowing for other factors (age, sex, qualifications, personal finances, mental health), people with persistent back or neck pain were 60% less likely to find new work than others not in work at baseline. We have also found that frailty and chronic pain are very strongly associated; and early cross-sectional analyses suggest that those who have undergone planned normal retirement are less likely to report low mood, poor SRH, insomnia, and poor well-being than those still working after allowing for affluence and social class. (Indications from the Gazel study are that SRH may improve with retirement, especially if jobs that are left are perceived to be demanding and unrewarding; longitudinal analysis with further waves of data and prescribing information will explore these possibilities).

To what extent were the award objectives met? If you can, briefly explain why any key objectives were not met
The HEAF study is proceeding broadly to plan. Indeed it has surpassed expectations in its recruitment (a third higher at baseline, with better response rates than expected at follow-up and some 50% more people under follow-up at 3 years than planned). Such success has brought challenges in terms of extra resources and mailings have taken longer than expected to process. There has also been a substantial delay in obtaining data from the CPRD whose governance arrangements changed between outline agreement and the study's execution; the obstacles have only recently been overcome but they preclude us reporting here on outcomes and risk factors derived from medical records - an important future component of the cohort's work programme.

The objectives of the HEAF study were always long-term, requiring several waves of follow-up and the full power of analysis has not yet been brought to bear, but the materials have been collected. Objectives related to the descriptive epidemiology of work and health at older ages (e.g. patterns of job loss and employment difficulties with leading causes) have been met; those relating to modifiable risk factors for HRJL have been partially met by analyses to date, but with much more to come. A key question we have had, important for policy, is whether working longer is good or bad for health. While we have some simple cross-sectional analyses on this, we need several waves of the cohort data to look more critically at this question; moreover, we can look in more detail with linked CPRD data from individuals' medical records. (For example, a Finnish study found a fall in antidepressant use with normal retirement - we may have the wherewithal to consider analyses like this).

How might the findings be taken forward and by whom?
As indicated above, there are many more findings to come. Collaborations have been proposed to develop a Scottish HEAF (SHEAF) study and an Australian one; a visiting Fellow from Amsterdam, Ranu Sewdas worked on the HEAF dataset in the summer of 2017 and a paper is in preparation. There are also data-sharing collaborations with colleagues from the University of Liverpool and internal and external PhD studentships at the planning stage. We have attracted additional funding from the COLT Foundation to support our Research Assistant in a part time PhD using the HEAF study cohort to investigate factors that influence the decision to retire from work. The HEAF cohort is becoming an important resource and will shortly have meta data available on the CLOSER discovery platform.

HEAF will remain a long-term cohort, managed by the MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton and follow-up will be maintained well beyond the lifetime of this grant.
Exploitation Route Potentially the HEAF dataset has extensive applications in policy and practice.
Sectors Aerospace, Defence and Marine,Agriculture, Food and Drink,Chemicals,Communities and Social Services/Policy,Construction,Creative Economy,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Education,Electronics,Energy,Environment,Financial Services, and Management Consultancy,Healthcare,Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism,Government, Democracy and Justice,Manufacturing, including Industrial Biotechology,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections,Pharmace

URL http://www.mrc.soton.ac.uk/cmhw/southampton-hub/research-projects-led-by-the-southampton-hub/the-heaf-study/
 
Description To date the HEAF study has attracted great interest from external stakeholders, including policy makers in government (DWP, DH) and the European and British research communities. Data on obesity have fed into a review for government by Dame Carol Black and other data shared with NHS and DWP groups involved in "working longer" and the DWP's Chief Medical Officer. The Work Foundation has been publicising the findings and discussing them with a cross-committee of DH and DWP representatives. Another of the grant funders, Arthritis Research UK, organised a national conference of policy makers, including those in government, to discuss "working with musculoskeletal conditions" and the HEAF data contributed to policy debate. Other activities are listed in ResearchFish and have many strands, from input to a NICE Public Health Advisory Committee to a conversation with HRH Duchess of Cornwall, presentations to the academic community internationally and OH practitioners nationally.
First Year Of Impact 2015
Sector Communities and Social Services/Policy,Education,Healthcare,Government, Democracy and Justice
Impact Types Societal,Policy & public services

 
Description Meeting with Chief Medical Officer at the Department of Work and Pensions to discuss HEAF study
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a national consultation
Impact Agreed to add in questions on benefits to the HEAF follow-up questionnaire and to provide statistics from the HEAF dataset. This programme of work is developing policy on the effect of holding or losing benefits for work at older ages.
 
Description NICE Public Health Advisory Committee on Workplace Health and Older Employees - KTP 2014
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
Impact The committee is developing guidance on measures to extend working life and to improve the well being of older workers. Report to be published March 2016
 
Description Working with colleagues in the Department for Work and Pensions Working Longer Group
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
 
Description Health and Employment After Fifty Study (CLRN)
Amount £29,211 (GBP)
Organisation NIHR Hampshire IOW CLRN 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start  
 
Description Health risks and benefits of extended working life (the HEAF study)
Amount £180,014 (GBP)
Funding ID 19817 
Organisation Versus Arthritis 
Start  
End 02/2017
 
Description The COLT Foundation Project Grants - KWB 2018
Amount £124,303 (GBP)
Organisation The Colt Foundation 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 07/2017 
End 06/2020
 
Description HEAF - 2014 
Organisation University of Liverpool
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Set up the consortium, ethics and research governance requirements, secured access to the GPRD database, designed data collecting instruments and recruitment to the proposed database.
Collaborator Contribution Access to data, service support costs for GPs and significant intellectual input.
Impact None as yet, we are still collecting data.
Start Year 2012
 
Description HEAF - 2014 
Organisation University of Southampton
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Set up the consortium, ethics and research governance requirements, secured access to the GPRD database, designed data collecting instruments and recruitment to the proposed database.
Collaborator Contribution Access to data, service support costs for GPs and significant intellectual input.
Impact None as yet, we are still collecting data.
Start Year 2012
 
Description HEAF Consortium 
Organisation Farr Institute of Health Informatics Research
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Set up the consortium, ethics and research governance requirements, secured access to the GPRD database, designed data collecting instruments and recruitment to the proposed database.
Collaborator Contribution Access to data, service support costs for GPs and significant intellectual input.
Impact Currently recruiting to the database so no outputs as yet.
Start Year 2012
 
Description HEAF Consortium 
Organisation Imperial College London
Department National Heart & Lung Institute (NHLI)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Set up the consortium, ethics and research governance requirements, secured access to the GPRD database, designed data collecting instruments and recruitment to the proposed database.
Collaborator Contribution Access to data, service support costs for GPs and significant intellectual input.
Impact Currently recruiting to the database so no outputs as yet.
Start Year 2012
 
Description HEAF Consortium 
Organisation University of Edinburgh
Department Centre for Cognitive and Neural Systems
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Set up the consortium, ethics and research governance requirements, secured access to the GPRD database, designed data collecting instruments and recruitment to the proposed database.
Collaborator Contribution Access to data, service support costs for GPs and significant intellectual input.
Impact Currently recruiting to the database so no outputs as yet.
Start Year 2012
 
Description HEAF Consortium 
Organisation University of Southampton
Department MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Set up the consortium, ethics and research governance requirements, secured access to the GPRD database, designed data collecting instruments and recruitment to the proposed database.
Collaborator Contribution Access to data, service support costs for GPs and significant intellectual input.
Impact Currently recruiting to the database so no outputs as yet.
Start Year 2012
 
Description HEAF Consortium 
Organisation University of Southampton
Department MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Set up the consortium, ethics and research governance requirements, secured access to the GPRD database, designed data collecting instruments and recruitment to the proposed database.
Collaborator Contribution Access to data, service support costs for GPs and significant intellectual input.
Impact Currently recruiting to the database so no outputs as yet.
Start Year 2012
 
Description HEAF Consortium 
Organisation University of Southampton
Department School of Social Sciences
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Set up the consortium, ethics and research governance requirements, secured access to the GPRD database, designed data collecting instruments and recruitment to the proposed database.
Collaborator Contribution Access to data, service support costs for GPs and significant intellectual input.
Impact Currently recruiting to the database so no outputs as yet.
Start Year 2012
 
Description HEAF Consortium 
Organisation University of Turku
Department Faculty of Medicine
Country Finland 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Set up the consortium, ethics and research governance requirements, secured access to the GPRD database, designed data collecting instruments and recruitment to the proposed database.
Collaborator Contribution Access to data, service support costs for GPs and significant intellectual input.
Impact Currently recruiting to the database so no outputs as yet.
Start Year 2012
 
Description 1st Annual Scientific Meeting ARUK Centre Feb 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact 1st Annual Scientific Meeting of the Arthritis Research UK/MRC Centre for Musculoskeletal Health and Work on 18th February 2015.
Keith Palmer gave an oral presentation on "The HEAF Study - preliminary findings"

The results generated much interest in the audience. Discussion arose on further possibilities of collaboration and possible extensions to the study.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description 2nd Annual Scientific Meeting ARUK February 2016 - KTP 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Keith Palmer presented an update of the HEAF study results to an audience of postgraduate students, health economists, scientists, physiotherapists, other researchers at the Annual meeting with questions and discussion afterwards which may lead to further study/collaboration
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description 31.01.17 - 3rd Annual Scientific Meeting Centre for Musculoskeletal Health and Work - KWB 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact 31.01.17 The Arthritis Research UK/MRC Centre for Musculoskeletal Health and Work (CMHW) held it's 3rd Annual Scientific Meeting at the MRC LEU. We had 53 attendees. Presentations were made by collaborators from the other spokes of the Centre, funders of the Centre, and invited speaker, Professor Ewan Macdonald, and the PhD students. the sessions were chaired by Director of MRC LEU, Professor Cyrus Cooper, Karen Walker Bone, Director of CMHW, Professors Keith Palmer and John Goodacre. the event was a huge success with lots of interest in our future research and possible collaborations.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description 3rd Annual Scientific Meeting ARUK February 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Keith Palmer acted as chair to an audience of postgraduate students, health economists, scientists, physiotherapists, other researchers at the Annual meeting with questions and discussion and networking opportunities concerning the HEAF study afterwards which may lead to further study/collaboration
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description 3rd Symposium of the European Cohort Studies on Healthy Ageing at Work, Copenhagen September 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Early analyses of the HEAF study were presented, promoting discussion and further opportunities for international collaboration
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description 4th Annual Scientific Meeting CMHW 13th February 2018 - KWB 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact 13.02.18 The Arthritis Research UK/MRC Centre for Musculoskeletal Health and Work (CMHW) held it's 4th Annual Scientific Meeting in Lecture Theatre 2, South Academic Block, Southampton General Hospital. We had 60 attendees. Presentations were made by collaborators from the other spokes of the Centre, funders of the Centre, and invited speakers, Professor Allard van der Beek, Professor Brad Evanoff, Dr Mary Grant and Professor Keith Palmer and the PhD students. The sessions were chaired by Director of CMHW Karen Walker Bone, and Professor Dame Carol Black. The event was a huge success with lots of interest in our future research and possible collaborations.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Australian HEAF - presentations to Alex Collie March 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A series of talks/presentations on the HEAF study to Alex Collie - who is wanting to set up an Australian HEAF study. Possibility of collaboration.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description British Society of Rheumatology AGM, Glasgow Invited lecture:'Inability to work to older ages is strongly associated with markers of physical functioning and frailty: Findings from the Health and Employment After Fifty (HEAF) study' April 2016 - KWB 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Karen was invited to give a lecture at the British Society of Rheumatology AGM, Glasgow based upon an abstract submitted 'Inability to work to older ages is strongly associated with markers of physical functioning and frailty: Findings from the Health and Employment After Fifty (HEAF) study'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://eiseverywhere.com/ehome/121743
 
Description EPICOH 2017 Oral Presentation GN 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact On 30.08.17 Georgia Ntani gave an oral presentation on occupational epidemiology
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.epicoh2017.org/programme/scientific-programme/download-full-programme/
 
Description EPICOH 2017 Poster Presentation - ECH 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact On 31.08.17 Clare Harris gave a poster presentation entitled The profile of informal carers in a cohort of 50-64 year olds, results from the Health and Employment After Fifty (HEAF) study, for which she won an award for Best Poster
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://oem.bmj.com/pages/epicoh-2017-prize-winners/
 
Description EPICOH 2017 Poster Presentation - SD 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Stefania D'Angelo gave a poster presentation entitled Poor health, lifestyle, work-related factors and premature loss of employment in older workers - results from the Health and Employment After Fifty (HEAF) study.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.epicoh2017.org/programme/scientific-programme/download-full-programme/
 
Description EPICOH Barcelona Sept 2016 - Presentation by Stefania D Angelo - KWB 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Stefania presented a lecture on Palmer KT, Walker-Bone K, Linaker CH, Harris EC, Coggon D, D'Angelo S, Syddall HE, Gale C, Cooper C, Sayer AA. Frailty and pre-frailty are strongly associated with worklessness between aged 50-64 years: Findings from the Health and Employment After Fifty (HEAF) study. EPICOH Conference, Barcelona
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.epicoh.org/conference.html
 
Description EPICOH Barcelona September 2016 Presentation by Stefania D Angelo - KWB 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Stefania presented a lecture on insomnia and the older worker Findings from the health and employment after fifty HEAF study.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.epicoh.org/conference.html
 
Description Face to Face: ARUK / MRC CMHW 2nd Annual Scientific Meeting (Talk) - KTP 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Face to Face: Talk: 2nd Annual Scientific Meeting - Keith Palmer gave a talk entitled HEAF update
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Health and Wellbeing @Work Conference Birmingham 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Keith Palmer was an invited lecturer at this conference and presented ;Health and Employment after Fifty - findings from the HEAF study; to an International Audience in a session dedicated to ;Health and Wellbeing - National Policy and Initiatives;.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Honorary Graduation Event for HRH Duchess of Cornwall 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact A poster describing the HEAF study was presented to HRH Duchess of Cornwall on the occasion of her Graduation with an Honorary Doctorate at the University of Southampton - to which she and others expressed interest. The occasion was heavily covered in both local and National Newspapers and on TV news
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description National MSK Health Data Group on 30th June 2016 in London 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Karen Walker-Bone was invited to give an initial presentation on the HEAF study methodology to share the work of Arthritis Research UK, promote best practice and encourage collaboration across the sector.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description National Musculoskeletal Health Data Group 23rd May 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Keith Palmer was invited to present an update on the HEAF study results to an audience of researchers and academics, public health, policy makers and other stakeholders from the MSK community, including professional societies and patient charities to share the work of Arthritis Research UK, promote best practice and encourage collaboration across the sector.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description PREMUS Conference, Toronto, Canada Invited lectures: 'Frailty and pre-frailty are strongly associated with worklessness between aged 50-64 years: Findings from the Health and Employment After Fifty (HEAF) study' June 2016 -KWB 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Karen attended the PREMUS Conference, Toronto, Canada and gave a lecture entitled: 'Frailty and pre-frailty are strongly associated with worklessness between aged 50-64 years: Findings from the Health and Employment After Fifty (HEAF) study'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Symposium "Working with musculoskeletal conditions" ARUK organised Acad Med Sciences June 2015 - invited presenter 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Supporters
Results and Impact Keith Palmer presented early data from the HEAF study which invited discussion afterwards.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Workshop at Kings College London 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact A workshop organised to encourage collaboration between research groups within the HEAF study - several presentations from both research teams
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description health and wellbeing@work conference, NEC, Birmingham, March 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Karen Walker-Bone presented results from the HEAF study in a session on Managing MSDs and Back Pain - "Older workers and frailty"
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017