Integrated studies of working later in life: individual and contextual determinants of extended working

Lead Research Organisation: University College London
Department Name: Epidemiology and Public Health

Abstract

With the growth of the older population predicted to continue in coming decades, it is increasingly important to understand how to encourage work participation in older people in jobs that will be satisfying and will promote healthy ageing. This project will explore characteristics of individuals and their family, workplace and living environments that promote working beyond age 50. Existing research has identified several factors that make a person more or less likely to retire from paid work including their health, financial circumstances, pension provision, their partner's health and partner's employment status and these have different contributions depending on whether we consider voluntary or disability-related retirement. These determinants have typically been measured around the time of retirement. Using long-running surveys, including some surveys which have been following a set of people from birth onwards, we will look further back in a person's life to see if there are factors which can be identified earlier on that could help identify early intervention points and help us understand more about how the health and social circumstances of an individual and their family across life promote or inhibit options for extended working.

Work environments may be more or less supportive of extended working. We will use several on-going surveys, including some occupational surveys that have recorded detailed information on a person's work environment across most of their career. We will examine features of workplaces and jobs, such as the extent of autonomy, control and satisfaction that an employee has in their work, their working hours, and the physical demands of the job. We will consider whether any of these work-related factors contribute to helping or hindering older people with long-term musculoskeletal or psychological ill health to remain in work.

Although there are considerable regional differences in the proportions of older people that are in work, studies have not yet explored what underlies these differences between regions. We will examine whether the local context, including local area unemployment rates and other characteristics of local industry, at various points in time over the last four decades or more contributes to extended working. These are known to be related to an individual's likelihood of being in paid work across the age range of working adults but their particular relevance for working in later life, and the ways in which they might interact with individual characteristics, is not yet clear. Finally, we will consider the national setting. The employment rate of older people varies substantially across countries, which indicates that national policies and cultural norms of extended working could contribute to retirement decisions. We have identified several surveys from Europe which will allow us to compare health and workplace characteristics with our UK studies.

The project makes excellent use of existing surveys that have been invested in over several decades so we will not have to collect new data. A key part of the analysis will be to standardise the data from the various surveys as much as is possible. We will then use statistical techniques to look at whether the likelihood of working beyond 50 years of age (with and without a chronic musculoskeletal or psychological condition) differs according to individual, workplace, or local area factors.

We will be developing these research questions and sharing research findings with a range of interested parties through written reports, presentations at conferences (including a conference we will organise to bring together people working in different disciplines and service sectors), a project website, our links with Government and employers, and, where appropriate, through the national media.

Planned Impact

We have identified 5 distinct user groups who may benefit from our research 1) Policy makers and advisers 2) Older persons' and other interest groups 3) the wider public 4) academic audiences and 5) Commercial and private sector organisations.
1. Policy makers and advisers
We will target government departments such as Department of Work and Pensions, the Health and Safety Executive and the Department of Health who will benefit from information on individual, family, workplace and local area factors from across life that influence retirement decisions in later life. We anticipate these departments to also have interests in comparisons with other countries and in estimates of working years lost for different sections of the population.
2. Older persons' and other interest groups
Our findings will be highly relevant to charities such as AgeUK who will be able to provide advice to older people about the types of employment in which older people may most readily work. Charities with a health condition focus e.g. MIND and Arthritis Research-UK will be able to highlight workplace factors that may help promote extended working for people with specific conditions.
3. Wider public - including employers and employees
The research will identify work environments in which older people can and do work, including those conducive to good health of older employees. This will help employers to identify features of occupations which might be modified so that they can retain their experienced staff. It will provide information that may help older people in making decisions related to timing of their retirement.
4. Academic beneficiaries
Life course approaches to understanding working in later life are beginning to be embraced more widely. Our project will contribute to this as well as to building a more complete picture of the interplay between workplace, health and family influences on extended working. The project will raise the profile of all the data sets, some of which are ESRC supported. It will exemplify longitudinal data analysis approaches in this field in the UK and beyond, benefitting both early career and established researchers. We will document our analytic and data harmonisation approaches which will benefit other researchers using these cohorts.
The project will contribute towards the health of social science in the UK through the development of new and established highly skilled researchers in cross-disciplinary and multi-disciplinary areas. This is vital where social science as a discipline and social scientists as individuals will make ongoing contributions to evidence-based policy making and will influence public policies and legislation at local, regional and national levels. Skills in the analysis of quantitative data are vital for the continuing growth, prosperity and economic competitiveness of the UK. The government's continued investment in higher education and skills training at a time when many other services are facing severe cuts along with the ESRC's recent investment in new quantitative data initiatives focusing on undergraduate and postgraduate training is evidence of this importance.
5. Commercial and private sector
Our project aims to identify multiple factors that may influence timing and type (that is, voluntary or disability-related) of retirement, and whether these factors differ by gender and socioeconomic background. We anticipate this may be of interest to pension companies developing and refining pension provision estimates for subsequent cohorts of employees. We have existing links with Legal and General.

Publications

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Ervasti J (2016) Socioeconomic gradient in work disability in diabetes: evidence from three occupational cohorts. in Journal of epidemiology and community health

 
Description The aim of the Research on Extending Working Lives (renEWL) consortium was to conduct longitudinal research on the determinants of working beyond the age of 50, with a focus on the interface of different domains: workplace and health, family and workplace, area and individual. The research involved secondary data analysis from several UK longitudinal studies as well as studies in other countries. Selected findings are summarised below.

- Factors in mid-adulthood predict extended working (EWL)
We found that EWL is more common among those who, in mid-adulthood, have better physical,
cognitive, and mental health, health-promoting lifestyles, and jobs characterised by low
psychosocial stress, particularly job control.

- There are socioeconomic inequalities in EWL
There are differences in EWL by education level and occupational grade. Employees with low
education level or low grade occupations are more likely to exit work for health-related reasons
(long term sickness or disability retirement).

- Health, working conditions and socioeconomic characteristics are all important for EWL
Having a chronic disease or poor mental health was associated with greater likelihood of work
exit independently of working conditions and socioeconomic characteristics. Similarly, poor
working conditions such as job control, were associated with greater likelihood of work exit after
taking account of occupational grade and health status. This implies that policies to extend
working lives should target improvements through both health and job-related interventions.

- Early life factors predict EWL
Our research showed that childhood and early adulthood factors are related to EWL. Those with poor mental health in childhood were more likely to be unemployed at age 55.

- Among employees with chronic health conditions, there is variation in EWL
Co-morbidity is an important consideration. Additionally, fewer functional limitations and better
physical and cognitive capability predict subsequent work participation irrespective of diagnosed
health conditions. Favourable working conditions appear to mitigate the effects of some but not
all chronic conditions.

- Onset of caring responsibilities is a key period
The challenges of balancing paid work and caregiving are well known. We found that female employees who entered a caregiving role of more than 10 hours a week were at increased risk of early exit from paid employment.

- Area context matters
Higher local unemployment rates and increasing levels of local unemployment were associated
with greater likelihood of work exit. This association was particularly strong for those in good
health, highlighting the importance of local job opportunities for EWL. However, those with a
limiting long standing illness were more likely to exit work than those without, regardless of local
unemployment rates, so initiatives need to be considered at multiple levels.

As of April 2018, 26 papers have been published with a further 14 papers submitted or close to submission. Our findings also formed the basis of a policy report "Working for Everyone: Addressing barriers and inequalities in the extended working lives agenda" published by the ILC-UK.
Exploitation Route Our findings have implications for policies that relate to employment among people over the age of 50 and the policy of many European governments to increase the length of working lives. This could include increasing awareness among employers of new caregiving responsibilities and that increasing the support available for new carers is important. We gave evidence to the independent review of UK State Pension age beyond 2028 that was published in 2017.

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Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Education,Environment,Financial Services, and Management Consultancy,Healthcare,Government, Democracy and Justice

URL http://www.ucl.ac.uk/renewl
 
Description The research findings from our programme are relevant to public policy in several areas. Demographic shifts, including population ageing and increased life expectancy has meant that in a relatively short amount of time, public policy has shifted from encouraging older workers to retire earlier, to encouraging them to work past the traditional retirement age. The culmination of this policy shift has been the increase of the State Pension Age, and the commitment by the government to review it every Parliament. Our research has highlighted that for some groups of the population, extending the length of time spent in employment is currently unrealistic. Health problems, shorter life expectancy and commitments such as informal caring mean that many drop out of the labour market before the current retirement age. Therefore, for these groups there is a need to ensure working lives are as full as possible, and to provide necessary support to ensure these groups are not unfairly disadvantaged. A particular focus of our programme was the use of longitudinal/long-term data from cohort studies to highlight that it is not just factors close to retirement age that matter for extended working, but also determinants much earlier in life. We disseminated findings from our project at several events attended by government officials, public and voluntary sector representatives as well as specific meetings with government departments including the DWP. Our findings were highlighted in a series of blogs for Worklife (http://worklife-blog.org) as well as invited blogs on other sites. So far, our findings on inequalities (eg by occupational position, chronic disease, local area characteristics, early life mental health and socioeconomic factors, informal caregiving) and extended working lives and the determinants of these inequalities have been picked up by various government and third sector organisations. They have also featured in broadcast media and the press. Our collaboration with the International Longevity Centre UK (ILC-UK) enabled us to extend our findings to many non-academic organisations. In April 2017 a one-day conference 'Overcoming Inequalities: Addressing barriers to extending working lives' was hosted by ILC-UK, our renEWL consortium and the Uncertain Futures Consortium. This event aimed to discuss research findings and was targeted at policy makers, business leaders, civil society organisations and academics. The ILC-UK produced a policy report based on findings from our project, published in December 2017. Subsequently, the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions and the Prime Minister's Policy Unit were briefed on these findings. By September 2018, the event and report had been publicised on twitter by accounts with over 4.7 million followers between them. The research team were invited to give evidence to John Cridland's independent review of State Pension age in 2016. Our input was acknowledged in the review and there is evidence that our key findings influenced this review as the report published in 2017 recommended a lower means-tested benefit age for people forced to leave the workforce early due to ill health or caring responsibilities. Our research findings were included in oral evidence given to the Women and Equalities Select Committee on older people and employment in 2018. We also provided evidence to the consultation on the Green paper on Work, Health and Disability-Improving lives. Our harmonisation of employment outcomes and subsequent cross-national analyses of inequalities in work exit at older ages is expected to lead to impact in other countries. Our international collaborative research on trajectories of health before and after retirement has led to impact outside the UK, for example, work with collaborators in Sweden fed into their government review of pension age. We anticipate that our project will continue to generate impact in the coming years. Our findings and events are publicised through twitter (@EWLresearch) and our project website http://www.ucl.ac.uk/iehc/research/epidemiology-public-health/research/renewl.
First Year Of Impact 2016
Sector Government, Democracy and Justice
Impact Types Societal,Economic,Policy & public services

 
Description Cridland review of State Pension age 2017
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Gave evidence to a government review
URL https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/state-pension-age-independent-review-final-report
 
Description Findings submitted to Women and Equalities Committee consultation on 'Older people and employment'.
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Gave evidence to a government review
URL http://parliamentlive.tv/event/index/586de6c3-c2c8-4cc9-9a66-b72ac7f6525f
 
Description Training in Modelling drop-out in ageing cohorts
Geographic Reach Europe 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact Advanced training in quantitative methods for doctoral and postdoctoral researchers.
URL http://kiwas.ki.se/katalog/katalog/kurs/1737
 
Description Travel funds
Amount £10,290 (GBP)
Organisation Karolinska Institute 
Sector Academic/University
Country Sweden
Start 01/2013 
 
Description Area and mental health in NSHD 
Organisation University College London
Department Research Department of Epidemiology and Public Health
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Emily Murray contributes expert knowledge on life course area effects to the project. Specific expertise using the area data in the 1946 cohort study.
Collaborator Contribution The partners provide data and analysis for co-authored papers.
Impact Collaboration between epidemiologists and sociologists.
Start Year 2016
 
Description IDEAR network 
Organisation Finnish Institute of Occupational Health (FIOH)
Country Finland 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The Integrated Datasets in Europe for Ageing Research (IDEAR) network brings together leading occupational cohort and ageing studies from five European countries to explore the impact of working conditions on health and well-being in later life. Our team contributes analyses of UK datasets to the research consortium and contributions to writing manuscripts.
Collaborator Contribution The partners provide data for pooled analyses and co-author papers.
Impact This is a multidisciplinary collaboration in epidemiology, public health, statistics and sociology.
Start Year 2013
 
Description IDEAR network 
Organisation Karolinska Institute
Country Sweden 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Integrated Datasets in Europe for Ageing Research (IDEAR) network brings together leading occupational cohort and ageing studies from five European countries to explore the impact of working conditions on health and well-being in later life. Our team contributes analyses of UK datasets to the research consortium and contributions to writing manuscripts.
Collaborator Contribution The partners provide data for pooled analyses and co-author papers.
Impact This is a multidisciplinary collaboration in epidemiology, public health, statistics and sociology.
Start Year 2013
 
Description IDEAR network 
Organisation National Center for Scientific Research (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique CNRS)
Department U1018 INSERM Center for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health
Country France 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The Integrated Datasets in Europe for Ageing Research (IDEAR) network brings together leading occupational cohort and ageing studies from five European countries to explore the impact of working conditions on health and well-being in later life. Our team contributes analyses of UK datasets to the research consortium and contributions to writing manuscripts.
Collaborator Contribution The partners provide data for pooled analyses and co-author papers.
Impact This is a multidisciplinary collaboration in epidemiology, public health, statistics and sociology.
Start Year 2013
 
Description IDEAR network 
Organisation Stockholm University
Country Sweden 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Integrated Datasets in Europe for Ageing Research (IDEAR) network brings together leading occupational cohort and ageing studies from five European countries to explore the impact of working conditions on health and well-being in later life. Our team contributes analyses of UK datasets to the research consortium and contributions to writing manuscripts.
Collaborator Contribution The partners provide data for pooled analyses and co-author papers.
Impact This is a multidisciplinary collaboration in epidemiology, public health, statistics and sociology.
Start Year 2013
 
Description IDEAR network 
Organisation Swansea University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Integrated Datasets in Europe for Ageing Research (IDEAR) network brings together leading occupational cohort and ageing studies from five European countries to explore the impact of working conditions on health and well-being in later life. Our team contributes analyses of UK datasets to the research consortium and contributions to writing manuscripts.
Collaborator Contribution The partners provide data for pooled analyses and co-author papers.
Impact This is a multidisciplinary collaboration in epidemiology, public health, statistics and sociology.
Start Year 2013
 
Description IDEAR network 
Organisation University of Copenhagen
Country Denmark 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Integrated Datasets in Europe for Ageing Research (IDEAR) network brings together leading occupational cohort and ageing studies from five European countries to explore the impact of working conditions on health and well-being in later life. Our team contributes analyses of UK datasets to the research consortium and contributions to writing manuscripts.
Collaborator Contribution The partners provide data for pooled analyses and co-author papers.
Impact This is a multidisciplinary collaboration in epidemiology, public health, statistics and sociology.
Start Year 2013
 
Description IDEAR network 
Organisation University of Manchester
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Integrated Datasets in Europe for Ageing Research (IDEAR) network brings together leading occupational cohort and ageing studies from five European countries to explore the impact of working conditions on health and well-being in later life. Our team contributes analyses of UK datasets to the research consortium and contributions to writing manuscripts.
Collaborator Contribution The partners provide data for pooled analyses and co-author papers.
Impact This is a multidisciplinary collaboration in epidemiology, public health, statistics and sociology.
Start Year 2013
 
Description IDEAR network 
Organisation University of Turku
Country Finland 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Integrated Datasets in Europe for Ageing Research (IDEAR) network brings together leading occupational cohort and ageing studies from five European countries to explore the impact of working conditions on health and well-being in later life. Our team contributes analyses of UK datasets to the research consortium and contributions to writing manuscripts.
Collaborator Contribution The partners provide data for pooled analyses and co-author papers.
Impact This is a multidisciplinary collaboration in epidemiology, public health, statistics and sociology.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Leverhulme Life Course Neighbourhood project 
Organisation University of Leeds
Department School of Geography Leeds
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The LCNE is a 2-year Leverhulme funded project examining whether where people live across their lives is related to later life health. Emily Murray contributes 4 hours per week of her time, namely expertise in the subject area.
Collaborator Contribution Partners contribute in-kind contribution of scientific knowledge.
Impact A life course approach to neighbourhood effects seminar (see engagement activities). Collaboration among epidemiologists, demographer and human geographer.
Start Year 2015
 
Description The Housing Inequalities Network (THINK) 
Organisation London School of Economics and Political Science (University of London)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Emily Murray contributes expert knowledge on life course health inequalities.
Collaborator Contribution Expertise on inequalities, specifically housing inequalities, from different disciplines.
Impact THINK presentation (see engagement activities). Collaboration between sociologists, epidemiologists, geographers and housing economists.
Start Year 2017
 
Description A life course approach to neighbourhood effects seminar 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact A lay summary based on our paper published in EJE: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10654-017-0347-7
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://www.ucl.ac.uk/iehc/news-events
 
Description A life course approach to neighbourhood effects seminar 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact 30 researchers, from across academic disciplines, attended a 2-day seminar devoted to working on neighbourhood effects over the life course. Presentations were given by a half dozen researchers, with rampant discussion. Researchers who met at the seminar have since given invited talks at institutions by contacts they made at the seminar. Academic knowledge was shared.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.ucl.ac.uk/hssrg/documents/UCL_neighbourhood_effects_seminar.pdf
 
Description Adobe sparks video 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A short video was created that summarized a report released by the research consortium. The intent of creating the video was to disseminate results in the report to a general audience. The video was retweeted by a number of other twitter accounts & included as a hyperlink in the Institute monthly newsletter.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://twitter.com/EWLresearch/status/938702740070502400
 
Description Blog post for WorkLife blog 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact A blog post based on our paper published in OEM: http://oem.bmj.com/content/early/2017/10/16/oemed-2017-104452.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://worklife-blog.org/2018/02/support-working-longer-what-works/
 
Description CALLS Hub Impact Case Study 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact An impact cast study written & published for the Census & Administrative data LongitudinaL Studies Hub (CALLS-HUB) website. The Case Study was written to communicate the research project and findings to a non-academic audience. A link to the Impact Case Study was also tweeted by the CALLS-hub twitter account. As well as re-tweeted by RenEWL's, and other, twitter accounts.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://calls.ac.uk/outputs/impact-case-studies/
 
Description COST action IS1409, Management committee substitute for the United Kingdom and monitoring and evaluation officer 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Working group meetings on gender and health policies in extended working lives. Participation in writing pension policy report and setting up grid with information on possible data for research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016,2017
URL http://www.genderewl.com
 
Description COST action IS1409, Management committee substitute for the United Kingdom and monitoring and evaluation officer 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Working group meetings on gender and health policies in extended working lives. Participation in writing pension policy report and setting up grid with information on possible data for research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://www.genderewl.com
 
Description DWP seminar 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Presentation and discussion of our research findings on inequalities in healthy life expectancy and working life expectancy to Department of Work and Pensions (DWP) Strategy Ageing Society and State Pensions team. Discussion of future research plans and what would be useful for DWP
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description ELSA Wave 6 Launch (Ewan Carr) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Type Of Presentation poster presentation
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presented a poster showing the link between working conditions and retirement in ELSA; generated several interesting discussions and suggested directions for future research.


DWP representative asked for copy of poster to be included in an internal DWP summary of the event.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Extending Working Lives: Overcoming Inequalities 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact This one-day conference showcased research findings from both the renEWL consortium and the Uncertain
Futures Research consortium, led by Professor Jenny Head and Professor Sarah Vickerstaff. It was attended by
leading experts from charities, industry, government, public bodies, universities and voluntary
organisations and included a keynote presentation from John Cridland (author of the Cridland Review
into State Pension Age).Theconference examined the current barriers to extending working lives: health inequalities, work place
practice and policy barriers, that government, businesses and civil society can collectively address.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://ilcuk.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/Overcoming-Inequalities-Conference-Report-final-ILC-...
 
Description Healthandwellbeing@work conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Invited speaker on determinants of Healthy Life Expectancy and Extending Working Lives, National Policy and Initiatives programme stream, Health and Wellbeing at Work 2015. This led to increased involvement of non-academic stakeholders in our project and requests for further information on findings from our project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://healthwellbeingatwork.co.uk/
 
Description IDEAR Paris 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Gave talk about aims of the renEWL consortium.

Increased research collaboration.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description International Centre for Lifecourse Studies Centre Day, invited speaker. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Presentation of findings on "Family context and extended working"
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description International Centre for Lifecourse Studies Policy Seminar 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Presentation given at ICLS policy seminar to share and exchange knowledge with external participants/policy-makers. Transcripts made available of talk so results can be disseminated to participant's colleagues and others.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.ucl.ac.uk/icls/policy_seminars
 
Description Manchester Festival of Public Health (Ewan Carr) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Type Of Presentation paper presentation
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Gave a presentation on "Job strain as a predictor of retirement transitions and intentions: initial results from five waves of ELSA"


Not aware of any impact.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Meeting with Public Health England 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Meeting with Public Health England to discuss policy implications of health behaviours in midlife
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Meeting with UK Health and Safety Executive 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Meeting with representative of Health and Safety Executive to discuss how our research can contribute to Health and Safety Executive policy on health of older workers.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description PHE academic network workshop on Work, Health and Wellbeing (Jenny Head) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Type Of Presentation keynote/invited speaker
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Gave talk on Predictors of working beyond the age of 50:the renEWL consortium. This generated considerable interest in our research consortium from academics and public health practictioners.


Disseminated research results to scientific community and others. Increased collaboration and contact with practitioners in the area of work and health.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Public Health England funded network on Work, Health and Wellbeing 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation of findings on working conditions as predictors of extended working lives.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.ihs.manchester.ac.uk/ResearchNetworks/healthwork/WHWB101114/
 
Description Storify of Overcoming Inequalities in Extended Working Lives event 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A storify summary of tweets was generated of our Inequalities in EWL event in April 2017. A link to the storify was then posted on Twitter. The storify page received 74 views. The original tweet was retweeted 10 times.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://storify.com/EWLresearch/overcoming-inequalities-in-extending-working-lives
 
Description Talk to civil servants 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact I presented to an audience of government statisticians at their annual professional conference
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://gss.civilservice.gov.uk/blog/2015/09/influence-innovation-and-impact-the-2015-gss-conference...
 
Description The Housing Inequalities Network (THINK) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact 10 researchers from different universities, inclusing two from Australia, met for a 2-day workshop to discuss emerging methods to address inequalities research. Each researcher gave a presentation of a current piece of work.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description University of Portsmouth, Geography Department Seminar (Emily Murray) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Gave a presentation on Geographic inequalities in exit from the work force at middle age: England and Wales 2001-201. This attracted great interest from scientists.



Potential future collaboration on research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Work, health and ageing roundtable 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Invited participant at roundtable on work, health and ageing. Shared relevant findings from renEWL.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description a. Article in 2017 Insights report, the annual report for Understanding Society (https://www.understandingsociety.ac.uk/2016/11/10/new-insights). 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Understanding Society publishes an annual report, which highlights policy-relevant research based on Understanding Society data. We were asked to participate in the 2017 report, based on our 2016 paper: https://academic.oup.com/psychsocgerontology/article/2645643. The report will be published in November 2017, at a launch event in London.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.understandingsociety.ac.uk/2016/11/10/new-insights.
 
Description a. Blog post for WorkLife blog 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact A blog post based on our 2015 paper: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10433-015-0357-9.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://worklife-blog.org/2016/10/empower-employees-they-will-retire-later/
 
Description renEWL advisory group meeting 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Presentation of findings from renEWL extending working lives to stakeholders who are members of renEWL advisory group which stimulated discussion of next steps for research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.ucl.ac.uk/renewl
 
Description renEWL launch 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Launch meeting of our renEWL research consortium to a policy audience. Presentations from our team members- Jenny Head, Mai Stafford and Nicola Shelton - plus presentation on policy challenges from Brian Beach, ILC-UK. Discussion of research plans generated interest and received helpful feedback and suggestions from policy makers on our research plans.

No impact so far.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.ucl.ac.uk/renewl/events