Buildings in the making: a sociological exploration of architecture in the context of health and social care

Lead Research Organisation: University of York
Department Name: Sociology

Abstract

This study has two interrelated aims. One to develop a sociological understanding of the day to day work of architects and two, to cast light on the way knowledge about health and social care is, quite literally, engineered into buildings designed for care. Architects are not health and social care professionals, but they are employed to create buildings within which care can take place. A better understanding of their ways of working and their contribution to the design and delivery of care therefore offers a novel path for research.

The study is led by a research team who are developing a suite of projects on the sociology of architecture. Our previous work on Maggie's Centres provides a point of departure for this study of architecture in the care sector. Maggie's is a charity that provides informal support centres for people living with cancer. Founded by architectural practitioners, Maggie's has a distinctive relationship with its architects who are given significant scope and autonomy in their designs. However, their client-professional relationship is atypical, and architects in the care sector face multiple commercial and regulatory constraints. Thus the Maggie's study provides a point of comparison for our ethnographic investigation into the work of architects in mainstream settings where buildings for care are commissioned by a mosaic of private, corporate, charitable, and state providers.

To frame the ethnography, qualitative interviews with architects (n = 10) will scope issues and challenges that they face when designing buildings such as care homes and dementia centres in commercial, charitable and public contexts. An accomplished researcher will then 'enter the field' to work alongside teams of designers in an architectural firm for 18 months. The firm was selected because of their extensive portfolio of projects in the health and social care sector. Attention will be given to the processes of commissioning, planning, concept and technical design of buildings in the making. Fieldwork will involve interviewing architects, commissioners, operators, planners, and service users. The research team will examine documentary sources (e.g. architectural briefs, perspective renderings, policy guidelines and specifications), and observe meetings and site visits. We will address questions such as: How are architectural briefs negotiated and operationalised? Do commercial, care and design considerations give rise to conflicts? Are original design concepts modified and why? Which care guidelines and design models are imported into the design process? How are users configured? What types of knowledge about the care needs are sourced and how are they translated into the materiality of design? Through our detailed observations of working practices we will also generate insights into the architectural craft and the complexities and tensions of design work in the commercialised sectors of care.

The project is informed by theoretical perspectives from medical sociology and science and technology studies (STS) that presume the constructed nature of health and medical knowledge and the malleability of technological artefacts. By opening the 'black box' between the commissioning of buildings and their delivery, the study will shed new light on the way evidence based knowledge of health and social care is woven into design, as well as factors that hinder or enhance these processes.

Findings will be disseminated to academic, professional, policy and practitioner audiences. We will establish a British Sociological Association 'sociology of architecture' study group. To ensure impact extends beyond academia we will work with our professional collaborators to reflect on how our findings may be used alter to their practice. We will invite practitioners and policy makers to a series of themed symposia, design a stand to exhibit our findings at the 'British Care Shows', and host an end of project dissemination event.

Planned Impact

Beneficiaries of the research will include:
Architecture firms working on building projects for health and social care
Health and social care operators and providers in charitable, commercial and public sectors
Health and social care policy makers and regulators
Service users and wider publics
Charities working to engage audiences in culture and aesthetics

Benefits comprise:
Knowledge translation and communication
* Detailing processes of collaborative working along with sources of tension between clients, architects and related stakeholders (planners, service users, and care providers) will benefit these players as our findings provide insight into the perspectives of those with whom each routinely have to deal with.
* Findings will inform best practice at all stages of the building projects, most especially the commissioning and briefing stages.
* Insights into the way architectural briefs are operationalised will enable health and social care providers to better appreciate the pragmatics of design work and be useful for preparing guidelines and briefs.
* Findings will inform dialogues on the need for inbuilt flexibility of care.

Education, training and on-going professional practice
* Sociological insights on the nature of architectural work should inform training of architects and planners through the development of teaching materials, and research outputs published in professional journals.
* Findings may be used in professional development of care commissioners and those involved in the procurement of buildings in public, commercial and third sector organizations.

Implementing evidence based practice
* Earlier work has found that knowledge about care needs is differentially interpreted by caring professions, policy makers, and providers. Our work will widen this by documenting how architects, planners and commissioners interpret and communicate what constitutes 'evidence based practice' through our focus on the way these ideas are woven into design and construction.
* Service users may benefit indirectly through improvements in the design that may result from changes in working practices and collaborations, most especially outputs that speak to the complexities of future proofing inherent in design work.
* The research should impact on the field of elderly care services dove tailing with our work on design, clothing and care for older people, particularly those living with dementia. In concert with this we will continue to challenge dominant representations of older people. Our pilot research has indicated that a crucial matter for architects is the longevity of care homes which requires flexibility of design to respond to changing care needs and which emphasize 'living with' conditions. Architects would welcome opportunities to debate these issues with operators and developers.
* The research should impact on those involved in commissioning and overseeing building projects in the care sector by disseminating examples of best practice in the provision of supportive architecture, and open up dialogue about the commissioning process. It will unlock some of the 'ways of knowing' about health and care that architects, as professionals shaping the experience of care in contemporary societies, bring to the buildings they design.

Aesthetics of place
* Service users and wider publics may benefit indirectly through the production of buildings that are aesthetically valued as well as functional. We will work with those in design fields and education (e.g. international charities such as the Helen Hamlyn Foundation and Engage) to explore the value of aesthetics in buildings for care.
 
Title Watercolour sketches: A Day in the Life of an Architect and a Site Manager 
Description Watercolour sketches produced by the artist Lynne Chapman who worked alongside the researchers as they followed the day in the life of an architect and the day in the life of a construction site manager. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2018 
Impact These sketches have been included in the monthly Newsletter of the nationwide construction firm Willmott Dixon (we are not able to include the full internal newsletter because some of the materials in the wider publication are confidential. However they were also reported in the local news media see here. http://rochdaleonline.co.uk/news-features/2/news-headlines/125770/university-artist-puts-willmott-dixon%E2%80%99s-rochdale-riverside-team-in-the-picture The Day in the Life of the Architect are also included in the hard copy of our Findings report https://www.york.ac.uk/media/sociology/events/2018/42563_Final%20Report_HR2.pdf (NB they are not in the pdf version but are in the hard copy version. The sketches can also be accessed in the url below. 
URL https://lynnechapman.blogspot.com/2018/12/a-day-in-life-of-construction-site.html
 
Description Buildings in the Making is a sociological study that explored the work of architects as they produced buildings for later life care. Architecture is recognised to be important for effective care, but there is little research into the social processes of design and construction in the context of health and social care. The research opened the 'black box' between the commissioning of buildings and their delivery, by interviewing architects, project managers, builders, developers, representatives from local authorities, and care providers, and through observing design meetings in architects' offices, project meetings on building sites, and attending public and user consultations.

A key finding identified the challenges of collaborative working. Architects, developers, contractors, regulators, commissioners, planners and building users often have competing priorities on matters such as; costs, quality, design features, future-proofing and time scales. Projects were most effective (completed on time, within budget, and appreciated by users) where there were shared values and a clear vision. This was most likely when relationships between stakeholders had developed over time, were based on trust and where there was respect across occupational roles. Routes of procurement and models of commissioning, especially those involving competitive tendering, could mitigate trust and interprofessional relationships. Contractual models are increasingly complex, such that they can derail projects and hamper good design.

We followed three contractual arrangements. 'Traditional' (the architect is employed to design, oversee and manage the building project); 'design and build' (the architect is employed by the client to develop the design and is then managed by a contractor who oversees the construction); and 'design and build private finance operate' (the architect designs the scheme financed by a developer who project manages the design and construction). In design and build, the designing architect may not be retained once the project has been handed over to the contractor to manage, and there is a risk that their expertise in dementia and/or later life may be lost.

Designing for building users who include care providers, residents, relatives, visitors, and staff, is complex, not least because they can have competing requirements. We found that the amount of input from users into the design process varied, but that it was most effective when resources were ring-fenced to enable their participation throughout the life of the project. Buildings are invariably revised as they unfold and, therefore, if user input is to be meaningful it must be sustained throughout. Perspectives of experienced care staff are especially important to ensure design intentions can operate once buildings are in use, but their views are often overlooked.

Architects sometimes felt their role was not understood by the public and that they are not always appreciated by others working in the construction sectors. We did find negative views of architects where they were presumed to prioritise aesthetics over practicalities. However, they were also valued for their ability to co-ordinate complex technical information and reconcile these with effective designs. Across the design, construction and care sectors there was an appetite to find ways to improve communication and collaboration.
Exploitation Route Findings continue to be disseminated in academic publications and academic/non-academic conference presentations. Summary documents are freely available for download on the project website: Buildings in the Making: a sociological exploration of architecture in the context of health and social care. We will continue to work with those in commercial, local government and charitable sectors to explore with how we might tailor our findings in ways that are beneficial for practice. We have hosted events that brought together representatives from these sectors and feedback indicates how our work is being used. For instance, one architects taking forward the importance of an agreed shared vision for discussion in a CPD session, and a local authority incorporating our findings in the development of a new scheme. We are collaborating with the Helen Hamlyn Centre for Design, who are using our research results to develop an interactive platform for use by architects and designers. We are also working with a commercial illustrator to produce materials to capture the 'day in the life of an architect' and the 'day in the life of a building site manager', with a view to enhancing public and cross-sectorial understanding of these roles.
Sectors Healthcare,Other

URL https://www.york.ac.uk/sociology/research/current-research/nettleton,-daryl-martin-chrissy-buse/
 
Description Key findings from the Buildings in the Making project have reached the primary beneficiaries of the study. These include: architects, care providers, charitable organisations, construction industries, building users, and agencies who commission buildings in the social care sector. The design and construction of buildings for later life involves collaboration between all these stakeholders yet rarely are they able to talk, as an architect put it, 'without having a position to protect.' The research team ran a series of stakeholder workshops bringing together representatives from all the beneficiaries. Feedback indicated that the events challenged existing views and, in some instances, led to reviews of practice. 1) Architects, care providers and construction professionals said the dialogue led them to question ingrained assumptions that they had long held about each other. 2) Designs and construction professionals recognised, that the success of projects rests on the establishment a shared sense of vision and values right across design and construction project teams, and that collaborative commitment will yield a legacy beyond bricks and mortar. 3). Relatedly, some architectural practitioners reported that they were using our findings report to inform the negotiations with industry partners to rethink procurement routes and contractual models, most especially 'design and build' which has come to dominate building projects in the UK. 4)The need to explore ways to involve buildings users early and throughout projects. Through the project the research team have established relationships with industry partners and continue to participate in training and related events.
First Year Of Impact 2018
Sector Construction
Impact Types Societal

 
Title Buildings in the Making: sociology of social care architecture 
Description Nettleton, Sarah (2018). Buildings in the making, a sociology of architecture for health and social care 2015-2018. [Data Collection]. Colchester, Essex: UK Data Service. 10.5255/UKDA-SN-853465 Interview transcripts with architects working in health and social care. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact Only recently submitted. 
URL http://reshare.ukdataservice.ac.uk/853465/
 
Description 'Buildings in the Making': A Sociological Exploration of Architectural Design for Care - conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact 'Buildings in the Making' is an interdisciplinary research symposium, and end of project conference for the study - Buildings in the Making: a sociological exploration of architecture for health and social care - funded by the UK Economic and Social Research Council (2015-2018). The aim of the conference is to create dialogue between sociology, anthropology, architecture and design, with a focus on architecture in health care and social care, in particular later life care. Although not health and social care professionals, architects are often employed to create settings where care takes place, and shape experiences in these contexts. While the focus of research has often been on individual buildings in use, the conference shifts the emphasis to the processes and practices of architectural design and construction, and how they shape the production of buildings for care.
Speakers included: architects, journalists/writers, and academics with backgrounds in later life and dementia, and construction, design and planning.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.york.ac.uk/sociology/about/department/2018/buildingsinthemakingasociologicalexplorationo...
 
Description Ageing Societies: Transnational contexts, technologies & practices, University of Leeds 28th-29th June 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact International scholars working at the interface between design, technology and later life - 2 day event with debate and presentaiton.s
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Annandale, E. Beynon-Jones, S., Buse, C., Martin, D., and Nettleton, S. (2017) 'Virtual Collectives' and 'embodied individuals': architects drawing stakeholders into alignment in the building of care homes for later life, BSA Medical Sociology Conference, University of York,  13-15 September 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact This contribution to a sociological audience and those working in health related sectors explained and raised awareness of the challenges and complexities associated with architectural work in the context of social care for later life.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.britsoc.co.uk/events/key-bsa-events/bsa-medical-sociology-group-annual-conference/
 
Description Architects Designing for Care: Knowledge Brokers in Times of Change'. Third ISA Forum of Sociology. Vienna.E. Annandale, C. Buse, S. Beynon-Jones, D. Martin, S. Nettleton. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Annandale, C. Buse, S. Beynon-Jones, D. Martin, S. Nettleton. 'Architects Designing for Care: Knowledge Brokers in Times of Change'. Third ISA Forum of Sociology. Vienna.
International conference for academic social scientists and related disciplines.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description BSA Conference presentation Building Stories. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Nettleton presented a talk by Nettleton, S. Buse, C. Martin, D. Patrick, M. and McGinley, C. called 'Building stories: representations of architectural design, commissioning and construction of settings for later life care'. BSA 50th Annual Medical Sociology Conference, Glasgow Caledonian University 12th September 2018.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.britsoc.co.uk/media/24810/medsoc18_final_prog.pdf
 
Description British Sociological Association Medical Sociology Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Buse, Nettleton, Martin and Twigg title "Bodies in mind: Architects conceptions of the ageing body when designing for care
Conference
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.britsoc.co.uk/medical-sociology/medsoc-annual-conference-archives.aspx
 
Description Buse, C., Nettleton, S., Twigg, J., and Martin, D. (2017) Identity, Material Objects and the Built Environment, International masterclass on design for dementia 1st June 2017, University of Stirling. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The event hosted by the DSDC which is an international centre of knowledge and expertise dedicated to improving the lives of people with dementia based at the University of Stirling brought together people from care organisations/architects/designers as well as researchers/academics. We presented on our work on the processes of design and construction in the care sector.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://dementia.stir.ac.uk/about-dsdc
 
Description Buse, C., Nettleton, S., Twigg, J., and Martin, D. (2017) Well-being and Materiality, National Heritage Science Forum event: Health, Well-being and Cultural Heritage: Research, Evidence and Practice, Tate Modern, London, 12th September 2017. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Academics and professionals working in the arts and cultural heritage sectors came together ad an event at the Tate Modern to explore how materiality could impact on wellbeing. Our focus was on dementia, clothing and architectural design - issues explored in two ESRC research projects.The contribution of arts and culture to health and well-being has received considerable attention over the last ten years from researchers, funders and government. In this briefing session, we contributed to a panel of experts to present on state-of-the-art thinking and to debate what kind of evaluation and evidence is needed to fill research gaps and build the evidence base.

We aim was to ignite curiosity about how heritage science can contribute to this very active area of research and public policy interest and encourage participants to think about heritage science research and its application to this field.

This seminar brought together:

Researchers and cultural organisations interested in exploring the opportunities for research in cultural heritage and health and well-being
People already active in the field of heritage science research
Individuals or organisations engaged in cultural and arts well-being initiatives.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.tate.org.uk/research/collection-care-research/nhsf-health-wellbeing
 
Description Christina Buse, Sarah Nettleton, Daryl Martin (University of York), Julia Twigg (University of Kent) Sian Beynon-Jones, Ellen Annandale (University of York); and Lindsay Prior (Queen's University Belfast) Images of Ageing in Architectural Design of Older People EASST conference, Barcellona, Spain 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact International conference academics, researchers and professional practitioners.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Compromising for care: architects as designers and knowledge brokers in the context of later life'. European Sociological Association Research Network on Sociology of Health and Illness conference 'New Directions in Health Care Work and Organisations'. Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities, Universidate Nova de Lisboa, Portugal. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact A few hundred academics from across Europe attended an international conference which generated much discussion and academics working in design and care sectors reported interest and were keen to follow the project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Dementia and Everyday Life Workshop, University of Manchester. Material methods for research with people with dementia: dress and architecture. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Invited presentation on - Material methods for research with people with dementia: dress and architecture. Much interest and requests for further information on the project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Design for dementia - Stirling event 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Buse, C., Nettleton, N., Martin, D., Patrick, M., McGinley, C. - Buse spoke to the title: "Design for dementia in practice: Following 'buildings in the making'" at the Shifting Paradigms in Dementia 5: Architecture, Design and Dementia event presented an invited talk at this event at University of Stirling May 31st 2018.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://dementia.stir.ac.uk/blogs/dementia-centred/2018-05-15/shifting-paradigms-dementia-arts-archi...
 
Description Martin on architecture and later life Thinking Aloud Radio 4 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Achitecture, housing and health. Laurie Taylor explores a neglected aspect of well being. He's joined by the writer, Iain Sinclair, Daryl Martin, Lecturer in Sociology at the University of York and Christine Murray, founder of the "Women in Architecture" Awards.https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m00013vd
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m00013vd
 
Description Martin, D. Buse, C. and Nettleton, S. (2017) The material cultures and affective atmospherics of care in later life. British Sociological Association Annual Conference. Manchester, April 6th. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact An academic presentation to the BSA Sociology Annual conference - which attracts an international audience. The paper contributed to conceptual and methodological debates on care, materialities and architectures.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.britsoc.co.uk/media/24335/print-programme-final-reduced-size.pdf
 
Description Materialities of Care: Encountering Health and Illness Through Objects, Artefacts, and Architecture symposium, University of York - supported by the SHI Foundation Trust 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Presentation entitled: "Architects conceptions of the ageing body when designing for residential care in later life" by Nettleton, Buse, Martin and Twigg
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://www.york.ac.uk/sociology/about/news-and-events/department/2015/materialitiesofcare/
 
Description Nettleton, S., Martin, D. and Buse, C. Future care, architecturally induced: the role of the body in designs for later life Annual International Conference on Architecture Competitions: the competition mesh, Leeds Beckett Conference Centre - Leeds 20-21st October 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Talk to architects and academics working on international design competitions.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Nettleton, S. Buse, C. and Martin, D. (2017) Making Places for Care: an Exploration of Materials and the Liveliness of Things in the Design of Residential Care Homes for Later Life, Research Seminar Series: Exploring Sensory And Material Methodologies Seminar 1, 5 May 2017, Brunel University London 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact The seminar explored contemporary approaches around material, sensory and creative methods. In particular the use of material methodologies - focusing on objects and materiality associated with urban living and wellbeing, and sensory methodologies - focusing on embodied being in the world, highlighting the contested nature of the senses.

Presentations and discussion reflected on the challenges involved in working with materiality and the senses in relation to different bodies and the ephemeral nature of the social.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.brunel.ac.uk/research/News-and-events/events/Exploring-Sensory-and-material-methodologie...
 
Description Poster presentation at the European Healthcare Design Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The research associate and architect (Patrick) developed and staged the following poster presention: Patrick, M., Buse, C., Martin, D., McKinlay, C. and Nettleton, S. Ecologies of Care: designing, construtcing and living with care (homes), European Healthcare Design Conference Royal College of Physicians, London, 11-13th June 2018 - which garnered much interest in the research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://europeanhealthcaredesign2019.salus.global/conference-programme/european-healthcare-design-201...
 
Description Presentation Biographies, bricks and belonging - British Society of Gerontology 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Martin, D presented the following paper Biographies, bricks and belonging: architectural imaginaries of home-making in later life, by Martin, D., Nettleton, S. and Buse, C. to the British Society of Gerontology 47th Annual Conference, University of Manchester, 4 -6 July 2018. It stimulated debate and led to new contacts in the field.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.britishgerontology.org/events-and-courses/past-conferences/2018-manchester
 
Description Presentation at University of Manchester creativity conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Buse presented a conference talk by: Buse, C., Nettleton, N., Martin, D. called "Everyday creativity in architectural design and construction" at the Everyday Creativity: A Morgan Centre Conference, University of Manchester, 10-22 July 2018.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.socialsciences.manchester.ac.uk/morgan-centre/connect/events/everyday-creativity/
 
Description Presentation on construction collaboration to mixed audience academics and practitioners in design and construction. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Buse, C., Nettleton, S., Martin, D. Working relationships and collaboration on design and construction projects for care, Construction safety and engagement with a multinational workforce: experiences and challenges from the UK and Denmark, University of Reading, 28th November 2018. Seminar for an invited group of around 10-15 people, to share findings from our different research projects on construction, particularly in relation to issues of safety and collaborative ways of working.

Audience: academics from different disciplinary backgrounds; sociology, architecture, construction management, also a risk consultant for the construction industry.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Presentation to UK Dementia congress 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact A talk presented by Buse and Martin by prepared by Buse, C., Nettleton, N., Martin, D., Patrick, M., McGinley, C. Translating dementia friendly design: Following building projects for later life care, UK Dementia Congress, Brighton, 6-8 November 2018.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.journalofdementiacare.co.uk/store/products,13th-uk-dementia-congress-2018_71.htm
 
Description Presentation to care providers: Architectural design for care in later life: following 'buildings in the making' 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Invited by Housing Lin's regional group - findings of the research were presented and promoted much debate about the challenges of working relationships in the design and construction sectors. The talk was:
Buse, C., Nettleton, N., Martin, D. Architectural design for care in later life: following 'buildings in the making', Yorkshire & Humber Region Housing LIN Meeting, The Octagon, Hull, June 19th 2018
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.housinglin.org.uk/AboutHousingLIN/
 
Description Stakeholder workshop: architects, care providers, local authority commissioners, user groups etc 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A participatory workshop called 'Architectural design and construction for later life care: challenges and opportunities for designing with and for building users' brought together approximately 45 stakeholders who work as architects, designers, care providers, commissioners of social care, surveyors and representatives of charitable organisations. As well as presentations there workshops led by experts in user engagement in design and construction (a UK designer and a Swedish expert in user participation in the design and construction sector). This team ran a hands on workshop which explored practical ways of involving users to ensure inclusive design in buildings for later life care.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Talk to Architects at RIBA event 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A talk presented by Patrick - prepared by Patrick, M., Buse, C., Martin, D., McGinley, C. and Nettleton, S. Building with Care: Learning from the design and construction of architecture for later life, RIBA Research Matters Conference, University of Sheffield, 18 - 19th October 2018
The RIBA book of abstracts see page 70:
https://www.architecture.com/-/media/files/awards/riba-presidents-awards-for-research-2018-book-of-abstracts.pdf
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.architecture.com/-/media/files/awards/riba-presidents-awards-for-research-2018-book-of-a...
 
Description Talk with local people living with dementia user group 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Patients, carers and/or patient groups
Results and Impact Buse, C., Nettleton, N., Martin, D. presented a talk: Design and construction for dementia care: Following 'buildings in the making', York Minds and Voices [DEEP - the Dementia Engagement and Empowerment Project], Wheatlands Grove York, 23rd July 2018. But this event also prompted a discussion about access and involvement in the production of design. This local - very active group - have produced guidance on design and access issues and so the debate was especially productive.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description The research team (Buse, Nettleton, Martin) organised and ran the following event: Buildings in the Making: Working relationships in design and construction for later life. 15th February 2018. Roundtable discussion stakeholders in the care and construction sectors 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The aim of the roundtable was to present the findings on working relationships that have emerged from the Buildings in the Making project. Architects, construction site managers, local authority and charitable care providers came together to debates the issues around models of procurement and the impact these can have on working relationships in design and construction of care homes for later life. The aim was to help to verify our findings and explore issues that might inform good practice.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Thinking about design and its implications for health research 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact BSA Medical Sociology Conference on Healthy spaces, design for wellbeing - nearly 100 academic participants - primarily those working in sociology. Presentation by Prior, L, Buse, C, Martin, D."Thinking about design and its implications for health research" exploring data from the Buildings in the Making study.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.york.ac.uk/sociology/about/department/2017/healthyspacesspaceplaceanddesign/